Beyond Housing and Affordability: Questionnaire Responses
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
BCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZAAABAC
1
NB: This document is best viewed on a desktop browser.This questionnaire was released on September 20, 2018. All candidates for mayor and council in the Vancouver 2018 municipal election were invited to respond by October 4. Each of the questions below were contextualized with preamble written by community members. To view the questionnaire and complete list of contributors, please visit: goo.gl/forms/J23JSQJeF0Y79lUQ2 Due to the varying length of responses and the number of candidates, the best way to view the answers is to select a cell and expand the formula window (directly above this cell). Please note that there are two sheets: one for council and one for mayoral candidates. *NB: Responses in grey are from candidates who answered after the deadline. If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact me: Megan Lau (hello@meganlau.com).
2
Candidate's First and Last NameCandidate's Political PartyCandidate is running for1. What does intersectionality mean to you in the municipal context? If elected, how will you practice intersectionality within your role and direct the practice of intersectionality at the City of Vancouver? How do you envision intersectionality applying to policies at the City, particularly vis-à-vis policies that do not currently have an “intersectional lens or framework” built into them (e.g. Greenest City 2020 Action Plan)?2. If elected, will you ensure that there is an empowered Office of Equity and Inclusion or similar department at the City of Vancouver, enabling the provision of necessary resources including financial, staffing, and decision-making authority, to ensure that the Office of Equity and Inclusion is involved in all City policies, programs, budgets, funding, staffing and governance? 3. If elected, (1) do you agree with the policy direction in the Reconciliation and Cultural Redress chapter of the Northeast False Creek plan, and (2) if so, how will you ensure the implementation of those policies by working with the First Nations and community groups named therein?4. What changes would you support to city policy to redress the loss of land, culture, and place to local Indigenous cultures & communities, given the city operates on unceded lands?5. If elected, would you ensure the increased value of this land directly benefits Indigenous Peoples financially? 6. If elected, would you advocate in municipal and provincial level for required legislative change to allow permanent residents vote in municipal election? Please elaborate on your answer above. If yes, how would you work with your constituents and political party to ensure the public, city councillors, and MLAs are fully informed and understand the importance of allowing permanent residents vote in civic elections? 7. If elected, would you support a basic income pilot project?Please elaborate on your answer above.8. If elected, would you (1) support an investigation into the racial disparity revealed in the Vancouver Police Department’s practice of “street checks” or police stops, often referred to as carding, (2) support the ability for people of all backgrounds to live freely without being subject to racial profiling on the on the streets or in other places according to the BC Human Rights Code? And (3) would you support working with local community organizations on the development of a justice strategy to address racial profiling?9. If elected, how would you work with the Vancouver Police Department to improve prevention efforts and police investigative capacity to ensure the safety and protect the lives of Indigenous women in Vancouver?10. If elected, how will you work with your constituents and political party to ensure racialized communities are protected from the negative consequences of environmental racism?11. What would you do to make Vancouver feel safe and welcoming for Muslim communities?12. Do you support making Vancouver a Sanctuary City?Please elaborate on your answer above.13. How will you advocate for greater diversity in municipal politics? 13A. If you are white and/or male, how is allyship and prioritizing the voices and issues of the underserved and underrepresented important to you? If applicable, please provide examples of your allyship to any marginalized community.14. Do you support policies and/or electoral reform ensuring women comprise at least 50% of candidates and elected officials (e.g. ward or proportional representation system)?Please elaborate on your answer above.
3
Adrian CrookIndependentCouncil
It is important that directing the practice of intersectionality is rooted in social justice. Any decision making process within the City of Vancouver must be sensitive to the various intersections and lived experiences that can contribute to the oppression of, or advantages given to, a specific person or group of people. Considering all policy decisions through an intersectional lens means examining the discriminatory nature of past decision making processes and policies and how they have led to the marginalization of various social and cultural groups and identities. It also means that future decisions made by council are not made within silos and are made with collaboration and consultation of the populations that will be affected most.
My platform calls for the creation of an Office of Accessibility, to advocate for not just standards, but innovation and collaboration toward reducing barriers for disabled and marginalized persons in Vancouver. This includes equitable access to economic, financial, and social resources to prevent further discrimination and to promote an inclusive city for all residents. So in short, yes I do support an Office of Equity and Inclusion department at the City of Vancouver.
Yes I do agree with the policy direction. To ensure implementation of these policies, I commit to working with the various First Nations and cultural groups identified within the Northeast False Creek Area Plan to explore opportunities for reconciliation and to secure capital and cultural funding to complete the plan.
Through consultation and collaboration with local Indigenous groups, I would ensure that any policy changes that affect the rights of the local First Nations people, including their economic, spiritual, land, and cultural rights, are grounded in the framework of reconciliation and cultural redress.
YesYesYes
Yes, to whatever extent such a project is in the domain of the City.
Yes, absolutely. We still have a lot to learn about systemic prejudice. Daylighting much of the statistics around racial disparity can only help further that understanding - to the benefit of affected groups.
One of my campaign platforms is to formally adopt the guidelines of the 8-80 Cities movement, so our city is as safe and inclusive for an 8 year old as it is for an 80 year old.

I also support the suggestions put forward by the Hot Pink Paper Campaign, which suggests conducting a full safety audit of the City of Vancouver to ensure the safety of women and especially Indigenous women in our city. I also support allocating funding to organizations doing anti-violence work.
Yes
Vancouver is increasingly becoming a safe destination for those who are seeking asylum while escaping areas of conflict, climate change, and social or cultural injustices. Vancouver must be prepared for these population changes and establish policy that will ensure that we remain resilient in the face of social and cultural change. Establishing Vancouver as a Sanctuary City would involve expanding the “Access to City Services without Fear” policy to further apply to municipal services such as the Police, School Board, and the Park Board, to ensure that our city remains safe and inclusive for all.
In advocating for greater diversity, it is important to acknowledge intersectionality and how it can prevent some people from participating in municipal politics while giving others the privilege to do so. Elevating the voices of those whose intersectionalities have been marginalized is imperative in creating a truly diverse city.
As a white male, I am aware of the advantages that I have been given based on my sex, social status, and skin colour. Being an ally to those who have been underserved and marginalized in our society requires first an awareness of this inequality. It also requires a strong dedication to creating equity in our society, in an effort to furthering the City of Vancouver’s commitment to becoming a City of Reconciliation. In working towards this commitment, I have advocated with Abundant Housing Vancouver to ensure that affordable, market, non-market, and social housing is planned for all residents of Vancouver, regardless of their social status, race, income, or ability. I believe that when more people are housed, we begin to develop a more equitable and inclusive society.
YesI'd definitely be willing to evaluate systems with this as their goal. I've not heard any specific proposals along these lines as of yet.
4
Brandon Yan and Christine BoyleOneCityCouncil
We understand intersectionality as an understanding of the many conditions that shape people's lived experience of the city. As city leaders, we will ask the question: Who does this policy help? Who does it disadvantage? We believe that a practice around intersectionality means asking people with diverse lived experiences to be at the table when making decisions, and going into communities to ask for feedback. In our policy creation, we have sought out ideas and feedback from women, from people of colour, from queer and transgender people, from people with disabilities, from elders and youth, and from Indigenous people. We intend to do the same as City Councillors.
Yes. As we stated above, we think that equity and inclusion frameworks should apply to all City actions, and a well-resourced office within the city bureaucracy would be an effective tool for achieving this.
Yes. Vancouver's Indigenous and Black community fought for these policies and we stand with them. We agree with the policy direction and would look to these communities to provide direction in their implementation.

One of the relevant policies we are running on in this election is to bring dedicated representation to City Council, School Board, and Park Board from Vancouver's Indigenous communities: http://www.onecityvancouver.ca/indigenous_representation

We do, however, want to acknowledge that many Chinatown communities were unhappy with parts of the NEFC plan. We were disappointed to see how the city seemed to pit marginalized cultural communities against one another, which perpetuates inequities and reduces our sense of solidarity. Furthermore, we do have concerns about other aspects of the NEFC plan - further gentrifying neighbourhoods, the impacts on shops and culture in Chinatown, and we need to hear more from all of those communities as the work goes ahead.
While these major institutions are valuable, they alone cannot support a vibrant, thriving city of arts and culture that can support emerging and community-based artists. 56% of city funding goes to art/culture orgs founded before 1960. Arts and culture are dynamic and this means we need to support new orgs that reflect the reality of the shifting landscape. We also need to shift funding to organizations that show they are supportive of diversity and equity throughout (staff, board, projects).We think Vancouver can do better. We have several policies that apply to this question: first, we think Vancouver should create tax exemptions to cultural spaces (http://www.onecityvancouver.ca/making_cultural_spaces_affordable).

Second, we believe that Indigenous people should have barrier-free access to Vancouver's park space to practice culture, hold ceremony, and harvest food and natural materials. We will work with the Park Board to open the parks for Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh people by removing parking fees for their citizens.
For this answer, we are going to quote directly from our Indigenous Justice policy:

There are approximately 1244 Musqueam, 4080 Squamish, and 596 Tsleil-Waututh people in Vancouver, and more than 40,000 Indigenous people currently live on these lands. In the past decade, people from the three local nations have increasingly been unable to afford housing in their homelands. The current housing crisis comes after a century of dispossession and displacement for Indigenous people, making its results even more severe for them. OneCity will work to address the housing crisis in these Indigenous communities by offering city-owned lands to Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for non-profit housing, and by supporting the development of culturally appropriate non-profit housing by and for Indigenous communities. This policy will work toward reconciliation, while addressing the unique housing challenges of urban Indigenous people, and the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations in their own territory.

Furthermore, we believe that our Land Value Capture, a tax designed to keep community created land value benefiting the community can benefit Indigenous people through the creation of large amounts of publicly owned affordable housing.

Yes
We believe that most people in Vancouver, with sufficient community conversation and education, would support this policy. Permanent residents are important contributing members of our community and should be able to vote. We think the voter turnout in municipal elections is dismal, and by enfranchising the permanent residents who live, work, go to school, run businesses, and contribute to our communities vote, we might increase voter engagement overall. We are also excited to support the youth led campaign #LostVotesYVR.
No
While we wouldn't oppose a basic income pilot project, we would instead advocate for an increase to social assistance and benefits, and a raising of the minimum wage to become a living wage. It's our understanding that basic income, without corresponding increases to minimum wage, becomes a way to subsidize employers who pay low wages. Instead, we need to address precarious work and make the benefits that used to flow from people's employment like extended health, pension and paid sick leave accessible to all. Also, without accessible and free childcare, basic income would increase the number of women who are outside of paid work. This can have consequences at retirement, when women have lower pensions because they earn less income throughout their working life.

With all that said, if we are hearing from our partners in social movements that universal basic income is the preferred means by which we can achieve greater income equity, we would stand together and fight for it.
Yes, we support all the measures suggested in the question above.
We support the policy proposals from Women Transforming Cities, to create a task force with significant representation from Indigenous women to advise the City of Vancouver, to ensure culturally safe engagement policies, and equitably fund social services, programs, and spaces for Indigenous women in Vancouver.
We believe that this work begins with collaboration with these communities to identify these negative safety effects, and in listening to them in how to ameliorate them. This comes back to the principle of intersectionality - with every decision, we need to ask: who is this helping? Who might this be harming? And be open to hearing hard truths. For too long, Vancouver's wealth has been created at the expense of vulnerable communities. We think it's time for that to change.
We think that improving political and civic representation is one way to help. We would work to elect Muslim representatives, appoint Muslim people to city committees, and promote Muslim people within our city bureaucracy.

Public-facing city staff and the Vancouver Police should also receive training from Muslim communities, to educate them in how to better welcome, support, and ensure the safety of Muslim communities, particularly Muslim women.
Yes
Yes. We believe that the recently passed Access without Fear measures need to be enacted and expanded, and City staff and police need to receive comprehensive training and direction from the city.

Our School Board candidate colleagues are fighting for the Vancouver School Board to adopt a Sanctuary Schools policy. More details here: http://www.onecityvancouver.ca/sanctuary_schools

We believe that OneCity is at present doing the work to increase diversity in municipal politics, in candidates and in who is engaged behind the scenes. We believe that representation matters in elected leaders. Further to that, we would make it a priority that city staff, committees, and other decision making groups actually reflect the community we live in.
From Christine Boyle: I am a white, cis-gendered, heterosexual woman. I deeply want better representation in all sorts of leadership roles, and aim to support work that gets us there by: 1) amplifying the voices of underrepresented voices, in events and panels I organize, communications efforts I am part of, and hiring decisions I have a say in. 2) Donating to and volunteering for candidates at every level of government that bring diversity (and progressive values) to the table, and supporting organizations that are lifting up underrepresented voices. 3) Talking about racism, classism, decolonization, ableism, and other intersecting oppressions with those around me, particularly other folks who don’t experience these systemic challenges personally. 4) Stepping back as frequently as possible when doing so could create space for someone more marginalized to be stepping up.

From Brandon Yan: As a cis, able-bodied man with a lower-middle class upbringing, there are many ways in which I can use my privilege to show up as an ally. Allyship is also a practice and not a destination: it means constant learning, unlearning, and navigating social spaces with a greater awareness of power dynamics. I know that just because I’m a queer person of colour, these intersecting identities do not give me a ‘free pass’ and that I can still perpetuate oppression and harm within my communities (internalized racism and homophobia is a hell of a thing). As a director in a non-profit, I have ensured that my hiring practices take into account peoples’ lived experiences as an asset in the work we do. It’s important for young people to see themselves reflected in the world and for them to also interact with a diversity of experiences. Some pieces of writing I did about the work I do that speaks to how allyship can work:

https://www.straight.com/news/873386/out-screens-brandon-yan-condemns-trumps-reversal-us-protections-transgender-students
https://www.straight.com/news/721256/out-schools-brandon-yan-orlando-shooting-using-your-story-change-world
YesIt is OneCity policy that no more than 50% of our candidates can identify as male. We are also calling for Electoral Reform in Vancouver, preferable to a proportional system, so as to ensure better representation in our local government: http://www.onecityvancouver.ca/electoral_reform.

5
Diego CardonaVision VancouverCouncil
An intersectional lens is a measurable, time sensitive grid to reflect the multidimensional lives of citizens. These include gender expression, ethno-cultural background and experience, income, paid and unpaid work, ability, diversity, age, sexual orientation, etc.
An intersectional lens can address systemic barriers and global crises. Intersectionality is a crucial starting point in all discussions and is grounded in social justice.
An intersectional lens must be applied to all policies, programmes, budgets, funding, governance and staffing. We will practice it by keeping it at the forefront of our decision-making, and by directing the city manager to review and update on an ongoing basis the intersectional outcomes of different departments. In regards to applying intersectionality to current policies that lack such a lens, our team is committed to this complex inclusion of lived experiences by consulting indigenous, and racialized communities to ensure that indigenous justice, and climate justice are key components of the Greenest City Action Plan. The Vision team reflects Vancouver; we appreciate intersectionality and it is at the core of our own lived experience.
Like sustainability, equity advocacy needs to be woven through every aspect of our service delivery, policy work, resource allocation, and governance frameworks. This is informed through meaningful input and empowered advisory groups and supported by senior leadership and line management in the City’s workforce. This work needs to happen in collaboration with all of our workers and labour partners and residents.

An Office of Equity and Inclusion may be the best approach to support this work, but it can’t do this alone. The Vision team is committed to taking on this challenge and building a made in Vancouver solution. We need to ensure a progressive majority at City Council, School Board and Parks Board to keep Vancouver moving forward.
(1) Yes (2) Under the leadership of a Vision-led Council, Vancouver was first in North America to become a City of Reconciliation, working in deep partnership with Indigenous peoples. It can’t stop here. We need to ensure a progressive majority at City Council, School Board and Parks Board to keep Vancouver moving forward.
Vision recognizes Vancouver’s situation on unceded Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh traditional territory. We support the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. We support Indigenous inclusion and rights recognition.

Under the Vision-led Council, the City of Vancouver committed to a government-to-government relationship, where City Council works together with First Nations Councils to achieve Indigenous human rights and recognition. We will work on this issues of fundamental fairness and justice in a sustained relationship of mutual respect and understanding with local First Nations and the Urban Indigenous community. For too long, governments have talked at Indigenous people and imposed solutions. It’s time to listen. It’s time to partner. And that is what we will do to advance these important issues.
Vision recognizes Vancouver’s situation on unceded Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh traditional territory. We support the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. We support Indigenous inclusion and rights recognition.

Under the Vision-led Council, the City of Vancouver committed to a government-to-government relationship, where City Council works together with First Nations Councils to achieve Indigenous human rights and recognition. We will work on this issues of fundamental fairness and justice in a sustained relationship of mutual respect and understanding with local First Nations and the Urban Indigenous community. For too long, governments have talked at Indigenous people and imposed solutions. It’s time to listen. It’s time to partner. And that is what we will do to advance these important issues.
Yes
Vision-led Vancouver city council unanimously agreed to request that the provincial government allow permanent residents—estimated at 60,000 in Vancouver­­--the right to vote in the Oct. 20 municipal election.

The Vision 5 is committed to increasing access and participation rights for all residents.
No
Vancouver’s Vision-led Council has championed innovative approaches to planning and co-creating strategies to reduce poverty through a dual community economic development and healthy communities approach. While income redistribution, including a basic income pilot is a concept we support, we recognize that it is outside the jurisdiction municipal government. The Vision 5 would continue to advocate for and support a provincial and federal anti-poverty plan. And we will continue to fight to make Vancouver a more caring and affordable city - an area where we demonstrated leadership by making the City of Vancouver a certified living wage employer. By doing this, we committed to paying the City’s direct employees and contracted services employees a living wage. This demonstrates Vision’s commitment to support healthy, thriving communities and help individuals and families make ends meet.
The Vision Vancouver team is concerned about the street checks policy. Vision is committed to working with the Vancouver Police Department and board to be ensure the system is fair.
1. Yes.
2. Yes.
3. Yes.
Vancouver was first in North America to become a City of Reconciliation, working in deep partnership with Indigenous peoples. In 2016, the Vision-led Council accepted the City’s review of the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action report which included a commitment by the City to 41 specific actions. The Vision Vancouver led-Council created the City’s Urban Aboriginal Peoples Advisory Committee (UAPAC) and consistently supported their advocacy, and the engagement of non-profits and local women serving organizations to shape and inform policy development and civic responses. The Vision Vancouver led-Council also formally recognized the devastating impact on family members, loved ones and the broader community of the loss of so many indigenous women. If elected to Council, the Vision 5 will continue to champion a reconciliation approach to guide VPD’s work to improve prevention and investigative practices to ensure the safety of and protect the lives of Indigenous women and girls in Vancouver.

The Vision team strongly believes that climate and housing justice are not distinct, and pave a successful path towards addressing environmental racism. Vision’s strong commitment to stand up against the Trans Mountain pipeline, and against a 7 fold increase in oil tanker traffic is directly connected to our determination to address environmental racism. Vision supports density in all neighbourhoods, and is committed to building social and supportive housing along non-arterials areas of the city. Non-arterial areas are the parts of the city less exposed to pollution, and with greater access to green space. We must ensure that low-income families who are often marginalized, racialized, and indigenous can enjoy the options of living in any neighbourhood of Vancouver with housing that matches their income levels. It was Vision Vancouver that initiated the Greenest City Action Plan and helped lead the global fight against climate change. Voting for the Vision 5 on October 20th means five solid votes on City Council for making the environment and climate action a top priority.

The Vision 5 will make make life better for Vancouver residents by fighting for:
The Broadway Subway to UBC - the Vision 5 will champion the extension of the subway from Arbutus all the way to UBC; this will make life better for commuters and reduce pollution that comes from gridlock and bumper-to-bumper traffic;
100% Renewables by 2050 - the Vision 5 will keep Vancouver on track to shift off fossil fuels and onto renewable energy sources by 2050 or sooner, by implementing Vancouver Renewable City Action Plan;
Zero Emission Buildings - the Vision 5 will ensure all new city buildings meet Passive House Standards, demonstrating leadership and promoting local investment and experience in the cutting-edge clean building technologies of the future;
An Even Greener City - the Vision 5 will double down on Vancouver’s successful Greenest City Action Plan; that means championing new green spaces and infrastructure for people, including 2,000 new community garden plots over the next four years, an expanded bike lane network to keep cyclists safe and better maintained parks.
Protecting our Coast - the Vision 5 will stand strong against the Trans Mountain Expansion Project, the seven-fold increase in tanker traffic, and the risk of a catastrophic diluted bitumen oil spill in our coastal waters. In our opposition to the Trans Mountain expansion project we are determined in our position to stand in solidarity with indigenous communities whose land rights, and titles are being once again ignored by colonial practices and systems.
Hate has no place in the City of Vancouver. Vision Vancouver is committed to combating racism and extremism. In a year of tragedies and extremism, Vancouverites have stood in solidarity. But diverse communities affected by these acts have endured tragedy far too many times. We know that If we hesitate to call out hatred, it will persist and grow. We can't let that happen.

It was the Vision-led Council that launched Vancouver’s 101 Days of Action Against Discrimination and held community meetings to challenge Franklin Graham’s anti-LGTBQ2+ statements.
Acts of hate and violence must always be met with strong resistance. We unequivocally reject racism, bigotry, and discrimination as well as those who spread it in our city. Here in Vancouver, people of all ages and backgrounds speaking out forcefully against racism and bigotry, and committing to standing strong, vigilant, and peaceful in the face of ignorance and fear. This the Vancouver we know and love.

The Vision 5 stands in solidarity with anti-racism protesters, and encourages peaceful efforts to call out white supremacy, hate, and racist speech whenever they take place. Vancouver is not immune to racism. It is imperative that we are vigilant with a passionate, non-violent defence of our values to ensure our city remains inclusive, welcoming, and diverse. Vision Vancouver will always stand with you in speaking out against racism, bigotry, homophobia and transphobia, Islamophobia, anti-Semitism, and other discrimination.
Yes
Vision Vancouver is committed to making sure Vancouver does its part to ensure inclusion of undocumented people, and folks with precarious immigration status. We are committed to making sure Vancouver is a safe and inclusive city for all, along the lines of the ‘access to services without fear’ policies in Toronto, Hamilton, and the more than 100 ‘Sanctuary Cities’ in the U.S.
At its annual general meeting in January 2018, Vision Vancouver passed the Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Policy committing the party to take action in all three areas. Following up on this policy, the Vision nomination team made deliberate outreach efforts to recruit many diverse candidates to our nomination race. This effort was successful and resulted in the Vision membership electing a gender balanced slate that reflects incredible diversity.
Part of the process of becoming an ally in my experience is to acknowledge one’s privilege and positionality within our social structures. The journey that I have undertaken to become an ally to women’s leadership is rooted in the mechanisms of accountability and trust the women in my life have created to remind me of when I take too much space, and of the different ways in which masculinity and patriarchy can have a negative impact in the way they navigate their everyday lives. As time passes, I have attempted to take ownership of all my actions, and have come to realize that is my responsibility - and not the job of women in my life - to correct my self, change my behaviour, challenge my peers and other men/boys to reject toxic masculinity, and support the movement for women’s liberation.
NoA referendum in 2004 decisively rejected wards and while Vision has a diversity of views among its leadership, there are no plans to revisit the issue. If there is a broad public call for change, we would do our best to respond -- in the meantime we are working on a number of fronts to strengthen women’s voices. We look forward to the outcomes of the upcoming referendum on proportional representation.
6
Elishia PerosaIndependent Council
Intersectionality resonates quite profoundly with me as A) a woman of colour and B) a voice for Women and Women’s Rights. Within the municipality of Vancouver, intersectionality plays an important role in determining the roles and benefits policies and services provide with regards to accessiblity and inclusivity. We are dealing with a wide range of marginalized women, with the largest demographic being of Indigenous decent. When discussing affordability and modular housing, are the needs of all people being met? Does building a subsidized, new SRO on the DTES serve women and marginalized women and their safety? And not just those who are marginalized, but any woman anywhere. In a different direction, when looking at developing a new music venue (such as the recently approved VIM House project at the Plaza of Nations), is back-of-house accessible for persons with disabilities? Taking into account all persons and all factors is how we create liveability.

As I work with women who are survivors, I already practice intersectionality. If elected, I bring my dedicated work with and for women to the table. For example, in analyzing reports are we factoring in safety, and spaces that are women-friendly? I do firmly support the implementation of a Women’s Advisory Committee in office. I hope to be heavily involved and I think incorporating strong, senior figureheads such as Ellen Woodsworth for direct consultation leads to more efficient and effective solutions.
Yes I will. Intersectionality is a practice we cannot ignore in implementing decisions in today’s society. Empowering an Office of Equity and Inclusion’s involvement in all roles and aspects of the City right from the get go will save in exponential costs in the long run and could have life saving abilities for spaces.
Yes, I agree. And I will absolutely make sure that we consult and collaborate with the First Nations and community groups. Without consultation, how are we upholding Reconciliation? We would digress. I agree with Women Transforming Cities that there should be a multi-sector/multi-level task force to advice the City upon Indigenous Women and Girls.
Yes
Absolutely to all! I have many Indigenois colleagues and friends to whom never receive my emails as the police have skimmed through them simply from standing on the street. How can we proclaim progress with Reconciliation when such archaic racial profiling and targeting still takes place?
I think this is a very important task that needs to take place, however, I am not versed well enough within what the Indigenous advocacy leaders require. I believe they should be the ones that put forward what they see that their women need. Though I work profusely with our Indigenous community, I have learned that they require a champion within the VPD to create a task force that can act as liaisons directly in relation to a committe set up within the Indigenous community. I am prepared to sit down and do whatever I can to implement stronger, more trustworthy strategies.
I fully endorse the Women Transforming Cities policy of putting in place a City advocate to support immigrant, migrant and refugee women. This creates a personalized approach and direct liaison for those entering our city for the first time. Another great example is through community empowerment. If we look at the Collingwood Neighbourhood House model, we see that they have nurtured a way for immediately integrating new residents into the community and getting them interactively involved allowing for a sense of belonging.
Yes
I was speaking with a gentleman who is an immigrations lawyer with the YWCA. He said when an immigrant woman and her children are under threat by a spouse/father, there is nowhere for them to go, no policies in place to protect their children and they almost always end up having to go back to their abuser. If Vancouver were a Sanctuary City, no matter your residence status, we would be able to put all prople’s lives and safety first.
Yes.Yes
7
Graham CookIndependentCouncil
In the municipal context, to me it means that we need to ensure that our policies and practices are evaluated in such a way that examines the way they interact with the various socioeconomic factors at play in Vancouver. Within my potential role, especially as a privileged individual, I envision myself practicing active listening and helping to play a facilitating role in guaranteeing that marginalized voices are heard during the policy creation process.
Yes, absolutely. I think this is a fantastic policy step to ensure, as referenced in Question #1, that an Intersectional Lens is applied to areas like the Greenest City 2020 Action Plan that do not already have one. Furthermore, it will be able to provide a comprehensive look at all city policies and programs that individual departments are not likely to have.
I believe this question goes hand-in-hand with the proposed Office of Equity and Inclusion, which can help ensure that the needs of the Indigenous community are being met with regards to city funding of arts and culture initiatives. This could include ensuring that First Nations' voices are being heard within existing organizations such as the Art Gallery and the Museum, or that new organizations are created altogether.
With the help of engaged residents and experts, I have recently become in favour of an overarching Land Value Tax to ensure that a portion of the land lift brought on by improvements to public infrastructure and livability is captured for public use. Ensuring that funds directly benefit the Indigenous community has historically been something that the Canadian Government (at all levels) has failed to do well. It has been a far too common thread in my answers, but I do believe that an Office of Equity and Inclusion can help with the fair and equitable distribution of funds, including those captured by a Land Value Tax. As the question primer begins to point out, the extent to which individuals have become enriched on unneeded land with very little benefit to the Indigenous Peoples is a wrong that needs to be righted immediately.
Yes
Municipal elections determine the level of government that impacts area residents the most, yet we refuse representation to Permanent Residents who have made Vancouver their home. All this while allowing the right to vote to Non-Resident Property Electors, those who do not live here but own property in the city and meet the other eligibility criteria. In terms of working with constituents, other councillors, and MLAs, I truly believe it begins with education and understanding as to the overall goal of allowing Permanent Residents the right to vote and that is to provide representation and a voice to all residents at the civic level.
Yes
The early success that was reported out of Ontario (before the unfortunate recent turn of events at the provincial level) were inspiring. Basic Income Projects can provide not only financial stability and all of the associated benefits for the recipient, they also provide economic efficiencies for governments. I would be extremely in favour of moving this project forward.
(1) Yes, I believe the people of Vancouver are owed an investigation into this practice.
(2), (3) As someone who has never faced discrimination, this is something I take completely for granted and I am very thankful to all of the residents who have been willing to take time with me to share their experiences and concerns. I would absolutely and emphatically support community organizations both on the creation of a justice strategy to address these unfair practices as well as further initiatives to ensure that all current and future Vancouverites and visitors are able to live freely without fear.
I believe that one of the best ways we can ensure the VPD allocates the necessary resources to this crisis is to ensure Indigenous representation (specifically including Indigenous women) on the Police Board.
Yes
I do not believe that any society as caring and compassionate as Vancouver should be turning other human beings away from essential services due their immigration status.
A major way to introduce a greater level of diversity in municipal politics is to move away from the "At Large" election system, which typically elects Councils that do not reflect the demographics of the city. This will not be a sufficient step, but certainly will help our city make progress.
I think this is incredibly important to me as someone who hasn't experienced discrimination and has benefited from my privilege to ensure I understand the experiences of those from differing backgrounds. I'm extremely thankful to the many Vancouverites, both within the context of this campaign and outside of it, who have been willing to share their experiences and viewpoints with me.
8
Heather Deal Vision VancouverCouncil
An intersectional lens is a measurable, time sensitive grid to reflect the multidimensional lives of citizens. These include gender expression, ethno-cultural background and experience, income, paid and unpaid work, ability, diversity, age, sexual orientation, etc.
An intersectional lens can address systemic barriers and global crises. Intersectionality is a crucial starting point in all discussions and is grounded in social justice.
An intersectional lens must be applied to all policies, programmes, budgets, funding, governance and staffing. We will practice it by keeping it at the forefront of our decision-making, and by directing the city manager to review and update on an ongoing basis the intersectional outcomes of different departments. In regards to applying intersectionality to current policies that lack such a lens, our team is committed to this complex inclusion of lived experiences by consulting indigenous, and racialized communities to ensure that indigenous justice, and climate justice are key components of the Greenest City Action Plan. The Vision team reflects Vancouver; we appreciate intersectionality and it is at the core of our own lived experience.
Like sustainability, equity advocacy needs to be woven through every aspect of our service delivery, policy work, resource allocation, and governance frameworks. This is informed through meaningful input and empowered advisory groups and supported by senior leadership and line management in the City’s workforce. This work needs to happen in collaboration with all of our workers and labour partners and residents.

An Office of Equity and Inclusion may be the best approach to support this work, but it can’t do this alone. The Vision team is committed to taking on this challenge and building a made in Vancouver solution. We need to ensure a progressive majority at City Council, School Board and Parks Board to keep Vancouver moving forward.
(1) Yes (2) Under the leadership of a Vision-led Council, Vancouver was first in North America to become a City of Reconciliation, working in deep partnership with Indigenous peoples. It can’t stop here. We need to ensure a progressive majority at City Council, School Board and Parks Board to keep Vancouver moving forward.
Vision recognizes Vancouver’s situation on unceded Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh traditional territory. We support the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. We support Indigenous inclusion and rights recognition.

Under the Vision-led Council, the City of Vancouver committed to a government-to-government relationship, where City Council works together with First Nations Councils to achieve Indigenous human rights and recognition. We will work on this issues of fundamental fairness and justice in a sustained relationship of mutual respect and understanding with local First Nations and the Urban Indigenous community. For too long, governments have talked at Indigenous people and imposed solutions. It’s time to listen. It’s time to partner. And that is what we will do to advance these important issues.
Vision recognizes Vancouver’s situation on unceded Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh traditional territory. We support the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. We support Indigenous inclusion and rights recognition.

Under the Vision-led Council, the City of Vancouver committed to a government-to-government relationship, where City Council works together with First Nations Councils to achieve Indigenous human rights and recognition. We will work on this issues of fundamental fairness and justice in a sustained relationship of mutual respect and understanding with local First Nations and the Urban Indigenous community. For too long, governments have talked at Indigenous people and imposed solutions. It’s time to listen. It’s time to partner. And that is what we will do to advance these important issues.
Yes
Vision-led Vancouver city council unanimously agreed to request that the provincial government allow permanent residents—estimated at 60,000 in Vancouver­­--the right to vote in the Oct. 20 municipal election.

The Vision 5 is committed to increasing access and participation rights for all residents.
No
Vancouver’s Vision-led Council has championed innovative approaches to planning and co-creating strategies to reduce poverty through a dual community economic development and healthy communities approach. While income redistribution, including a basic income pilot is a concept we support, we recognize that it is outside the jurisdiction municipal government. The Vision 5 would continue to advocate for and support a provincial and federal anti-poverty plan. And we will continue to fight to make Vancouver a more caring and affordable city - an area where we demonstrated leadership by making the City of Vancouver a certified living wage employer. By doing this, we committed to paying the City’s direct employees and contracted services employees a living wage. This demonstrates Vision’s commitment to support healthy, thriving communities and help individuals and families make ends meet.
The Vision Vancouver team is concerned about the street checks policy. Vision is committed to working with the Vancouver Police Department and board to be ensure the system is fair.
1. Yes.
2. Yes.
3. Yes.
Vancouver was first in North America to become a City of Reconciliation, working in deep partnership with Indigenous peoples. In 2016, the Vision-led Council accepted the City’s review of the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action report which included a commitment by the City to 41 specific actions. The Vision Vancouver led-Council created the City’s Urban Aboriginal Peoples Advisory Committee (UAPAC) and consistently supported their advocacy, and the engagement of non-profits and local women serving organizations to shape and inform policy development and civic responses. The Vision Vancouver led-Council also formally recognized the devastating impact on family members, loved ones and the broader community of the loss of so many indigenous women. If elected to Council, the Vision 5 will continue to champion a reconciliation approach to guide VPD’s work to improve prevention and investigative practices to ensure the safety of and protect the lives of Indigenous women and girls in Vancouver.

The Vision team strongly believes that climate and housing justice are not distinct, and pave a successful path towards addressing environmental racism. Vision’s strong commitment to stand up against the Trans Mountain pipeline, and against a 7 fold increase in oil tanker traffic is directly connected to our determination to address environmental racism. Vision supports density in all neighbourhoods, and is committed to building social and supportive housing along non-arterials areas of the city. Non-arterial areas are the parts of the city less exposed to pollution, and with greater access to green space. We must ensure that low-income families who are often marginalized, racialized, and indigenous can enjoy the options of living in any neighbourhood of Vancouver with housing that matches their income levels. It was Vision Vancouver that initiated the Greenest City Action Plan and helped lead the global fight against climate change. Voting for the Vision 5 on October 20th means five solid votes on City Council for making the environment and climate action a top priority.

The Vision 5 will make make life better for Vancouver residents by fighting for:
The Broadway Subway to UBC - the Vision 5 will champion the extension of the subway from Arbutus all the way to UBC; this will make life better for commuters and reduce pollution that comes from gridlock and bumper-to-bumper traffic;
100% Renewables by 2050 - the Vision 5 will keep Vancouver on track to shift off fossil fuels and onto renewable energy sources by 2050 or sooner, by implementing Vancouver Renewable City Action Plan;
Zero Emission Buildings - the Vision 5 will ensure all new city buildings meet Passive House Standards, demonstrating leadership and promoting local investment and experience in the cutting-edge clean building technologies of the future;
An Even Greener City - the Vision 5 will double down on Vancouver’s successful Greenest City Action Plan; that means championing new green spaces and infrastructure for people, including 2,000 new community garden plots over the next four years, an expanded bike lane network to keep cyclists safe and better maintained parks.
Protecting our Coast - the Vision 5 will stand strong against the Trans Mountain Expansion Project, the seven-fold increase in tanker traffic, and the risk of a catastrophic diluted bitumen oil spill in our coastal waters. In our opposition to the Trans Mountain expansion project we are determined in our position to stand in solidarity with indigenous communities whose land rights, and titles are being once again ignored by colonial practices and systems.
Hate has no place in the City of Vancouver. Vision Vancouver is committed to combating racism and extremism. In a year of tragedies and extremism, Vancouverites have stood in solidarity. But diverse communities affected by these acts have endured tragedy far too many times. We know that If we hesitate to call out hatred, it will persist and grow. We can't let that happen.

It was the Vision-led Council that launched Vancouver’s 101 Days of Action Against Discrimination and held community meetings to challenge Franklin Graham’s anti-LGTBQ2+ statements.
Acts of hate and violence must always be met with strong resistance. We unequivocally reject racism, bigotry, and discrimination as well as those who spread it in our city. Here in Vancouver, people of all ages and backgrounds speaking out forcefully against racism and bigotry, and committing to standing strong, vigilant, and peaceful in the face of ignorance and fear. This the Vancouver we know and love.

The Vision 5 stands in solidarity with anti-racism protesters, and encourages peaceful efforts to call out white supremacy, hate, and racist speech whenever they take place. Vancouver is not immune to racism. It is imperative that we are vigilant with a passionate, non-violent defence of our values to ensure our city remains inclusive, welcoming, and diverse. Vision Vancouver will always stand with you in speaking out against racism, bigotry, homophobia and transphobia, Islamophobia, anti-Semitism, and other discrimination.
Yes
Vision Vancouver is committed to making sure Vancouver does its part to ensure inclusion of undocumented people, and folks with precarious immigration status. We are committed to making sure Vancouver is a safe and inclusive city for all, along the lines of the ‘access to services without fear’ policies in Toronto, Hamilton, and the more than 100 ‘Sanctuary Cities’ in the U.S.
At its annual general meeting in January 2018, Vision Vancouver passed the Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Policy committing the party to take action in all three areas. Following up on this policy, the Vision nomination team made deliberate outreach efforts to recruit many diverse candidates to our nomination race. This effort was successful and resulted in the Vision membership electing a gender balanced slate that reflects incredible diversity.
As a white woman, I have had many advantages in my life. As I have become more aware of my privledge over the years, I have made and continue to make efforts to ensure that I watch for language, assumptions, and exclusionary policies. I firmly believe in the approach of "nothing about us without us". We need to continue to work to bring underrepresented people to the table so that all voices are heard.
NoA referendum in 2004 decisively rejected wards and while Vision has a diversity of views among its leadership, there are no plans to revisit the issue. If there is a broad public call for change, we would do our best to respond -- in the meantime we are working on a number of fronts to strengthen women’s voices. We look forward to the outcomes of the upcoming referendum on proportional representation.
9
Jean Swanson, Derrick O'Keefe, and Anne RobertsCOPECouncil
In the municipal context, intersectionality means applying an anti-oppression and solidarity lens to all the work we do inside and outside of City Hall. COPE is a member-driven, progressive party committed to eliminating systemic injustice and discrimination based on class, race, gender, sexuality, ability and all other intersecting factors.

Our core policies are designed to make life better for marginalized, poor, and working-class Vancouverites. Economic class intersects strongly with many other forms of oppression, meaning that we can’t address one without the other.

A great deal of the mainstream conversation on housing is focused on fixing the market for the middle class (e.g. “the missing middle” narrative). At COPE, we are concerned with people who are most vulnerable to the impacts of the housing crisis, and who are least likely to have their voices heard. Our analysis starts with what is needed to lighten the impacts of austerity and the housing crisis on those at the bottom half of the income bracket, especially those at the intersection of class and other axes of oppression, such as gender/sexuality, race, ability, and age. This is why we support 100% community-controlled social housing at welfare and shelter rate for important sites such as 58 W Hastings and 105 Keefer.

We would a apply an intersectional lens to all aspects of our work at City Council, and direct staff to do likewise. Here are some examples.

Transit and climate change: We can’t address Vancouver’s contribution to climate change without taking into consideration race, class, and gender. The biggest source of GHGs in Metro Vancouver is personal vehicles and the best way to cut emissions is to expand public transit and increase ridership, but we can’t do that without making transit more affordable. Women, single mothers, and racialized workers are significantly overrepresented among transit commuters, but high fares and poor services can be insurmountable barriers. COPE’s “U-Pass for the working class” plan would reduce fares and expand service, allowing 40,000 new people to take public transit and taking up to 40,000 polluting cars off the road. Just Vancouver’s portion of the recently announced increase in BC’s carbon tax could fully fund this program. We believe this is a more just application of the carbon tax than BC Liberals’ approach of giving tax credits to corporations.

Homelessness: Currently, 40% of people without homes are Indigenous. This is a perpetuation of settler colonial violence. It is a crime and we have to stop it. That’s one important reason why we are fighting for a Mansion Tax to end homelessness in one year. We just can’t let cynicism delay action any longer.

Renters: A large portion of renters spending over 50% of their income on housing are racialized people, women, single mothers, seniors, and young people. Renters and these groups have not been properly represented on city council. We hear from people everyday that politicians just don’t get how important it is to keep rents down. That’s why we are fighting so hard for a Rent Freeze, 0% increase for four years, and vacancy control to create housing security for people who aren’t millionaires. People who are most at risk of renoviction are seniors -- many of them women on fixed income -- who have been living in their apartments for decades. Since their rents are lower, landlords can make more profit from evicting them. This is an epidemic in places like the West End, and seniors feel they have nowhere to go. That’s why the city must use its permitting powers to stop as many renovictions as possible immediately. There’s no time left for excuses or pointing fingers at other levels of government.

About COPE: In our own party we have provisions for gender equality and Indigenous representation on our electoral slates, as well as committees with decision-making representation on our executive made up of various equity-seeking groups. The make-up of COPE’s volunteer and staff base in this election reflects our intersectional lens.

Diana Day, one of the very few if not the only Indigenous woman candidate for school board, is running under the COPE banner. This is her third time running with COPE and she is on track to become the first woman Indigenous school trustee. Diana has been a vocal advocate for an Indigenous high school and for uplifting Indigenous students in Vancouver school to close the racial achievement gap. 5 of 7 COPE candidates are women, each of whom have a long track record of activism and advocacy in the different communities they are rooted in. We recognize that even in the most progressive-minded organizations, patriarchy, racism and classism operate in various, often hidden, ways and we work to hold ourselves accountable to the values that we advocate for through the city council.
Yes, we support the Office of Equity and Inclusion having the resources to work with the listed departments and groups. COPE is required by its membership to hold an equity caucus to oversee all of the party’s activities and help implement an equity lens to our policies. Once in power, COPE will support necessary structures to the City’s operations. COPE councillors have a track record of putting resources toward social justice and equity committees at the City level and taking a bold stance in these regards.
We strongly support direction of working with the local First Nations around streets, parks, and other public space designs. COPE’s platform also calls for working with the local Nations to create community land-trusts to address the housing crisis for Indigenous people. We strongly support working with Chinatown to preserve cultural assets, and we also will fight the gentrification of Chinatown that is already leading to displacement of residents and small businesses. We are concerned about the gentrification effects of the proposed NEFC condo developments.
At COPE, we believe recognition of Vancouver’s colonial history and the theft of land from Indigenous peoples is an important first step, but we don’t need to stop there. We want to see reconciliation with teeth, which must include devolution of power to the Tsleil-Waututh, Squamish and Musqueam nations. Where possible, we would work on City Council to partner with the local nations to redistribute the massive amount of wealth generated by the real estate industry on these unceded territories and where possible to return land, for instance in the form of land trusts. We will also work on instituting an Indigenous wellness centre and other cultural centres.
Absolutely, one of the main stated purposes of COPE’s Mansion Tax policy is to capture the value from escalating property costs and, after ending homelessness, working with local First Nations to build non-market housing and creating land trusts.
Yes
Yes, COPE supports extended voting in municipal elections to permanent residents. Jean Swanson’s independent campaign in the 2017 by-election, which COPE endorsed, included and prioritized the demand for voting rights for permanent residents.

COPE’s staff and volunteer base greatly reflects the need for extending voting rights to non-citizens. COPE’s electoral campaign actively extends an invite to those who are disenfranchised by the current electoral laws and embraces their voices and leadership in our movement.
No
Recognizing that there are different points of view within COPE on the issue of basic income, and that such programs have been applied with different intentions by different types of governments around the world, we tend to be cautious about such proposals in the current socio-economic climate. Jean Swanson has spoken on this subject on numerous occasions. Below is a transcript of one of her talks and the reasons why she does not support a universal basic income. Instead she supports improving the welfare system as well as providing more public services and advocating for living wages https://www.facebook.com/notes/bc-disability-caucus/jean-swansons-talk-about-basic-income-other-reports/1956735524571749/
https://cws.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/cws/article/viewFile/6259/5447

Yes, carding and racial profiling remain structural injustices in Vancouver that we have to change. We will support an investigation and working with community groups to end these practices.

The city’s policing budget has ballooned by over $100 million dollars over the past decade, but we cannot police ourselves out of poverty, stigma, and racial discrimination. Much of the police budget is being eaten up by community policing, but these moneys would be better spent using a health and social justice approach. That means providing space and funding for harm reduction, women’s health initiatives, groups that fight stigma against poor people and drug users, proper housing, immigration services, and an Indigenous healing and wellness centre in the Downtown Eastside.

Violence against Indigenous women is perpetuated because of many factors, and we should look at all of them, including theft of land, poverty, housing, and various forms of discrimination in society and in the police force. In terms of policing, one important component is to improve the way that police relate to Indigenous people, to improve trust between police and the community. That could entail changes in training, hiring, and accountability practices.
COPE will work tooth and nail to stop the Kinder Morgan pipeline from being expanded and polluting land and water of the three host nations. COPE policy is to densify land in the city that has historically been exclusive, mostly the west side, and less polluted by traffic and noise, with social housing. With revenue from the mansion tax COPE could return some of the less polluted land in these areas to the host nations--it wouldn’t be a lot, cause there is not enough revenue there, but it could be some. COPE is working to get more people out of cars to reduce carbon emissions by providing free transit for low income people.
COPE city councillors, school board trustees, and park board commissioners would commit city resources to education and mobilization against Islamophobia and all other forces of bigotry and racism.
Yes
Yes, COPE campaigned to make Vancouver a sanctuary city in 2014, Jean Swanson did as well in 2017, and this year COPE’s platform calls for an end to any city service, including the VPD, sharing citizenship status with Border Security. COPE will also ensure that city staff are trained in how to actually implement the sanctuary city policy.
When housing, child care and finances are more equalized, women and other marginalized individuals will have the freedom and resources to run for office. COPE will be a strong advocate for $10/day child care plan, model maternity leave policies for councillors, higher welfare rates, higher minimum wages, unions, and affordable housing as pre-conditions for a more diversified city council. The city must also examine ways to involve citizens in the political process and ensure all voices heard at consultation sessions, meetings, city council sessions, by developing improved communication strategies to residents who speak languages other than English. COPE’s internal policies mandate that all candidate slates must consist of 50% or fewer men. COPE is already looking for diverse candidates to run with us in the 2022 city election
When in hiring positions, trying to hire people who are women and/or racialized. When organizing meetings ensuring that diverse voices are represented in chairing or MCing, and on panels.
YesCOPE has a long history of fighting for electoral reform, and will prioritize negotiating with the provincial government to improve the voting system. This will include extending the vote to permanent residents and youth, closing campaign finance loopholes, and exploring proportional representation that accounts for gender diversity. City council also has the power to create wards right now, which is important because the current at-large system benefits parties with big money contributors and is biased against neighbourhood activists.
10
Katherine RamdeenIndependentCouncil
City Hall needs to set the standard for Vancouver. Every issue that is brought to council, should be looked at with a rational, empathetic, and democratic lens. This means looking at an issue from multiple perspectives, gaining invaluable community input in the form of a transparent and accessibility city hall. How do we do this? We need a public ledger that is easy-to-use, free, and online. Everything that the government does should be made available on this open database. Transparency ensures accountability.
I can understand how creating a new department would give a voice to the otherwise voiceless, but I think this can be done by implementing 100% transparency in all civic matters using an open database, as well as inviting and encouraging the input of the community when council is deliberating.
I'm going to have to take a detailed look at this proposal and can't make any statement one way or the other. I'm generally in favour of giving land back to public spaces, but I'd want to understand the logistics of removing the viaducts and what that means for traffic and how traffic flow would be redirected.
Under democracy, all people should be given a voice on how their greater home (city, province, country) should be run. The intersectional lens on this issue becomes more complex as we open our view on a situation to different perspectives. I think that local indigenous voices need to be heard and I think extending the aesthetics decisions to these voices is a great initiative to show support to these communities.
"40% of Vancouver’s homeless population identifies as Indigenous" - this is a terrible statistic but one that we need to look at to find solutions. I think funding needs to go to better Mental Health care, housing with built in support systems for addiction and mental illnesses, and empowering programs that foster individual financial independence.
Yes
If you pay income taxes in BC, you should get a vote. You should be able to have a say on how your tax dollars are spent. Period. Hold a referendum, perhaps, to see what the public thinks about this? But the rational response of YES, means, we need to make this a reality using whatever channels necessary. When people get a vote, they care more. Let's give PR even more reasons to love this fair and democratic city!
No
We need to make the cost of living cheaper. The biggest expense for people in Vancouver is housing. I think funding should go towards building different variations of affordable housing in Vancouver.
1) YES 2) YES 3) YES
There needs to be a free shuttle program on the Highway of Tears. People don't have access to transport so they're hitching rides. We need a transport system in the 720-kilometre section of Highway 16 between Prince George and Prince Rupert, BC.
We need to look at zoning and implement distance restrictions that protect the health of people and the environment from polluting industries.
I'd want to look into the purpose and effectiveness of "increased surveillance and interrogations by state authorities" and find out why we're even doing that. Everyone has the right to believe what they want to, so long as they aren't harming others or themselves. It doesn't make sense to me to spend tax dollars policing a community of people simply because of their religion.
Yes
It would be fantastic to see Vancouver elect more diverse representatives for their government. I think creating a policy where all elected government officials must be comprised of 50% male and female is a good start. Why not have 2 mayors, too? A female and male?
My mom is Ukrainian/Polish and my father is Trinidadian. If you look at me, I look like a white female, but in fact 50% of my family is West Indian. I want to see more diversity in elected officials and a more accurate reflection of our communities in elected officials.
YesHaha I just said this! Yes! 2 mayors is a good idea too, perhaps.
11
Larry FallsIndependentCouncil
The concept is intertwining and inclusive on all levels
Yes
I agree but it also requires more involvement by First Nations in the planning stage.
Introduce more First Nations information and traditions about their culture and folklore related to governance and education .
YesNo
The most important thing is to understand the political system and Canadian culture.
Yes
Yes, because poverty is interconnected with wealth and associated with inequality of pay standards for affordable living including, disparity between men and women.
Yes
Work with representatives of indigenous women to build trust and increase knowledge about women's rights and social gender issues in various cultures.
Racialized communities need to be educated in regards to what their rights are and taught to be pro-active in working with constituent representative.
Get Muslim communities more evolved in working with new arrivals and political education.
Yes
It's basic human rights to have shelter and protection from harm.
Educate and encourage the public minority to become more involved in politics.
I am a Black Nova Scotian and the first thing I recognize is the need to build trust between the various ethnic groups.
YesPolitically and emotionally women must be given assurance that they have equality in a patriarchal society.
12
Marlo FransonIndependentCouncil
Vancouver has one of the most diverse groups of people living throughout the city. This means we as individuals or groups are continuously surrounded by the intersectionality of the life around us, whether we see it or not. We must bring forth to Council ways in which we see the issues that our population face on a daily basis and try and understand the importance of intersectionality that is unique to Vancouver. Stepping into politics can be very opening to what we do and don’t know and only the public can bring forth their concerns and issues of the problems we all face. I can see creating public forums that would allow those around us to express the concerns they face within their social hierarchy. It is important for us to be aware of the social dynamics for each part of Vancouver and the issues that need to be addressed not only in the public spectrum but on the interactive social level of the individual.
I envision creating a new technology forefront for Vancouver’s region to bring forth any issues and concerns Vancouverites have regarding the problems they face. Once we understand our local diverse culture and population only then can we combine it to the intersectional model to completely understand what needs to be addressed and fixed.
We can create educational discussions in the public schools and universities to help educate/move people towards more of an all-inclusive society, so nobody is missing out on our for example Green Action Plan. We can identify areas that need more focus and help with regards to how their lives matter around them to benefit from any Action Plans Vancouver wishes. Whether it be a Green Plan or a Housing Plan, we must ensure the people are represented when taking on new investment projects from any source.
I can not imagine a City without a framework that does not include an Office of Equity and Inclusion, for the safety of Vancouverites alone this would be an asset to our working and future growth model. I am not sure of the total aspects of what responsibilities this Office would entail but ensure you I will look at this thoroughly with the entire Council. It is important to understand with whom we are referring to and what exactly is the nature of the social change or region within the area of change. We are all involved in this so it is important to look at what road we need to take before we hand over conditions and rights of the employment. I will ensure this concept is brought up and considered as a viable avenue of pursuit for the good of the people.
Destroying the Viaducts and creating these new cultural areas from Vancouver’s History is very noble of our city to commence. Reaching out to Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for input into the design, growth, art and other traditional aspects including a culture center are great steps to remembering our past history, whether it was good or bad. I agree the need for this type of reconciliation is a must for the area if it is to undergo the changes.
We would have to set up a liaison with the First Nations people to obtain their ideas and concepts before we can go to developers for construction of residence and commercial units are built or planned out for. If we are to consult with first nations, we will have to make any finalization with their partnership. It is only then can we ensure their values, traditions, history and legacy are met for all Canadians to visit and learn about the First Nations people and who else would know more than Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh people. We have much to learn and I look forward to being apart of this learning culture to create these policies.
I support the Northeast Falsecreek Plan in character, and the ideas put forth to recognize all cultures from history, as well as to take ideas and work with First Nations and other nationalities of the region. I would also like to see a Reconciliation Day created to remember and teach all Vancouverites of the land we live on and it’s history. It would be great to finally work with and create a multicultural task force to help design and create a Vancouver for all people and incorporate how we can move forward in remembrance and education. This all begins with meetings and ideas and then policies can be incorporated where city hall is giving back to the population of Vancouver in a health well thought out design.
If we are to identify the land as a cultural heritage place and placing a traditional name to it, there can be many new benefits brought up from the area for the people. It can benefit the city by holding events in the area or leasing the area for other entertainment purposes that would put the financial prosperity back into the community. It is important we see the well being of our city and the benefits of income investment into the low income and homeless generation currently living downtown and surrounding areas. I value any income derivatives that the city acquires put back to those affected by our growth and lack of current investment.
Yes
We are all people who work, live and play in Vancouver, we also pay taxes and if they are apart of this livelihood, we should be able to hear their voice on the ballot as well. This city is about inclusion and sustainability. It is important those who contribute to our society’s social structure and well being, while investing their lives and money into the community have a right to vote. It is important to keep everyone aware of the issues surrounding them, give them a chance to speak out on the issues and follow through with inclusion. It is all of us that make city hall and this city what it is today, inclusion is a helpful way to keep all residence the option to become a part of the city no matter what their current status is.
Yes
The Income Pilot Project is a unique idea and great to see it is being studied and implemented in Ontario. I have to really look into their model and see other ways to enhance their project. We all know that employment under a fair wage for the region is the best way for those who live in the area to be able to stay ahead of the poverty line. So it can be more beneficial to push for higher wages, along with increasing disability and those who need it income checks . It is important to know where the problems lie, who needs the help and how they need the help more than giving out more money. What ways can we help better the lives of Vancouverites than by asking them, meeting them and talking to business on hiring them. It will be an interesting project/plan to take on and come up with and I look forward to hearing the ideas to how to better everyone’s life in Vancouver.
As a Councillor and educated person in the field of criminology, I would personally sit down with the police department to focus on many issues of crime in the city and the issues people have about them. I think we can change the pattern of police tactics by asking what are they looking for. The city maybe big and active day and night, it is important we keep it safe but what methods of actions by the police do we need to concern ourselves over with the public. I will find out more from one meeting than holding an investigation and I will then come up with solutions to the issue and to stop any profiling. It would be great to work with the local community to find out where the issues lie and how we can work with police for a better community. I can definitely get to the bottom of this myself as this is one area I would set my focus on.
I look forward with meeting with the Vancouver Police to hear the issues we face in this city. I would also recommend the hiring of more Female Indigenous Police Officers to the force to help and give Indigenous people a voice on the force. We need to create a co-operationship with the Police and have more safety opportunities for women in trouble.
The city has concepts and initiatives to move to a 0% GHG plan for the city, as we move towards this solution, hopefully following the models from UBC research, we can restore the areas. We will create healthier air, recycling, waste reduction, and cleaning crew. If we plan to clean up Vancouver this will be an issue of the past.
Muslims in Vancouver in my thoughts have a solid community in the city, even though I know very little of the community itself I see and hear their positivity. I would have to reach out to them to see what the real issues are in their communities. I am aware of these issues in the larger cities but was not aware of any disparities within the Vancouver region that need investigating. I would have to study this and meet the community to assess my solutions or ideas for a better Vancouver to be nicer to each other and stop the fear making.
Yes
The complete definition of what Sanctuary Cities offer to those who are on any stage of the immigration application is hard to ascertain at my current level. What I have learnt is if Vancouver wants to be different we have to create our own version of how we treat those who need help to survive. We mustn’t treat human being different because of their current status in our country. We know the Federal Government has it’s own rules and regulation, but in the meantime, we in Vancouver can offer assistants to those who need it. Irregardless of ones immigration status and is considered to become a citizen should have educational tools to hopefully one day obtain employment and become a great addition to Vancouver. Employment for immigrants is vital so it is important to help them through social programs and access education programs. If we offer the services this should reduce problems they need not face for their future.
This election I am in is for Vancouver City Council, though there is 71 candidates and 7 more men than woman, we are almost equal today than what was yesteryears. We have a huge diverse level of people running in our city, I can only say Vancouver is at a forefront for offering opportunities in our election the way it stands. If they try and change our system to a Ward system this diversity might dimension to just certain regions so I am all about keeping the current system. I am certain Vancouver has ample information and methods already in place for the diversity issue.
I think these meet and greet meeting in the community are amazing ways to learn and hear from those who want a voice to be heard. I think meeting the public on the forum level is a great way for me to reach out to the community. I am always friendly and understanding of anyone’s world, and I do know the difference of need and want. I do see my city on a personal level but will have to meet them more to get that allyship up.
NoOnce again we live in Vancouver, our candidates are almost equal and the only thing we can do is educate more people in the public that they could run for office. If the next election does not go to the ward system, we could have over 100 people running for city council and I am sure we would have equal representation in Vancouver. If we go ward we may lose this 50% goal as different communities have different priorities and an imbalance may occur in the wards. I am for keeping the system the way it is, it is the fairest, just extend the campaign time so people can get to know candidates.
13
Nycki BasraVancouver 1stCouncil
This needs to be supported and implemented by the entire municipality in a multitude of ways: awareness/education in various forms i.e.: having a week dedicated to this, festivals (similar to fusion festival in Surrey), arts and cultural initiates, training and education programs, guest speakers, but more importantly have this interwoven into all initiatives, projects and policies. I do this as much as possible in my day to day life I am constantly talking to people, i.e.: on the train, at the grocery store. When we adopt a kinder and more accepting approach we can learn and enrich our own lives and those around us. We need to be mindful of our own actions and thoughts first, therefore I am constantly checking and rechecking myself. Compassion starts with us first.
Yes, I absolutely believe in this. I was on the City of Richmond Intercultural Advisory Board (made up of all volunteers) this was some of the work we did.
Yes I agree with these policies and will work to have them adopted and implemented by council. Engage with the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations as well as the the other community groups named and have them engaged and involved with the implementation of these polices.
Have grant funds allocated to Indigenous cultures and communities. Ensure all funds are equally distributed and maybe until a balance is reached, allocate more fund to Indigenous cultures and communities.
Yes. We need to address these systematic issues of poverty and intergenerational trauma. We need to implement programs of harm reduction, treatment, and prevention. These programs to address these underlying systematic issues are necessary so that health, safety and well being are given priority. All of this needs to be done through collaboration and consultation with health care providers, community services and especially the Indigenous community. Find evidence based solutions
Yes
I do believe that we should give this some serious consideration as PR's are contributing members of Vancouver. I think we could put some parameters down, i.e.: certain # of years in Canada, doing their taxes, here, etc. I have read the task forces' recommendations on this topic and agree with them, particularly the following two:
- Create public awareness and engagement opportunities for an open dialogue on permanent residents voting rights
- Undertake consultation with the public and affected stakeholders
Yes
I would support a project that is based on best practices and evidence based solutions. We need to support people, but in a way that helps them to get out of poverty so that they can stand on their two feet, i.e.: develop skills/education so that they can become higher income earners.

Absolutely!!!! I have already and continue to do work in this area.
I have first hand experience in this area as I worked on the Missing Women Task Force and later the Missing Women Commission of Inquiry and recommended policies that have been adopted (within another police force). I will work with out Indigenous partners, the agencies that support women (i.e. WISH) and together review the current police practices/policies and advocate to change these as needed. This is an area that I am extremely passionate about and am absolutely committed to.
Better regulation of polluting industries, review the City's environmental action plans make changes as necessary and implement; working with these communities to get them moved out of these neighbourhoods and into cleaner neighbourhoods through increased affordable housing options; supporting these communities so that they can get access to education/skills so that they can thrive economically. I would also advocate for provincial and federal legislation to address this issue as needed. In all of this consultation and collaboration with the constituents.
If any safety measures need to be put into place (i.e.: extra patrols, extra officers during particular dates/time) ensure those are done by looking at stats and consulting with the Muslim Community. More education and awareness on this topic. Increasing events where collaboration and inclusivity can take place, i.e.: public festivals where all communities can partake equally. Festivals where food, culture, arts can be shared bring people together and allow for understanding and acceptance. Community consultative groups where strategies and ideas can be developed and shared. This should be done for all minority groups. Again I have experience in this area has I have created or been a part of community consultative groups that worked on this issue. I would also address the racial profiling of authorities by creating policies to deal with this and doing increased education/awareness with these authorities.
Yes
I worked with victims of domestic violence and often had clients who were immigrants/migrants and needed services but could not access them. Furthermore, these women were more susceptible to abuse and less likely to report abuse because they feared they would be deported and because they did not know their rights. We especially need to have supports and services for women and children in these types of circumstances. I agree with creating an advocate for women in these situations so that they can get essential services but also to do outreach to these women so that they are protected from violence and exploitation.
By merely being elected, I will be accomplishing greater diversity, I am a woman of colour. I am also running with several other "minority" women. I will look at all options to create more diversity and inclusivity. If elected one of the things I would like to do is take a child to council day (each council, parks, school board member gets assigned a student who gets to take part in our duties that day). Ensure that students from all demographics are represented. Other options may be mentorship programs. I will work with Women Transforming Cities and other such groups to implement initiatives to create greater diversity.
YesOur elected officials need to reflect the communities they serve. As our community is 50% women that should be reflected. As this area has been dominated by men, we need to put in policies and reforms to get this corrected.
14
Penny MussioCoalition Vancouver Council
We should be focusing on equal right for all regardless of race, religion, sex, Indegineousbstatus, sexual orientation, etc... To do otherwise is signing out a group of citizens. Everyone is equal.
We should be focusing on equality for all regardless of race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, etc...
We need to focus on equality for all not one special interest. Canada is an inclusive nation and one that should not be focusing on one group.
The Jericho lands compensate the indigenous people, giving them the largest undeveloped land track in the City. Should the federal government give the indigenous people even more is a federal question not a City question. I believe in equality for everyone not a select few. This push is reverse racism.
The federal government is working hard to support the Indigenous people in Canada and the City can support their efforts.the funding per indigenous person far exceeds any other group. We need equal treatment for all.
Yes
We should be an inclusive City where everyone is treated equally.
Yes
A minimum wage should be provided to all residents working but we need to ensure businesses can afford the determined wage rate. We need to balance the interests of workers and employers.
Absolutely, everyone should be treated equally regardless of sex, race, religion, sexual orientation, etc....
We need to treat everyone equally. The question implies racism. If racism is found in the police force, it should be corrected promptly.
I don’t believe this is a real issue. Racism in Canada in 2018 is not abrealbissue. It was in the 60’s to 80’s as I grew up then.
I believe Vancouver is safe and welcoming. This issue is a problem globally in some large cities but Vancouver and Canada is a caring and understanding culture.
No
Canada has established a rule of law and whether I or you agree with it or not, to allow non-compliance is to encourage anarchy. We can not condone lawlessness.
Everyone should be equaland the fact you are asking a question based on sex is not appropriate. I am female and believe I am equal to a man. There is no issue here.
I am a female NoThat is a sexist policy. We should be ensuring the best candidate is elected. I am a female and would be offended if women get 50% of the vote because of sex. We can win without an artificial policy!!!! We are equal to males so why put an emphasis on our sex?
15
Pete FryGREEN PARTYCouncil
I have lived in Strathcona/DTES for close to thirty years, and work in community development at Ray-Cam Community Centre. I see intersectionality everyday: gender, age, ability, injury, addiction, indigenous identity, trans identity, ethnicity, food insecurity, language, colonialism, trauma, isolation — and of course, poverty. That is my municipal context.

In my community development work: we have developed a place-based collective-impact approach (called OurPlace) where we seek to coordinate services and service providers around communities, not as clients and metrics but as people. By meeting them and their needs "where they are at" in the process we break down silos and apply an intersectional lens to the work.

I envision this sort of approach to city policy. In practice this would mean making space for people with direct lived experience and intersectional context, it would mean a new approach toward authentic, co-creative and de-politicized community engagement.
Yes, though what that looks like: as an office; offices; advisory committee; or policy framework to be applied to all departments, would have to be considered with input from staff and stakeholders.

The concept is very similar to work I am doing now with OurPlace, specifically our Youth Matters Accountability Pledge which pledges: " to support the goal of parents, children, elders, and youth to be meaningfully included in decisions about themselves and in their community. We believe that their different perspectives, identities, and experiences must be acknowledged and valued."

To date the pledge has been signed by First Nations Health Council, Representative for Children and Youth, BC Government Employees Union, Vancouver Public Library, Vancouver Police Department, Vancouver Park Board, City of Vancouver, as well as individual community centres, health and service providers.

Though I keep this separate from my partisan political efforts, I'm very proud of this work, and happy to talk further about it and our team.

Yes I agree with the policy direction, and have had an active role in this process as a resident and community advocate: not just the NEFC plan but on additional issues of viaducts removal and RePlan, Hogan's Alley, St Paul's Campus planning, Chinatown planning, the Historic Area Heights Review, and the Downtown Eastside Local Area Plan.

I do think there is quite a lot of work to be done on implementation, and a cross-cultural co-creation process to break down some of the silos that exist and if left unaddressed will only be exacerbated. I'm very committed to making sure this happens so that everyone is on the same page with shared goals and aspirations for the future of this area.
Cultural services funding and land assets should be framed in intersectional and Reconciliation and Redress contexts discussed above. As such funding for new and existing institutions should be contingent on incorporating these values in their operations and services.
Yes, as part of an overall equity-informed benefits package that considers housing as a human right, historic discriminations, and Urban Indigenous Peoples on the whole as well as unceded territories.
Yes
I am an immigrant, and growing up "not-white" in Vancouver, I've overcompensated to prove my worth as a citizen. I understand what it means to want to contribute as a new-comer and would offer my personal experience by way of example. I have a history of working across party lines and good working relationships with a number of MLAs.
Yes
Guaranteed income is a platform that drew me to the Green Party in the first place and it is supported on a federal, provincial and civic level by our parties. I've worked with Minister Shane Simpson's office on this idea as part of my work with OurPlace and Exchange Inner City (DTES Community Economic Development) on the Poverty Reduction strategy.

My work and advocacy experience have convinced me that this is a necessary foundation for lifting people out of poverty. I do recognize concerns expressed that Basic/Guaranteed Income might result in erosion of social services - and I think that is an important context to be mindful of.
Yes, I note that the VPD seem to be heading in this direction (according to recent news) — I think this presents an opportunity to develop a justice strategy, and I would be very interested in an active role in that capacity, ideally using a framework identified in (2).
Yes, and I would include community policing, community centres/neighbourhood houses, local businesses and/or BIAs, and resident-based groups alongside advocacy groups like DEWC, WISH and PACE and service providers like VCH and VNHS.
This is a fight we are undertaking right now with the Burrard Inlet Line and Centerm Expansion - which will see and increase in train and truck traffic, with attendant Nitrous Oxides and Diesel Particulate Matter exposure particularily impacting low income and often radicalized peoples in Stamps Place, along Clark Drive and Grandview Cut.

The city of Vancouver has been negligent in ensuring we are monitoring and mitigating the impacts of these and other pollutants. This is an emerging issue and subject of class action suits in Europe and elsewhere in North America where low income housing has been built by highways and railyards and resulted in marked increases in cancers, COPD, low birth weights, and other health effects.
This would be an approach best discussed with the Muslim community, but at a minimum I would suggest that the city commit to more 'fun' and engaging intercultural event funding. I am committed to making Vancouver a safe and welcoming city for Muslims and all discriminated communities.
Yes
I had previously taken this position in favour of Sanctuary City and Access Without Fear in the 2014 civic election. It was a commitment we expected would be upheld by Vision Vancouver as they had also committed to same. My position has not changed and I will continue to advocate for both.
This would hopefully result from an intersectional lens and policy as articulated above, that results in purposeful inclusionary policies in everything the city does.

Ultimately, however discrimination is a reflection of the electorate and their voting preferences: I say this in the context of a 2014 candidate a woman of South Asian decent who ran with a dominant and well funded party yet failed to get elected while everyone else on her slate was. This will be more of a challenge to eradicate, though I am hopeful that with changing city demographics and values and thoughtful policies we can bring about a change in mindset.
Examples listed elsewhere listed above. As a bigger man and off-white, I am mindful that my physical presence can be intimidating to some and as a result, I have consciously tried to 'make space' for others, as a behavioural trait since before political endeavours. I feel this does influence how I try and prioritize voices and issues of others — but I'm not perfect and recognize my inherent privilege as a relatively well-off, educated, tall man and do constantly work at keeping myself in check.
YesI'm not entirely supportive of the idea of a ward system; but yes to more women and proportional representation.
16
Raza MirzaProVancouverCouncil
As an immigrant person of colour, to me intersectionality means acknowledging that a persons thoughts, understanding of normal and even expectation in life are shaped by their own lived experiences. They only way to incorporate everyone's view is to give them equal access and opportunity to shape city's future. "Making Room", in particular, and City of Vancouver's housing policy, in general, is a clear example where city was failed to apply insertional lens. For most immigrants families and people of colour it is a cultural norm, even expectation, to take care of aging parents and retired grandparents to look after children. Therefore living in multi generation housing is very common, yet city continues to ignore that is use "RS One-Family Districts" to define most of the areas where People of Colour and immigrant live. This discriminatory zoning, and accompanying language, is used daily is self-labeled "progressive" to discriminate and displace immigrants and People of Colour today.
No, the systemic Inequality and Exclusion cannot be solved by having a token "Office" and "Department" which will only lead to inter-departmental fights and further bureaucracy. The only way to address this issue is to have historically discriminate and racialized people be part of all decision making and be provided equal access and voice is all Offices and Departments in City of Vancouver.
I do not agree with the overall Northeast False Creek plan, and it needs to be revised. As member of audience (and a speaker) at the public hearing for Northeast False Creek plan, I witnessed first hand the opposition to the plan and lack of opportunities provided to by working with the First Nations and community groups named therein to work together to come with a plan they want. At the hearing, different communities opposed each others, which is an empirical evidence the lack of effort made, and planning it backwards, by the City of Vancouver. Concerns of First Nations and community groups named therein should have been address ahead of time by bring them together to decide the future of Northeast False Creek, because they will ultimately be the neighbours living next to each other.
I support creating Culturally Sensitive neighbourhoods, acknowledged by the City of Vancouver, where local Indigenous cultures & communities have the veto power over council decisions to ensure the only path forward is the get acceptance from local Indigenous cultures & communities before and during all phrase of planning. Each Culturally Sensitive neighbourhood will get a higher share of cultural operating funds, which communities will decide where, for what and how to use these funds.
And unapologetic Yes. This shouldn't need any explanation.
No
I'm an immigrant and was a Permanent residents for 6 years. I currently have 5 members of my own household as Permanent residents, and even after living in Canada for years, in a very politically inclined household, they still express the lack of understanding needed to make an informed choice. In addition to that programs like Express Entry, various investor class programs and family unification programs grant can PR even before living in the country for day.

Even a large part of Citizenship test itself focuses on a persons command of basic tools needed to participate.
Yes
I support a pilot program, should be based of matching earned income with supplement to achieve a higher overall income.
I believe the correct matrix to use for comparison is not Vancouver’s overall population but percentage of Indigenous people and radicalized community in marginalized people. This oversimplification masks to true problems; larger percentage of profiling of marginalized people, and higher percentage of marginalization among BICoPs. First has to be dealt with re-training for staff and re-directly policing resources to supports staff, and second needs to be addressed by providing integration programs that focus of all level of needs providing safe housing to training and job placement.
VPD expense is approximately 22% of City of Vancouver's budget and a large portion of that going to community policing. We can to direct significant part of that budget from community policing to preventive measures (education and empowerment program for community, and providing all resources needed) and (when unfortunate incident do happen) to investigation.
Environmental racism is entrenched in all level of Government. Federal decision to approve Kinder Morgan and Provincial Government to continue Site C are just two major example in last year alone. Environmental racism is something which isn't even part of the most people working set of tools when apply racism lens. As part of BCNDP's committee of economy and environment, I'm already working with other groups (internal and external) including BICoP committee and Equity committee to create a framework for all level of government to adopt.
"Is he a Muslim" was among the first question asked, almost immediately, after I announced I'm seeking to be a Vancouver City Council. Even today (Oct 4) a prominent "progressive unity candidate" is asking muslim community leaders (who invited me) to meet him in "his office".
It is no different from what other groups have faced when they first arrived, the only way to address this is Anti-Muslim Racism is education and showing at largest stage that we are no different in our commitment to our cities, province and Canada. I plan to lead by example and that's why I'm running.
Yes
City should focus on providing services to people, and should not download costs and operational duties of Federal government on itself. A large majority of people eventual become legal residents in Canada, therefore policing resourcing should be spent to training for they can productively contribute to society.
The best way to increase diversity is to highlight the great work people of colour, women, and LGBTQAI2+ people already do on council. One particular policy, I will push for is to create a requirement that Mayor, Acting mayor, Deputy Mayor and Duty Councillor must all be from 4 different group of people.
N\AYesI'll push for a policy, which requires at least 50% of candidates are women to qualify for an electoral organization status on ballot.
17
Rob McDowellIndependentCouncil
Practicing intersectionality in the municipal context means holding those who are in a position of power in the City – elected officials, city staff, Police and By-Law Officers, etc, – to the highest standard in assessing every situation and planning every policy from the lens of those whose sexual identities, race, gender, religion, etc, have contributed to their continued oppression.

While ambitious, the Greenest City 2020 Action Plan does not address the systemic displacement of the Black community from Hogan’s Alley and the ongoing gentrification occurring within Chinatown – two communities who were forever altered in the making of Vancouver’s urban plan and whose displacement contributed greatly to Vancouver’s ability to promote itself as “green”. Nor does the Action Plan target reconciliation with Vancouver’s urban Indigenous population as well as the Black and Chinese communities in an effort to make Vancouver the Greenest City by 2020.

To apply an intersectional lens to this policy would be to properly consult with and to make reparation to the communities who are most marginalized by current and past policy making. The Greenest City 2020 Action Plan should in fact contain recommendations that ensure its services, spaces and policies are inclusive and equitable to all. In fact, what this Action Plan lacks is the “action” of practicing intersectionality in an effort to make Vancouver a more green city.

I would support applying the "intersectional lens" to future city policy as well as integrating it into the existing policy framework of the city.
As a two-term appointed member of the city's LGBTQ Advisory Committee, I have a unique perspective on the operations of the city and how to move policies and practises for the betterment of all Vancouverites. I would certainly support this and would ensure that the necessary resources are provided.
Yes I do. I will ensure that staff will follow and implement the policies as approved.
I would advocate for the support of local Indigenous culture and communities.
I would work to ensure that Indigenous People benefit financially from the city's growth.
Yes
I want to ensure residents feel involved and engaged in city governance. We should look a how we can maximize the feeling of belonging for all people residing in Vancouver.
Yes
I would support the most vulnerable in our society with such initiatives as the provision of a higher minimum wage and basic income levels.
I would talk to the VPD and hope to understand their rationale for carding, as I support the BC Human Rights Code and do not understand how carding might benefit the city's most vulnerable.
The LGBTQ community works with a VPD liaison to address community concerns and this model seems to have been productive. I would suggest that we could replicate this model with a focus on Indigenous women in Vancouver.
I would champion the establishment of an Advisory Committee for Racialized Communities in Vancouver, and would insist that they have input into city policies on an on-going basis.
I would reach out and listen to the Muslim community to understand how we can ensure that they feel safe and welcomed here. In the mid-90s, there was tremendous backlash against Hong Kong newcomers to Vancouver, and the community responded with the establishment of the Dragon Boat Festival as a way to bridge cultures and people. Over 20 years later, the Dragon Boat Festival is an important festival in this city and really brings people together in a positive way. I hope that we can establish a similar cultural event or festival which would be as successful in breaking down possible barriers.
While I agree we should protect vulnerable people in Vancouver regardless of their citizenship status, the issue of Immigration is wholly within the purview of the Federal government. Without the support and agreement of the Federal government department responsible for the apprehension and detention of migrants, I fear there could be misunderstandings among the people that we were hoping to protect, which may put them in danger.
As a member of the LGBTQ2S+ community, I would continue to advocate for diversity, and would fully support and encourage any interested women and people of colour to enter the political arena.
I have advocated on behalf of the LGBTQ community while on the LGBTQ Advisory Committee, including the banning of Conversion Therapy in Vancouver, creating trans policies for the city, and ensuring our Community Centres were LGBTQ2S+ friendly, as well as other issues.
YesI believe women should comprise at least 50% of candidates and elected officials in Vancouver. I am glad that 50% of the City Councillors are women currently and hope that this continues after the next election.
18
sarah blythindependantCouncil
We still have a long way to go. We should evaluate all of our policies in departments across the board and review problem departments. For example an increase in VPD carding First Nations people. Same set of rules justice and opportunities for all. Training for staff to make sure they look at everything the City does with an intersectional lens.
Yes
I will respect the work that has been done and come along side to help where I can.
The park board recently voted to name parks back to traditional names I will support ideas that come from First Nations people through reconciliation. We have lost of culture and culture saves lives! I will respect the work that has been done.
Yes. YesYes
Yes of course 100% I will do whatever I can to put an end to racial profiling.
We are in a crisis we need to ensure that First Nations woman or any woman is put in a situation where they are vulnerable. If they use drugs we need to provide them, if they need safe shelter they need to have that provided, if they need to get on a bus with no money we need to let them. We need to identify issues in school where young women might be at risk and help.
We need to use a lens on everything we do that has an negative environmental impact and make sure that we are not targeting black and indigenous communities.
I would meet with Muslim community members to see what the issues they face are and come up with a plan to address them. We must have zero tolerance for harassment and attacks.
Yes
I am a women I know its not easy. I will support and mentor women, LGBTQA12+ and people of colour.
Nothing about us with out us is an important standard when you are working with any community, asking first and coming alongside.
YesI support PR! Think we need to make change to see change!
19
Stephanie OstlerYES VancouverCouncil
Intersectionality is not just about creating fairness but it is about addressing the current systemic issues around inequality. We need to approach our policies from a place of understanding with an open mind for the real experiences of others while providing equity that allows everyone an authentic shot at success and happiness. We must also be responsible for fostering understanding in our community through our programs, our landscape and environment, and our housing policies. We have a lot to tackle but leaving it to education programs doesn't address the real issues. We need people across the spectrum coming together to help council understand how their policies impact the lives of our all citizens, how to build safe streets and accessible amenities, how providing a leg up for a marginalized person provides a big step forward for us all.
Communication has been broken at city hall for a long time. Conversation has been a top down process with city hall dictating what will be done. City hall is suppose to be about representation for the people. Their first job should be to listen and to be educated on the needs of the community. To engage with them in accessible and considerate ways not just though posters with zoning and land use initiatives. I propose we assess how all communication is done at city hall and that we bring in community leaders from all areas of our community on a regular basis to provide education, information, support and ideas. It is going to have to be done in an organized fashion with a wholistic approach so we can insure that everyone is heard by all branches of government that should be concerned.
We have an moral and ethical obligation to move forward with reconciliation. As we find ways to work together it will be a process that benefits us all. I follow the lead of our aboriginal communities and would like to move forward building on progress we have already made. The False Creek area is going to be a massive undertaking for the city and addressing cultural sensitivity and claims in the area should only serve to enhance the area for all Vancouverites.
We will be doing a core review of city hall and will be assessing the use of our tax dollars to find the most efficient use of our funds for the most benefit for us all. Change doesn't happen over night but indigenous cultural institutions are a valuable experience and asset in our city and are appreciated and experienced often by people who are not of indigenous background. They cultivate understanding and appreciation. We should be addressing each area with the sensitivity and thoroughness they deserve.
The increased value of Vancouver's land should ideally be a benefit to everyone living in this beautiful city. The fact that indigenous people are overrepresented in the homeless population is something we should all be ashamed of as a city and a country and as people. There is a clear issue with inequality and the indigenous population has specialized needs that need to be recognized. We need an immediate relief program for our homeless population utilizing public land to build no barrier and low barrier housing that is well staffed with ample resources immediately. We are sitting on a lot of wealth we can unlock and it should be going first to the areas it is needed most. Homelessness has increased over 30% in the last 3 years under a government that has been claiming to do something about it. Clearly it has not been a focus. If we made it a priority we could get everyone off the streets then we could deal with getting them the mental health services, the addiction services, and the resources they need to live the lives they, and all beings on our planet deserve. Absolutely the increase in the value of the land should benefit indigenous people.
Yes
Municipal elections have some of the lowest voter turnouts and it is a level of government that could be considered the most impactful to peoples day to day lives. We discuss making it a requirement that our citizens vote but we don't talk enough about allowing the people that already live here who want to vote the right to do so. It makes elections disproportionately represent certain communities and we should be fighting to be representation for all of our communities and citizens. I do believe that if we are going to make this change citizens are going to have to be on board. It is going to start with communication and civic engagement and I would like to encourage leaders in the PR communities to come out and have their voice be heard for what difference it would make for them and what they would be able to do for the city if they had the vote.
Yes
I am not sure basic income is the ideal solution but I do believe it is something that should be tried. I believe that if we try it we are going to learn about what the ideal solution is while having the opportunity to lift some people out of poverty. I don't see running a small pilot program as a heavy cost burden and the information it would provide would be very valuable. We have to be open to more experimentation. That is how we learn and grow.
Absolutely we should investigate racial profiling. It simply shouldn't be done. Absolutely we should be working with local communities to address their unique circumstances. Communities are good at identifying what they need to be kept safe. They are the closest to experts we have on the ground. The VPD should be working in partnership with communities. This comes back to communication. We need to rebuild communication and how it is done in this city.
We know indigenous women are exposed to more assaults than other groups in our city. We have known this for a long time. We need to address this with sensitivity and a real desire for collaboration. The people who know best what they need are the victims of these crimes. We need to turn them into advocates and leaders when they are willing to come forward to work together. We need to listen without judgment and to take every allegation seriously without bias. We need to communicate and be willing to let them take the lead and tell us how we can insure this horrible statistic is put to rest.
Lower income housing is often associated with the less desirable areas of a city. We need to clean up our pollution as a city and continue working towards being the greenest city in the world but we need to also create more affordable housing across the city. We nee to get to a 5% vacancy rating so rents can be competitive and there is more choice for people. We have to be considerate when we build low income housing like low barrier and no barrier housing that we aren't placing it in hazardous or polluted areas. We absolutely need to implement a city wide zoning plan so we can identify the areas where these populations are likely to live to insure their safety and health.
We are suffering from an illness of racism in our society. We need to heal and come together. As leaders in this city it is up to us to make sure that everyone is represented, seen, heard and safe. We need opportunities for cultures to come together to experience one another and to reduce the fear of the unknown other and we need to take a heavy hand towards hate crime no matter who they are perpetrated against. Again we need to work with the leaders of the communities to find out what they have learned works best to prevent issues before they happen. We need to fix our communication. We need city wide zoning so we can account for safe, green, open and social spaces. We need presence on the street so we can identify issues before they go too far. As a city we can be leaders on eliminating racism.
Yes
This is an ethical issue. Everyone needs to have access to basic services regardless of who they are. That is our obligation as citizens of humanity.
As a young woman running is advocating for diversity but I am still a white woman. I am part of a party, YES Vancouver, with a majority of our candidates being woman, a majority of our candidates are from minority backgrounds and a majority of our candidates are young. I feel it is through acts such as this that we support diversity in campaigns. Being a young woman I intend to run events aiming to get more young and ethnic women into politics but we can't stop there. We need to shift the conversation around the word politician. As a young woman I have received so much negativity, undirected hate and insults around my decision to become a politician and I believe until we change the conversation around being a politician why would most people want to put themselves out there and run regardless of their background.
I am a young, white, female. I don't believe that is my identity though I understand how it is perceived and how I have had advantages over others. As above I have chosen to join a party where being white is a minority and being a female is a majority. Already as a party YES Vancouver is turing the status quo on it's head.
YesI support it but I have a problem with mandating it because we live in a democracy and we can't force people to run or vote if we want to be an open and fair democracy but I do think we can be inclusive. We can redefine politics so it is more welcoming to people to serve and we can reform voting so it is more fair.
20
Tanya PazVision VancouverCouncil
An intersectional lens is a measurable, time sensitive grid to reflect the multidimensional lives of citizens. These include gender expression, ethno-cultural background and experience, income, paid and unpaid work, ability, diversity, age, sexual orientation, etc.
An intersectional lens can address systemic barriers and global crises. Intersectionality is a crucial starting point in all discussions and is grounded in social justice.
An intersectional lens must be applied to all policies, programmes, budgets, funding, governance and staffing. We will practice it by keeping it at the forefront of our decision-making, and by directing the city manager to review and update on an ongoing basis the intersectional outcomes of different departments. In regards to applying intersectionality to current policies that lack such a lens, our team is committed to this complex inclusion of lived experiences by consulting indigenous, and racialized communities to ensure that indigenous justice, and climate justice are key components of the Greenest City Action Plan. The Vision team reflects Vancouver; we appreciate intersectionality and it is at the core of our own lived experience.
Like sustainability, equity advocacy needs to be woven through every aspect of our service delivery, policy work, resource allocation, and governance frameworks. This is informed through meaningful input and empowered advisory groups and supported by senior leadership and line management in the City’s workforce. This work needs to happen in collaboration with all of our workers and labour partners and residents.

An Office of Equity and Inclusion may be the best approach to support this work, but it can’t do this alone. The Vision team is committed to taking on this challenge and building a made in Vancouver solution. We need to ensure a progressive majority at City Council, School Board and Parks Board to keep Vancouver moving forward.
(1) Yes (2) Under the leadership of a Vision-led Council, Vancouver was first in North America to become a City of Reconciliation, working in deep partnership with Indigenous peoples. It can’t stop here. We need to ensure a progressive majority at City Council, School Board and Parks Board to keep Vancouver moving forward.
Vision recognizes Vancouver’s situation on unceded Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh traditional territory. We support the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. We support Indigenous inclusion and rights recognition.

Under the Vision-led Council, the City of Vancouver committed to a government-to-government relationship, where City Council works together with First Nations Councils to achieve Indigenous human rights and recognition. We will work on this issues of fundamental fairness and justice in a sustained relationship of mutual respect and understanding with local First Nations and the Urban Indigenous community. For too long, governments have talked at Indigenous people and imposed solutions. It’s time to listen. It’s time to partner. And that is what we will do to advance these important issues.
Vision recognizes Vancouver’s situation on unceded Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh traditional territory. We support the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. We support Indigenous inclusion and rights recognition.

Under the Vision-led Council, the City of Vancouver committed to a government-to-government relationship, where City Council works together with First Nations Councils to achieve Indigenous human rights and recognition. We will work on this issues of fundamental fairness and justice in a sustained relationship of mutual respect and understanding with local First Nations and the Urban Indigenous community. For too long, governments have talked at Indigenous people and imposed solutions. It’s time to listen. It’s time to partner. And that is what we will do to advance these important issues.
Yes
Vision-led Vancouver city council unanimously agreed to request that the provincial government allow permanent residents—estimated at 60,000 in Vancouver­­--the right to vote in the Oct. 20 municipal election.

The Vision 5 is committed to increasing access and participation rights for all residents.
No
Vancouver’s Vision-led Council has championed innovative approaches to planning and co-creating strategies to reduce poverty through a dual community economic development and healthy communities approach. While income redistribution, including a basic income pilot is a concept we support, we recognize that it is outside the jurisdiction municipal government. The Vision 5 would continue to advocate for and support a provincial and federal anti-poverty plan. And we will continue to fight to make Vancouver a more caring and affordable city - an area where we demonstrated leadership by making the City of Vancouver a certified living wage employer. By doing this, we committed to paying the City’s direct employees and contracted services employees a living wage. This demonstrates Vision’s commitment to support healthy, thriving communities and help individuals and families make ends meet.
The Vision Vancouver team is concerned about the street checks policy. Vision is committed to working with the Vancouver Police Department and board to be ensure the system is fair.
1. Yes.
2. Yes.
3. Yes.
Vancouver was first in North America to become a City of Reconciliation, working in deep partnership with Indigenous peoples. In 2016, the Vision-led Council accepted the City’s review of the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action report which included a commitment by the City to 41 specific actions. The Vision Vancouver led-Council created the City’s Urban Aboriginal Peoples Advisory Committee (UAPAC) and consistently supported their advocacy, and the engagement of non-profits and local women serving organizations to shape and inform policy development and civic responses. The Vision Vancouver led-Council also formally recognized the devastating impact on family members, loved ones and the broader community of the loss of so many indigenous women. If elected to Council, the Vision 5 will continue to champion a reconciliation approach to guide VPD’s work to improve prevention and investigative practices to ensure the safety of and protect the lives of Indigenous women and girls in Vancouver.

The Vision team strongly believes that climate and housing justice are not distinct, and pave a successful path towards addressing environmental racism. Vision’s strong commitment to stand up against the Trans Mountain pipeline, and against a 7 fold increase in oil tanker traffic is directly connected to our determination to address environmental racism. Vision supports density in all neighbourhoods, and is committed to building social and supportive housing along non-arterials areas of the city. Non-arterial areas are the parts of the city less exposed to pollution, and with greater access to green space. We must ensure that low-income families who are often marginalized, racialized, and indigenous can enjoy the options of living in any neighbourhood of Vancouver with housing that matches their income levels. It was Vision Vancouver that initiated the Greenest City Action Plan and helped lead the global fight against climate change. Voting for the Vision 5 on October 20th means five solid votes on City Council for making the environment and climate action a top priority.

The Vision 5 will make make life better for Vancouver residents by fighting for:
The Broadway Subway to UBC - the Vision 5 will champion the extension of the subway from Arbutus all the way to UBC; this will make life better for commuters and reduce pollution that comes from gridlock and bumper-to-bumper traffic;
100% Renewables by 2050 - the Vision 5 will keep Vancouver on track to shift off fossil fuels and onto renewable energy sources by 2050 or sooner, by implementing Vancouver Renewable City Action Plan;
Zero Emission Buildings - the Vision 5 will ensure all new city buildings meet Passive House Standards, demonstrating leadership and promoting local investment and experience in the cutting-edge clean building technologies of the future;
An Even Greener City - the Vision 5 will double down on Vancouver’s successful Greenest City Action Plan; that means championing new green spaces and infrastructure for people, including 2,000 new community garden plots over the next four years, an expanded bike lane network to keep cyclists safe and better maintained parks.
Protecting our Coast - the Vision 5 will stand strong against the Trans Mountain Expansion Project, the seven-fold increase in tanker traffic, and the risk of a catastrophic diluted bitumen oil spill in our coastal waters. In our opposition to the Trans Mountain expansion project we are determined in our position to stand in solidarity with indigenous communities whose land rights, and titles are being once again ignored by colonial practices and systems.
Hate has no place in the City of Vancouver. Vision Vancouver is committed to combating racism and extremism. In a year of tragedies and extremism, Vancouverites have stood in solidarity. But diverse communities affected by these acts have endured tragedy far too many times. We know that If we hesitate to call out hatred, it will persist and grow. We can't let that happen.

It was the Vision-led Council that launched Vancouver’s 101 Days of Action Against Discrimination and held community meetings to challenge Franklin Graham’s anti-LGTBQ2+ statements.
Acts of hate and violence must always be met with strong resistance. We unequivocally reject racism, bigotry, and discrimination as well as those who spread it in our city. Here in Vancouver, people of all ages and backgrounds speaking out forcefully against racism and bigotry, and committing to standing strong, vigilant, and peaceful in the face of ignorance and fear. This the Vancouver we know and love.

The Vision 5 stands in solidarity with anti-racism protesters, and encourages peaceful efforts to call out white supremacy, hate, and racist speech whenever they take place. Vancouver is not immune to racism. It is imperative that we are vigilant with a passionate, non-violent defence of our values to ensure our city remains inclusive, welcoming, and diverse. Vision Vancouver will always stand with you in speaking out against racism, bigotry, homophobia and transphobia, Islamophobia, anti-Semitism, and other discrimination.
Yes
Vision Vancouver is committed to making sure Vancouver does its part to ensure inclusion of undocumented people, and folks with precarious immigration status. We are committed to making sure Vancouver is a safe and inclusive city for all, along the lines of the ‘access to services without fear’ policies in Toronto, Hamilton, and the more than 100 ‘Sanctuary Cities’ in the U.S.
At its annual general meeting in January 2018, Vision Vancouver passed the Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Policy committing the party to take action in all three areas. Following up on this policy, the Vision nomination team made deliberate outreach efforts to recruit many diverse candidates to our nomination race. This effort was successful and resulted in the Vision membership electing a gender balanced slate that reflects incredible diversity.
NoA referendum in 2004 decisively rejected wards and while Vision has a diversity of views among its leadership, there are no plans to revisit the issue. If there is a broad public call for change, we would do our best to respond -- in the meantime we are working on a number of fronts to strengthen women’s voices. We look forward to the outcomes of the upcoming referendum on proportional representation.
21
Taqdir Kaur BhandalIndependentCouncilI am an intersectional feminist researcher, so I could go on for about 100 pages about what intersectionality means in a municipal context. I am so happy to see this survey taking place, and I hope that other candidates are at least stimulated to think about applying a decolonial, intersectional lens to their approach to decision making.

Intersectionality at the municipal to me means
- Increased representation of Black, Indigenous and people of colour (BIPOC) communities in municipal politics (one main driver for why I am running is that I am hoping to be the first South Asian woman ever elected to Vancouver city council).
- Increase representation of people with diverse genders, sex, ages, incomes, sexualities, abilities, and immigration status.
- Revitalization and growth of landmarks of ethnocultural diversity in Vancouver such as the Punjabi Market, Chinatown, Hogan’s Alley, Little Saigon, Japantown, etc.
- Recognizing and redressing the health and social inequities that are products of Canadian settler-colonialism.
- Drawing on Indigenous and Southern/Eastern worldviews to promote the health of the Earth
100% yes. However, I would like to the Office of Equity and Inclusion at City Hall to not fall into the problematic trapping of tokenizing BIPOC communities. I think all of the points outlined in the Reconciliation and Cultural Redress chapter are important. I am assuming that the report writers drew on community advice and guidelines to put the document together. I would like the policies to go a few steps further and consider additional radical approaches to reconciliation. For example:
- The school board and council work together to build a new school entering Indigenous and Southern/Eastern knowledges in NEFC area.
- Council could look into repatriating lands to the Coast Salish First Nations to allow self-determination in an urban city. At the very least, the city can lease the land for 1$/year as it does with other developers.
- Support the establishment of a Hogan’s Alley Business Improvement Association
- Increase purpose-built, non-market rentals in the area.
- Consult community and match the ethno-culturally diverse architectural and artistic style of the neighbourhood (e.g. building in Hogan’s Alley, draw on and pay local Black and/or African diasporic artists for design work; building in Jericho lands, draw on and pay Indigenous artists for design work, etc.).
- Increase representation of Indigenous communities, culture, and languages in municipal politics (e.g. youth leadership programs funded by city hall).
- My goal in the first 6 months of office will be to have a clear idea of what municipal policies can feasibly contribute to zero waste practices, and to support a decrease in dependance on burning carbon.
- Repatriate land back to the Coast Salish First Nations in Vancouver.
- Work with Parks Board to take decolonial approach to parks and public spaces (e.g. consider intersection of sleeping on the street, colonization, and by-law enforcement).
- Support the growth of urban agriculture by leasing land to urban farms run and/or employing Indigenous communities.
Yes
YesThe motion to allow permanent residents to vote was passed by Vancouver city council in mid-2018, and sent for further review at the provincial government level. Permanent residents are required to pay taxes, have the right to live, work, or study anywhere in Canada, are eligible to receive social benefits including health-care coverage, and are protected under Canadian law and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. They should have a right to vote in towns and cities that they work, play, and live. Council will have to work closely with the province (MLAs and Dept of Municipal Affairs) to make a convincing argument. Most likely, a provincial referendum would have to be passed. I can only guess the amount of racism, and misinformation about permanent residency that advocates will have to overcome. YesAll public health research points to the direct social and economic benefits of a basic income pilot project. Drawing on the experiences from other cities and provinces, council will have to work with the provincial government to implement a similar project.
Yes to all of the above. Some of my main platform agenda items include:
- Greater oversight over the Vancouver Police Board and more education for public safety officials. Action is needed for Vancouver’s Indigenous, and people of colour communities based on recent and historical reports on “carding” and representation in prisons.
- Add additional outcome measures to Vancouver Police Dept. in addition to response time, including: anti-oppression training, relationship building with marginalized communities, presence and exposure of weapons in community spaces, movement away from training partnerships in the USA.
- Examination and re-distribution of public safety funds for the purposes of greater professional development. 
- Mental health support teams on public buses that service Downtown Eastside residents, including a street medic, therapy dog, and trained de-escalator
- Draw on landmark reports such as: https://bccla.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/2007-BCCLA-Report-Racial-Profiling.pdf
- Increase in financial and policy support for street medics and mobile health units.
- Increase the number of 24 hour femme, non-binary, and two-spirit shelters in the city
- Draw on evidence from leading researchers on how to incorporate harm reduction, trauma- and violence informed care, Indigenous cultural safety, contextually-tailored care, gender transformative health promotion, and other equity-oriented approaches to municipal policies
- Creation of more peer health navigator programs for both primary and other forms of health care that bridge allopathic and non-allopathic forms of prevention, healing, and recovery
- Initiating steps towards the decriminalization of sex work and HIV non-disclosure, with evidence taken from the feminist non-profits and health researchers working in these areas
- Open dialogue and meaningful inclusion of feminist, non-profits in health care, non-health care, and funding related decision-making by health authorities and other governmental bodies such as BC housing and the Ministry of Child and Family Development
- Increase in the number of portable housing subsidies and the allocation of designated social justice real estate, to broaden the scope of housing options to which women have access.
- Support local health authorities to model successful programs in other provinces, such as the Ontario framework for laboring and birthing centers or the Winnipeg model of having post-sexual assault care, STI testing, abortions, and other reproductive and sexual health services all in one place. It should be noted that some non-profit organizations put forth a recommendation at a recent Women Transforming Cities meeting to turn the Vancouver Art Gallery space into such a place for women in Vancouver.
- As stated above, my goal in the first 6 months of office will be to have a clear idea of what municipal policies can feasibly contribute to zero waste practices, and to support a decrease in dependance on burning carbon.
- On a small scale, I would like to pass by-law to ban the ban on visible clotheslines in the entire city.  
- Support the work of the Cultural Communities Advisory Committee. For example, they are going to be hosting the first Islamic History Month in October 2018 at the Vancouver Public Library
- Increase signage in diverse languages including Arabic
- Increase access to city services in diverse languages
- Public education campaigns to promote intra and inter cultural dialogue and community building
YesAs a councillor, I plan to ensure the practice of Access Without Fear policies to allow people to use public services without disclosing their relationship to settler-colonial government of Canada.- By running and getting elected! I hope to be the first South Asian woman ever elected to city council. In my campaign work I am also uplifting the voices of other diverse candidates as well. I am a woman of colour Yes- Yes. We need more divine feminine power in politics. We don’t need to look far to see the violence enacted by some entitled, cis-male politicians. I will be voting yes in the BC proportional representation referendum. I hope this will open space for conversations on how to change the at-large system in Vancouver.
22
Wade GrantIndependantCouncil
I believe in embracing diversity. It is not just a slogan to me. My heritage is one of generations of leaders in his community. I am a proud descendant of new Canadians who immigrated from both Europe and China many years ago. This diverse heritage and a love for the environment give him a unique perspective on how we can come together to build a sustainable Vancouver.
I believe we should govern that way in all circumstances.
As an indigenous leader I would take a leadership role in bring all parties together. I have fostered relationships amongst many indigenous groups over my career. I would be happy to continue this as a city councilor.
As a leader in a Local First Nation I have helped mend relationships throughout my career. I would be honored to continue to do so.
I have worked my whole career to advance the socio economic well being and my community and the other indigenous communities in BC. I have many ideas including land use and housing. Sustainability is an important item for my people. I would be honoured to continue this economic work as a city councilor.
Yes
I would advocate for this as an independent.
YesPilot projects can be fruitful.
I would work with the VPD as an indigenous community leader to help bridge gaps.
The Musqueam have a heart to help all vulnerable indigenous in Vancouver and I would advocate for them.
As an independent I would stand up for marginalized communities.
I was the co chair for city wide dialogues between indigenous and new Canadians and recognized the importance of fostering these relationships as early as possible.
Yes
we should be an open and safe community.
If I'm elected I would be the first Indigenous from the Local First Nations on city council. I am also part Chinese. I would work to embrace more diversity throughout the city.
My mom was chief of the Musqueam and I have learned to ally with women leaders.
NoI believe we should vote on the best candidates and that means minorities and women should have an equal playing field.
Loading...
Main menu