Updates to Benefits Fact Sheet for 2019
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Instructions: Review the current fact sheet, and plug in any new research since spring 2017 when we last did an update. Also feel free to plug in any research that should already have been included. Include a summary description, a link, and then tag relevant categories.Current fact sheet: http://www.farmtoschool.org/Resources/BenefitsFactSheet.pdf
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DescriptionLinkeconomic development - job creation and economic activityeconomic development - farmer and producer incomepublic health - student nutrition behaviorspublic health - knowledge, attitudes, and accesseducation - student engagement and academic achievementeducation - educator and parent engagementenvironment - food wasteenvironment - sustainbility community engagementNOTES - list any specific impacts from the research, as outlined on page 4 of the fact sheet (F&V consumption, physical activity, health, food choice, academic achievement, behavior, meal participation, meal cost, and so on)
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The Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF) recommends school-based gardening interventions in combination with nutrition education to increase children’s vegetable consumption. After conducting a systematic review of 14 studies that examined gardening interventions with children ages 2 - 18 years between January 2005 - October 2015, CPSTF found sufficient evidence that gardening and nutrition education has a positive effect on kids.https://www.thecommunityguide.org/task-force/community-preventive-services-task-force-membersXF&V consumption
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Poster Abstract ‘‘This is Way Better than Cheetos!’’: Changing Children’s Eating Behavior Through Garden and Kitchen-Based Nutrition Education. Diana Bergman, MS, diana@olivewoodgardens.org, Olivewood Gardens and Learning Center, 2525 North Avenue, National City, CA 91950; C. Barry. Conclusions and Implications: Repeated participation in hands-on gardening and cooking experiences increases children’s consumption of healthier foods. Developing familiarity with fruits and vegetables encourages children to become ‘‘adventurous’’ eaters.Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior Volume 48, Number 7S, 2016XF&V consumption
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nutrition gardening interventions increase veg consumptionhttps://www.thecommunityguide.org/findings/nutrition-gardening-interventions-increase-vegetable-consumption-among-childrenXF&V consumption
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farmer perspectives on impacts of F2Shttps://www.foodsystemsjournal.org/index.php/fsj/article/view/569X
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A Plate Waste Evaluation of Farm to School Programhttps://www.jneb.org/article/S1499-4046(17)30954-5/fulltext?utm_campaign=STMJ_76546_CALLP_HYBCON&utm_medium=email&utm_dgroup=CALLP_HYBCON&utm_acid=18829322&SIS_ID=0&dgcid=STMJ_76546_CALLP_HYBCON&CMX_ID=&utm_in=PDM306098&utm_source=AC_30XFruit and Vegetable consumption - The NSLP participants at the treatment schools consumed, on average, 0.061 (P = .002) more servings of vegetables and 0.055 (P = .05) more servings of fruit after implementation of the FTS Program.
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Farm to School programs: is there a connection to the implementation of wellness policies at the elementary school building level?see email sent to Helen on 8/9/18
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http://www.farmtoschool.org/Resources/EconomicImpactReport.pdf
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Sheet1
Notes
 
 
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