Beyond Housing and Affordability: Questionnaire Responses
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NB: This document is best viewed on a desktop browser.This questionnaire was released on September 20, 2018. All candidates for mayor and council in the Vancouver 2018 municipal election were invited to respond by October 4. Each of the questions below were contextualized with preamble written by community members. To view the questionnaire and complete list of contributors, please visit: goo.gl/forms/J23JSQJeF0Y79lUQ2 Due to the varying length of responses and the number of candidates, the best way to view the answers is to select a cell and expand the formula window (directly above this cell). Please note that there are two sheets: one for council and one for mayoral candidates. *NB: Responses in grey are from candidates who answered after the deadline. If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact me: Megan Lau (hello@meganlau.com).
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Candidate's First and Last NameCandidate's Political PartyCandidate is running for1. What does intersectionality mean to you in the municipal context? If elected, how will you practice intersectionality within your role and direct the practice of intersectionality at the City of Vancouver? How do you envision intersectionality applying to policies at the City, particularly vis-à-vis policies that do not currently have an “intersectional lens or framework” built into them (e.g. Greenest City 2020 Action Plan)?2. If elected, will you ensure that there is an empowered Office of Equity and Inclusion or similar department at the City of Vancouver, enabling the provision of necessary resources including financial, staffing, and decision-making authority, to ensure that the Office of Equity and Inclusion is involved in all City policies, programs, budgets, funding, staffing and governance? 3. If elected, (1) do you agree with the policy direction in the Reconciliation and Cultural Redress chapter of the Northeast False Creek plan, and (2) if so, how will you ensure the implementation of those policies by working with the First Nations and community groups named therein?4. What changes would you support to city policy to redress the loss of land, culture, and place to local Indigenous cultures & communities, given the city operates on unceded lands?5. If elected, would you ensure the increased value of this land directly benefits Indigenous Peoples financially? 6. If elected, would you advocate in municipal and provincial level for required legislative change to allow permanent residents vote in municipal election? Please elaborate on your answer above. If yes, how would you work with your constituents and political party to ensure the public, city councillors, and MLAs are fully informed and understand the importance of allowing permanent residents vote in civic elections? 7. If elected, would you support a basic income pilot project?Please elaborate on your answer above.8. If elected, would you (1) support an investigation into the racial disparity revealed in the Vancouver Police Department’s practice of “street checks” or police stops, often referred to as carding, (2) support the ability for people of all backgrounds to live freely without being subject to racial profiling on the on the streets or in other places according to the BC Human Rights Code? And (3) would you support working with local community organizations on the development of a justice strategy to address racial profiling?9. If elected, how would you work with the Vancouver Police Department to improve prevention efforts and police investigative capacity to ensure the safety and protect the lives of Indigenous women in Vancouver?10. If elected, how will you work with your constituents and political party to ensure racialized communities are protected from the negative consequences of environmental racism?11. What would you do to make Vancouver feel safe and welcoming for Muslim communities?12. Do you support making Vancouver a Sanctuary City?Please elaborate on your answer above.13. How will you advocate for greater diversity in municipal politics? 13A. If you are white and/or male, how is allyship and prioritizing the voices and issues of the underserved and underrepresented important to you? If applicable, please provide examples of your allyship to any marginalized community.14. Do you support policies and/or electoral reform ensuring women comprise at least 50% of candidates and elected officials (e.g. ward or proportional representation system)?Please elaborate on your answer above.
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Kennedy StewartindependentMayor
Vancouver is a really diverse city. Not everyone’s experiences are the same and people’s and policies need to reflect that. Gender and sex intersect with other identities like race, ethnicity, Indigeneity, sexual orientation, age, class, and physical ability.

I believe that Vancouver cannot reach its full potential as a city when certain segments of our population are marginalized and not fully included in our democracy and economy.
As an MP I have been using an intersectional lens in my work. I was able to take a course on gender-based analysis plus which I found very enlightening and I recommend it to others who are attempting to learn more.
https://www.swc-cfc.gc.ca/gba-acs/course-cours-2018/eng/mod00/mod00_01_01.html

I feel strongly that all leaders should take responsibility for applying a gender-based and intersectional anaylsis to policy-related decisions.

That’s why I will fully fund and implement the City of Vancouver’s women’s equity strategy and use an intersectional lens to make the city better for women, Indigenous people, the LGBTQ2s+ community, visible minorities, cultural communities, people living with disabilities, and other equity-seeking groups.
My number one priority as Vancouver’s mayor will be housing affordability. My plan includes policies that directly address the fact that marginalized groups are disproportionately affected by soaring housing costs. For example, I’ll focus on building affordable rental homes for those making $80,000 a year or less and more non-market and supportive housing for our most vulnerable citizens.
In the Downtown Eastside, I will form an emergency task force to work with the community to immediately implement achievable actions to improve the health and quality of life of residents. I’ll provide the support and resources the neighbourhood needs and recognize and reinforce the value and knowledge of local residents, front-line peer-to-workers, and health experts as well as the specific needs of Indigenous Peoples, women, and the intersectionality of DTES community members.
I believe that an inclusive city is one that supports small arts and culture organizations and small businesses. Inclusive cities are also accessible cities and have public transit that makes it easier for people of all abilities to get around. I have a plan to build new studio space that will be more affordable for underrepresented groups, expand arts grants and library services, and support small business and expanded transit.
I want to build a Vancouver that works for everyone and intersectionality is a lens that I will bring to all my actions as Mayor.
My goal is an inclusive city that works for everyone. I will look at all problems with the lens of intersectionality and consider how best to structure City Hall to achieve that objective, which may include a dedicated Office of Equity and Inclusion.
I will support plans already underway at the city, particularly the A City for All Women, Women’s Equity Strategy. I support pay equity for all city workers.
The Reconciliation and Cultural Redress chapter in the Northeast False Creek Area plan is one of the many important initial steps the City of Vancouver has taken on the long climb towards reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples and better relations with Vancouver’s cultural communities, including Chinese-Canadians and people of African descent/the city’s Black community.
As Mayor, I would take several immediate actions to further these goals, including:
- Meaningful inclusion of the feedback of Musqueam, Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, and Urban Indigenous Communities in the implementation of the Northeast False Creek Area plan, including exploring opportunities to provide space for traditional, spiritual, health and healing practices.
- Food Street pilot project. I would instruct the City’s Planning Department to initiate a consultation process with members of the community and report back to Council options for the creation a year-round, large scale farmers market and a permanent “food street” in historic Chinatown.
- UNESCO World Heritage Status. As Mayor, I would work to accelerate the work currently underway between the city, the provincial government, and the federal government to see Chinatown designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site.
- Support a Chinese History Museum. I would work with provincial, federal and private sector partners to develop a Chinese history museum to showcase the unique role those of Chinese descent have played in Vancouver and Canada’s history.
- Culture hubs and exhibition space. Building on the success of the Arts Factory and Sun Wah Centre, I will identify spaces suitable for live/work/exhibition space to allow more artists the freedom to create and showcase their work, which could include a Cultural Centre for the Black Community.
In all my work, I will recognize and reinforce the value and knowledge of local residents and seek to build a more inclusive city that works for everyone. During my work on the Kinder Morgan issue, I have built relationships with First Nations communities across BC. Their work has been critical in protecting our coast and I want to continue working closely with these communities.
I know first-hand the value of affordable creative spaces in Vancouver--when I came to Vancouver in 1989, I could work odd jobs to pay rent and still have time to play in a band. We played shows in venues all over Vancouver –something that helped me save money to pay my way through university. Today, those same opportunities aren’t available to most people.
We need to build a Vancouver that supports arts and culture, especially arts and culture of local Indigenous communities. It’s not only good for our economy and community, but it helps us craft an identity for our city that’s vibrant and creative. We need to support our arts and culture organizations, especially small- and medium-sized ones.
As Mayor, I would take several immediate actions to further these goals, including:
- Expand arts grants. Small- and medium-scale community-based arts groups need more funding and better access to grants. I would expand the funding for these organizations and change the granting process to include individuals and groups of artists, and informal collectives.
- 100,000 ft2 of affordable studio space for creators. I will build 100,000 ft2 of affordable studio space over the next decade by integrating arts spaces into more public buildings and affordable housing developments and creating new purpose-built spaces.
- Culture hubs and exhibition space. Building on the success of the Arts Factory and Sun Wah Centre, I will identify spaces suitable for live/work/exhibition space to allow more artists the freedom to create and showcase their work.

The City of Vancouver has taken many important initial steps on the long climb towards reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples. As your mayor, housing affordability for everyone, including Indigenous Peoples, will be my number one priority. I’ll take immediate actions to address the crisis, including:
- Revise Community Amenity Contributions. The City has an opportunity to fund new affordable housing, including targeted solutions for Indigenous Peoples, by ensuring that developers pay their fair share in fees to the City when a property value goes up after a rezoning. Currently, the City negotiates these fees through lengthy processes that delay housing, create uncertainty, and reduce the public funds available for housing. I would make the Community Amenity Contributions process clearer and more streamlined so that more housing gets built quicker and the City has the resources to deliver on affordable housing.
- Build 25,000 new non-profit affordable rental homes over the next ten years. I’ll focus on building affordable rental homes for those making $80,000 a year or less, more non-market and supportive housing for our most vulnerable citizens, and targeted housing solutions for Indigenous Peoples.
- Get Ottawa and Victoria back into housing permanently. I will use seven years of experience as a Member of Parliament to work with senior levels of government to create long-term housing funding, including for Indigenous Peoples.
Yes
Yes, I would advocate to allow permanent residents to vote in municipal elections.
We have significant challenges in Vancouver and to solve them we need a government people trust. Our elections also need to be fair and democratic. For too long we have operated under an at-large system that lacks community representation and disenfranchises racialized people.
As an MP for the past seven years, I have the experience and knowledge needed to work with senior levels of government to advocate for Vancouver and all its residents. My entire academic and professional career has focussed on cities and democracy. I’ve worked in the City of Vancouver planning department. My PhD from the London School of Economics was about cities. I’ve written books and taught about cities as an SFU professor. I’ve provided policy advice to municipal, provincial, and national governments and the United Nations.
We cannot reach our full potential as a city when certain segments of our population are marginalized and not fully included in our democracy and economy.
Yes
Yes, I would support a basic income pilot project.
I support the provincial government’s current efforts to study the costs and benefits of universal basic income.
As mayor, I would support pilot projects in British Columbia that explore whether basic income is the most efficient and effective means to reduce poverty and increase the well-being of marginalized groups, including Indigenous Peoples, cultural communities, seniors, and people living with disabilities.
I want to build an inclusive Vancouver where everyone feels safe and there is fair and equal treatment of all people by our public institutions, including the Vancouver Police Department
I would support working with the VPD as well as equity-seeking groups to facilitate partnerships founded on mutual respect and trust and develop strategies to achieve our shared objectives, including fair and equitable approaches to street checks.
Indigenous women in Vancouver are a strong and resilient community despite the daily dangers and barriers they face and protecting their safety and lives is imperative.
Many of the problems Indigenous women face are seen most clearly in the Downtown Eastside. As Mayor, I will form an emergency task force to work with the community and immediately implement achievable actions.
My plan outlines the support and resources I would provide to the neighbourhood to implement community-driven, health-focussed, initiatives to significantly improve the wellness, safety, and quality of life for those struggling with chronic poverty, lack of safe, permanent affordable housing, a dangerous illegal drug supply, and lack of employment.
I will also work closely with the Vancouver Police Department to facilitate partnerships with Indigenous women founded on mutual respect and trust and develop strategies and immediately implement actions to achieve our shared objectives.
As an MP for the past seven years, I stood with my constituents in opposing the TransMountain Expansion Project. The pipeline was pushed through a broken review process by a government that did not listen to the voices of the people most directly affected by the project, including those in the Lower Mainland and Indigenous communities throughout the province. I stood with my constituents and indigenous communities to oppose this project. I want to continue standing with these communities to support their rights to a clean and healthy environment.
As Mayor, I would continue to oppose the TransMountain pipeline and work with all levels of government to mitigate impacts of developments and projects in Vancouver that have disproportionate environmental impacts on marginalized communities. 
I believe that Vancouver cannot reach its full potential as a city when certain segments of our population are marginalized and not fully included in our democracy and economy.
That’s why I will fully fund and implement the City of Vancouver’s women’s equity strategy and use an intersectional lens to make the city better for visible minorities and cultural communities, including Muslim communities.
I also recognize the importance of culture hubs in making communities feel safe and welcomed in Vancouver. Building on the success of the Arts Factory and Sun Wah Centre, I will identify spaces suitable for live/work/exhibition space to allow more artists the freedom to create and showcase their work, including for Vancouver’s Muslim community.
Yes
I want to build a Vancouver that is a safe, inclusive, and welcoming place for all people, including immigrants. I would take time to explore how City Hall can increase migrant’s access to services, including potentially via a Sanctuary City designation. I want to ensure residents are able to access city services, for example libraries and schools, regardless of their immigration status.
We have significant challenges in Vancouver and to solve them we need a government people trust. Our elections also need to be fair and democratic. For too long we have operated under an at-large system that lacks community representation and disenfranchises racialized people.
This election will be the last Vancouver civic election where we elect our local representatives using the out-dated at-large voting system. If city residents vote in the November provincial referendum to change to a proportional representation system, then future local elections will be conducted using Pro Rep. If Pro Rep is rejected in the fall referendum, then future local elections will be conducted using neighbourhood constituencies, similar to those used at the federal and provincial level.
I also recognize that Vancouver residents want more ways to help shape the future of our city between elections. That’s why I’ll bring in a resident petition, similar to the online petition system I founded in the Parliament of Canada. Under Vancouver’s new petition tool, residents will write petitions that other residents can sign online and/or in-person. Depending on the total number of petition signatures gathered, the petitioner will either receive a direct response from the mayor’s office, or be invited to take part in a special petition hearing chaired by the mayor. These petitions are one means that underrepresented groups can have a greater influence in municipal politics.
I believe that Vancouver cannot reach its full potential as a city when certain segments of our population are marginalized and not fully included in our democracy and economy.
That’s why my platform includes a commitment to fully fund and implement the City of Vancouver’s women’s equity strategy and use an intersectional lens to make the city better for women, Indigenous people, the LGBTQ2s+ community, visible minorities, cultural communities, people living with disabilities, and other equity-seeking groups.
As Mayor, I’ll also build 25,000 new non-profit affordable rental homes over the next 10 years, focusing on those making $80,000 a year or less, more non-market and supportive housing for our most vulnerable citizens, and targeted housing solutions for Indigenous Peoples, cultural communities, seniors, and people living with disabilities.
As a MP for the past seven years, I understood that equal access to Canada’s democratic institutions is a question of social justice. That’s why I introduced Bill C-237, the Candidate Gender Equity Act. I recognize that systemic underrepresentation of women and other marginalized groups in politics is not caused by a lack of willingness to stand for elected office, but rather by barriers within the process used by political parties to select candidates. Bill C-237 would have amended the Canada Elections Act and provided financial incentives for political parties to have equal numbers of male and female candidates.
We have significant challenges in Vancouver and to solve them we need a government people trust. Our elections also need to be fair and democratic. For too long we have operated under an at-large system that lacks community representation and disenfranchises racialized people.
This election will be the last Vancouver civic election where we elect our local representatives using the out-dated at-large voting system. If city residents vote in the November provincial referendum to change to a proportional representation system, then future local elections will be conducted using Pro Rep. If Pro Rep is rejected in the fall referendum, then future local elections will be conducted using neighbourhood constituencies, similar to those used at the federal and provincial level.
As a MP for the past seven years, I understood that equal access to Canada’s democratic institutions is a question of social justice.
That’s why I introduced Bill C-237, the Candidate Gender Equity Act. I recognize that systemic underrepresentation of women and other marginalized groups in politics is not caused by a lack of willingness to stand for elected office, but rather by barriers within the process used by political parties to select candidates. Bill C-237 would have amended the Canada Elections Act and provided financial incentives for political parties to have equal numbers of male and female candidates.
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Brandon Yan and Christine BoyleOneCityCouncil
We understand intersectionality as an understanding of the many conditions that shape people's lived experience of the city. As city leaders, we will ask the question: Who does this policy help? Who does it disadvantage? We believe that a practice around intersectionality means asking people with diverse lived experiences to be at the table when making decisions, and going into communities to ask for feedback. In our policy creation, we have sought out ideas and feedback from women, from people of colour, from queer and transgender people, from people with disabilities, from elders and youth, and from Indigenous people. We intend to do the same as City Councillors.
Yes. As we stated above, we think that equity and inclusion frameworks should apply to all City actions, and a well-resourced office within the city bureaucracy would be an effective tool for achieving this.
Yes. Vancouver's Indigenous and Black community fought for these policies and we stand with them. We agree with the policy direction and would look to these communities to provide direction in their implementation.

One of the relevant policies we are running on in this election is to bring dedicated representation to City Council, School Board, and Park Board from Vancouver's Indigenous communities: http://www.onecityvancouver.ca/indigenous_representation

We do, however, want to acknowledge that many Chinatown communities were unhappy with parts of the NEFC plan. We were disappointed to see how the city seemed to pit marginalized cultural communities against one another, which perpetuates inequities and reduces our sense of solidarity. Furthermore, we do have concerns about other aspects of the NEFC plan - further gentrifying neighbourhoods, the impacts on shops and culture in Chinatown, and we need to hear more from all of those communities as the work goes ahead.
While these major institutions are valuable, they alone cannot support a vibrant, thriving city of arts and culture that can support emerging and community-based artists. 56% of city funding goes to art/culture orgs founded before 1960. Arts and culture are dynamic and this means we need to support new orgs that reflect the reality of the shifting landscape. We also need to shift funding to organizations that show they are supportive of diversity and equity throughout (staff, board, projects).We think Vancouver can do better. We have several policies that apply to this question: first, we think Vancouver should create tax exemptions to cultural spaces (http://www.onecityvancouver.ca/making_cultural_spaces_affordable).

Second, we believe that Indigenous people should have barrier-free access to Vancouver's park space to practice culture, hold ceremony, and harvest food and natural materials. We will work with the Park Board to open the parks for Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh people by removing parking fees for their citizens.
For this answer, we are going to quote directly from our Indigenous Justice policy:

There are approximately 1244 Musqueam, 4080 Squamish, and 596 Tsleil-Waututh people in Vancouver, and more than 40,000 Indigenous people currently live on these lands. In the past decade, people from the three local nations have increasingly been unable to afford housing in their homelands. The current housing crisis comes after a century of dispossession and displacement for Indigenous people, making its results even more severe for them. OneCity will work to address the housing crisis in these Indigenous communities by offering city-owned lands to Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for non-profit housing, and by supporting the development of culturally appropriate non-profit housing by and for Indigenous communities. This policy will work toward reconciliation, while addressing the unique housing challenges of urban Indigenous people, and the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations in their own territory.

Furthermore, we believe that our Land Value Capture, a tax designed to keep community created land value benefiting the community can benefit Indigenous people through the creation of large amounts of publicly owned affordable housing.

Yes
We believe that most people in Vancouver, with sufficient community conversation and education, would support this policy. Permanent residents are important contributing members of our community and should be able to vote. We think the voter turnout in municipal elections is dismal, and by enfranchising the permanent residents who live, work, go to school, run businesses, and contribute to our communities vote, we might increase voter engagement overall. We are also excited to support the youth led campaign #LostVotesYVR.
No
While we wouldn't oppose a basic income pilot project, we would instead advocate for an increase to social assistance and benefits, and a raising of the minimum wage to become a living wage. It's our understanding that basic income, without corresponding increases to minimum wage, becomes a way to subsidize employers who pay low wages. Instead, we need to address precarious work and make the benefits that used to flow from people's employment like extended health, pension and paid sick leave accessible to all. Also, without accessible and free childcare, basic income would increase the number of women who are outside of paid work. This can have consequences at retirement, when women have lower pensions because they earn less income throughout their working life.

With all that said, if we are hearing from our partners in social movements that universal basic income is the preferred means by which we can achieve greater income equity, we would stand together and fight for it.
Yes, we support all the measures suggested in the question above.
We support the policy proposals from Women Transforming Cities, to create a task force with significant representation from Indigenous women to advise the City of Vancouver, to ensure culturally safe engagement policies, and equitably fund social services, programs, and spaces for Indigenous women in Vancouver.
We believe that this work begins with collaboration with these communities to identify these negative safety effects, and in listening to them in how to ameliorate them. This comes back to the principle of intersectionality - with every decision, we need to ask: who is this helping? Who might this be harming? And be open to hearing hard truths. For too long, Vancouver's wealth has been created at the expense of vulnerable communities. We think it's time for that to change.
We think that improving political and civic representation is one way to help. We would work to elect Muslim representatives, appoint Muslim people to city committees, and promote Muslim people within our city bureaucracy.

Public-facing city staff and the Vancouver Police should also receive training from Muslim communities, to educate them in how to better welcome, support, and ensure the safety of Muslim communities, particularly Muslim women.
Yes
Yes. We believe that the recently passed Access without Fear measures need to be enacted and expanded, and City staff and police need to receive comprehensive training and direction from the city.

Our School Board candidate colleagues are fighting for the Vancouver School Board to adopt a Sanctuary Schools policy. More details here: http://www.onecityvancouver.ca/sanctuary_schools

We believe that OneCity is at present doing the work to increase diversity in municipal politics, in candidates and in who is engaged behind the scenes. We believe that representation matters in elected leaders. Further to that, we would make it a priority that city staff, committees, and other decision making groups actually reflect the community we live in.
From Christine Boyle: I am a white, cis-gendered, heterosexual woman. I deeply want better representation in all sorts of leadership roles, and aim to support work that gets us there by: 1) amplifying the voices of underrepresented voices, in events and panels I organize, communications efforts I am part of, and hiring decisions I have a say in. 2) Donating to and volunteering for candidates at every level of government that bring diversity (and progressive values) to the table, and supporting organizations that are lifting up underrepresented voices. 3) Talking about racism, classism, decolonization, ableism, and other intersecting oppressions with those around me, particularly other folks who don’t experience these systemic challenges personally. 4) Stepping back as frequently as possible when doing so could create space for someone more marginalized to be stepping up.

From Brandon Yan: As a cis, able-bodied man with a lower-middle class upbringing, there are many ways in which I can use my privilege to show up as an ally. Allyship is also a practice and not a destination: it means constant learning, unlearning, and navigating social spaces with a greater awareness of power dynamics. I know that just because I’m a queer person of colour, these intersecting identities do not give me a ‘free pass’ and that I can still perpetuate oppression and harm within my communities (internalized racism and homophobia is a hell of a thing). As a director in a non-profit, I have ensured that my hiring practices take into account peoples’ lived experiences as an asset in the work we do. It’s important for young people to see themselves reflected in the world and for them to also interact with a diversity of experiences. Some pieces of writing I did about the work I do that speaks to how allyship can work:

https://www.straight.com/news/873386/out-screens-brandon-yan-condemns-trumps-reversal-us-protections-transgender-students
https://www.straight.com/news/721256/out-schools-brandon-yan-orlando-shooting-using-your-story-change-world
YesIt is OneCity policy that no more than 50% of our candidates can identify as male. We are also calling for Electoral Reform in Vancouver, preferable to a proportional system, so as to ensure better representation in our local government: http://www.onecityvancouver.ca/electoral_reform.

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Jean Swanson, Derrick O'Keefe, and Anne RobertsCOPECouncil
In the municipal context, intersectionality means applying an anti-oppression and solidarity lens to all the work we do inside and outside of City Hall. COPE is a member-driven, progressive party committed to eliminating systemic injustice and discrimination based on class, race, gender, sexuality, ability and all other intersecting factors.

Our core policies are designed to make life better for marginalized, poor, and working-class Vancouverites. Economic class intersects strongly with many other forms of oppression, meaning that we can’t address one without the other.

A great deal of the mainstream conversation on housing is focused on fixing the market for the middle class (e.g. “the missing middle” narrative). At COPE, we are concerned with people who are most vulnerable to the impacts of the housing crisis, and who are least likely to have their voices heard. Our analysis starts with what is needed to lighten the impacts of austerity and the housing crisis on those at the bottom half of the income bracket, especially those at the intersection of class and other axes of oppression, such as gender/sexuality, race, ability, and age. This is why we support 100% community-controlled social housing at welfare and shelter rate for important sites such as 58 W Hastings and 105 Keefer.

We would a apply an intersectional lens to all aspects of our work at City Council, and direct staff to do likewise. Here are some examples.

Transit and climate change: We can’t address Vancouver’s contribution to climate change without taking into consideration race, class, and gender. The biggest source of GHGs in Metro Vancouver is personal vehicles and the best way to cut emissions is to expand public transit and increase ridership, but we can’t do that without making transit more affordable. Women, single mothers, and racialized workers are significantly overrepresented among transit commuters, but high fares and poor services can be insurmountable barriers. COPE’s “U-Pass for the working class” plan would reduce fares and expand service, allowing 40,000 new people to take public transit and taking up to 40,000 polluting cars off the road. Just Vancouver’s portion of the recently announced increase in BC’s carbon tax could fully fund this program. We believe this is a more just application of the carbon tax than BC Liberals’ approach of giving tax credits to corporations.

Homelessness: Currently, 40% of people without homes are Indigenous. This is a perpetuation of settler colonial violence. It is a crime and we have to stop it. That’s one important reason why we are fighting for a Mansion Tax to end homelessness in one year. We just can’t let cynicism delay action any longer.

Renters: A large portion of renters spending over 50% of their income on housing are racialized people, women, single mothers, seniors, and young people. Renters and these groups have not been properly represented on city council. We hear from people everyday that politicians just don’t get how important it is to keep rents down. That’s why we are fighting so hard for a Rent Freeze, 0% increase for four years, and vacancy control to create housing security for people who aren’t millionaires. People who are most at risk of renoviction are seniors -- many of them women on fixed income -- who have been living in their apartments for decades. Since their rents are lower, landlords can make more profit from evicting them. This is an epidemic in places like the West End, and seniors feel they have nowhere to go. That’s why the city must use its permitting powers to stop as many renovictions as possible immediately. There’s no time left for excuses or pointing fingers at other levels of government.

About COPE: In our own party we have provisions for gender equality and Indigenous representation on our electoral slates, as well as committees with decision-making representation on our executive made up of various equity-seeking groups. The make-up of COPE’s volunteer and staff base in this election reflects our intersectional lens.

Diana Day, one of the very few if not the only Indigenous woman candidate for school board, is running under the COPE banner. This is her third time running with COPE and she is on track to become the first woman Indigenous school trustee. Diana has been a vocal advocate for an Indigenous high school and for uplifting Indigenous students in Vancouver school to close the racial achievement gap. 5 of 7 COPE candidates are women, each of whom have a long track record of activism and advocacy in the different communities they are rooted in. We recognize that even in the most progressive-minded organizations, patriarchy, racism and classism operate in various, often hidden, ways and we work to hold ourselves accountable to the values that we advocate for through the city council.
Yes, we support the Office of Equity and Inclusion having the resources to work with the listed departments and groups. COPE is required by its membership to hold an equity caucus to oversee all of the party’s activities and help implement an equity lens to our policies. Once in power, COPE will support necessary structures to the City’s operations. COPE councillors have a track record of putting resources toward social justice and equity committees at the City level and taking a bold stance in these regards.
We strongly support direction of working with the local First Nations around streets, parks, and other public space designs. COPE’s platform also calls for working with the local Nations to create community land-trusts to address the housing crisis for Indigenous people. We strongly support working with Chinatown to preserve cultural assets, and we also will fight the gentrification of Chinatown that is already leading to displacement of residents and small businesses. We are concerned about the gentrification effects of the proposed NEFC condo developments.
At COPE, we believe recognition of Vancouver’s colonial history and the theft of land from Indigenous peoples is an important first step, but we don’t need to stop there. We want to see reconciliation with teeth, which must include devolution of power to the Tsleil-Waututh, Squamish and Musqueam nations. Where possible, we would work on City Council to partner with the local nations to redistribute the massive amount of wealth generated by the real estate industry on these unceded territories and where possible to return land, for instance in the form of land trusts. We will also work on instituting an Indigenous wellness centre and other cultural centres.
Absolutely, one of the main stated purposes of COPE’s Mansion Tax policy is to capture the value from escalating property costs and, after ending homelessness, working with local First Nations to build non-market housing and creating land trusts.
Yes
Yes, COPE supports extended voting in municipal elections to permanent residents. Jean Swanson’s independent campaign in the 2017 by-election, which COPE endorsed, included and prioritized the demand for voting rights for permanent residents.

COPE’s staff and volunteer base greatly reflects the need for extending voting rights to non-citizens. COPE’s electoral campaign actively extends an invite to those who are disenfranchised by the current electoral laws and embraces their voices and leadership in our movement.
No
Recognizing that there are different points of view within COPE on the issue of basic income, and that such programs have been applied with different intentions by different types of governments around the world, we tend to be cautious about such proposals in the current socio-economic climate. Jean Swanson has spoken on this subject on numerous occasions. Below is a transcript of one of her talks and the reasons why she does not support a universal basic income. Instead she supports improving the welfare system as well as providing more public services and advocating for living wages https://www.facebook.com/notes/bc-disability-caucus/jean-swansons-talk-about-basic-income-other-reports/1956735524571749/
https://cws.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/cws/article/viewFile/6259/5447

Yes, carding and racial profiling remain structural injustices in Vancouver that we have to change. We will support an investigation and working with community groups to end these practices.

The city’s policing budget has ballooned by over $100 million dollars over the past decade, but we cannot police ourselves out of poverty, stigma, and racial discrimination. Much of the police budget is being eaten up by community policing, but these moneys would be better spent using a health and social justice approach. That means providing space and funding for harm reduction, women’s health initiatives, groups that fight stigma against poor people and drug users, proper housing, immigration services, and an Indigenous healing and wellness centre in the Downtown Eastside.

Violence against Indigenous women is perpetuated because of many factors, and we should look at all of them, including theft of land, poverty, housing, and various forms of discrimination in society and in the police force. In terms of policing, one important component is to improve the way that police relate to Indigenous people, to improve trust between police and the community. That could entail changes in training, hiring, and accountability practices.
COPE will work tooth and nail to stop the Kinder Morgan pipeline from being expanded and polluting land and water of the three host nations. COPE policy is to densify land in the city that has historically been exclusive, mostly the west side, and less polluted by traffic and noise, with social housing. With revenue from the mansion tax COPE could return some of the less polluted land in these areas to the host nations--it wouldn’t be a lot, cause there is not enough revenue there, but it could be some. COPE is working to get more people out of cars to reduce carbon emissions by providing free transit for low income people.
COPE city councillors, school board trustees, and park board commissioners would commit city resources to education and mobilization against Islamophobia and all other forces of bigotry and racism.
Yes
Yes, COPE campaigned to make Vancouver a sanctuary city in 2014, Jean Swanson did as well in 2017, and this year COPE’s platform calls for an end to any city service, including the VPD, sharing citizenship status with Border Security. COPE will also ensure that city staff are trained in how to actually implement the sanctuary city policy.
When housing, child care and finances are more equalized, women and other marginalized individuals will have the freedom and resources to run for office. COPE will be a strong advocate for $10/day child care plan, model maternity leave policies for councillors, higher welfare rates, higher minimum wages, unions, and affordable housing as pre-conditions for a more diversified city council. The city must also examine ways to involve citizens in the political process and ensure all voices heard at consultation sessions, meetings, city council sessions, by developing improved communication strategies to residents who speak languages other than English. COPE’s internal policies mandate that all candidate slates must consist of 50% or fewer men. COPE is already looking for diverse candidates to run with us in the 2022 city election
When in hiring positions, trying to hire people who are women and/or racialized. When organizing meetings ensuring that diverse voices are represented in chairing or MCing, and on panels.
YesCOPE has a long history of fighting for electoral reform, and will prioritize negotiating with the provincial government to improve the voting system. This will include extending the vote to permanent residents and youth, closing campaign finance loopholes, and exploring proportional representation that accounts for gender diversity. City council also has the power to create wards right now, which is important because the current at-large system benefits parties with big money contributors and is biased against neighbourhood activists.
6
Pete FryGREEN PARTYCouncil
I have lived in Strathcona/DTES for close to thirty years, and work in community development at Ray-Cam Community Centre. I see intersectionality everyday: gender, age, ability, injury, addiction, indigenous identity, trans identity, ethnicity, food insecurity, language, colonialism, trauma, isolation — and of course, poverty. That is my municipal context.

In my community development work: we have developed a place-based collective-impact approach (called OurPlace) where we seek to coordinate services and service providers around communities, not as clients and metrics but as people. By meeting them and their needs "where they are at" in the process we break down silos and apply an intersectional lens to the work.

I envision this sort of approach to city policy. In practice this would mean making space for people with direct lived experience and intersectional context, it would mean a new approach toward authentic, co-creative and de-politicized community engagement.
Yes, though what that looks like: as an office; offices; advisory committee; or policy framework to be applied to all departments, would have to be considered with input from staff and stakeholders.

The concept is very similar to work I am doing now with OurPlace, specifically our Youth Matters Accountability Pledge which pledges: " to support the goal of parents, children, elders, and youth to be meaningfully included in decisions about themselves and in their community. We believe that their different perspectives, identities, and experiences must be acknowledged and valued."

To date the pledge has been signed by First Nations Health Council, Representative for Children and Youth, BC Government Employees Union, Vancouver Public Library, Vancouver Police Department, Vancouver Park Board, City of Vancouver, as well as individual community centres, health and service providers.

Though I keep this separate from my partisan political efforts, I'm very proud of this work, and happy to talk further about it and our team.

Yes I agree with the policy direction, and have had an active role in this process as a resident and community advocate: not just the NEFC plan but on additional issues of viaducts removal and RePlan, Hogan's Alley, St Paul's Campus planning, Chinatown planning, the Historic Area Heights Review, and the Downtown Eastside Local Area Plan.

I do think there is quite a lot of work to be done on implementation, and a cross-cultural co-creation process to break down some of the silos that exist and if left unaddressed will only be exacerbated. I'm very committed to making sure this happens so that everyone is on the same page with shared goals and aspirations for the future of this area.
Cultural services funding and land assets should be framed in intersectional and Reconciliation and Redress contexts discussed above. As such funding for new and existing institutions should be contingent on incorporating these values in their operations and services.
Yes, as part of an overall equity-informed benefits package that considers housing as a human right, historic discriminations, and Urban Indigenous Peoples on the whole as well as unceded territories.
Yes
I am an immigrant, and growing up "not-white" in Vancouver, I've overcompensated to prove my worth as a citizen. I understand what it means to want to contribute as a new-comer and would offer my personal experience by way of example. I have a history of working across party lines and good working relationships with a number of MLAs.
Yes
Guaranteed income is a platform that drew me to the Green Party in the first place and it is supported on a federal, provincial and civic level by our parties. I've worked with Minister Shane Simpson's office on this idea as part of my work with OurPlace and Exchange Inner City (DTES Community Economic Development) on the Poverty Reduction strategy.

My work and advocacy experience have convinced me that this is a necessary foundation for lifting people out of poverty. I do recognize concerns expressed that Basic/Guaranteed Income might result in erosion of social services - and I think that is an important context to be mindful of.
Yes, I note that the VPD seem to be heading in this direction (according to recent news) — I think this presents an opportunity to develop a justice strategy, and I would be very interested in an active role in that capacity, ideally using a framework identified in (2).
Yes, and I would include community policing, community centres/neighbourhood houses, local businesses and/or BIAs, and resident-based groups alongside advocacy groups like DEWC, WISH and PACE and service providers like VCH and VNHS.
This is a fight we are undertaking right now with the Burrard Inlet Line and Centerm Expansion - which will see and increase in train and truck traffic, with attendant Nitrous Oxides and Diesel Particulate Matter exposure particularily impacting low income and often radicalized peoples in Stamps Place, along Clark Drive and Grandview Cut.

The city of Vancouver has been negligent in ensuring we are monitoring and mitigating the impacts of these and other pollutants. This is an emerging issue and subject of class action suits in Europe and elsewhere in North America where low income housing has been built by highways and railyards and resulted in marked increases in cancers, COPD, low birth weights, and other health effects.
This would be an approach best discussed with the Muslim community, but at a minimum I would suggest that the city commit to more 'fun' and engaging intercultural event funding. I am committed to making Vancouver a safe and welcoming city for Muslims and all discriminated communities.
Yes
I had previously taken this position in favour of Sanctuary City and Access Without Fear in the 2014 civic election. It was a commitment we expected would be upheld by Vision Vancouver as they had also committed to same. My position has not changed and I will continue to advocate for both.
This would hopefully result from an intersectional lens and policy as articulated above, that results in purposeful inclusionary policies in everything the city does.

Ultimately, however discrimination is a reflection of the electorate and their voting preferences: I say this in the context of a 2014 candidate a woman of South Asian decent who ran with a dominant and well funded party yet failed to get elected while everyone else on her slate was. This will be more of a challenge to eradicate, though I am hopeful that with changing city demographics and values and thoughtful policies we can bring about a change in mindset.
Examples listed elsewhere listed above. As a bigger man and off-white, I am mindful that my physical presence can be intimidating to some and as a result, I have consciously tried to 'make space' for others, as a behavioural trait since before political endeavours. I feel this does influence how I try and prioritize voices and issues of others — but I'm not perfect and recognize my inherent privilege as a relatively well-off, educated, tall man and do constantly work at keeping myself in check.
YesI'm not entirely supportive of the idea of a ward system; but yes to more women and proportional representation.
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