Regional Project Needs (Responses)
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZAAABACADAEAFAGAHAIAJAKALAMANAOAPAQARASATAUAVAWAXAYAZ
1
TimestampProject NameOrganizationPrimary Contact NameProject Type
Would you like this project to be available for IRWMP-specific funding?
Project Status
County where project will be implemented
Grant Funding AskPrimary Project BinSecondary Project Bin
Does your project benefit a DAC?
What community or communities will benefit as a result of your project?
Watersheds where project will be implemented
If your project involves groundwater, please indicate which Bulletin 118 groundwater basin(s) it affects?
Rank your grant experience level
Estimated Project Duration (in Months)
Total Match Funding Available
Does your project address Objective #1 (Water Supply)?
Does you project address Objective #2 (Water Quality)?
Does your project address Objective #3 (Stewardship)?
Does your project address Objective #4 (Infrastructure)?
Does your project address Objective #5 (Climate Change) ? *
Does your project address objective #6 (DACs)?
Does your project address Objective #7 (Stormwater/Flood)?
Does your project address Objective #8 (Groundwater)?
Project Description
2
2/26/2015 10:01:39Lower Owens River Conveyance Project
Inyo County Water Department
Bob HarringtonPlanningYesPlanning StageInyo$125,000Water Quality
Environmental Stewardship
Yes
Aberdeen, Alabama Hills, Big Pine, Big Pine Paiute Tribe, Bishop, Bishop Paiute Tribe, Fort Independence Tribe, Independence, Keeler, Lone Pine, Lone Pine Paiute-Shoshone Reservation
OwensOwens Valley515$125,000YesYesYesYesYesYesNoYes
Inyo County seeks grant funding to perform a feasibility study for improved flow conveyance through the “Islands” area of the Lower Owens River Project (LORP). Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) will likely match funds received by the County.

The LORP is a large-scale habitat restoration project that is implemented jointly by Inyo county and LADWP. The centerpiece of the project is the restoration of 62 miles of the Lower Owens River (LOR) by providing flows to enhance fish, wetland, and riparian habitats.

The majority of the river had been dry since 1913 when the river was diverted from its bed and into the Los Angeles Aqueduct. A flow of 40 cfs was established and maintained throughout the Lower Owens River beginning in December 2006.

The LORP is an adaptive management project that has been monitored since 2007. In general the project is meeting goals; however, water quality has become an issue. The flow regime specified for the project has in places fostered the development of channel blockages and caused water spreading. As a result, sediments and muck have accumulated in the river bed, and when this material is stirred up and entrained during seasonal habitat flows, water quality, principally dissolved oxygen (DO), declines. Low DO has led to fish stress and fish kills in the river.

The LOR is naturally a low gradient system, with a river-mile to linear-mile relationship of 2:1. One area in particular, the 450 acre “Islands,” located 4.5 miles north of Lone Pine, CA, has backed up the river and created an enlarging wetland monoculture of emergent vegetation. There is no distinct channel through the Islands and the force and volume of the season habitat flow is attenuated for 25 miles downriver. It’s this 25 mile stretch where water quality is most reduced by raising flows. This is likely in part because of the Islands influence; the organic load contributed by acres of dying and decaying plant material and diminished flows that are not adequate to scour sediments.

Project consultants believe that channelizing flows through the Islands will provide a more efficient flow and improve downriver water quality. They have encouraged Inyo County and the LADWP to conduct a feasibility study to determine if a channel cleared through the islands would benefit the project. A grant from CA DWR would be used to commission the study.
3
3/17/2015 15:29:37Bishop Paiute Fire Hydrant ProjectBishop Paiute TribeLinda AkyuzImplementationYesPlanning StageInyo287733Water SupplyYesBishop Paiute TribeOwens4240NoNoNoYesNoYesNoNo
The Bishop Paiute Reservation currently has 61 working fire hydrants, and needs at least 56 more in order to provide hydrants in compliance with NFPA guidelines and to ensure our residents' safety. We have 16 of those being installed currently but need to fund the purchase and installation of at least 40 more:

All public fire hydrants shall be installed at street intersections where possible. Public hydrant spacing shall be measured along vehicle access routes.

In areas zoned for single-family residential use, public hydrants shall be spaced no more than 600 feet apart. If dead-end streets, or driveways, singly or in combination, are over 300 feet long, additional public hydrants shall be installed so that the public hydrant spacing is not over 600 feet.

In areas other than single-family residential, public fire hydrants shall be spaced an average of 300 feet apart. If dead-end streets or driveways, singly or in combination, are over 150 feet long, additional public hydrants shall be installed so that the public hydrant spacing is not over 300 feet.
4
3/30/2015 14:52:02Antelope Valley "A"WRAMP FoundationBruce WoodworthImplementationYesPlanning StageMono140000Water Quality
Environmental Stewardship
YesColeville, Topaz, WalkerWest WalkerAntelope Valley43028000YesYesYesYesYesNoNoYes
The Antelope Valley of Mono County is amidst the high desert beauty of the Eastern Sierras. The Valley surrounds the communities of Coleville, Walker and Topaz in northernmost portion of the county.

Yet water is drought-scarce, the National Fish & Wildlife Foundation is seeking County approval to export water to Nevada, groundwater is sinking in the Valley, the wreckage of the 1997 Flood remains evident in the West Walker River sedimentation (Otis Bay study, 2015) affecting the endangered Cutthroat trout and the once storied Valley sport fishery and the tourist-dependent local economy.

Restoration of the wealth of the area needs data and coordination.

Proposed:

Local Water District. Restoring the moribund Antelope Valley Water District, working through LAFCO to enlarge its boundaries to include the scientifically-linked, full West Walker watershed, and petitioning both agencies to embrace groundwater as within the District’s purview.

Regulatory Changes. Prepare and submit regulatory wording for approval by Mono County to facilitate conjunctive water use, sale of water dedications for in-stream use, water banking and payment for ecosystem services such as clean water trading.

Additionally establish cooperative or assessment district arrangements between lodging/service and agricultural interests to benefit from developed fishing access. This will strongly invest the business economy in the health of the fishery.

Public Land Exchanges. Work with the Bureau of Land Management and the Humbolt-Toiyabe national forest to recognize non-serving public land parcels in the Antelope Valley to exchange with land owners for public fee or easement rights on West Walker River frontage.

Acquiring Data.
1. Commissioned water quality/quantity monitoring. (Monitoring in formats used by SWRCB (CEDEN for surface water).
2. Compile data and/or arrange for additive groundwater measuring through well water elevation tracking and other feasible technology.
3. Hydrology studies in general and for ground and surface water interface and groundwater storage potential in particular.
5
3/30/2015 15:02:26Antelope Valley "B"WRAMP FoundationBruce WoodworthPlanningYesPlanning StageMono120000
Environmental Stewardship
Water QualityYesColeville, Topaz, WalkerWest WalkerAntelope Valley42424000NoYesYesYesYesNoNoYes
The Antelope Valley of Mono County is amidst the high desert beauty of the Eastern Sierras. The Valley surrounds the communities of Coleville, Walker and Topaz in northernmost portion of the county.

Yet water is drought-scarce, the National Fish & Wildlife Foundation is seeking County approval to export water to Nevada, groundwater is sinking in the Valley, the wreckage of the 1997 Flood remains evident in the West Walker River sedimentation (Otis Bay study, 2015) affecting the endangered Cutthroat trout and the once storied Valley sport fishery and the tourist-dependent local economy.

Restoration of the wealth of the area needs design vision and coordination.

Proposed:

Riverine Amelioration. Tested river amelioration strategies can be put to work immediately.

• fish laddering.
• screening against fish entrainment in the irrigation ditch intakes on the West Walker River.
• establish legal cooperative or assessment district arrangements between lodging/service and agricultural interests to benefit in developing fishing access facilities. This will strongly invest the business economy in the health of the fishery.
• critical bank stabilization made practical by new state streamlined permitting.
• habitat restoration for the fishery by select river border plantings and recovery of existing oxbow fish refuges through easements when necessary.
• facilitate public lands exchange of current non-servicing properties for public riverine fee land or easements.
• assure minimum in-stream flow agreements with the Antelope Valley Mutual Water District (AVMWD) during vulnerable biotic seasons, targeting specific life stages for fish and other wildlife (Water Transaction study, 2014 Mono Co. RCD.
• Seek county regulatory revision to facilitate conjunctive water use, sale of dedications of in-stream use and water banking.
6
3/30/2015 15:11:24Antelope Valley "C"WRAMP FoundationBruce WoodworthImplementationYesPlanning StageInyo400000Stormwater/Flood
Environmental Stewardship
YesColeville, Topaz, WalkerWest WalkerAntelope Valley43640000YesYesYesYesNoNoYesYes
The Antelope Valley of Mono County is amidst the high desert beauty of the Eastern Sierras. The Valley surrounds the communities of Coleville, Walker and Topaz in northernmost portion of the county.

Yet water is drought-scarce, the National Fish & Wildlife Foundation is seeking County approval to export water to Nevada, groundwater is sinking in the Valley, the wreckage of the 1997 Flood remains evident in the West Walker River sedimentation affecting the endangered Cutthroat trout and the once storied Valley sport fishery and the tourist-dependent local economy.

Restoration of the wealth of the area needs design vision and coordination.

Proposed:

Flood Control. Interlaced structures for flood calming by pre-determined flood diversions which will also benefit groundwater recharge.

The Antelope Valley is veined with working ditches that historically extend back a century, but two of the agricultural ditches deliver the preponderance of the irrigation water on which the Valley relies.

• By a slight repositioning and redesign, the Main Canal ditch diversion will accommodate a fishery on an oxbow in the immediate upstream reach.

• Redesigning and replacing the agricultural diversion dam at the Big Slough ditch will assure its now tenuous ability to reliably provide the Valley’s most essential irrigation artery.

Design and construction of both these diversion facilities will also serve to redirect flood waters to avoid direct damage in Walker and Coleville and the serious sedimentation damage (Otis Bay study, 2015) that continues as a legacy of the 1997 flood.

The existing irrigation ditch system will course the flood waters to easement-permitted settlement ponds. The sediment will remain in the ponds as the waters slow and those waters can be sent further along the ditch system to surface water impounds or to locations which studies will indicate as having maximal opportunity for water table recharge.

Wildlife Habitat.
• Greater Sage Grouse habitat facilitated by NRCS, the mutual water district and land trust easements providing for targeted seasonal habitat irrigation.
• Migratory bird benefits from basins for sediment isolation and water infiltration.
7
3/31/2015 9:47:02Bartell Parcel Recycled Water Regreening Demonstration ProjectInyo CountyLarry FreilichImplementationYesPlanning StageInyo294250Water Supply
Environmental Stewardship
Yes
Big Pine, Big Pine Paiute Tribe
Owens5240YesYesYesYesYesYesNoYes
The County of Inyo proposes to use recycled water to provide surface irrigation to a 5.5 acre parcel on Main Street in Pine, CA. The Bartell parcel, has frontage on U.S. Highway 395, and is bordered on three sides by the Big Pine Paiute Reservation and on one side by the Big Pine Elementary and High School.

This would be the first recycled water project in all of Inyo County. Because of its prominent location, this pilot project would serve as a highly visible demonstration project. Partners would likely include City of Los Angeles, Department of Water and Power (LADWP).

Treated waste water from the Big Pine Community Service District’s aeration peculation ponds would provide up to three acre feet of water, per year, for irrigation for pasture, orchard, or other crop that does not come in contact with the recycled water.

The site is owned by LADWP. It was once productive pastureland, but is currently not supplied any water. The parcel is now an abandoned dirt field in the center of Big Pine, CA; it’s an eyesore and dust hazard in this charming rural tourist town.

Now, a considerable quantity of treated water from the waste ponds is simply left to evaporate. This project would put this water to good use, both to provide green cover, and provide additional recharge of local groundwater. No private or public wells are within 150 feet of the proposed project.

Funding would be used to 1) complete a waste water engineering study to assure a level of disinfection that meets CDPH standards; 2) design and build a disinfection system and distribution system to convey recycled water from the waste treatment ponds to the Bartell Parcel; 3) develop efficient onsite irrigation and plant a crop on the parcel; 4) design and install interpretive signage promoting the concept of using recycled water.
8
3/31/2015 9:47:13Bartell Parcel Recycled Water Regreening Demonstration ProjectInyo CountyLarry FreilichImplementationYesPlanning StageInyo294250Water Supply
Environmental Stewardship
Yes
Big Pine, Big Pine Paiute Tribe
Owens5240YesYesYesYesYesYesNoYes
The County of Inyo proposes to use recycled water to provide surface irrigation to a 5.5 acre parcel on Main Street in Pine, CA. The Bartell parcel, has frontage on U.S. Highway 395, and is bordered on three sides by the Big Pine Paiute Reservation and on one side by the Big Pine Elementary and High School.

This would be the first recycled water project in all of Inyo County. Because of its prominent location, this pilot project would serve as a highly visible demonstration project. Partners would likely include City of Los Angeles, Department of Water and Power (LADWP).

Treated waste water from the Big Pine Community Service District’s aeration peculation ponds would provide up to three acre feet of water, per year, for irrigation for pasture, orchard, or other crop that does not come in contact with the recycled water.

The site is owned by LADWP. It was once productive pastureland, but is currently not supplied any water. The parcel is now an abandoned dirt field in the center of Big Pine, CA; it’s an eyesore and dust hazard in this charming rural tourist town.

Now, a considerable quantity of treated water from the waste ponds is simply left to evaporate. This project would put this water to good use, both to provide green cover, and provide additional recharge of local groundwater. No private or public wells are within 150 feet of the proposed project.

Funding would be used to 1) complete a waste water engineering study to assure a level of disinfection that meets CDPH standards; 2) design and build a disinfection system and distribution system to convey recycled water from the waste treatment ponds to the Bartell Parcel; 3) develop efficient onsite irrigation and plant a crop on the parcel; 4) design and install interpretive signage promoting the concept of using recycled water.
9
3/31/2015 11:27:11Bishop Paiute Tribe Irrigation Water Conservation PlanBishop Paiute TribeBryanna VaughanPlanningYesPlanning StageInyo21,000Climate ChangeWater SupplyYesBishop Paiute TribeOwens430YesNoYesYesYesYesYesNo
Water Conservation Studies performed by a California Civil Engineer
A. Irrigation Water Conservation Plan – A complete conservation plan for the existing irrigation system on the Bishop Paiute Reservation. Includes:
i. Overall Assessment of Existing System
ii. Future Demand and Needs Analysis
iii. Project Development for Irrigation Projects
a. Rehabilitation of Existing High Volume Flood Irrigation System;
b. New Low-Volume Irrigation System Utilizing Yard Hydrants: Cost Benefit and Needs Analysis; Conceptual-Level Drawings; Preliminary Engineering Analysis; Detailed Cost Estimates for a and b
10
3/31/2015 11:49:14BIshop Paiute Tribe Domestic Water Conservation PlanBishop Paiute TribeBryanna VaughanPlanningYesPlanning StageInyo125000Water Supply
Environmental Stewardship
YesBishop Paiute TribeOwens4120YesNoYesYesYesYesNoNo
Domestic Water Conservation Plan – A complete conservation plan for the existing domestic water system on the Bishop Paiute Reservation. Includes:
i. Overall Assessment of Existing System
ii. Future Demand and Needs Analysis
iii. Analysis of Potential Water Savings
iv. Rate Structure Analysis = Complete Domestic Water Rate Study
v. Project Development for Domestic Water Conservation Projects
a. Water Meter Replacement and Monitoring Program; b. Water Meter Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) System Upgrades: Cost Benefit and Needs Analysis; Conceptual-Level Drawings; Preliminary Engineering Analysis; Detailed Cost Estimates for a and b
c. Water System Leak Survey: Preparation of Leak Survey Plan; Ultrasonic Testing of the Water Mains and Services; Follow-up Analysis and Testing after Initial Survey; Detailed Cost Estimates
d. Water Fixture Replacement Program: Analysis of Water Savings; Preparation of Replacement Program Plan ; Detailed Cost Estimates
e. Energy Conservation for Domestic Water System (Solar Energy for Three Well Pumps): Cost Benefit and Needs Analysis; Conceptual-Level Drawings; Preliminary Engineering Analysis; Detailed Cost Estimates
11
3/31/2015 11:49:37Indian Wells Valley "Cash for Grass" Program
Indian Wells Valley Water District
Jennifer KeepImplementationYesActiveKern50000Water SupplyGroundwaterNoRidgecrestIndian WellsIndian Wells Valley5350000YesNoNoNoNoNoNoYes
With extended local drought conditions and dependency on groundwater as the sole source in the Indian Wells Valley, a “Cash For Grass” program should be expected to achieve measurable results within some reasonable time period. According to a five-year, multi-million-dollar study conducted by the Southern Nevada Water Authority, grass in a similar desert environment to ours requires 73 gallons of water per square foot per year to thrive while xeriscape only needs 17 gallons per square foot – a significant savings. With the average conversion in that study at approximately 1,000 square feet, each completed retrofit would save about 56,000 gallons of water annually – and would continue to do so as long as the conversion remained in place. A program of this nature requires adequate financial incentive to produce enough living turf conversion to substantially reduce water usage in the Indian Wells Valley. We believe that, for our purposes, an attractive buy-back price per square foot of turf would be $1.00 for up to 2,000 square feet. Research compiled by Mojave Water Agency and the Southern Nevada Water Authority suggests that there is a significant “bandwagon effect” resulting in increased awareness and conversion to more water efficient landscaping.
12
3/31/2015 16:50:09Bishop Paiute Tribe Wastewater PLanBishop Paiute TribeBryanna VaughanPlanningYesPlanning StageInyo21,000WastewaterYesBishop Paiute TribeOwensOwens Valley490NoYesNoYesNoYesNoNo
Wastewater Conservation Plan – A complete conservation plan for the existing wastewater system on the Bishop Paiute Reservation. Includes:
i. Overall Assessment of Existing System
ii. Future Demand and Needs Analysis
iii. Analysis of Potential Water Savings
a. Rate Structure Analysis/Complete Wastewater Rate Study
b. Project Development for Domestic Water Conservation Projects
1. Leak, Infiltration and Flow Survey: Preparation of Leak and Infiltration Measuring Plan; Preparation of Flow Monitoring Plan; Ultrasonic Testing of the Water Mains and Services; Follow-up Analysis and Testing after Initial Survey; Analysis of Potential Water Savings; Detailed Cost Estimates
2. Manhole and Sewer Main Survey and Rehabilitation Plan: Preparation of Survey and Rehabilitation Plan; Detailed Cost Estimates
13
3/31/2015 17:01:40Bishop Paiute Tribe Increase Water Pressure for Fire HydrantsBishop Paiute TribeBryanna VaughanImplementationYesPlanning StageInyo220,312DACWater SupplyYesBishop Paiute TribeOwens4120YesNoNoYesNoYesNoNo
For current fire hydrants and for the proposed additional 56 fire hydrants needed on the Reservation (see Bishop Paiute Tribe Fire Hydrant proposal), approximately 8,000 linear feet of 4-inch water line must be replaced with 6-inch water line in order to provide adequate pressure for optimal hydrant output. Project includes 8,000 feet of 6" line, labor , gate valves, saddles, a meter, corporation stops, and connecting pipe.
14
4/2/2015 8:10:19Inyo/Mono Watersheds Invasive Weed Control ProjectInyo CountyNathan ReadeImplementationYesShovel-readyInyo305000
Environmental Stewardship
Water SupplyYes
Big Pine, Big Pine Paiute Tribe, Bishop, Bishop Paiute Tribe, Bridgeport, Bridgeport Indian Colony, Coleville, Independence, Laws, Lone Pine, Topaz, Walker
East Walker, Owens, West Walker
42480000YesYesYesNoNoNoYesYes
This project aims to control and eradicate invasive weeds including Perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium), Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense), Spotted knapweed (Centaurea maculosa), Yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis), Scotch thistle (Onopordum acanthium), and Russian knapweed (Acroptilon repens) that threaten the Owens, East Walker, and West Walker River watersheds. This biological pollution inflicts many adverse effects on watersheds including:

• Water issues such as increased erosion leading to increased sedimentation, lowered quality and decreased flood control capacity
• Native habitat issues such as lowered species diversity, damaged native plant communities and compromised wildlife habitat
• Working landscape impacts such as lowered property values and a threatened local agricultural economy
• Fire issues including changes in fire regimes and increased fire severity
• Air quality issues such as increased dust events leading to public health impacts
• Recreation impacts such as impediments to access, and aesthetic degradation.

This project will employ an integrated pest control approach and best management practices to control invasive plant species for the benefit of our local population, recreationalists, those receiving water exports from Inyo and Mono counties, and the local native plant and wildlife communities. The Eastern Sierra Weed Management Area (ESWMA) group will collaborate with and contribute to this project. ESWMA includes:

• Inyo and Mono Counties Agricultural Commissioner’s Office
• Inyo County Water Department
• Inyo National Forest
• Humboldt - Toiyabe National Forest
• Bureau of Land Management Bishop Field Office
• Bureau of Land Management California Desert District
• Los Angeles Department of Water and Power
• California State Parks
• California Department of Food and Agriculture
• California Department of Transportation District 9
• CalFire
• Natural Resource Conservation Service
• Inyo/Mono Resource Conservation District
• Inyo/Mono Cattleman’s Association
• Bishop Paiute Tribe
15
4/2/2015 11:07:30June Lake Water Treament - Ion Exchange for Uranium RemovalJune Lake PUDRichard CiauriImplementationYesPlanning StageMono186600Water QualityWater SupplyNoJune LakeMono11546100YesYesYesYesYesNoNoYes
The June Lake Public Utility District is confronted with a Water Quality issue as it relates to the uranium content in June Lake, which is an approved surface water source for the District. Over the last 3 years we have been experiencing higher uranium test results that have now exceeded what the State allows. We believe this is a result of reduced lake level due to the ongoing drought conditions and decomposing natural materials within the lake that increases uranium levels. We have attempted to use an alternative water source in blending the Snow Creek water plant and the June Lake water plant to reduce the uranium content in the blended waters. This has worked for the short term, however if the Snow Creek plant is offline for any reason we would be forced to use the June Lake water plant with uranium content that exceeds the State requirements. We have researched and been provided a proposal for an Ion Exchange system that could be installed as 1 unit that would connect to our incoming raw water supply, process the raw through the ion exchange filtration system then through our normal micro filtration process and subsequently pumped to our June Lake storage tank for domestic use. Current filtration rates are approximately 200 GPM and we are required to have an Ion Exchange system sufficient to treat raw water supply at this rate of flow. We believe this project is fairly straight forward in that there would be minimal construction since the unit could be set in place, connected for power, influent and effluent water connections then could be put into service. This project would require an amended special use permit from the US Forest Service to allow us to install the 20’ x 8’ x 9.5’ container or (POD) adjacent to our existing June Lake water plant. We would also be required to amend our current standard operating plan for the June Lake water treatment plant which would include the use of the Ion Exchange system, approval by CDPH (California Department of Public Health) would also be required. We expect that CEQA would be exempt through categorical exemption.
16
4/2/2015 14:49:50Developing Estimates of Recharge for Indian Wells Valley
Indian Wells Valley Cooperative Groundwater Management Group
Don ZdebaPlanningNoPlanning StageKern45000Climate ChangeGroundwaterNo
Inyokern, Ridgecrest, Searles Valley, Trona
Indian WellsIndian Wells Valley4915000YesNoNoNoYesNoNoYes
The Basin Characterization Model (BCM) is a monthly regional water-balance model that was originally developed for use in the desert southwest to establish the dominant mechanisms responsible within basins that lead to recharge and runoff. The model calculates in-place recharge and runoff and is calibrated regionally for snow cover, solar radiation, and potential evapo-transpiration. The USGS California Water Science Center proposes to use historical maps of recharge and runoff for the Indian Wells Valley and develop local calibrations to historical observations of streamflow. The summation of estimated runoff and some proportion of recharge that returns to the stream as baseflow is used to calculate basin discharge at any downstream pour point coincident with a stream gage. The results will be used to assess potential patterns of stream channel gains and losses to better quantify the potential range of historical groundwater recharge in the valley. Historical time series of recharge will be evaluated to develop an understanding of precipitation thresholds that generate runoff and recharge, and how this differs spatially throughout the basin. Historical and future changes in climate, recharge, and evaporative demand defining irrigation needs will also be evaluated for a selection of future climate projections. This project is intended as a pilot project with no formal documentation to characterize recharge patterns and provide potential upper and lower bounds for spatially distributed recharge along with potential future changes. The results are to be considered a first approximation, and will provide a basis for additional work, including analyses of field data, chemical signatures of groundwater, and well levels for consideration of and application to geologic framework modeling and development or refinement of a groundwater flow model. The Basin Characterization Model can be used over very large areas, at very fine spatial resolution and for long time periods, and thus is very applicable for regional analyses or climate change studies that require long model runs or multiple projections over historical and future centuries. This model has been applied to numerous groundwater flow models in California, Nevada, Arizona and Utah. In its current form, the BCM is a research tool and requires calibration and hydrologic understanding for local applications.
17
4/2/2015 15:25:28Consolidation of Owens Valley Groundwater ModelsInyo CountyRobert HarringtonPlanningYesPlanning StageInyo325000Groundwater
Environmental Stewardship
Yes
Aberdeen, Alabama Hills, Big Pine, Big Pine Paiute Tribe, Bishop, Bishop Paiute Tribe, Cartago, Fort Independence Tribe, Independence, Keeler, Laws, Lone Pine, Lone Pine Paiute-Shoshone Reservation, Olancha, Paradise, Round Valley, Rovana, Swall Meadows, Wilkerson
OwensOwens Valley5240YesNoYesNoNoNoNoYes
Under the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act of 2014, local agencies in groundwater basins designated by the California Department of Water Resources (CDWR) as medium or high priority are required to form groundwater sustainability agencies. Groundwater sustainability plans (GSP) must be developed to avoid undesirable effects such as declining groundwater levels, degraded water quality, reductions in groundwater storage, subsidence, or adverse effects on beneficial uses of surface water. CDWR has designated Owens Valley as a ‘medium priority’ groundwater basin, and the portions of the basin not managed under the Inyo/Los Angeles Water Agreement are subject to preparation of a GSP. Preparation and implementation of a GSP requires quantitative understanding of hydrogeology and basin water budgets; groundwater models are the principal tool available to develop this information on a basin-wide scale. The proposed model will also be useful in implementation of the Inyo/Los Angeles Water Agreement.
This project will consolidate several existing groundwater models into a basin-wide model that can be used to support development and implementation of a GSP for Owens Valley. The purpose of the model would be to evaluate effects of groundwater pumping and surface water management on groundwater levels, groundwater storage, and groundwater-dependent resources.
Required tasks are:
1. Acquisition and review of existing models. This task will acquire groundwater models that have been developed for portions of the Owens Valley (including Owens Lake) by the USGS, LADWP, Inyo County, and others. Model inputs and documentation will be assembled and reviewed. The models and data most suitable for inclusion into a basin-wide model will be determined.
2. Identify and address data gaps such as areas not included in existing models, or insufficient or out of date model inputs and data.
3. Development of basin-wide steady-state and transient water budgets. This task will include refinement of evapotranspiration estimates and quantification of recharge throughout the basin.
4. Reconciliation of existing models and data into a single basin-wide conceptual model.
5. Development of a single basin-wide numerical model based on results of Tasks 1-4.
6. Steady-state model calibration.
7. Transient model calibration.
8. Technology transfer to project proponent, IRWM members, and other stakeholders.
18
4/3/2015 13:14:19Bishop Paiute Tribe Meter ImplementationBishop Paiute TribeBryanna VaughanImplementationYesPlanning StageInyo51,500Water Supply
Environmental Stewardship
YesBishopOwens4120YesNoYesYesYesYesNoNoThe installation of domestic-water meters to 600 households with the outcome of reducing water use (amount unknown). A radio meter-reading wand to read all meters will save labor costs.
19
4/6/2015 10:28:41Ultra Low Flush Toilet (ULFT) Change Out Program Bishop Paiute TribeBrian AdkinsImplementationYesShovel-readyInyo170000Water SupplyWastewaterYesBishop Paiute TribeOwensOwens Valley2240YesNoNoYesYesYesNoNo
Project Need and Justification
This project will increase the efficiency of water use primarily through the implementation of indoor conservation measures. Water leaks will be stopped via repairs and high efficiency fixtures will be installed via a voucher system administered by tribal public works department. The residents of the Bishop Paiute Reservation will directly benefit from the water savings through 1) reduced total sewage flow (more capacity for community sewage treatment) and 2) reduced user rates (reduced pumping costs due to water savings). Estimates of water saved were obtained directly by measuring water loss and by direct count of low-efficiency fixtures in 403 connections via a water audit survey conducted in 2004 and updated in 2006 (Bishop Paiute Reservation Water Audit and Drip Survey, 2006)).

Project Summary
This project replace and repair of leaking and low-efficiency fixtures. The result of these measures will be to save a minimum 24 Acre-ft/year of domestic water, enough for an additional 20 new domestic water connections without increasing domestic water production (Bishop Paiute Reservation Water Audit and Drip Survey, 2006). The project will also install six (6) water meters which will result in the 100% of all domestic water connections being metered on reservation.
20
4/6/2015 10:32:24Bishop Paiute Tribe Irrigation Replacement ProjectBishop Paiute TribeBrian AdkinsImplementationYesShovel-readyInyo1050000Water SupplyClimate ChangeYesBishop Paiute TribeOwensOwens Valley2240YesNoNoYesYesYesNoNo
Purpose
A subsurface irrigation system was constructed in the 1940’s by the BIA for the Bishop Paiute Reservation. The system (approx. 63,000 total lineal feet (12 miles)) is in moderate and in some places, poor condition. Much of the original concrete piping has outlived its useful life. Approximately 28,000 feet (5 miles) has been upgraded to PVC pipe (44% of total). There remains approximately 35,000 (56% of total) lineal feet (7 miles) to be rehabilitated. Several segments of lines are dead and many valves are frozen or poorly functioning.

Project Description
We propose to replace the remainder 35,000 feet (56% of total) of these aged irrigation lines with high pressure plastic irrigation piping (PIP) and new valves. This is a replacement/efficency improvement project that will increase the ability to control the water and use in efficient manner. Aged large diameter mainlines and valving will be the priority for replacement followed by laterals. Completion of this Project will employ local labor to ensure that irrigation water will flow to tribal assignments for years to come, enhancing agriculture, the environment, and the economy.
21
4/6/2015 10:35:37Bishop Creek Flood Mapping ProjectBishop Paiute TribeBrian AdkinsPlanningYesPlanning StageInyo300000Stormwater/Flood
Environmental Stewardship
Yes
Bishop, Bishop Paiute Tribe
OwensOwens Valley2120YesYesYesNoYesYesYesNo
Using the remote sensing technique of LIDAR, create a detailed topographic strip map of the lower perennial Bishop Creek in order to define topographic geometry of main and overflow channels in a section from SCE Hydro plan 6 through residental areas of West Bishop, Bishop Paute Reservation and City of Bishop. Funded project could leverage US Army Corps of Engineers hydrology and hydraulic services through Section 22 Water Resources Development Act of 1974 - Planning Assistance to States and Tribes to update flow routing models and increase accuracy of the extent of flooding in lower reaches and to predict the magnitude and reoccurance of naturally occuring flows from headwaters.
22
4/6/2015 10:39:32
Bishop Paiute Tribe Conservation Open Space Area Wetland Restoration Project
Bishop Paiute TribeBrian AdkinsImplementationYesShovel-readyInyo1000000
Environmental Stewardship
DACYesBishop Paiute TribeOwensOwens Valley2360NoNoYesYesNoYesNoNo
Project consists of rehabilitating Reservation agricutural drains and installing water distribution lines linked to Reservation irrigation systems to hydrate a portion of the Tribe's 24.8 acre Conservation Open Space Area for a native desert fish refuge. Two species of desert fish endemic to the Owens Valley are sought to be protected at the site: Owens Pupfish (Cyprinodon radiosus) and Owens Tui Chub (Siphateles bicolor snyderi); both of which are on the USFWS list of Threatened and Endangered species as well as the Owens Valley Speckled Dace (Ryinichthys osculus ssp.) and Owens Valley checkerbloom both a US Fisho and Wildlife Servece species of concern. Project will supply several alternate sources of water (drain, irrigation, well) to provide a robust supply of water to the area as well as interpretive and educational improvements including trails, boardwalks, signs and kiosks. Project has recieved some inital funding from US Bureau of Reclamation and Bishop Paiute Tribe for planning, design and implementaion of the first phase of the projects five (5) phases.
23
11/20/2015 15:32:27Upper John Muir Slope ProtectionMono CountyJamie RobertsonImplementationYesConceptualMono$1,709,000Stormwater/Flood
Environmental Stewardship
NoMammoth LakesMono4240NoNoNoYesNoNoYesNo
Existing cut slope located above the hairpin turn in John Muir Road is severely eroding. The proposed project will protect cut slope from erosion using retaining wall and/or rock slope protection. The slope is very steep, at least 1:1 H:V, and vertical to overhanging in many places. The area requiring mitigation extends horizontally about 35' from the edge of pavement and ranges from 15 to 50 feet in height.
24
11/20/2015 15:36:58Upper John Muir Storm DrainMono CountyJamie RobertsonImplementationYesConceptualMono$1,508,600Stormwater/Flood
Environmental Stewardship
NoMammoth LakesMono424DiscussionYesNoNoYesNoNoYesNo
John Muir Road above the hairpin turn lacks engineered drainage
infrastructure. The proposed project would construct surface collection and conveyance (curb and gutter, AC swale, or PCC swale) along the edge of pavement and install inlets and storm drain piping. Detention/infiltration basins would be installed near the western terminus of Davison Road. Storm drain piping and rock lined channel would be installed to direct drainage from John Muir Road and Davison Road to these basins.
25
11/20/2015 15:39:19Lower John Muir Slope ProtectionMono CountyJamie RobertsonImplementationYesConceptualMono$1,924,400Stormwater/Flood
Environmental Stewardship
NoMammoth LakesMono424Can Be DiscussedNoNoNoYesNoNoYesNo
Existing cut slopes at eight (8) locations on John Muir Road and Lee Road are moderately to severely eroding. The proposed project will protect cut slopes from erosion using retaining walls, rock slope protection, and/or revegetation. Slopes vary between 0.5:1 and 2:1 H:V. The areas requiring mitigation extend 20 to 40 feet horizontally from the edge of pavement and range from 10 to 60 feet in height.
26
11/20/2015 15:41:54Lower John Muir Storm DrainMono CountyJamie RobertsonImplementationYesConceptualMono$951,900Stormwater/Flood
Environmental Stewardship
NoMammoth LakesMono424Up for DiscussionNoYesNoYesNoNoYesNo
John Muir Road generally lacks engineered drainage infrastructure. The proposed project would construct surface collection and conveyance (curb and gutter, AC swale, or PCC swale) along the edge of pavement and install inlets and storm drain piping. The proposed storm drain system would connect to the existing 36" storm drain which outfalls to an unprotected slope above Lake Mary Road. The 36" pipe would be extended to the bottom of the slope where a detention/infiltration basin
would be installed near the intersection of Lee Road and Lake Mary Road.
27
11/20/2015 15:44:10Davison Road Storm DrainMono CountyJamie RobertsonImplementationYesConceptualMono$2,062,900Stormwater/Flood
Environmental Stewardship
NoMammoth LakesMono424Up for DiscussionNoYesNoYesNoNoYesNo
Davison Road generally lacks engineered drainage infrastructure. The proposed project would construct surface collection and conveyance (curb and gutter or swale) along the edge of pavement and install inlets and storm drain piping. The proposed SD system would discharge storm water to detention/infiltration basins to be installed near the intersection of Davison Road and Lake Mary Road. Detention/Infiltration could also be installed in vacant parcels on the north side of Davison Road.
28
11/20/2015 15:47:28Majestic Pines Storm DrainMono CountyJamie RobertsonImplementationYesConceptualMono$1,324,200Stormwater/Flood
Environmental Stewardship
NoMammoth LakesMono424$1,324,200NoYesNoYesNoNoYesNo
Majestic Pines Road receives significant offsite flows from upstream development in addition to locally generated runoff. Existing drainage infrastructure requires improvement to adequately convey runoff and entrained sediment. The proposed project would construct curb and gutter or swale along the south side of Majestic Pines Road with inlets directing flows into an existing storm drain pipe. A series of check dams is recommended to create five (5) small infiltration basins along the channel receiving runoff from this system. Improvements are needed on Monterey Pine Road to relieve flooding issues.
29
11/20/2015 15:49:55Forest Trail, Hillside Drive, Crest Lane, and Crystal LaneMono CountyJamie RobertsonImplementationYesConceptualMono$1,360,900Stormwater/Flood
Environmental Stewardship
NoMammoth LakesMono424Up for DiscussionNoYesNoYesNoNoYesNo
Existing cut slopes are severely eroding at five (5) locations. The proposed project will protect cut slopes from erosion using retaining walls and/or rock slope protection. Slopes vary between 1:1 and 2:1 H:V. The areas requiring mitigation extend 20 to 40 feet horizontally from the edge of pavement and range from 10 to 30 feet in height.
30
11/20/2015 15:51:45Forest Trail Storm DrainMono CountyJamie RobertsonImplementationYesConceptualMono$1,296,500Stormwater/Flood
Environmental Stewardship
NoMammoth LakesMono424Up for DiscussionNoYesNoYesNoNoYesNo
Uncontrolled runoff from impervious surfaces around Hillside Drive and Forest Trail results in erosion and increased potential for flooding downstream. The proposed project will construct surface conveyance along Forest Trail and Hillside Drive with a series of inlets and infiltration/detention facilities designed to reduce peak flows from reaching downstream facilities.
31
3/7/2016 14:36:15Deep Monitoring Well Pair to Protect MCWD Groundwater Supply
Mammoth Community Water District
Irene YamashitaImplementationYesPlanning StageMono1800000Water SupplyWater QualityNoMammoth LakesMono, Owens412300000YesYesNoYesNoNoNoYes
Mammoth Community Water District serves the community of Mammoth Lakes, Mono County. A nearby geothermal plant is planning to increase their production capacity by moving their production well pumping closer to our domestic groundwater supply wells. We are seeking funding to drill a deep geothermal well and a nested shallow and medium depth well to monitor the extent pressure changes propagate towards our well field. MCWD is concerned that changes in pressure below the shallow cold water aquifer may impact the aquifer’s water quality and quantity beyond the ability of MCWD to mitigate the impacts. The USGS is currently monitoring surficial changes due to the geothermal plant such as increased emissions of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide; increases in soil temperature; and expansion of areas experiencing Jeffery Pine die off. In addition, the USGS has expressed concern that steam carrying reservoir contaminants and heat may migrate through faults and cracks as reservoir pressures decline and cause contamination of the potable water aquifer pumped by the water district. Declines in pressure could also slowly siphon water from the more shallow aquifers through the faulted layers between the two resources.
To avoid the degradation of MCWD's groundwater supply, two deep monitoring well pairs are necessary. Ormat, the plant owner, has already installed a nested shallow and medium well and has agreed to fund the installation of one deep well. MCWD is seeking funding to construct the second well pair, a deep well with a shallow and medium depth nested well. MCWD’s hydrogeologist and the USGS have supported the contention that at least two monitoring well pairs are necessary to adequately protect the potable groundwater resource.
32
6/17/2016 16:47:34IWVWD AMI Project
Indian Wells Valley Water District
Jennifer KeepImplementationYesActiveKern4250250Water SupplyGroundwaterNoRidgecrestIndian WellsIndian Wells Valley5122250250YesNoNoNoYesNoNoYes
IWVWD plans install Neptune automated metering infrastructure (AMI) meter registers to all 12,000 meters in the District. A primary benefit is having the reads automatically transported into the office daily so 1) leaks can be detected faster; 2) less time for vehicles on the road, an 3) frees up staff to work on leaks.
33
3/17/2017 10:08:04Bridgeport Watershed Analysis & Water Quality RemediationMono County RCDBruce WoodworthImplementationYesPlanning StageMono2000000Water Quality
Environmental Stewardship
NoBridgeportEast Walker436500000YesYesYesYesYesNoYesYes
Purpose: Ameliorate Water Quality Problems in the Bridgeport Valley, Bridgeport, CA

Strategy: Identify the contributing factors throughout the watershed, while moving ahead with a Wetlands application for the Bridgeport Reservoir.

Tactics: 1) Midterm/Continuous.

• Establish provisional Best Management Practices for inter-ranch and watershed-wide collaboration from Literature Search of the watershed and from previous on-ground practices by Bridgeport Rancher’s Association.

• Monitoring.
a) Utilize existing studies.
b) Continuation of earlier data collection.
c) “Fingerprinting” by DNA processes to identify the sources.
d) Expand the scope to the full watershed.
e) Accommodate the Wetlands Implementation below to evaluate progress.

2) Immediately.

• Wetlands Implementation.
a) Secure access (fee, easement, lease) of lands upstream of the Bridgeport Reservoir .
b) Consult on agency receptivity (CA and US F&W, US Corps of Engineers, CA & US EPA, Mono County).
c) Research funding.
d) Contract for design/costing of wetlands based remediation .
I. Wetlands-only construction
II. Wetlands plus woodchips (see file)
III. Wetlands Floating Islands (see file)
IV. Saturated Buffers (see file)
e) Apply for implementation funding.
34
5/10/2017 10:21:43Amargosa Canyon restoration
Amargosa Conservancy
Tanya HendersonOtherYesPlanning StageInyo100000
Environmental Stewardship
YesTecopaAmargosa4150YesYesYesNoYesYesNoYes
Restoration in the Amargosa Canyon to improve habitat for migrating birds, especially the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher. This would include removal of invasive plants such as Tamarisk, and removing early-successional species while planting late-successional species to improve habitat for the Flycatcher.
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
Loading...
 
 
 
Form Responses 1
AccessHeadings4Import2Database
Submission Summary