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Start Time: Local Coverage6/15/2016School Board Votes in Favor of Later Start TimesGreenwich SentinelThe Greenwich Board of Education endorsed the adoption of later start times for Greenwich High School for the 2017-18 school year in Tuesday’s meeting, passing a motion by a 6-2 vote, and approving the board to take the next steps in refining the school bell times. Although no final decision was made on a specific bell time for GHS, the board endorsed an approximate 8:30 a.m. start time for the high school, which currently starts at 7:30 a.m.

School Board Votes in Favor of Later Start Timeshttps://www.greenwichsentinel.com/2016/06/15/school-board-votes-in-favor-of-later-start-times/
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Start Time6/15/2016How Much Sleep Do Kids Need? Probably More Than They're GettingForbesIt’s becoming clearer with each passing sleep-and-the-brain study that sleep is wildly important for brain and mental health, no matter what age you are. Babies needs huge amounts of sleep since their brains are developing so dramatically, but so do teens, whose brains are also undergoing big changes. (And as any adult who’s dealt with insomnia or any amount of sleep deprivation can attest, missed sleep can wreak havoc on your cognitive function.) As such, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) has just released official recommendations about how much sleep anyone from four months to 18 years old should be getting. At the same time, the American Medical Association has released a statement officially urging schools to push their start time later, for the sake of kids’ sleep.

How Much Sleep Do Kids Need? Probably More Than They're Gettinghttp://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2016/06/15/how-much-sleep-do-kids-need-probably-more-than-theyre-getting/#6121fa4f1a46
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Start Time6/14/2016Start School Later Applauds AMA for Endorsing Later School Start Times for TeensStart School Later“I am encouraged by yet another powerful message about teen sleep and later school start times from a renowned and respected national medical organization,” states Dr. Lynn Keefe, a Florida pediatrician and Health Policy Director for Start School Later, Inc. “Every local school board and superintendent needs to direct and lead the change to later school start times - working alongside parents and community pediatricians to raise and support healthy teens.”Start School Later Applauds AMA for Endorsing Later School Start Times for Teenshttp://www.startschoollater.net/uploads/9/7/9/6/9796500/ssl_applauds_ama_endorsement_of_later_school_start_times_061416.pdf6/18/2016
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Start Time6/14/2016AMA Supports Delayed School Start Times to Improve Adolescent WellnessAmerican Medical AssociationOver the past several decades, school start times have become increasingly early as school districts try to make time for additional classes, sports, and extracurricular activities. Nearly 10 percent of U.S. high schools today begin at or before 7:30 a.m. However, research has found that not allowing more time for sleep hinders health, academic performance, behavior and general well-being. Mental manifestations of inadequate sleep often include poor memory performance and mood disorders. Symptoms of depression and anxiety are also more evident with those who get less than six hours of sleep each night.

AMA RecommendationsAMA Supports Delayed School Start Times to Improve Adolescent Wellnesshttp://news.cision.com/american-medical-association/r/ama-supports-delayed-school-start-times-to-improve-adolescent-wellness,c20290276/18/2016
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Safety6/1/2016Too little sleep is tied to teenagers’ injury-related risk behaviorsContemporary PediatricsHigh school students who report sleeping 7 hours or less on an average school night are significantly more likely than their peers who sleep up to 9 hours a night to engage in several injury-related risk behaviors: infrequent bicycle helmet use; infrequent seatbelt use; riding with a driver who has been drinking; drinking and driving; and texting while driving. An analysis of data from 50,370 high school students who participated in the national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys in 2007, 2009, 2011, or 2013 found that 3 of these behaviors—infrequent seatbelt use, riding with a driver who has been drinking, and drinking and driving—also were more likely for students who reported sleeping 10 or more hours compared with 9 hours on an average school night.Too little sleep is tied to teenagers’ injury-related risk behaviorshttp://contemporarypediatrics.modernmedicine.com/contemporary-pediatrics/news/too-little-sleep-tied-teenagers-injury-related-risk-behaviors6/18/2016
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Start Time6/13/2016Recharge With Sleep: Pediatric Sleep Recommendations Promoting Optimal HealthAmerican Academy of Sleep MedicineFor the first time, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) has released official consensus recommendations for the amount of sleep needed to promote optimal health in children and teenagers to avoid the health risks of insufficient sleep.

The recommendations in the consensus statement are as follows:
Infants four to 12 months should sleep 12 to 16 hours per 24 hours (including naps) on a regular basis to promote optimal health.
Children one to two years of age should sleep 11 to 14 hours per 24 hours (including naps) on a regular basis to promote optimal health.
Children three to five years of age should sleep 10 to 13 hours per 24 hours (including naps) on a regular basis to promote optimal health.
Children six to 12 years of age should sleep nine to 12 hours per 24 hours on a regular basis to promote optimal health.
Teenagers 13 to 18 years of age should sleep eight to 10 hours per 24 hours on a regular basis to promote optimal health.
The AASM consensus statement is published in the June issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine and will be discussed this week during SLEEP 2016, the 30th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS) in Denver.
Recharge With Sleep: Pediatric Sleep Recommendations Promoting Optimal Healthhttp://www.aasmnet.org/articles.aspx?id=63266/18/2016
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Start Time6/13/2016Here’s Proof School Days Should Be Starting LaterTeen VogueThe guidelines, which follow the recommendations already in place by the American Academy of Pediatrics, say that if you’re between 13 and 18 years old, you should be getting 8 to 10 hours of sleep per night. The catch here, though, is that teenage hormones and body chemistry make it really tough to get to bed at an hour that would get you the recommended amount of sleep and still have you awake for class at 7:30 a.m. That’s why the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends schools push back their start times until at least after 8:30 a.m.

Here’s Proof School Days Should Be Starting Laterhttp://www.teenvogue.com/story/teen-sleep-guidelines-school-days6/18/2016
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Safety6/10/2016Sleepy College Kids Still Feel Like Ace DriversMedPage TodayWhen young drivers felt drowsy, they were still confident enough in their perceived behavioral control to get behind the wheel -- a condition as worrisome as driving while impaired, researchers suggested here.
Sleepy College Kids Still Feel Like Ace Drivershttp://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/APSS/520476/18/2016
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Start Time6/12/2016Editorial: Time has come for new school schedulesGreenwich TimeThe school board’s vote on school start times is to take place at the Tuesday meeting, scheduled for 7 p.m. at New Lebanon School. We support Option 11, which moves the high school start time by 60 minutes. A compromise would deliver no true benefits, but this choice can produce dividends in the classroom, healthier children and safer roads. There were good reasons for this issue to percolate for so long. There are a lot of pieces to move in a town is large as Greenwich, and not everyone will be happy regardless of the final decision. But it’s also an opportunity for the town to be a model for other municipalities that should follow suit. Greenwich does not have the only weary students in Connecticut.Greenwich, CTEditorial: Time has come for new school scheduleshttp://www.greenwichtime.com/news/article/Editorial-Time-has-come-for-new-school-schedules-8000452.php6/18/2016
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Start Time6/13/2016AAP endorses new recommendations on sleep timesAmerican Academy of PediatricsTeens should sleep eight to 10 hours per night while younger children need even more sleep, according to new recommendations from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM).

AAP endorses new recommendations on sleep timeshttp://www.aappublications.org/news/2016/06/13/Sleep0613166/18/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage6/11/2016Deborah Smith: We need to listen to our tired studentsGreenwich TimeI’m an English teacher at Greenwich High School, and I’m one of those fortunate people who looks forward to going to work in the morning. I’m surrounded by a remarkably diverse, gifted student body. I marvel at the talent and dedication of my colleagues. But then there’s a disconnect. When I look around my classroom, I see exhausted students: bags under their eyes, flat affect, heads on the desks. In other words, I see first-hand what scientific research shows: that Greenwich High’s 7:30 a.m. start time is starkly at odds with teen body clocks, and students are paying a high price for it. Of the five different schools where I have taught over the course of my 18-year career, GHS has the earliest start time, and GHS students are far and away the most handicapped by fatigue. I’m also a GHS parent with two sons recently graduated, and a daughter headed to GHS in the fall. At home, I have seen my own children hobbled by sustained exhaustion. Fatigue is a frequent subject of conversation in our house. I don’t know what to say anymore when my tearful, exasperated child says, “I’m just too tired to work.” The sleep science backs her up. Having teens wake up at 6 a.m. for a 7:30 school start time is the equivalent of wresting an adult from bed at 3 a.m. Greenwich, CTDeborah Smith: We need to listen to our tired studentshttp://www.greenwichtime.com/news/article/Deborah-Smith-It-s-time-to-listen-to-our-tired-7987372.php6/18/2016
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Start Time2/11/2016The real reasons later school start times are effectiveeSchool NewsIn short, we believe that longer sleep times, coupled with delayed timing, may both be necessary to realize improvements to mood, health, and academic performance. A start time delay is a first step, and may, all on its own, effect changes in behavior and on-time arrival. But school start time delays are not like Jack’s magic beans in the old fairy tale: one can’t scatter the seeds and then watch the bean plant grow towards the clouds, all on its own. Start time changes can provide the impetus for many students to sleep later, but our communities as a whole must provide the encouragement and the examples to our students in order to allow sleep to take its place as a critical element of physical, mental, and cognitive health. A comprehensive effort to educate and persuade constituents of the benefits that can occur when sleep is improved may be needed to implement delays in school start times and to maximize the benefits that can follow.A call for a comprehensive approachThe real reasons later school start times are effectivehttp://www.eschoolnews.com/2016/02/11/the-real-reasons-later-school-start-times-are-effective/6/18/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage6/9/2016GHS Families Against Late Dismissal Explain Opposition to Later Start time for GHSGreenwich TimeLate start (i.e., late dismissal) will jeopardize athletics and clubs that develop fitness, leadership skills, teamwork and spirit of one of the town’s most important institutions, Greenwich High School.Opposition letter in Greenwich CTGHS Families Against Late Dismissal Explain Opposition to Later Start time for GHShttp://greenwichfreepress.com/schools/ghs-families-against-late-dismissal-explain-opposition-to-later-start-time-for-ghs-67111/6/18/2016
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Start Time6/9/2016How Much Sleep Does Your School-Age Child Need?Live Science... teenagers' circadian rhythms may make it difficult for them to fall asleep early enough at night to get enough sleep. Kids' biological clocks naturally shift around the time of puberty, Melendres said. Someone who was able to easily fall asleep at 9 o'clock during his or her school-age years would have a natural tendency to fall asleep later, after reaching adolescence, Melendres said. And because bedtime is delayed, a teen's natural wake-up time is delayed, too. But even if a teen goes to bed at 11 p.m., to get the recommended 8 to 10 hours of sleep, she or he would have to wake up between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m., which usually isn't feasible on a school day. As a result, teens are usually chronically sleep-deprived during the week, Melendres said.

Update to sleep recommendationsHow Much Sleep Does Your School-Age Child Need?http://www.livescience.com/55021-sleep-school-age-kids.html6/18/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage6/10/2016Op-ed: Health experts endorse changing start timesGreenwich TimeThe American Academy of Pediatrics describes a school start time of no earlier than 8:30 am for adolescents as “an effective countermeasure to chronic sleep loss” that “has a wide range of potential benefits to students with regard to physical and mental health, safety, and academic achievement.” The academy notes in an accompanying technical report a nearly threefold increase in the risk of suicide attempts among adolescents who sleep less than eight hours per night, even when controlling for confounding factors. This data underscore the potential seriousness of this issue. The policy statement concludes that “both the urgency and the magnitude of the problem of sleep loss in adolescents and the availability of an intervention that has the potential to have broad and immediate effects are highly compelling.” We would also point out that the Center for Disease control states: “Among the possible public health interventions for increasing sufficient sleep among adolescents, delaying school start times has the potential for the greatest population impact (emphasis added) by changing the environmental context for students in entire school districts.”
Letter from doctors as editorial, Greenwich CTOp-ed: Health experts endorse changing start timeshttp://www.greenwichtime.com/news/article/Op-ed-Health-experts-endorse-changing-start-times-7973501.php6/18/2016
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Start Time Massachusetts6/9/2016High school day will start later for Hanover studentsThe EnterpriseHANOVER – High school students will start school 30 minutes later next year, and administrators hope they’ll spend that time getting extra sleep. After weeks of debate, the school committee voted 4-1 Wednesday night to approve Principal Matthew Paquette’s proposal to push the first bell to 7:55 a.m. Committee member Libby Corbo voted against the plan “My overriding concern is making this an incremental change,” Corbo said. “I’m not sure that would be in the best interest of students and parents to do 30 (minutes) and 30 (minutes), rather than take a year and look and do an hour. I think it’s disruptive to schedules.” Corbo said she was in favor of a later first bell – high school students currently start at 7:25 a.m. – but didn’t think 7:55 a.m. would be late enough. Hanover, MAHigh school day will start later for Hanover studentshttp://www.enterprisenews.com/article/20160609/NEWS/1606060346/18/2016
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Start Time6/9/2016Why School Start Times Play A Huge Role In Kids’ SuccessHuffington PostA 2012 study found that students who started school an hour later than usual saw their math scores on standardized tests increase an average 2.2 percentage points and reading scores increase an average 1.5 percentage points. They also watched less television, spent more time on homework and had fewer absences, the research found. “Start times really do matter,” Finley Edwards, author of the study, told The Huffington Post in 2012. “We can see clear increases of academic performance from just starting school later.”state-by-state analysis of the CDC dataWhy School Start Times Play A Huge Role In Kids’ Successhttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/school-start-time-kids-success_us_57586d22e4b0ced23ca6c4446/18/2016
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Start Time6/10/2016Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance — United States, 2015Centers for Disease ControlThe CDC has published the results of the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey and the news for teen sleep is not good. The total percent of high school students who are getting 8 or more hours of sleep has FALLEN from 31.1% in 2007 to 27.3% in 2015, and this is despite recommendations and pleas from the medical community to schools to move school start time to 8:30am or later. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance — United States, 2015http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/data/yrbs/pdf/2015/ss6506_updated.pdf6/18/2016
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Start Time6/8/2016Why is My Teen so Tired?Huffington PostAccording to a number of studies the average adolescent falls asleep between 10:30 p.m. and 12 a.m. So, why is it that our teenagers insist on staying up late when they know that they need to get up early? One reason is because according to Nationwide Children’s when a child goes through puberty, there is a shift in their biology which creates a natural tendency to want to go bed two hours later, so a early teen who would normally go to bed at 9 p.m., will now have difficulty falling asleep before 11 pm. And, since they need on average 9-9 ¼ hours sleep, a teen going to bed at 11 p.m. would have to sleep a little after 8 a.m. to feel fully rested.Why is My Teen so Tired?http://www.huffingtonpost.com/carin-winter/why-is-my-teen-so-tired_1_b_10349546.html6/18/2016
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Start Time Massachusetts6/7/2016Monomoy adopts new school starting times for 2017Cape Cod TimesWhile Monomoy Regional School District Superintendent Scott Carpenter had little trouble convincing the regional school committee of the need to begin the school day a half hour later for high school and middle school students and an hour earlier for the elementary schools, the committee was divided on his proposal to delay the change for a year to allow parents and school officials to budget for possible increases in personal child care and school transportation.Monomy, MassachusettsMonomoy adopts new school starting times for 2017http://www.capecodtimes.com/article/20160607/NEWS/1606096326/18/2016
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Start Time6/4/2016How good sleep became a game-changer for the NBA's best playersBusiness InsiderA 2011 study found that when basketball players on Stanford's men's team got 10 hours a night, they ran faster, shot free throws and threes with nine percent more accuracy and reported feeling less worn out during practices and games. Even without numbers from a study, getting enough sleep might seem like an obvious part of a professional athlete's routine. But obvious or not, NBA players didn't always have the opportunity to get that sleep.

...the Warriors' Steph Curry sleeps about eight hours a night, and tries to get a two-to-2.5-hour nap before the pregame shoot around. "Getting more sleep directly affected my three-point percentage, which doubled, my free-throw percentage was up 30, 40 percent, my turnovers were way down, I got more steals," he told her. "Having that rest, and feeling confident as a healthy human being, you're able to react to those situations and make better decisions."
Sports teams recognizing the value of sleep as part of trainingHow good sleep became a game-changer for the NBA's best playershttp://www.businessinsider.com/how-good-sleep-became-a-game-changer-for-the-nbas-best-players-2016-66/18/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage6/7/2016The Start School Later Movement Is Ringing Through PennsylvaniaHuffington PostMost Pennsylvania middle and high school students start class too early in the morning to get healthy sleep. This could change soon thanks to legislation ((HB2105) just introduced by Representative Tim Briggs of Montgomery County, which directs the state department of education to study the relationship between teen sleep and school start times. “We are on our way,” says Gail Karafin, EdD, a school psychologist and leader of the Pennsylvania chapter of Start School Later, a nationwide nonprofit dedicated to ensuring safe, healthy, equitable school hours. She says that while the legislation is big news, “it comes on the heels of a lot of other hard work and progress thanks to the tireless work of student, parent, and professional volunteers.”PennsylvaniaThe Start School Later Movement Is Ringing Through Pennsylvaniahttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/terra-ziporyn-snider-phd/the-start-school-later-mo_b_10280794.html6/18/2016
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Start Time6/23/2014Causes and consequences of sleepiness among college studentsNature and Science of SleepDaytime sleepiness, sleep deprivation, and irregular sleep schedules are highly prevalent among college students, as 50% report daytime sleepiness and 70% attain insufficient sleep. The consequences of sleep deprivation and daytime sleepiness are especially problematic to college students and can result in lower grade point averages, increased risk of academic failure, compromised learning, impaired mood, and increased risk of motor vehicle accidents. This article reviews the current prevalence of sleepiness and sleep deprivation among college students, contributing factors for sleep deprivation, and the role of sleep in learning and memory. The impact of sleep and sleep disorders on academics, grade point average, driving, and mood will be examined. Most importantly, effective and viable interventions to decrease sleepiness and sleep deprivation through sleep education classes, online programs, encouragement of naps, and adjustment of class time will be reviewed. This paper highlights that addressing sleep issues, which are not often considered as a risk factor for depression and academic failure, should be encouraged. Promotion of university and college policies and class schedules that encourage healthy and adequate sleep could have a significant impact on the sleep, learning, and health of college students. Future research to investigate effective and feasible interventions, which disseminate both sleep knowledge and encouragement of healthy sleep habits to college students in a time and cost effective manner, is a priority.Causes and consequences of sleepiness among college studentshttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4075951/6/18/2016
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Start Time6/2/2014Poor sleep equal to binge drinking, marijuana use in predicting academic problemsScience Daily, American Academy of Sleep MedicineResults show that sleep timing and maintenance problems in college students are a strong predictor of academic problems even after controlling for other factors that contribute to academic success, such as clinical depression, feeling isolated, and diagnosis with a learning disability or chronic health issue. The study also found that sleep problems have about the same impact on grade point average (GPA) as binge drinking and marijuana use. Its negative impact on academic success is more pronounced for freshmen. Among first-year students, poor sleep -- but not binge drinking, marijuana use or learning disabilities diagnosis -- independently predicted dropping or withdrawing from a course. Results were adjusted for potentially confounding factors such as race, gender, work hours, chronic illness, and psychiatric problems such as anxiety.Roxanne Prichard, PhD, associate professor of psychology and Monica Hartmann, professor of economics at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, MinnesotaPoor sleep equal to binge drinking, marijuana use in predicting academic problemshttps://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140602102011.htm6/18/2016
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Start Time6/1/2014Poor sleep equal to binge drinking, marijuana use in predicting academic problemsAmerican Academy of Sleep Medicine A new study shows that college students who are poor sleepers are much more likely to earn worse grades and withdraw from a course than healthy sleeping peers. Results show that sleep timing and maintenance problems in college students are a strong predictor of academic problems even after controlling for other factors that contribute to academic success, such as clinical depression, feeling isolated, and diagnosis with a learning disability or chronic health issue. The study also found that sleep problems have about the same impact on grade point average (GPA) as binge drinking and marijuana use. Its negative impact on academic success is more pronounced for freshmen. Among first-year students, poor sleep— but not binge drinking, marijuana use or learning disabilities diagnosis—independently predicted dropping or withdrawing from a course. Results were adjusted for potentially confounding factors such as race, gender, work hours, chronic illness, and psychiatric problems such as anxiety.Bad sleep habits in high school are carried into college, with disastrous results.Poor sleep equal to binge drinking, marijuana use in predicting academic problemshttp://www.aasmnet.org/articles.aspx?id=47806/18/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage6/4/2016Chris Rickert: Shift to later school starts moving about as fast as a teenager at dawnWisconsin State JournalIn large public bureaucracies with near-monopolistic control over crucial local services, fundamental change can take a long time to happen — if it happens at all. But at least there’s reason to hope the Madison School District can affect some fundamental change in its school start times now that one of the School Board’s members is getting his long-requested discussion of the topic on Monday.WisconsinChris Rickert: Shift to later school starts moving about as fast as a teenager at dawnhttp://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/columnists/chris-rickert/chris-rickert-shift-to-later-school-starts-moving-about-as/article_32d2de9f-9e4f-5b62-960d-44fa886a35a8.html6/18/2016
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Start Time6/3/2016Growing trend to start school later, let kids sleep longerFox News"Students say that the extra half hour of sleep has helped them remain focused. One parent, a school board member says the idea came down to common sense."VideoGrowing trend to start school later, let kids sleep longerhttp://video.foxnews.com/v/4926542075001/growing-trend-to-start-school-later-let-kids-sleep-longer/?#sp=show-clips6/18/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage6/3/2016Letters: School start times; Front page; School constructionCapital GazetteAs the single father of a high school freshman, we struggle with 5:30 a.m. wake-ups, 6:30 bus pickups and 7:17 start times. As frustrated and dismayed as I am with the latest proposal for delaying schools a mere 13 to 18 minutes (The Capital, April 21), I am even more so with the continued misperception that changing high school hours is a waste of tax dollars (The Capital, May 26). What is often not considered is the amount of wasted time, energy and, in the end, money when children are too exhausted to learn. Additional education resources don't help students asleep at their desks. The well-documented health and safety benefits of rested students for the entire community (The Capital, Feb. 16), clearly justify the limited expense within an education budget of more than $ 1 billion.VirginiaLetters: School start times; Front page; School constructionhttp://www.capitalgazette.com/opinion/letters/ph-ac-ce-letters-0603-20160603-story.html6/18/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage6/1/2016York County parents will keep fighting for a later school dayExaminerWere you aware that shifts in the sleep-wake cycle at puberty mean that most adolescents get their best sleep between 11 p.m. and 8 a.m.? Apparently a group of York County, VA parents are well aware of it and are saying they will not stop speaking at School Board meetings until the school division pushes back start times for high school students. "Do we have to wait until a life is lost to make a change?" asked Kathleen Howe, one of the parents. "They're getting up for school around 5:15 to 5:30," Howe said of her 16- and 18-year-old daughters. "It would be equivalent to an adult who works a 9-to-5 job going in at 4:30 a.m. and expecting them to be productive all day. … My youngest one doesn't even speak to anyone in the morning," she added.York County, VirginiaYork County parents will keep fighting for a later school dayhttp://www.examiner.com/article/york-county-parents-will-keep-fighting-for-a-later-school-day6/18/2016
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Health7/1/2016Setting Adolescents Up for Success: Promoting a Policy to Delay High School Start TimesJournal of School HealthThis is a call to action for the implementation of AAP/CDC recommendations across the state and nation. A unique biological shift in sleep cycles occurs during adolescence causing later sleep and wake times. This shift is not matched by a concurrent modification in school start times, resulting in sleep curtailment for a large majority of adolescents. Chronic inadequate sleep is associated with poor academic performance including executive function impairments, mood, and behavioral issues, as well as adverse health outcomes such as an increased risk of obesity, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. In order to address sleep deficits and the potential negative outcomes associated with chronic sleep deprivation, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) support delaying school start times for middle and high school students. We summarize current evidence, explicate the need for policy change, and urge school districts to put adolescent students' health as top priority and implement school start times consistent with their developmental needs. Whereas substantial evidence illustrating adverse consequences of inadequate sleep on psychological and physical health, and recommendations exist to adapt daytime school schedules to match sleep needs have been released, actual implementation of these recommendations have been limited.Setting Adolescents Up for Success: Promoting a Policy to Delay High School Start Timeshttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/272466806/18/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage3/31/2016What happened when one Minnesota school district let high schoolers sleep inMichigan LiveJacobus: We are pleased with the results. We have had the University of Minnesota continue to look at our data. We have a high performing school district so increases in achievement have been harder to tie to the start time change. We have seen an improvement in students who are tardy, absenteeism, discipline, and a number of qualitative measures. Our high school principals report a better start to each day with kids coming in more calm and prepared for each day as opposed to rushing in and trying to get prepared in the last few minutes before the first class.Washington County, Minnesota case studyWhat happened when one Minnesota school district let high schoolers sleep inhttp://www.mlive.com/education/index.ssf/2016/05/what_happened_when_one_minneso.html6/18/2016
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Health5/17/2016Schools struggle to cope with rising mental health needsBoston GlobeMassachusetts, like the rest of the country, has a shortage of child psychologists and psychiatrists, creating long waiting lists for care. The shortage is particularly severe in the spring when mental health issues among teenagers spike. Mental health experts say it may be linked to sleep deprivation and the mounting pressure students face to excel in school and get into the best colleges. ... Over the last decade, many schools have seen the number of cases grow from just a few a year to upwards of several dozen, often transforming guidance offices into de facto psychiatric wards, educators say.Schools struggle to cope with rising mental health needshttps://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2016/05/16/schools-confront-students-rising-mental-health-toll/J4nGkaSYW23qDbmQ2PmjLO/story.html6/1/2016Last emailed
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Health5/18/2016Teens who lack sleep at greater risk for depression, suicide, warns Mason researcherGeorge Mason UniversityWhile the National Institutes of Health recommends teenagers get around nine hours of sleep a night, only 3 percent of Fairfax County students reported getting that much sleep, and 20 percent said they got five hours or less of sleep per weeknight. On average, respondents reported getting only six-and-a-half hours of sleep each weekday night. The consequences of skipping sleep can be dire. Accounting for variables such as family composition and income, gender, and ethnic and community-level differences, Winsler determined each hour of sleep lost was associated with a 38-percent increase in feelings of sadness and hopelessness among teens, a 23-percent increase in substance abuse, a 42-percent increase in suicidal thoughts and a 58-percent increase in actual suicide attempts.Teens who lack sleep at greater risk for depression, suicide, warns Mason researcherhttps://www2.gmu.edu/news/2375216/1/2016
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Healthno dateI Hate When My Teen is Still Sleeping at NoonYour Teen MagazineSchool’s out for summer, which for many teenagers means staying up late and sleeping in. And to some extent that’s appropriate, says Sasha Carr, Ph.D., a certified sleep consultant with the Family Sleep Institute and founder of Off to Dreamland. “So many teenagers are sleep deprived because school starts so early,” explains Carr. “So during the summer, it makes perfect sense for teenagers to stay up later, sleep in more and have a schedule that is more suited to them biologically.” But that doesn’t mean all bets are off. “Yes, loosen the schedule and allow everything to go later, but not crazy later,” advises Carr. “Not two a.m. in the morning.”I Hate When My Teen is Still Sleeping at Noonhttp://yourteenmag.com/physical-health/tips-teens-summer-sleep6/1/2016
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Health7/5/2010Impact of delaying school start time on adolescent sleep, mood, and behavior.PediatricsResults: After the start time delay [from 8:00am to 8:30am], mean school night sleep duration increased by 45 minutes, and average bedtime advanced by 18 minutes (95% confidence interval, 7-29 minutes [t423 = 3.36; P < .001]); the percentage of students getting less than 7 hours of sleep decreased by 79.4%, and those reporting at least 8 hours of sleep increased from 16.4% to 54.7%. Students reported significantly more satisfaction with sleep and experienced improved motivation. Daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and depressed mood were all reduced. Most health-related variables, including Health Center visits for fatigue-related complaints, and class attendance also improved.Does a later start time mean more sleep? YES.Impact of delaying school start time on adolescent sleep, mood, and behavior.http://archpedi.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=3834366/1/2016
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Health5/27/2016Chronic sleep deprivation tied to more depression for young womenReuters“The overall message that poor quality and insufficient sleep lead to poor mood, which, in turn, worsens sleep was not surprising,” said lead author David A. Kalmbach of the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor. More noteworthy, he added, was that these relationships were evident in healthy, young women, not just insomniacs or depressed people. Women who averaged less sleep per night over the two-week period tended to report greater “anhedonic” depression symptoms, or the inability to enjoy pleasurable things. But they also tended to report more of these symptoms the day after a night of particularly long sleep, as reported in Sleep Medicine.Chronic sleep deprivation tied to more depression for young womenhttp://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-sleep-depression-idUSKCN0YI2FL6/1/2016
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Health11/28/2005Epidemiology of insomnia, depression, and anxiety.SleepRESULTS: People with insomnia had greater depression and anxiety levels than people not having insomnia and were 9.82 and 17.35 times as likely to have clinically significant depression and anxiety, respectively. Increased insomnia frequency was related to increased depression and anxiety, and increased number of awakenings was also related to increased depression. These were the only 2 sleep variables significantly related to depression and anxiety. People with combined insomnia (ie, both onset and maintenance insomnia) had greater depression than did people with onset, maintenance, or mixed insomnia. There were no differences between other insomnia types. African Americans were 3.43 and 4.8 times more likely to have clinically significant depression and anxiety than Caucasians, respectively. Women had higher levels of depression than men. CONCLUSION: These results reaffirm the close relationship of insomnia, depression, and anxiety, after rigorously controlling for other potential explanations for the relationship.Epidemiology of insomnia, depression, and anxiety.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=163353326/1/2016
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Health5/3/2016Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome (DSPS) and TeenagersSound Sleep Health"The scenario of the late-night teenager being dragged out of bed in order to go to school is classic. Up until recently, such behavior was blamed on poor sleep hygiene, laziness, and maybe the side effects of hormone imbalances. Now we know better. Research shows our kids are more likely to become night owls during their teens, and that this is a normal part of growing up. What's unfortunate is that some of our teens develop delayed sleep phase syndrome or DSPS, which exaggerates this late rhythm shift. Add other influences like cell phone use, caffeine as self-medication, and the demands of school, sports, and job schedules, and it's easy to see how our young people have become dangerously sleep deprived."Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome (DSPS) and Teenagershttp://blog.soundsleephealth.com/delayed-sleep-phase-syndrome-dsps-and-teenagers-teens-and-screens-start-school-later6/1/2016
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Safety5/22/2014Juvenile violent crime time-of-day profilesOffice of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency PreventionOne side effect of our early school start and end times is that some teens will have long, unsupervised afternoons while their parents are still at work. The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has found that juvenile violence peaks during after school hours on school days, and in the evenings on nonschool days. Furthermore, even though the number of school days and nonschool days is roughly equivalent, most violent crimes (63%) committed by juveniles occur on school days, with 19% of all juvenile violent crimes occuring between the hours of 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. on school days. Crime studiesJuvenile violent crime time-of-day profileshttp://www.ojjdp.gov/ojstatbb/offenders/qa03301.asp6/1/2016
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Start Time5/16/2016Don't snooze on sleep issueSingaporeThe findings keep coming and they are never good. Yet again, a study reported in March on teenagers in Singapore is pointing to the deleterious effects of not getting enough sleep. The study, by the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, showed that teens who were sleep deprived did worse cognitively after one week than teens who had enough sleep. Just seven nights of shortened sleep resulted in prominent deterioration of sustained attention, working memory and alertness, as well as foul moods. The price teens pay for sleep deprivation is not just for now. In the long term, it is also linked to high blood pressure, depression, behavioural problems and impaired growth.A look at the link between sleep deprivation and obesityDon't snooze on sleep issuehttp://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/dont-snooze-on-sleep-issue6/1/2016
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Start Time7/1/2012Do schools begin too early?Education NextI find that delaying school start times by one hour, from roughly 7:30 to 8:30, increases standardized test scores by at least 2 percentile points in math and 1 percentile point in reading. The effect is largest for students with below-average test scores, suggesting that later start times would narrow gaps in student achievement. Finley Edwards; looks at effects on academic achievement: a skeptic, he finds resultsDo schools begin too early?http://educationnext.org/files/ednext_20123_Finnley.pdf6/1/2016
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Start Time8/6/2015Most US middle and high schools start the school day too earlyCDCCDC: Most US middle and high schools start the school day too early. Schools that have a start time of 8:30 AM or later allow adolescent students the opportunity to get the recommended amount of sleep on school nights: about 8.5 to 9.5 hours. Insufficient sleep is common among high school students and is associated with several health risks such as being overweight, drinking alcohol, smoking tobacco, and using drugs – as well as poor academic performance. The proportion of high school students who fail to get sufficient sleep (2 out of 3) has remained steady since 2007, according to the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Report. The authors report that delayed school start times do not replace the need for other interventions that can improve sleep among adolescents. Parents can help their children practice good sleep habits. For example, a consistent bedtime and rise time, including on weekends, is recommended for everyone, including children, adolescents, and adults. Health care providers who treat adolescents should educate teens and parents about the importance of adequate sleep in maintaining health and well-being.Most US middle and high schools start the school day too earlyhttp://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2015/p0806-school-sleep.html6/1/2016
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Start Time5/4/2016New Center for College Sleep says a good night’s rest is key to better mental health"Society is failing teens. We have a whole generation who do not know what it feels like to get enough sleep. Teens need eight to 10 hours of sleep a night. They’re not getting that. I’m not surprised we are seeing rising rates of depression and anxiety alongside their decreasing sleep.” And sleep deprivation aggravates mental illnesses like depression and anxiety, Prichard explained. “People who are chronically sleep deprived are nine times more likely to show depression symptoms and 17 times more likely to show anxiety symptoms. Research has shown that a lack of sleep ramps up your stress response so that you are much more likely to view normal behavior as a threat.” When a person is behind on their sleep, Prichard continued, “They are much more likely to become stressed about life.”New Center for College Sleep says a good night’s rest is key to better mental healthhttps://www.minnpost.com/mental-health-addiction/2016/05/new-center-college-sleep-says-good-night-s-rest-key-better-mental-he6/1/2016
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Start Time2014Synchronizing education to adolescent biology: ‘let teens sleep, start school later’Learning, Media and TechnologyWhen social time and biological time are more closely aligned, as in the early years of education, this distinction is not critical. In contrast, in late adolescence the conflict between social time and biological time is greater than at any point in our lives. During adolescence biological changes dictate both a sleep duration of nine hours and later wake and sleep times, a phenomenon found in other mammals (Hagenauer et al. 2009; Rüger et al. 2012). At its peak the combination of these two biological changes leads to a loss of two to three hours sleep every school day. Thus, a 07:00 alarm call for older adolescents is the equivalent of a 04:30 start for a teacher in their 50s. Failure to adjust education timetables to this biological change leads to systematic, chronic and unrecoverable sleep loss. This level of sleep loss causes impairment to physiological, metabolic and psychological health in adolescents while they are undergoing other major physical and neurological changes (Hansen et al. 2005; Giedd 2009; Giedd et al. 2012; Sawyer et al. 2012; Sørensen et al. 2012; Foster et al. 2013). The impact of early school times on adolescents is not understood by most educators: a common belief is that adolescents are tired, irritable and uncooperative because they choose to stay up too late, or are difficult to wake in the morning because they are lazy. Educators tend to think that adolescents learn best in the morning and if they simply went to sleep earlier, it would improve their concentration. These assumptions reflect societies’ prejudice in favour of early risers in adulthood, exemplified by the proverb: "Early to bed, early to rise
Makes a man healthy, wealth and wise" This belief finds expression in many cultures, and even in today’s business world (Czeisler 2006; Roenneberg 2012). Such conventional wisdom lies behind the misconception that adolescents need to be trained to rise early and to go to sleep early. The truth is that adults need to be educated to adjust to another significant change in adolescents during puberty: a major biological shift in their sleep patterns.
Synchronizing education to adolescent biology: ‘let teens sleep, start school later’http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/17439884.2014.9426666/1/2016
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Start Time6/13/2014Let The Teens SleepSeattle Children's"I touched base with Dr Maida Chen, a sleep expert about why this movement matters so much. “I have to start by saying that it is impossible to place a ‘price’ on the health, safety and achievement of a child,” she told me. She mentioned she’d spent significant time this week documenting the evolving data and cost-effectiveness of moving school start times. She’s written, “Rational start times, which align with students’ fundamental sleep needs, are a cost-effective and scientifically robust approach to improve equity, opportunity gap, and academic achievement on a large-scale with the greatest positive impact on students at the most disadvantage.” Translation: this makes sense and will affect a large amount of teens.SeattleLet The Teens Sleephttp://seattlemamadoc.seattlechildrens.org/let-the-teens-sleep/6/1/2016
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Start Time5/4/2016Kids' dream, adults' nightmareNorth Jersey"Teens' changing biological rhythms require that they get even more sleep than their younger siblings (8.5 to 9.5 hours). By forcing them to be in class before their minds and bodies are ready, says the report, we are jeopardizing their overall health and safety as well as their capacity to learn. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) concurs with those findings. New Jersey's middle and high schools have an average start time of 8 a.m., says the CDC, which leads to inadequate sleep in two out of every three adolescent students. Broken down by start time, about 7 percent of middle and high schools in the state begin their day before 7:30 a.m. Another 37 percent start between 7:31 and 7:59, and approximately 41 percent ring the opening bell between 8 and 8:29, leaving just 15 percent of schools to start after the recommended 8:30 a.m. threshold. Thanks to the new law, the DOE is charged with assessing the health, safety, and academic benefits associated with later start times for students in middle and high school. Potential negative effects to students and school districts must also be considered, as should strategies to combat them. At the conclusion of the study, the DOE may decide to establish a pilot program to test later start times at selected schools."Kids' dream, adults' nightmarehttp://www.northjersey.com/news/education/kids-dream-adults-nightmare-1.15663646/1/2016
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Start Time5/1/2016Experts Push Hard This Year For Later School TimesWDTV 5 NewsThey say it's never too late to learn, but sometimes, is it too early? Experts are pushing hard this year to have students getting to school later to give them more hours for sleep. "If you have ever woken up your teenager for school in the morning, you know how hard it can be, but their unwillingness to get out of bed is actually biological. Students are now getting less sleep than ever. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports 85% of middle schools and high schools start too early to give students adequate time to sleep."Experts Push Hard This Year For Later School Timeshttp://www.wdtv.com/wdtv.cfm?func=view&section=5-News&item=Experts-Push-Hard-This-Year-For-Later-School-Times-304216/1/2016
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Start Time9/11/2014Early school starts can turn teens into ‘zombies’Student ScienceJanet Croft studies teens and sleep at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Ga. U.S. high schools, she says, “start at such an early time that most teens are essentially brain dead when they go to these early classes.” As a result, she says, too many students start their day as “walking zombies.” Too little sleep has become so common among teens that the CDC calls it an epidemic, or a widespread public-health problem. Many teens get too little sleep because they attend middle and high schools that start earlier than 8:30 a.m., according to the AAP. Those early start times throw off a student’s internal body rhythm, called the circadian clock. Too little sleep disrupts that clock and causes problems.Early school starts can turn teens into ‘zombies’https://student.societyforscience.org/article/early-school-starts-can-turn-teens-‘zombies’6/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/21/2016Commentary: Insist on later high school start in NewtonWicked Local NewtonTeens need an average of 9.5 hours of sleep per night, but they get, on average, less than seven hours. Study after study has shown that when schools start later, students are more awake during the day, better able to focus on learning, and better able to handle the stress and emotions of adolescence. Research has even shown a reduction in car accidents by teen drivers when they’ve been able to sleep later. In addition, student athletes are almost twice as likely to be injured when they get less than eight hours of sleep. A common argument that we hear is that, if school starts later, teens will just stay up later at night and get the same amount of sleep. Research and adolescent biology does not support that argument. By starting school later, teens can sleep at times that are more aligned with their natural body clocks, instead of fighting against nature to fall asleep and rise earlier.Newton, MACommentary: Insist on later high school start in Newtonhttp://newton.wickedlocal.com/article/20160521/OPINION/1605295756/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/24/2016Montgomery County lawmaker to push bill to delay start time in high schoolsPhilly VoiceMy legislation would study the issue of delaying the start time of the school day for high schools in Pennsylvania, not because it is what teenagers want but because it is most likely what is good for them, Briggs said. "Emerging science has proven what many of us have known for years, teenagers need more sleep than they are getting. The consequences of failing to do so are serious, so this idea is worthy of consideration and study."PhiladelphiaMontgomery County lawmaker to push bill to delay start time in high schoolshttp://www.phillyvoice.com/montgomery-county-lawmaker-push-bill-delay-start-time-high-schools/6/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/24/2016Barrington School District 220 parents want another say on later start timesChicago Tribune"Some parents feel so strongly about changing the start times that some have expressed a willingness to pay more in student fees so the district can afford additional buses," Jeffrey Arnett, the district's assistant superintendent of operations and outreach, said after the April 19 meeting. Board member Wendy Farley pointed out during the May 17 town hall that the district's policy of picking up many students at their homes needs to change, suggesting the district could reduce transportation costs by letting buses pick up students at one location rather than driving door to door. ChicagoBarrington School District 220 parents want another say on later start timeshttp://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/barrington/news/ct-bcr-late-start-survey-tl-0526-20160524-story.html6/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/25/2016Rondout Valley considers starting school day laterDaily Freeman“Many of our students in grades 4 to 12 are picked up as early as 6:30 a.m. for a 7:30 a.m. arrival time,” school board President Rebecca Versace said. “Such early start times appear to contradict with what the [American Academy of Pediatrics] is suggesting regarding children and adolescents’ natural sleep cycles. The research is showing that those schools who have changed to a later start time are reporting positive results, including increased participation in class, [improved] alertness, higher academic performance and a reduction in discipline issues.” The committee said chronic loss of sleep can contribute to anxiety, depression, suicide, poor attention and problem solving, reduced impulse control, low tolerance for frustration, increased risk-taking and drug use, and additional violence and bullying in school.New YorkRondout Valley considers starting school day laterhttp://www.dailyfreeman.com/general-news/20160525/rondout-valley-considers-starting-school-day-later6/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/24/2016Later School Start TimesThe Valley LedgerYou might be wondering why teens just can’t go to sleep earlier at night so that they can get up earlier in the morning and still obtain their required 8.5-9.5hrs of nightly sleep that they need. The reason has to do with their circadian rhythms, or biological clocks. As humans we all have a sleep hormone called Melatonin that helps us to feel sleepy at night. For young children and adults, Melatonin increases in our systems earlier in the night, however, this hormone increase does not happen for teens until a much later hour. While they may go to bed at 9:30 or 10pm, they often aren’t able to actually fall asleep until somewhere between 11pm-12am. Again, they have science working against them when it comes to their going to bed at an acceptable hour. Couple those late nights with needing to be awake at 5 or 6am to catch a bus or drive to school, and it is a recipe for disaster!Lehigh Valley, PALater School Start Timeshttp://www.thevalleyledger.com/?p=156386/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/25/2016Should Schools Move Back Start Times?Alton Daily News“It’s very early, but she has her coffee when she wakes up at 5 [a.m.],” Rebmann said. “She tries to go to bed at about 9 [p.m.], but it’s hard for her to fall asleep, so we give her melatonin on occasion.”IllinoisShould Schools Move Back Start Times?http://www.altondailynews.com/news/details.cfm?id=214585#.V07qJVdN80o6/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/26/2016Later Start Time Gains MomentumNewport this weekNewport, RI: The discussion stemmed from the growing national focus on the importance, for teenagers, of getting a good night’s sleep, and the growing movement that views a later start to their school day as a solution. Goss said that he has lived through such a change, when he was assistant principal at Classical High School in Providence from 2012-2014 prior to coming to Rogers. “You do see the difference,” he assured the group. He also said he saw a significant bump-up in “alertness and with it-ness.” Conversation at the meeting centered on not if it should be done, but when and how.Newport, RILater Start Time Gains Momentumhttp://www.newportthisweek.com/news/2016-05-26/Around_Town/Later_Start_Time_Gains_Momentum.html6/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/27/2016Greenwich parents continue push for later school startsGreenwich time"Ever since sixth grade, I’ve been exhausted," Greenwich High School ninth-grader Matthew Gesell said at the meeting at Western Middle School. "I don’t remember the last time I ever felt fully awake. Honestly, it just makes being successful in school so hard, and it makes my life really hard… Please give us later start times because I am just so tired." Almost all of the speakers expressed support for a later schedule at Greenwich High, which now starts at 7:30 a.m. "Why are we making high school students get up so early?" said Wendy Reilly Harris, who has a 12th-grade daughter at the high school. "They just can’t be as productive then." Greenwich, CTGreenwich parents continue push for later school startshttp://www.greenwichtime.com/local/article/Greenwich-parents-continue-push-for-later-school-7948789.php6/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/26/2016Students push for later start times in Huron Valley DistrictClick On DetroitA group of Huron Valley Schools’ students say it’s time for school to start later in the day. The students believe later start times are better for their health and learning capabilities and they’ve got the research to back it up. Eighth graders from Oak Valley Middle School presented their findings to the Huron Valley Schools Board of Education and cited numerous sources for their research. Their research included information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Sleep Foundation, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Education Association. “We as a group are all concerned about hour high school times which start absurdly early,” Liam White said. “Over 44 states have already changed their start times.” The boys researched the issue and found that later start times can have positive effects on students. “It promotes academic success,” Luke Aman said. “It reduces tardiness and dropout rates.” The high school students in the Huron Valley District have started at 7 a.m. for more than 40 years. The boys started an online petition to get the community on board. “We’re not trying to change this for our own good,” Brandon Werner said. “We’re trying to change it for everybody’s good because the times they start now are unhealthy.”Detroit, MichiganStudents push for later start times in Huron Valley Districthttp://www.clickondetroit.com/news/students-push-for-later-start-times-in-huron-valley-district6/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/27/2016Yarmouth approves later start school start timesPortland Press HeraldThe Yarmouth School Committee has approved pushing the school start times back 20 minutes at all Yarmouth schools. Starting next school year, students at the high and middle schools will start at 8 a.m. and school will get out at 2:45 p.m. Yarmouth Elementary School and Rowe School will start at 8:40 a.m. and let out at 3:30 p.m. High school students will still start later on Wednesdays, starting school at 9 a.m. and letting out at 2:45 p.m.Yarmouth, MEYarmouth approves later start school start timeshttp://www.pressherald.com/2016/05/27/yarmouth-approves-later-start-school-start-times/6/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage12/3/2014Moving School Start Later Is A Mindset, Says Sharon PrincipalEast Greenwich NewsThe principal from Sharon High School in Massachusetts came to the forum on pushing back school start times Monday night to talk about his school’s experience doing just that. His message? It’s hard, it’s courageous, but Sharon would never go back. “Once the School Committee made the decision,” said Sharon Principal Jose Libano, “where there’s a will there’s a way. And if this is the right thing for our students and their growth, we had to find a way to make that happen.” High school students in Sharon used to start their day at 7:25 a.m. Today they start at 8:05 a.m. “If we polled our [high school] kids then, there was resentment, there was anger. “’We can’t do this.’ ‘How are we going to do athletics?’ ‘How am I going to get extra help?’ ‘How am I going to do clubs?’ ‘How am I going to get to work?'” Libano said. “If I polled 1,200 students now, I’d get 1,200 kids saying, ‘I would never go back to school at 7:25.”Greenwich, CT and Sharon, MA: video attachedMoving School Start Later Is A Mindset, Says Sharon Principalhttp://www.eastgreenwichnews.com/moving-school-start-later-is-a-mindset-says-sharon-principal/6/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/31/2016Asleep at the desk: How school begins for many Michigan teensBridge Michigan"District administrators at the time said they would continue to look for ways to push start times to 8 a.m. The move drew considerable online comment from parents, some faulting the board for taking such timid steps toward a later start time. But there were doubts about moving the start of school back as well, including this comment: “The schools don’t need to alter their schedules for our high school students. The students need to suck it up and manage themselves. After all, who will do this for them after they graduate from high school? 80% of life is just showing up.” Brown University sleep researcher Carskadon told Bridge that entrenched skepticism about the science of sleep continues to impede widespread adoption of later school start times. She said the debate is often shaped by what’s convenient for adults rather what’s best for learning. “This kind of, ‘Suck it up, Buttercup’ approach is really not well informed. It’s not useful and it’s not a public health strategy. The job of adolescents isn’t just to show up. They have work to do. They need to learn. They need to grow their brains. This matters a lot. If they are wandering through school half awake, it isn’t going to be successful.”Asleep at the desk: How school begins for many Michigan teenshttp://bridgemi.com/2016/05/asleep-at-the-desk-how-school-begins-for-many-michigan-teens/6/1/2016
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Start Time: Local CoverageCommentary: Insist on later high school start in NewtonWicked Local NewtonFamilies in Newton are beginning to understand how serious sleep deprivation is for our teens, and what a start time change might mean for them: "High school is a time of enormous learning and growth, but as we have seen in Newton and other communities around the country, these years can also lead to vulnerability and stress in our students. When we ask ourselves what we can do, as parents and as a community, to best support teens during their high school years starting school later in the morning is one of the obvious answers. The scientific evidence demonstrates without a doubt that adjusting school start times benefits students physically, intellectually and emotionally. We understand that in a large district like Newton, a change in school start time affects many other aspects of the school day for students, teachers, parents and the community at large. The recent survey by the Newton Public Schools focused on understanding how changes to the school day may affect early morning and afternoon routines for school families. These effects, however, need to be weighed against the best interests of our children. The inconveniences of a new routine — something many are quick to point out — would be quickly outweighed by improved physical and emotional health and learning. New routines are uncomfortable at first, but by mid-year, most families will have adjusted to the new routines. This is the experience of the hundreds of school districts nationwide that have moved their start time."Newton, MACommentary: Insist on later high school start in Newtonhttp://newton.wickedlocal.com/article/20160521/OPINION/160529575/?Start=16/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/18/2016Councilors: It's past time to let high-school kids sleep inUniversal hubThe City of Boston joins dozens of communities in Massachusetts in recognizing that a later start time can have a significant impact on the health and well being of our children, by aligning the school day with their own natural sleep schedule: "City Councilors want Boston to join the ranks of communities pushing back high-school start times to give sleep-deprived students a better jump on the day. The council unanimously approved holding a hearing on the idea of starting high school as late as 8:30 a.m. Nearly half the city's high schools currently start at 7:20 or 7:30 a.m., councilors said. At-large Councilor Annissa Essaibi-George, a former teach at East Boston High School, says giving kids even just an extra hour of shuteye could reduce tardiness, absenteeism and even obesity and depression."Boston, MACouncilors: It's past time to let high-school kids sleep inhttp://www.universalhub.com/2016/councilors-past-time-let-high-school-kids-sleep6/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/14/2016Valerie Erde: Refuting concerns about later school start timesGreenwich timeGreenwich, CT, responding to an editorial questioning whether the school should change start time: "Ms. Herrmann argues that a later start time at GHS will not increase sleep for students. The science refutes this. The University of Minnesota’s 2014 study of more than 9,000 high school students across six districts showed that students get more sleep when start times are moved later — and the later the start time, the more sleep they gained. ... Herrmann also raises a concern that if high school students were to benefit from a later schedule initiated now, they might not be able to handle the transition to college, which might not offer “the flexibility to sleep in.” First, few college students face a schedule with 7:30 a.m. classes five days a week, if at all. Some colleges are actually doing away with even 8 a.m. classes. Second, college students usually have flexibility in choosing what time in the morning is reasonable to start class. Lastly, adolescents’ circadian rhythm begins to shift back toward a “normal” arc by their early twenties, making early mornings less of an issue down the road."Greenwich, CTValerie Erde: Refuting concerns about later school start timeshttp://www.greenwichtime.com/news/article/Valerie-Erde-Refuting-concerns-about-later-7467456.php6/1/2016
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Start Time: Local CoverageAdmnistrators advocate later starting time for Hanover High SchoolWicked Local HanoverHigh school students could be getting an extra half-hour of sleep if school officials adopt a plan to push the first bell to 7:55 a.m. Teenagers perform better when they are able to sleep later, Principal Matthew Paquette said. Later high school start times have been linked to increased attendance, improved academic performance and decreased disciplinary issues in high schools nationwide, he said. “Mental well-being and physical well-being are valid, proven benefits, and that’s the single driving force behind this possibility,” Paquette said. “This is not to benefit our teachers or administrators, it’s because it’s in the best interest of students here at Hanover High School.”Hanover, MAAdmnistrators advocate later starting time for Hanover High Schoolhttps://www.facebook.com/Start-School-Later-Masconomet-1531632683830904/insights/?section=navPosts6/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/8/2016Taunton School Committee to study later school start timesWicked Local TauntonTaunton joins the growing list of Massachusetts schools studying later start times: "It’s only under discussion, so don’t set your alarm clocks for a later start to the school day, Taunton students. Not yet, anyway. The Taunton School Committee is exploring whether or not to start classes later than the current schedule. Pediatrician Dr. Eric J. Ruby spoke to school board members and school administrators about the need for children and teens to get 8½ to 9½ hours of sleep a night, the doctor said. Recently, Easton joined other Massachusetts communities, such as Duxbury, in opting for a later start to the school day. Taunton High School students begin classes before 7:30 a.m."Taunton, MATaunton School Committee to study later school start timeshttp://taunton.wickedlocal.com/article/20160508/NEWS/1605065906/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/7/2016What time should school start in the morning? Some parents want change.The Virginian PilotBouchard said she understands the economic reasons behind the current schedule and hasn’t heard many complaints from parents about it. But she thinks older students should be starting later. “It’s scientifically proven that teenagers need more sleep, and they’re not awake at eight in the morning,” she said. Wolland said she sees it daily. Her two youngest children – one in preschool and one in second grade at Northern Shores Elementary – are up and ready before the other three. Wolland readily admits she doesn’t have an ideal solution. She understands the division’s budget and why it set up the schedule. That doesn’t mean she supports it, though. “I can see how it saves money,” she said. “But it really is at the expense of the students it’s serving.”VirginiaWhat time should school start in the morning? Some parents want change.http://pilotonline.com/news/local/education/what-time-should-school-start-in-the-morning-some-parents/article_33c7ee99-b23d-5e8a-a09a-4621283681b8.html6/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/5/2016How Concord students, faculty really feel about later start timeConcord Wicked LocalDor, along with 13 of 15 students and faculty members interviewed for this story, feels the school day start should be moved half an hour to an hour later -- meaning that the day would start somewhere between 8 and 8:30 a.m. School administrators are now looking into doing just that. Gaia Daelli, a junior who moved to Carlisle from Italy, agrees that 7:30 is “too early.” Daelli wakes at 5:30 “because the bus comes at 6:40.” She finds waking up before the sun “unnatural,” and says that rising in the dark is not just “bad for the body,” but “dangerous for drivers.” Phillip Brown, a senior at the high school, agrees that school should be pushed back a half-hour. Brown reports having “napped in first block” and finds himself once more tired by the end of the school day. Björn Supplies, a freshman, recounts a similar problem, that he “can’t pay attention in first class.” “There’s just not enough time to do anything in the morning,” Supplies states. “It’s too early for my system.”Concord MAHow Concord students, faculty really feel about later start timehttp://concord.wickedlocal.com/article/20160505/NEWS/1605083426/1/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage5/4/2016Laval parents say 7:45 a.m. is too early for school to startCBC News MontrealOf the 8,300 parents who responded to a survey put out by the parents committee at the Commission Scolaire de Laval (Quebec, Canada), 75 per cent said they would prefer a later school start time. Parents say the early start time leads to crunched routines and tired kids. "My kids are at the end of their rope," wrote another parent. Sylvain Martel, the president of the parents' committee, proposed the survey because he thinks parents, like teachers, should be consulted on decisions about scheduling. "It not only concerns their kids at school, it's their kids at home also," said Martel. One in three elementary schools and one in five high schools in the Laval board begin classes at 7:45 a.m., whereas most of the parents who responded to the survey said they'd prefer school to start around 8:15 a.m.MontrealLaval parents say 7:45 a.m. is too early for school to starthttp://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/laval-parents-early-start-times-1.35668366/1/2016
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Athletics7/1/2011The Effects of Sleep Extension on the Athletic Performance of Collegiate Basketball PlayersSLEEP JournalTotal objective nightly sleep time increased during sleep extension compared to baseline by 110.9 ± 79.7 min (P < 0.001). Subjects demonstrated a faster timed sprint following sleep extension (16.2 ± 0.61 sec at baseline vs. 15.5 ± 0.54 sec at end of sleep extension, P < 0.001). Shooting accuracy improved, with free throw percentage increasing by 9% and 3-point field goal percentage increasing by 9.2% (P < 0.001). Mean PVT reaction time and Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores decreased following sleep extension (P < 0.01). POMS scores improved with increased vigor and decreased fatigue subscales (P < 0.001). Subjects also reported improved overall ratings of physical and mental well-being during practices and games.Stanford study on basketball players showing reduced athletic performanceThe Effects of Sleep Extension on the Athletic Performance of Collegiate Basketball Playershttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3119836/5/4/2016
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Athletics4/29/2016Sleep or Sports: Which Is More Important for Teens?Huffington PostIt’s indisputable that sleep has enormous impact on athletic performance. One study found that even moderate sleep deprivation has the same impact on reaction time as being legally drunk. Another study found that athletes who slept less than 8 hours were 1.7 times more likely to suffer injury compared with athletes who slept more than 8 hours. The bottom line is sleep enhances athletic performance and participation. Students need both. Sports are not a substitute for adequate sleep, and it’s not in the best interest of students to power through fatigue. The ravages of sleep deprivation are real and proven, as are the benefits of adequate sleep. It’s the single most cost effective way to enhance athletic and academic performance, while also reducing stress, injury, accidents and even teen pregnancy. Districts need to power through the challenges of changing sports schedules and give sleep a chance.Sleep or Sports: Which Is More Important for Teens?http://www.huffingtonpost.com/sharon-peaslee/sleep-or-sports-which-is-_b_9811120.html5/3/2016
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Start Time4/29/2016Teens Need to Wake Up to the Need for More Shut EyeCreatorsFor young people that stick it out, many routinely stay up past midnight on school nights, a lot of them transfixed by new media, only to be faced with getting up at the crack of dawn in order to make it to school before the 8:00 a.m. bell. Now, a new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has revealed that there are consequences of resulting tiredness we see in young people as a result of this cycle. It's also now becoming clear that this sleep-deprived way of life of today's teenagers is not only dangerous, it could be deadly. The new CDC report reveals an association between lack of sleep and a greater tendency toward riskier behaviors by teens. The study found that when teens get less than seven hours of sleep on school nights, they are more likely to engage in a wide range of risky behaviors. Those behaviors included texting and driving, drinking and driving, riding with a driver who was drinking, and not wearing a seat belt in a car, or a helmet while on a bicycle; such risky behaviors were less likely to be found in teens that sleep nine hours a night, according to the report.Chuck Norris!Teens Need to Wake Up to the Need for More Shut Eyehttps://www.creators.com/read/c-force/04/16/teens-need-to-wake-up-to-the-need-for-more-shut-eye5/3/2016
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Start Time5/1/2016New Jersey holding hearings to consider later school start timesNorth JerseyState education officials this week will launch a series of hearings to discuss whether middle and high school students should start the school day later in the morning. The Legislature passed a law last year to consider the proposal. Proponents cited an American Academy of Pediatrics report that recommended that students start class no earlier than 8:30 a.m. The group says insufficient sleep is "an important public health issue" impacting the students' academic success.New Jersey holding hearings to consider later school start timeshttp://www.northjersey.com/news/new-jersey-holding-hearings-to-consider-later-school-start-times-1.15566255/3/2016
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Start Time5/2/2016Maryland Ties Orange Ribbon On Sleep-Friendly SchoolsHuffington Post"Maryland’s governor made history last week by enacting the Orange Ribbon Bill for Healthy School Hours, the nation’s first legislation to help schools implement later, safer, healthier class times. ... This bill is an innovative way to address a longstanding public health problem: extremely early, unhealthy, and counterproductive school hours that many communities haven’t been able to address on their own."Maryland Ties Orange Ribbon On Sleep-Friendly Schoolshttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/terra-ziporyn-snider-phd/maryland-ties-orange-ribb_b_9815418.html5/3/2016
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Start Time4/15/2016Sleep deprivation is serious threat to teensCourier-PostWhat if we could create schedules that allowed teens to fall asleep and wake at their natural bedtimes? How would that change their lives? "When the brain is developing during adolescence, its two main goals are pruning--the process of get rid of all the associations and circuits the brain doesn't use much, in preparation for adulthood--and myelinating, which is the process of strengthening the most used circuits in the brain for maximum speed and efficiency."Sleep deprivation is serious threat to teenshttp://www.courierpostonline.com/story/life/family/driving-lessons/2016/04/15/sleep-deprivation-is-serious-threat-to-teens/83076364/5/3/2016
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Start Time4/20/2016The U.S.’s Best High School Starts at 9:15 a.m.Slate.com"There are doubtless many reasons why the School for the Talented and Gifted landed in the top spot—for the fifth straight year—in the U.S. News and World Report rankings. That its start time allows students to get a good night’s sleep is likely just a part of the equation—but it’s one that we can easily implement elsewhere. Our students deserve it."The U.S.’s Best High School Starts at 9:15 a.m.http://www.slate.com/articles/life/education/2016/04/can_the_best_high_school_in_the_country_thank_its_9_15_a_m_start_time_for.html5/3/2016
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Start Time4/20/2016Nikhil Marda: How can Rochester schools' schedules make the grade?Post-BulletinNikhil Marda, a high school junior (2015-16) at John Marshall High School in Rochester, MN, who published a well-researched and compellingly argued article in her local newspaper about the need to start school at healthy, evidence-based hours in a city that houses the Mayo Clinic. In her article, she writes: "The most common objection to changing start times is that teens could just sleep earlier now. However, there are scientific reasons as to why this is flawed. Teenagers are biologically predisposed to sleeping later, with a phenomenon called sleep phase shift making them feel more awake in the late evening. Interestingly, a study conducted by Brown University found that when schools start later, students still sleep at the same time on average. The result? More sleep."Nikhil Marda: How can Rochester schools' schedules make the grade?http://www.postbulletin.com/life/lifestyles/nikhil-marda-how-can-rochester-schools-schedules-make-the-grade/article_35bda8a3-cb6d-52ea-87bf-4d6692b6f1b2.html5/3/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage4/29/2016N.J. wants to know: Does school start too early?Philly.comThe New Jersey Department of Education will hold hearings next week to learn whether the public thinks students in middle and high school grades should be spared very early school start times. Parents, educators, students, and other community members are being asked for input into the possibility of school start times of 8:30 a.m. or later. The Legislature passed a law last year to look into the proposal, after the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended later school start times for middle and high schoolers. N.J. wants to know: Does school start too early?http://www.philly.com/philly/education/20160430_N_J__wants_to_know__Does_school_start_too_early_.html5/3/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage4/7/2016Does school start too early?Good News Network“Some kids are exposed to the same degree of sleep loss for four or five years,” Judith Owens, director of the Center for Pediatric Sleep Disorders at Boston Children’s Hospital told the Boston Globe. “It’s not a good thing. . . . If you are asking teenagers to get up at 5:30 or 6, that is their lowest point of alertness in their 24-hour cycle. It’s at that point where their brain is most loudly saying ‘stay asleep.’” The Globe investigated several high schools experimenting with pushing their morning start time back to 8:30 a.m., letting their students sleep an extra hour every night. The switch produced positive results almost immediately: test scores went up, the number of Ds and Fs dropped by half, rates of tardiness and absence went down, and teen related car crashes decreased dramatically. Students said they did not mind being kept in school until 3:00 p.m. because the later start time made them feel better rested and less likely to fall asleep while in class. New legislation for a delayed morning bell is currently being discussed by the school boards with possible implementation as early as 2017.Does school start too early?http://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/school-starts-implementing-later-start-times-sees-dramatic-improvement/5/3/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage4/30/2016Does Greenwich High’s early start endanger teen drivers?Greenwich TimeParents, educators and medical experts agree that high-schoolers should not be getting behind the wheel when they are tired. From 2005 to 2009, approximately 1.4 percent of all motor-vehicle crashes in the United States, 2.2 percent of those that led to injuries and 2.5 percent of all fatal crashes involved a drowsy driver, resulting in some 5,000 deaths, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “As a parent you would not in a million years knowingly allow your teen to get behind the wheel of a car having consumed three or four beers, and yet we do that every day when we allow our students to drive themselves to school,” Owens said during a presentation this week at Eastern Middle School.In Greenwich they haven't seen this as a local problem, but they haven't studied it either.Does Greenwich High’s early start endanger teen drivers?http://www.greenwichtime.com/local/article/Does-Greenwich-High-s-early-start-endanger-teen-7385474.php5/3/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage4/30/2016Chester County Student Forum lobbying for more sleepDaily Local News“There’s pretty substantial evidence that a later school start time would be helpful,” said Melisa Moore, a clinical psychologist at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, who has trained in sleep for the past 10 years. She said teens have a biological disposition to go to bed later and between after school activities, homework and spending time with friends, they need to give their developing brains the extra sleep in order to function and learn. Early school start times rob them of that. ... “I hope that the board will be open to the idea and actually listen to possible solutions to it,” Arencibia said. “We have thought of all the possible drawbacks. The solutions definitely outweigh the struggles to overcome. I hope they’ll be open to it and work with us to accomplish it.” Chester County, PA A roll-up of findings from this committee's research is interesting, though still a lot of skepticism from the district's leadership. Chester County Student Forum lobbying for more sleephttp://www.dailylocal.com/article/DL/20160430/NEWS/1604399945/3/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage4/29/2016Superintendents support later start time for high schoolsMiddlesex East“Looking at research in terms of sleeping patterns, there seems to be a benefit not only in terms of academics, but also in risky behavior. Anything that could be good for kids should be something we should be taking a look at,” Burlington Superintendent Dr. Eric Conti commented during a phone interview with Middlesex East. “We know the research is out there supporting the benefits, so on that issue alone, I can support the statement ,” said Stoneham Superintendent Dr. Les Olson in a separate interview. In particular, the Middlesex League superintendents, which meets regularly to discuss common interests and areas of concern, unanimously agrees that adolescents should report to school sometime between 8 a.m. and 8:30 a.m.Superintendents support later start time for high schoolshttp://homenewshere.com/middlesex_east/article_1bcc3688-0c8d-11e6-8f9d-4ffa92123201.html5/3/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage4/28/2016Greenwich schools hear from teen sleep expert on start timesGreenwich Time“You’re asking students to wake up and function at a time when their brains are telling them loudly and clearly to be asleep,” said Owens, director of sleep medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital and a Harvard Medical School neurology professor. On Tuesday, Owens said teens are struggling physically and psychologically from a chronic lack of sleep, in large part because they cannot adjust to their schools’ early schedules. They are not adapting because their circadian rhythms naturally shift later during their teenage years. As a result, the average adolescent finds it “almost impossible” to go to sleep before 11 p.m. and is not “biologically programmed” to wake up before 8 a.m., Owens said. “Teens cannot force themselves and parents cannot make them fall asleep earlier,” Owens said. In addition, early schedules force students to get up during their “circadian nadir,” the time of day when they feel most sleepy. They also miss out on rapid eye movement sleep, concentrated in the latter third of the night, which is critical for memory consolidation and learning, Owens said. “We’re asking these kids to get up at the wrong time, when they haven’t gotten enough sleep and when they haven’t gotten the stage of sleep that is most critical for their ability to learn in school - a triple whammy if you will,” Owens said.Greenwich schools hear from teen sleep expert on start timeshttp://www.greenwichtime.com/local/article/Greenwich-schools-hear-from-teen-sleep-expert-on-7381995.php5/3/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage4/20/2016Wiped Out: Early School Start Times And Boston’s Epidemic Of Exhausted StudentsWBUR Cognoscenti"Here’s the problem with denying children the sleep they need: They don’t learn as well when they are tired. Grades are not the only thing to suffer — students experience anxiety, depression, poor concentration and behavioral problems. What’s more, the latest research on teenagers’ sleep patterns suggests that, as puberty begins, their circadian rhythms shift to a “sleep phase delay,” which means they naturally fall asleep as late as 10:00 and 11:00 at night, even as their need for up to nine hours of sleep remains the same."Wiped Out: Early School Start Times And Boston’s Epidemic Of Exhausted Studentshttp://cognoscenti.wbur.org/2016/04/20/sleep-and-school-start-times-deborah-j-bennett5/3/2016
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Start Time: Local Coverage4/19/2016Maine Schools Team Up for Teen Health — and SleepHuffington Post“I am pleased that Biddeford was able to cross the bridge and partner with area schools to make this critical change in service to our kids,” stated Biddeford superintendent Jeremy Ray. “The science is unimpeachable, and the results will be measurable. I am pleased that we were able to accomplish what so many consider difficult: collaborating across town lines. Our leadership team in Biddeford has a history of shared services and collaboration, and this is yet another example of what good will and good science can do to help our community.”Biddeford, MEMaine Schools Team Up for Teen Health — and Sleephttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/terra-ziporyn-snider-phd/maine-schools-team-up-for_b_9705538.html5/3/2016
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Athletics9/9/2014Sleep: Mission ImpossibleVimeoAdolescents are chronically sleep deprived, athletes that participate in early morning practices are acutely impacted. This video seeks to highlight this fact and call for an end to 5:00am wakeup times for high school student athletes in with the goal of achieving better health, mood, academic, and athletic performance.VideoSleep: Mission Impossiblehttps://vimeo.com/1056951964/26/2016
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Sleep Health10/15/2015The Big SleepReady, Set, GrowAs parents, it’s our role to look after the health of our children. Getting a good night’s rest has been shown to benefit t both a child’s physical and emotional health. Kids who sleep well are less likely to be responsible for car accidents, they perform better in school and they are better able to regulate their behavior and emotions. Great sleep enables kids to perform at their greatest potential. Ensuring a screen-free, cell phone-free space at night will not only benefit your children in the short term, it will also teach healthy habits that can promote wellness long into their adult years.Good sleep habits - great article covering the basicsThe Big Sleephttp://readysetgrowmag.com/the-big-sleep/4/26/2016
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Start Time4/25/2016The Detrimental Effects of an Early School Start Time for StudentsHuffington PostSchools with start times at 8:30 or later found that students do not go to bed later as a result of the change, but actually get an hour more of sleep per night. Overall, the school bell shift gives students an average of five more hours of sleep per week, which may not seem like much, but when put on a larger scale, it adds up to around two-hundred more hours of sleep per year.The Detrimental Effects of an Early School Start Time for Studentshttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/frano-katalinic/the-detrimental-effects-o_b_9760984.html4/26/2016
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Start Time4/21/2016Hundreds of Greenwich Teens Following the ‘Napping Cardinal’Greenwich SentinelWhen 600 teens follow the Napping Cardinal on Instagram, they are not only liking and sharing amusing photos of a sleepy bird, but they are also sending a very loud and clear message to the adults about how a lack of sleep negatively affects their health, mood, and learning—many students citing things such as falling asleep in class, not feeling alert, or getting sick more often. While the Napping Cardinal contest will end on April 26, the education campaign will continue until through the end of the school year.Hundreds of Greenwich Teens Following the ‘Napping Cardinal’https://www.greenwichsentinel.com/2016/04/21/hundreds-of-greenwich-teens-following-the-napping-cardinal/4/26/2016
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Start Time4/21/2016If you ever thought high school should start later, you were right.Huffington Post If you ever thought high school should start later, you were right.Video
The Case For Starting School Later
http://rise.huffingtonpost.com/watch/case-starting-school-later4/26/2016
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Start Time4/20/2016How can Rochester schools' schedules make the grade?Post-BulletinNikhil Marda, a high school junior (2015-16) at John Marshall High School in Rochester, MN, who published a well-researched and compellingly argued article in her local newspaper about the need to start school at healthy, evidence-based hours in a city that houses the Mayo Clinic. In her article, she writes: "The most common objection to changing start times is that teens could just sleep earlier now. However, there are scientific reasons as to why this is flawed. Teenagers are biologically predisposed to sleeping later, with a phenomenon called sleep phase shift making them feel more awake in the late evening. Interestingly, a study conducted by Brown University found that when schools start later, students still sleep at the same time on average. The result? More sleep."How can Rochester schools' schedules make the grade?http://www.postbulletin.com/life/lifestyles/nikhil-marda-how-can-rochester-schools-schedules-make-the-grade/article_35bda8a3-cb6d-52ea-87bf-4d6692b6f1b2.html4/26/2016
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Start Time4/20/2016Pediatrician wishes to see later school start timesWBRC FOX 6 NewsThose few hours, Dr. Maddox says, can make a huge difference. “In very young children, it looks like ADHD, learning problems, growth problems. As they get older we know that they’re more at risk at getting hit by a car, crossing the street. More at risk for injuries in athletics that can take them out of athletics. More at risk for depression and weight gain, suicidal thoughts, suicidal attempts,” Dr. Maddox said.The original article keeps reloading the page, so it's reprinted on our web site.Pediatrician wishes to see later school start timeshttp://startmascolater.com/2016/04/26/pediatrician-wishes-to-see-later-school-start-times/4/26/2016
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Start Time4/20/2016The U.S.’s Best High School Starts at 9:15 a.m.Slate.comIt’s true that altering middle-school and high-school start times often presents a few major hurdles for school districts: Bus schedules and athletic programs must be retooled, and resistance to change from parents, coaches and others must be overcome. And yet districts from Seattle to Cape Cod, Massachusetts, are doing it. In fact, Seattle will be the largest district to date to make the shift, which will take effect this fall.The U.S.’s Best High School Starts at 9:15 a.m.http://www.slate.com/articles/life/education/2016/04/can_the_best_high_school_in_the_country_thank_its_9_15_a_m_start_time_for.html4/26/2016
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Start Time4/20/2016Oxford Scientist Confirms Starting Work, School before 10 AM is Torture“Your parents think it’s because you’re lazy and opinionated and everything would be ok if you could get to sleep earlier. But science is telling us that teenagers need to sleep more in the mornings. Society’s provision for learning is school, but the brain’s is sleep. So we’re exploring the possibility that if you delay the schools start time until 10 am, it will improve learning performance.”Dr. Paul Kelley, the article also includes a 15 minute video presentation that's very goodOxford Scientist Confirms Starting Work, School before 10 AM is Torturehttp://anonhq.com/oxford-scientist-confirms-starting-work-school-10-torture/4/26/2016
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Start Time4/15/2016Sleep deprivation is serious threat to teensCourier-PostYes but, if you start the day at 9, kids will just stay up til 2 and sleep in, assumes a teacher I spoke with last week. Studies say that's not the case. Schools in this country that have moved start times to 8:15, 8:30 and even 8:45 have seen a significant increase in academic performance, an increase in pro-social behavior, a reduction in absenteeism, depression and bullying.Sleep deprivation is serious threat to teenshttp://www.courierpostonline.com/story/life/family/driving-lessons/2016/04/15/sleep-deprivation-is-serious-threat-to-teens/83076364/4/26/2016
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Start Time4/14/2016Why letting teens sleep in could save livesCNNIt will be years before my girls, 8 and 10, begin high school. But after going through the research, hearing the benefits of later school start times, and knowing how difficult it is to get a teen to go to bed early despite a parent's best intentions, I'm hoping by the time they get there, later start times will be as normal in high school as a teenager's eye roll.Why letting teens sleep in could save liveshttp://www.cnn.com/2016/04/14/health/teens-sleep-school-start-times/index.html4/26/2016
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Start Time4/8/2016Sleep-Deprived Teenagers Make Worse Choices -- But Schools Could HelpForbesThe AAP went on to say that “the evidence strongly implicates earlier school start times (i.e. before 8:30 a.m.) as a key modifiable contributor to insufficient sleep, as well as circadian rhythm disruption.” The pediatricians recommended that middle schools as well as high schools delay the start of class to 8:30 a.m. or later. Later start times are important because you can’t simply tell sleep-deprived teens to go to bed earlier. One of the first signs of puberty, Wheaton says, is a shift toward a later bedtime. Teens can’t fall asleep as early as they did when they were younger.Sleep-Deprived Teenagers Make Worse Choices -- But Schools Could Helphttp://www.forbes.com/sites/ritarubin/2016/04/08/sleep-deprived-teenagers-make-worse-choices-but-schools-could-help-them-by-starting-later/#2b5618a36eb44/26/2016
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Start Time Massachusetts4/20/2016Wiped Out: Early School Start Times And Boston’s Epidemic Of Exhausted StudentsWBUR CogniscentiHere’s the problem with denying children the sleep they need: They don’t learn as wellwhen they are tired. Grades are not the only thing to suffer — students experience anxiety, depression, poor concentration and behavioral problems. What’s more, the latest research on teenagers’ sleep patterns suggests that, as puberty begins, their circadian rhythms shift to a “sleep phase delay,” which means they naturally fall asleep as late as 10:00 and 11:00 at night, even as their need for up to nine hours of sleep remains the same.Wiped Out: Early School Start Times And Boston’s Epidemic Of Exhausted Studentshttp://cognoscenti.wbur.org/2016/04/20/sleep-and-school-start-times-deborah-j-bennett4/26/2016
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Start Time Massachusetts4/11/2016Massachusetts Is Waking Up to Sleep-Friendly SchoolsHuffington Post “The momentum is gaining considerable speed in Massachusetts,” says Hamaker. “We have 14 town-based chapters where parents and school officials are cooperating to work through the logistics to change school start time. Their local efforts are becoming statewide efforts as more and more people contact Start School Later about how to drive the conversation in their towns.”Massachusetts Is Waking Up to Sleep-Friendly Schoolshttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/terra-ziporyn-snider-phd/massachusetts-is-waking-u_b_9649650.html4/26/2016
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Start Time, Local Coverage4/19/2016Maine Schools Team Up for Teen Health — and SleepHuffington Post “I am pleased that Biddeford was able to cross the bridge and partner with area schools to make this critical change in service to our kids,” stated Biddeford superintendent Jeremy Ray. “The science is unimpeachable, and the results will be measurable. I am pleased that we were able to accomplish what so many consider difficult: collaborating across town lines. Our leadership team in Biddeford has a history of shared services and collaboration, and this is yet another example of what good will and good science can do to help our community.”Maine Schools Team Up for Teen Health — and Sleephttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/terra-ziporyn-snider-phd/maine-schools-team-up-for_b_9705538.html4/26/2016
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