Women In Microbiome Research - December 2017
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXY
1
First nameLast name
University / Institution
CityCountryPositionWebsiteResearch Interests
2
RachelGibson
University of South Australia
AdelaideAustralia
Associate Professor
http://people.unisa.edu.au/Rachel.Gibson
Rachel's research interests are in the gastrointestinal side effects of cytotoxic cancer therapies. * Medical and Health Sciences * Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences * Clinical Sciences * Artificial Intelligence and Image Processing * Dentistry
3
CarlyRosewarne
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
AdelaideAustralia
Staff, Microbial Ecologist
http://people.csiro.au/R/C/Carly-Rosewarne/PublicationsHistory.aspx
At CSIRO in Adelaide, I provide expertise in microbiology and metagenomics to understand the interplay between diet, gut microbiota and human health. I am currently focused on a collaborative project to investigate the efficacy of faecal microbiota transplantation for treatment of ulcerative colitis (NHMRC grant awarded to Jane Andrews as CIA). I have developed novel approaches to study methane-producing microbes in the rumen of livestock, and in 2015 was awarded a Fulbright Professional Scholarship to further this research I am a member of the Australian Academy of Science EMCR Forum Executive and am passionate about changing our national research environment through advocacy and engagement
4
LauraWeyrich
University of Adelaide
AdelaideAustralia
Research Associate, Postdoc
http://researchers.adelaide.edu.au/profile/laura.weyrich
I'm interested in the evolution of microorganisms that live on and within the human body (microbiome). Using ancient DNA, we can investigate how cultural changes, dietary shifts, and disease shaped the human microbiome. We are also able to understand bacterial evolution in real time, monitoring how pathogens evolved through the course of human history. Further, we can investigate how the evolution of these microorganisms effects today's diseases and how they may have changed human evolution.
5
ClaireO'Brien
Australian National University
Australian Capital Territory, Australia
AustraliaLecturer
https://researchers.anu.edu.au/researchers/o-brien-cl
Dr Claire O'Brien is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) researcher with a particular interest in the gut microbiome. Claire's main research interests are the microbiology of the inflammatory bowel diseases, particularly Crohn's disease, understanding how perturbations of the gut microbiota relate to health and disease, and the genetics of Escherichia coli.
6
SandieDegnan
University of Queensland
BrisbaneAustralia
Associate Professor
http://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/724
Sponge-microbial interactions: exploring the interactions between microbes and metazoans using bioinformatic, metagenomic, functional genomics and electron microscopy approaches. Lateral gene transfer from microbial to animal genomes - Using a combination of bioinformatic, phylogenetic and functional analyses to investigate the extent of lateral gene transfer (LGT) from microbial genomes into animal genomes.
7
LiZhang
Griffith University,
BrisbaneAustralia
Associate Professor
https://experts.griffith.edu.au/academic/li.zhang
Microbiome researcher and working on vascular catheters.
8
MelThomson
MTPConnect, Medical Technologies and Pharmaceuticals Industry Growth Centre
ClaytonAustralia
General Manager
https://www.linkedin.com/in/melanie-thomson-bab97a12
Microbiome, science communication, social media, biotech, women in science, crowd funding, gastrointestinal microbial pathogen research
9
LindaBlackall
Swinburne University of Technology
HawthornAustralia
Adjunct Professor
https://www.swinburne.edu.au/science-engineering-technology/staff/profile/index.php?id=lblackall
Biotechnology; Microbially Influenced Corrosion; Biointerface Engineering; Microbiology; Materials Science; Environment; Science; Sustainability, wastewater treatment
10
KatHolt
University of Melbourne
MelbourneAustralia
Associate Professor
https://holtlab.net/
We are a computational lab based in the Centre for Systems Genomics at the University of Melbourne and affiliated with the Bio21 Institute. We work closely with collaborators in other research, public health and hospital labs to develop projects and generate data. We then use a combination of phylogenetics, sequence analysis, comparative genomics, spatiotemporal analysis and epidemiological methods to analyse and interpret the data. Much of this is done using high performance computing.
11
HeidiDrummerBurnet InstituteMelbourne Australia
Program director
https://www.burnet.edu.au/staff_members/93_heidi_drummer
Hepatitis, HIV, Zika, vaccines, virus entry
12
Catherine Burke
University of Technology Sydney
SydneyAustraliaProfessor?
http://www.uts.edu.au/staff/catherine.burke
I am interested in understanding the ecology of microbial communities, and how those communities interact with living hosts. In the case of microbial communities that live on humans (the human microbiome), these microbes are thought to play important roles in our immune development, and to protect us from pathogenic microbes. Many diseases have been linked to shifts in our microbial communities, and these shifts are implicated in disease development. My ultimate aim is to understand how our native microbial communities interact with us to keep us healthy, and how these communities can be manipulated in the case of disease to achieve better health outcomes.
13
WillaHuston
University of Technology, Sydney
SydneyAustraliaSenior Lecturer
http://www.uts.edu.au/staff/wilhelmina.huston
My work has mainly focussed on understanding the chlamydial mechanisms of disease, persistence, and how the disease causes infertility in women. I am also interested in the role proteases have in pathogenesis and biology. I have strong expertise in intracellular infection models and human disease models. My team has research projects on-going in chlamydial biology, human disease factors, diagnosis and treatment and we welcome enquiries from interested students or collaborators.
14
Emma L.Johnston
University of New South Wales (UNSW)
SydneyAustraliaProfessor
http://www.bees.unsw.edu.au/emma-johnston
Professor Emma Johnston is Pro Vice-Chancellor (Reserach) at the University of New South Wales and head of the Applied Marine and Estuarine Ecology Lab (AMEE). Her group investigates the ecology of human impacts in marine systems. She combines the diverse disciplines of ecology, microbiology and ecotoxicology in an exciting research program that expands our fundamental understanding and provides recommendations for management. Her research is conducted in such diverse field environments as Antarctica, the Great Barrier Reef and temperate Australian estuaries. Major Research Themes: *** Estuarine Health: Estuaries are widely considered the most impacted of all marine habitats, and more than half of Australian estuaries are disturbed by anthropogenic activities to some degree. Most are subject to combinations of stressors from industry, agriculture, urbanisation and coastal development. This program aims to identify processes and interactions that drive impacts in an effort to develop targeted and effective management strategies to conserve biodiversity in these systems *** Antarctic Marine Communities: Antarctica is no longer considered a pristine environment and the impact of human activity is likely to increase in coming years. This project compares the vulnerability of Antarctic assemblages to those of other regions and provides information on the responses of individuals, populations and communities to environmental stressors. *** Marine Biological Invasions: This program aims to determine the major drivers of marine bioinvasions. We investigate whether disturbance facilitates the colonisation, persistence or spread of non-native species and how biological diversity modifies this response.
15
CynthiaWhitchurch
University of Technology Sydney
SydneyAustralia
Associate Professor
http://www.uts.edu.au/staff/cynthia.whitchurch
* Explosive cell lysis and roles in infection and biofilm development * L-form bacteria and roles in infection and antibiotic resistance * Twitching motility mediated biofilm expansion by P. aeruginosa * Biofilm formation and migration on implanted medical devices * Assessment of novel surfaces and compounds for antibiofilm activity
16
TracyAinsworth
James Cook University
TownsvilleAustralia
Associate Professor
https://research.jcu.edu.au/portfolio/tracy.ainsworth/
I am a research fellow studying coral holobiont response to early thermal stress events, coral host-microbe interactions and coral symbioses in diverse environments. My research aims to investigate the response of marine organims to changes in the marine environemnt and to determine how host-microbe-environment interactions influence physiology, adaptation and acclimation. My Science magazine author profile has links to my recent research in these fields.
17
NicoleWebster
Australian Institute of Marine Science
TownsvilleAustralia
Principal Research Scientist
http://data.aims.gov.au/staffcv/jsf/external/view.xhtml?partyId=100000289
The health of reef ecosystems is underpinned by a diverse array of microorganisms that undertake essential biogeochemical transformations and which live in intimate symbioses with reef hosts. My research explores the various ways in which microorganisms contribute to reef health. We undertake experimental and field based research and use sensitive molecular approaches to define host and microbial sensitivity thresholds to different environmental pressures. Our research also explores how microorganisms can contribute to the transgenerational acclimatisation of reef invertebrates in a rapidly changing climate.
18
Helen L. Hayden
Agriculture Victoria
VictoriaAustralia
Research Scientist
http://www.publish.csiro.au/book/7358/
My research focuses on soil microbial ecology, particularly in agricultural environments. Our soil biology group is interested in N cycling, suppressive soils and soil mapping of microbial communities. We utilise metagenomics, 16S amplicon studies, metatranscriptomics and soil metadata to interpret our results.
19
ChristaSchleper
University of Vienna
ViennaAustriaProfessor
http://genetics-ecology.univie.ac.at/schleper.html
1.) Ecology, genetics and evolution of Archaea with a focus on: * stress reactions, virus-host interactions and RNA-Interference in hyperthermophilic Archaea * metabolism and ecology of moderate and extremophilic ammonia oxidizing archaea *** 2.) Metagenomics: Development and application of metagenomic and metatranscriptomic approaches to study natural microbial communities with a focus on terrestrial and arctic environments
20
SarahLebeer
University of Antwerp
Antwerp, Belgium
BelgiumProfessor
https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/rg/endemic/research/research-topics/
Bacteria-host interaction for beneficial microbes and probiotics (lactobacilli in gut, vagina, ...) Microbial analyses and identification (Microbiome research) Bacterial genetics Mutagenesis and heterologous expression in bacterial Biochemical and functional analysis of bacterial cell wall molecules Bacterial glycoproteins Cell and gene biotechnology Genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metagenomics Cell culture of epithelial and monocytic cells Immunology and inflammation Determination of microbial air quality, incl. LAL assay (endotoxins) Air pollution: biomonitoring of proinflammatory capacity
21
VeronikaOudovaS-BiomedicAntwerpenBelgiumCo-founder
https://www.linkedin.com/in/veronikaoudova/
S-Biomedic has developed a direct microbiome manipulation technology which allows to transplant beneficial bacteria on the skin. We pack skin microbiome transplantation into cosmetics.
22
DebbyLaukens
Ghent University
GentBelgium
Associate Professor
http://www.ugent.be/ge/inwgen/en/research/neurology/lcen.htm/medewerkers/debbylaukens.htm
Ulcerative colitis, gut microbiome, Crohn's Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Liver Cancer, inflammation, immunology
23
NathalieDelzenneUC LouvainLeuvenBelgium
Vice President of Immunology Scientific Innovation
https://www.uclouvain.be/en-270139.html
Our group research focuses its scientific activities on integrative physiology, metabolism and nutritional approaches in order to investigate the role of the gut microbiota in the development of inflammation associated with obesity and related disorders (insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, or cachexia associated with tumor development....). The functional effects of food components targeting the gut in the management of metabolic disorders associated with obesity are investigated. One main issue is to characterize the impact of specific molecular targets such as gut peptides, the endocannabinoid system, and bacterial metabolites-binding receptors in the control of body weight, fat mass, systemic immunity and energy homeostasis
24
DorisVandeputteKU LeuvenLeuvenBelgiumPostdoc
https://www.linkedin.com/in/doris-vandeputte-phd-6aaa518b/
I am a data scientist trying to unravel how the interplay of bacteria in our gut contributes to health and disease using big data techniques and statistical analysis. Keywords: Gut microbiome
25
FionaBrinkman
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby, BCCanadaProfessor
http://www.brinkman.mbb.sfu.ca/
The Brinkman laboratory comprises an interdisciplinary bioinformatics and “wet-lab” environment, investigating key infectious disease-causing microbes and their diseases in the following ways: (1) Investigating the role in disease of both the microbe and its host (i.e immune system failure), using genomics and systems biology-based approaches (2) Using genomics and network analysis to characterize disease outbreaks and their environmental/social/genetic causes, and (3) Identifying new anti-infective and immune modulating therapies/biomarkers. The overall goal is to capitalize on a combined bioinformatics and wet lab approach, to better understand key themes in infectious disease etiology and aid development of more sustainable approaches for infectious disease control.
26
LisaGieg
University of Calgary
CalgaryCanada
Associate Professor
https://www.ucalgary.ca/research/scholars/gieg-lisa
Petroleum Microbiology, Environmental Microbiology
27
LauraSycuro
University of Calgary
Calgary, Alberta
Canada
Assistant Professor
https://www.ucalgary.ca/microinfect/faculty/primary-members/laura-sycuro
The broad goal of my research program is to harness the microbiome to promote maternal and child health. My lab is working to advance the precision with which we define the composition of the microbiome and mechanistically link its species, strains, and genes to health outcomes. This work is unfolding in two directions: 1) Technology development that deepens our understanding of the microbiome's pan-genomic content and fluidity 2) Identification of important genes that are funneled into interdisciplinary functional studies *** The Microbiome and Preterm Birth *** Metagenomics *** Cultivation Models ***Maternal microbiome, metagenomics, early childhood microbiome
28
RebeccaCase
University of Alberta
EdmontonCanada
Assistant Professor
https://www.ualberta.ca/science/about-us/contact-us/faculty-directory/rebecca-case
Bacterial-algal interactions, antibacterials, cell-cell signaling
29
JuliaFoght
University of Alberta
EdmontonCanada
Retired Professor
http://www.biology.ualberta.ca/faculty/julia_foght/?Page=895
Petroleum Microbiology, Environmental Microbiology
30
Le LuoGuan
University of Alberta
EdmontonCanadaProfessor
https://www.ualberta.ca/agriculture-life-environment-sciences/about-us/facultylecturer-directory/leluo-guan
My research focuses on studying bovine “OMICS” and “MICROBES”. Specific areas of interest include: Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of host-microbial interactions by characterization of bovine gut microbial ecology and its functions using metagenomics/metatranscriptomics approaches, and host gene expression using a functional genomics approach *** Association between gut microbial ecology and feed efficiency, methane emission and gut immunity development in beef and dairy cattle *** Study of the bovine transcriptome, proteome, and non-coding microRNAs and their roles in economically important traits host-microbial interactions, bovine gut microbial ecology
31
AnitaKozyrskyj
University of Alberta
EdmontonCanadaProfessor
http://www.prg.ualberta.ca/en/faculty-members/anita-kozyrskyj.aspx
PI of SyMBIOTA (Synergy in Microbiota) program, which is investigating pre- and postnatal influences on infant gut microbiota and their connection to the development of atopy and overweight phenotypes.
32
EmmaAllen-Vercoe
University of Guelph
Guelph, ONCanada
Associate Professor
http://www.uoguelph.ca/mcb/people/faculty/faculty_allen-vercoe.shtml
Research in my laboratory is focused on the study of the normal human gut microbiota, both in disease and in health. The research can be loosely divided into several main areas centered on fundamental questions in the field of microbial ecology of the gut
33
GisèleLaPointe
University of Guelph
Guelph, ONCanadaProfessor
https://www.uoguelph.ca/foodscience/users/gisele-lapointe
Gisèle has teaching and research experience in biotechnology, food microbiology and food applications of microbial molecular genetics, genomics and proteomics. Her goal is improving the quality and functionality of food, with a special focus on dairy products, and she is always looking forward to learning new approaches. Her research aims towards understanding the factors controlling the metabolic activities of probiotic and lactic acid bacteria that have technological applications or health benefits
34
DawnBowdish
McMaster University
Hamilton, ONCanada
Associate Professor
https://fhs.mcmaster.ca/pathology/contact_us/faculty/faculty_bios/bowdish.html
Lung microbiome, Streptococcus pneumonia, microbiology of aging, innate immunity
35
JaneFoster
McMaster University
Hamilton, ONCanada
Associate Professor
http://Www.jfosterlab.com
The Foster lab investigates how the immune system and gut microbiota influence brain function and behaviour. We use molecular, behavioural, anatomical, and immunological approaches in the lab. In parallel, we collaborate with clinical groups to examine the role of inflammatory and gut-brain mediators in psychiatric illness.
36
JenniferStearns
McMaster University
Hamilton, ONCanada
Assistant Professor
http://farncombe.mcmaster.ca/team/stearns-jennifer/
Our microbial partners, living on and within us, are essential to our health and provide us with countless benefits from food digestion to protection from pathogens. They interact intimately with our bodies, especially in the first years of life, educating the immune system, establishing metabolic set points and impacting developing gut physiology. Understanding healthy normal microbial colonization in early life is essential to the study of healthy infant development, as well as for the design of effective translational interventions aimed at the microbiota. Research in my lab aims to uncover the core processes, such as colonization, succession and stability, involved in microbial establishment within the human body. My approach involves human cohorts and animal models and uses molecular methods, microbial culture and bioinformatics, with the ultimate goal of understanding how the microbiota contributes to infant development and long term health. Current Research Topics: * Microbial community maturation within the context of a maturing host environment. My lab is developing and applying computational, molecular and culture based methods to study human associated microbial communities longitudinally. * Early infant nutrition choices on bacterial succession. By combining molecular profiling, with in vitro and in vivo experiments we are exploring how the infant diet helps to shape microbial communities. * Microbial contribution to early life origins of disease. By studying large populations of individuals we are connecting the gut microbiome and microbially derived metabolites in early life with evolving phenotypes of human disease, such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and atopy.
37
ElenaVerdu
McMaster University
Hamilton, ON Canada
Associate Professor
http://www.verdulab.ca/
Intestinal microbiota and influences on celiac disease and IBD
38
ElainePetrof
Queen's University
Kingston, ONCanada
Assistant Professor
http://meds.queensu.ca/gidru/Petrof.htm
My lab is interested in the study of commensal bacteria, probiotics and the products they synthesize to inhibit inflammation and various forms of colitis, and in understanding their mechanisms of action. It is hoped that these investigations will ultimately result in a better understanding of the protective role of “good” gut microbes under conditions of inflammation and stress, and lead to novel microbe-based treatment modalities for the management of inflammatory intestinal diseases. Ongoing projects in the laboratory revolve around this long-term goal. There are several disease states of intestinal inflammation in which our lab has an interest, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a form of inflammatory colitis whose etiology is poorly understood; necrotizing enterocolitis, an inflammatory colitis of premature babies, and infectious colitis such as Salmonella colitis (i.e. food poisoning) and C.difficile colitis, a serious life-threatening illness which can occur after people take antibiotics. Different models which represent these different disease states are used in our laboratory to further investigate the protective effects of normal gut bacteria and probiotics under these different conditions, in order to better understand their mechanisms of action. Together with our collaborators, we work towards developing new therapies to treat these diseases. An example of this is “RePOOPulate”, a “synthetic stool” mixture developed for the treatment of recurrent C.difficile infection for patients at KGH*. Our translational “bench-to-bedside” research program is committed to moving these types of microbe-based novel therapies into clinical settings to treat patients.
39
CorinneMaurice
McGill University
Montreal, QCCanada
Assistant Professor
https://www.mcgill.ca/microimm/people/professors/corinne-maurice
The human gut is home to trillions of microbial cells, bacteriophages (viruses specific to bacteria), fungi, and eukaryotes; collectively referred to as the gut microbiota. The gut microbiota is key to human health: it is central to our digestion, synthesizes essential vitamins, metabolizes therapeutic drugs, and shapes host immunity; yet we have no clear understanding of the metabolic activities performed by individual members of this complex community. This is a critical gap to overcome in our pursuit of personalized medicine. Research in the lab aims to address two major goals: 1. Identify and characterize the metabolically active microbial members of the gut microbiota. 2. Determine the role of bacteriophages as regulators of the active gut microbiota. Combining single-cell and metagenomics approaches to the study of the human gut microbiota, our projects aim to explore human health from a microbial standpoint. Ultimately, our goal is to increase our understanding of the ecological processes and interactions between the different members of the gut microbiota, focusing on bacteria and phages, in order to modulate them and restore a healthy gut microbiota after clinically relevant perturbations.
40
JanetHill
University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, SKCanadaProfessor
http://homepage.usask.ca/~jeh369/
Our group is interested in microbial ecology and in diagnostic methods for detecting specific organisms in complex backgrounds. We work with equal enthusiasm on developing molecular diagnostic methods for application in the clinical microbiology laboratory and in studying the structure and function of complex microbial communities, particularly those associated with humans and animals. At the core of our work is the cpnDB project, which evolved out of a collaboration between the University of Saskatchewan, the National Research Council of Canada and the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control.
41
ElizabethEdwards
University of Toronto
Toronto, ONCanada
Professor, Director
http://www.chem-eng.utoronto.ca/faculty-staff/faculty-members/elizabeth-a-edwards/
Anaerobic Microbiology, Bioremediation
42
Marie-ClaireArrieta
University of Calgary
Vancouver, BCCanada
Assistant Professor
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Marie_Claire_Arrieta
Gastroenterology, Microbiology, Immunology
43
JenniferGardy
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BCCanadaProfessor
http://spph.ubc.ca/person/jennifer-gardy/
Genomic epidemiology / Phylogenetics and molecular evolution / Tuberculosis / Metagenomics / Information visualization / Risk communication
44
CaraHaney
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BCCanada
Assistant Professor
https://haneylab.msl.ubc.ca/
Plants roots are surrounded by communities of microbes (i.e. the “rhizosphere microbiome”); these microbes influence plant growth, development, and disease resistance. Using the model plant Arabidopsis and its associated bacteria, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens, our lab studies the genetic and environmental factors that regulate plant-microbiome associations. *** Our current projects are focused on: * Uncovering how microbes, including P. fluorescens, can colonize a host despite the presence of an intact immune system. * Identifying plant genes that shape microbiome community. * Identifying bacterial and plant genes that affect the functional outputs of the microbiome.
45
Deborah M.Money
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BCCanadaProfessor
http://obgyn.ubc.ca/person/deborah-money/
Manage care of HIV positive women in British Columbia – led perinatal care of HIV positive women in BC since 1994 *** Viral infections in pregnancy *** The role of Vaginal Microbiota in health and disease *** The role of HPV vaccine in prevention of cervical cancer.
46
LisaOsborne
Univerisity of British Columbia
Vancouver, BCCanada
Assistant Professor
https://www.microbiology.ubc.ca/research/labs/osborne
How the host recognizes the diverse species that reside in the gut - from microscopic viruses to large, multicellular helminthic worms - and tailors an immune response of the appropriate scope and magnitude necessary to achieve homeostasis
47
Helen Tremlett
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BCCanadaProfessor
http://epims.med.ubc.ca/our-team/faculty/helen-tremlett/
Current research interests include: the natural history of MS; prognosis and predictors of disease progression in MS; effectiveness of the immunomodulatory drugs (IMDs) in MS; adverse effects of the MS IMDs; MS epidemiology; cancer and MS; pregnancy outcomes and MS; vitamin D, sunlight, infections and MS disease activity.
48
Lisa
Plant Science and Biotechnology, plant pathology, phytopathology, fungal biology, fungal plant biology, biological control of plant diseases
University of Victoria
Victoria, BCCanada
Assistant Professor
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Lisa_Reynolds6
Interactions between the microbiota, parasites, and immune cells at mucosal surfaces, during health or during states of allergic or infectious disease.
49
LauraHug
University of Waterloo
Waterloo, ONCanada
Assistant Professor
https://uwaterloo.ca/biology/people-profiles/laura-hug
Environmental Microbiology, bioremediation
50
MeghanAzad
Childrens Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba
Winnipeg, MBCanada
Assistant Professor
http://chrim.ca/researcher/meghan-azad/
I am particularly interested in the role of prenatal nutrition, breastfeeding and human milk composition in DOHaD. Prenatal nutrition plays a key role in programming fetal growth and immune development, with implications for disease risk throughout the lifespan. Breastfeeding may be protective, but existing epidemiologic evidence is conflicting and the underlying biological mechanisms are poorly understood. My research program aims to clarify the influence of breastfeeding on infant health and development, identify the bioactive components of human milk that underlie these associations, and determine how maternal characteristics including prenatal nutrition influence breastfeeding, milk composition and infant health.
51
CristinaDorador
University of Antofagasta
AntofagastaChile
Associate Professor
http://cebib.cl/en/cristina-dorador/
Microbial ecology of Extreme environments, Atacama Desert, Altiplano, Rare Biosphere
52
TulikaArora
University of Copenhagen
CopenhagenDenmarkPostdoc
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Tulika_Arora
Bariatric surgery, enteroendocrine cells, germ free mice
53
AimeeClassen
Natural History Museum of Denmark
CopenhagenDenmark
Associate Professor
http://snm.ku.dk/english/staffsnm/staff/?pure=en/persons/471059
I am an experimental ecosystem ecologist whose work largely focuses on how global change shapes ecosystems. Research in my group explores the interactions between above- and below-ground biotic communities and how and when changes in abiotic processes might alter those interactions.
54
SusanneBrix Pedersen
Technical University of Denmark
LyngbyDenmark
Associate Professor
http://www.dtu.dk/english/service/phonebook/person?id=5787
Extracellular matrix remodeling in cardiovascular and renal fibrosis *** PreGI - Prebiotics for Prevention of Gut Infections *** PreGI - Prebiotics for Prevention of Gut Infections *** Characterization of immune stimulating components in milk
55
LoneGram
Technical University of Denmark
LyngbyDenmarkProfessor
http://www.dtu.dk/english/service/phonebook/person?id=6257&tab=1
Professor Lone Gram studies bacterial eco-physiology and biotechnology. The science is focused on aquatic bacteria (freshwater and marine) and covers both pathogeneic bacteria as well as beneficial bacteria. The purpose of our research is to control bacteria that cause disease in man or fish. Our studies are aimed at understanding how we can influence virulence and behaviour in pathogenic bacteria and also we study novel principles and compounds that can control pathogenic bacteria. Lone and her group are course responsible for courses at DTU and several project students are affiliated with the group. Also, the group has an extensive international network.
56
SünjePamp
Technical University of Denmark
LyngbyDenmark
Associate Professor
http://www.dtu.dk/english/service/phonebook/person?id=28182&tab=1
We are host to a remarkable diversity of microbes that are key to our health and well-being, but the microbiome of humans and animals can also be the source of infectious diseases and contribute to a variety of complex diseases. My research aims at unraveling the mechanisms by which microorganisms adapt, evolve, and interact in space and time – from the perspective of single cells to complex host-associated microbial communities. We integrate approaches from genomics, microbial ecology, evolution, classical & molecular microbiology, and clinical & veterinary medicine to provide insight into: * Biogeography of Pathogens * Microbe-Microbe Interactions * Microbe-Host Immune System Interactions * Antimicrobial Resistance and Tolerance * Beneficial Functions of the Microbiota * Structure and Function of Microbial Communities (Biofilms) ***** Through interdisciplinary approaches our research has already revealed the identity and predicted function of important uncultivated members of human and animal microbiomes (e.g. Segmented Filamentous Bacteria) and their impact on host immune system maturation, provided a first insight into microbial interactions of opportunistic pathogens (e.g. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa), and led to a strategy for specifically targeting physiologically distinct microbial subpopulations resulting in a successful combined antimicrobial treatment strategy. The ultimate goal is to provide better preventive and control strategies against microbial infections and complex microbial diseases to the benefit of society.
57
Amelia-ElenaRotaru
University of Southern Denmark
OdenseDenmark
Assistant Professor
http://rotarulab.com/
We investigate how to harness microbial metabolisms in order to produce fossil fuel free renewable resources and control harmful microbial processes. For these purposes, we look at extracellular electron transfer for energy metabolism in various microorganisms. Environmental microbiology, microbial metabolism, extracellular electron transfer, biorecovery, bioremediation, sustainable biotechnology, biogas, bioenergy, corrosion monitoring and prevention. Electromicrobiology, Biotechnology
58
LotteJelsbak
Roskilde University
RoskildeDenmark
Associate Professor
http://forskning.ruc.dk/site/en/persons/lotte-jelsbak(896b6750-c1bf-4e7d-9e82-0c542cabbf2d).html
In my research group, we are interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions and regulatory mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria. We are presently focusing on three major projects. *** The role of polyamines as an environmental signal in bacterial pathogens *** Molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions during chronic bacterial infections *** What are pathogenic bacteria feeding on while inside the host?
59
TineRask Licht
Technical University of Denmark (TDU)
SøborgDenmarkProfessor
http://www.dtu.dk/english/service/phonebook/person?id=2791&tab=1
Gene transfer between gut microorganisms | Interactions between pathogens and gut microbes | Impact of gut microbiota on immune function | Efficacy and safety of pro/prebiotics | Molecular profiling of intestinal microbiota | Influence of dietary components on host gut flora *** I am heading the The National Food Institute research group on Intestinal Microbial Ecology. The focus of our research is on effects of diet on composition, activity and genetic exchange in the gut microbiota, as well as on effects of the gut environment on resistance to pathogenic infections. Additionally, we adress the impact of gut microbes on maturation and maintenance of the host immune system. We look at effects of whole food items as well as of prebiotic carbohydrates and probiotic bacteria.
60
JenniHultman
University of Helsinki
HelsinkiFinland
University researcher
https://tuhat.helsinki.fi/portal/en/persons/jenni-hultman(98cd8dfc-4891-475f-9135-59915c954a01).html
Arctic microbiology, food microbiology, microbial ecology, metagenomics, permafrost, bioinformatics
61
ReettaSatokari
University of Helsinki
HelsinkiFinland
Principal investigator
https://tuhat.helsinki.fi/portal/en/persons/reetta-satokari(66da45d1-a85e-43c6-b5d9-41e377c283f2).html
Microbiological and molecular mechanisms of Clostridium difficile eradication by fecal transplantation
62
MachaNikolski
Bordeaux University
BordeauxFranceSenior Scientist
http://dept-info.labri.fr/~macha/
Currently, I'm particularly interested in applications of high-throughput sequencing data. My group develops methods for Next Generation Sequencing data analysis and de novo sequence assembly and its downstream analysis (genome assembly, variant detection, diversity analysis, biomarker identification, functional analysis). Methodological solutions are often a mix of algorithmics and machine learning. * bioinformatics, computational methods for microbiome and metagenomics analysis, health-associated microbio
63
MurielDerrien
Danone Nutricia Research
Île-de-France, France
France
Program Leader
https://www.linkedin.com/in/muriel-derrien-5b7498b/
Researcher specialized in the microbiota of intestinal ecosystems (human and mice, in vitro gut models), impact of nutrition (probiotics and other ingrdients) and stressors on microbiota and host responses. * Expertise in growth of strict anaerobic bacteria
64
MurielThomas
Micalis Institute, INRA France
Jouy-en-JosasFrance
Research Director
https://www.micalis.fr/micalis_eng/Poles-and-teams/Pole-Ecosystems/Probihote-Langella/P.-Langella-and-4-Groups/Muriel-Thomas
Our increasing knowledge on the essential role of microbiota in health has led us to reconsider our view of digestive physiology and pathologies; the maintenance of homeostasis between microbes with each other and between microbes and host dictates the balance between health and disease. Although the demonstration of the main impact of gut microbiota for the structure and maturation of gut immune system has been done; the role of microbiota in maturation of epithelium is less known.Thus, we investigated the role of intestinal microbiota in main functions of the digestive tract, like absorption, protection, storage and renewal. Conversely, we also investigated the impact of gut environment on microbiota function and composition
65
Sara
Romano-Bertrand
University of Montpellier / University Hospital of Montpellier
MontpellierFrance
Assistant Professor
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Sara_Romano-Bertrand
Human-associated microbiota, in particular in hospital conditions, special focus on skin, surgical and urinary microbiota - Bacterial communities in hospital envirnoments, especially in hydric niches
66
CarmenBuchrieser
Institute Pasteur
ParisFrance
Head of laboratory
https://research.pasteur.fr/en/team/biology-of-intracellular-bacteria/
The research conducted in the unit Biologie des Bacteries Intracellulaires (BBI) associated to CNRS (UMR 3525), focuses mainly on pathogenicity related genomic features of the intracellular pathogens Legionella and their function in host-pathogen interactions.Many aspects of this research are based on the studies on Legionella genomics that we have initiated in the last years at the Institut Pasteur.
67
KarineClément
ICAN: Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition/INSERM/Universté Pierre et Marie Curie
ParisFranceProfessor
Inside ICAN, INSERM/UPMC KC’s team (NutriOmics: Nutrition and obesity Systemic approaches) is involved in understanding the complex pathophysiology of obesity and related cardiometabolic complications combining different “omic” approaches. Her work led to the identification of monogenic forms of obesity (Leptin receptor and MC4R mutations) and to genetic risk factors in common obesity. Developing broader systemic and tissue cross-talk approaches, her group showed notably the importance of inflammatory and remodeling genes in human adipose tissue and links with immune cell modifications and fibrosis. Deeper insight into mechanisms is now undertaken. The team is exploring the link between environmental changes (such as food intake), systemic changes and functional modifications in the adipose tissue in link with organs at its vicinity or at distant sites (liver, intestine, heart). The gut microbiota is of evidence a key actor of this link. Recently, pioneering results were obtained by metagenomic approaches showing that loss in gut microbiome diversity in human obesity associates with increased cardiometabolic risks. Gut bacterial diversity can be modulated by dietary changes and the challenge is now to identify commensal bacteria and gut-derived molecules associated with improved cardiometabolic health. KC is author of more than 250 publications in the field of obesity and cardio-metabolic health and received several prizes.
Inside ICAN, INSERM/UPMC KC’s team (NutriOmics: Nutrition and obesity Systemic approaches) is involved in understanding the complex pathophysiology of obesity and related cardiometabolic complications combining different “omic” approaches. Her work led to the identification of monogenic forms of obesity (Leptin receptor and MC4R mutations) and to genetic risk factors in common obesity. Developing broader systemic and tissue cross-talk approaches, her group showed notably the importance of inflammatory and remodeling genes in human adipose tissue and links with immune cell modifications and fibrosis. Deeper insight into mechanisms is now undertaken. The team is exploring the link between environmental changes (such as food intake), systemic changes and functional modifications in the adipose tissue in link with organs at its vicinity or at distant sites (liver, intestine, heart). The gut microbiota is of evidence a key actor of this link. Recently, pioneering results were obtained by metagenomic approaches showing that loss in gut microbiome diversity in human obesity associates with increased cardiometabolic risks. Gut bacterial diversity can be modulated by dietary changes and the challenge is now to identify commensal bacteria and gut-derived molecules associated with improved cardiometabolic health. KC is author of more than 250 publications in the field of obesity and cardio-metabolic health and received several prizes.
68
PascaleCossart
Pasteur Institute
ParisFranceProfessor
https://research.pasteur.fr/en/team/bacteria-cell-interactions/
Our Unit investigates the molecular and cellular basis of the infection by Listeria monocytogenes, a model pathogen for the study of the intracellular parasitism. L. monocytogenes is responsible for severe foodborne infections. This bacterium is characterized by its ability to cross three host barriers -the intestinal, blood-brain or feto-placental barriers- and to invade several cell types in which it multiplies. L. monocytogenes moves in the cytosol of infected cells and spreads from cell to cell using an original propelling process; i.e. cell actin polymerization at one pole of the bacteria.
69
MurielDerrien
Danone Research
ParisFrance
Research Scientist
http://www.danone.com/en/for-all/research-innovation/research-at-danone/
Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Bioinformatics
70
MarionLeclercINRAParisFranceScientist
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Marion_Leclerc
We study the human gut microbiome and its impact on health and disease. We integrate different approaches such as microbial ecology, genomics, mathematical modeling.
71
GabrielleVeronèse
Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA)
ParisFrance
Director of Research
http://nationalagriculturalresearchinra.academia.edu/GabrielleVeronese
digestive microbiota; carbohydrate-active enzymes; functional metagenomics
72
AliceMcHardy
Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany
BraunschweigGermanyProfessor
https://www.helmholtz-hzi.de/en/research/research_topics/bacterial_and_viral_pathogens/computational_biology_of_infection_research/alice_mchardy/
Computational metagenomics, microbial trait/phenotype prediction
73
AntjeBoetius
Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology
BremenGermanyProfessor
http://www.mpi-bremen.de/en/Antje_Boetius.html
Microbial Ecology of the Deep Sea * Marine Methane Cycle * Gas Hydrates and Cold Seeps * Geomicrobiology * Global Carbon Cycle
74
NicholeDubilier
Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology
BremenGermanyProfessor
http://www.mpi-bremen.de/en/Nicole_Dubilier.html
Symbionts in marine invertebrates / Transfer of energy from the geosphere to the biosphere at hydrothermal vents and cold seeps / Ecology of chemosynthetic environments
75
AlgaZuccaroCEPLASCologne (Köln)GermanyProfessor
http://ceplas.eu/en/faculty/alga-zuccaro/
Currently my research is focused on the mechanisms that enable symbiotic fungi to colonize plants successfully and on the processes accounting for variations in host preferences and fungal lifestyles, especially in mutualistic root endophytes. With respect to insights into how symbiotic fungi establish themselves in metabolically active root cells and how the plants are reprogrammed for enhanced performance, in my group we routinely use integrated approaches that rely on the combination of reverse genetics, transcriptomics, cell biology, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. We propose to analyze the genetics and cell biology of the root endophyte Piriformospora indica, and the closely related orchid mycorrhizal fungus Sebacina vermiferain their symbioses with the model plants barley (monocot) and Arabidopsis (dicot) and to understand the evolutionary mechanisms involved in the establishment of biotrophy.
76
Sonja-VerenaAlbers
University of Freiburg
FreiburgGermanyProfessor
https://www.ag-albers.uni-freiburg.de/
The central theme in the Albers lab is the assembly of cell surface appendages in archaea and their role in adhesion and biofilm formation. The model organisms we study are the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius which grows optimally at 76oC and a pH of 2-4 and the extreme halophilic Haloferax volcanii. We are interested in understanding the biogenesis of the archaeal cell envelope including processes like N-glycosylation, the assembly of macromolecular structures like pili and the archaellum, and regulatory processes depending on protein phosphorylation. We use genetic approaches to identify systems in Sulfolobus and Haloferax that are involved in the assembly of cell surface appendages and biochemically characterize the subunits and their interplay in the assembly process.
77
Amelia
Camarinha Silva
University of Hohenheim
HohenheimGermanyDirector
https://www.uni-hohenheim.de/en/organization/person/dr-rer-nat-amelia-camarinha-silva
Livestock microbiome / Aging-associated modification of intestinal homeostasis and barrier function: Role of microbiota, iNOS and innate immunity / Changes in broiler gastrointestinal bacterial community: response to different experimental diets/ Evaluation of DNA extraction kits and phylogenetic diversity of the porcine gastrointestinal tract / Microbial Regulation of Soil Functions in Agro-Ecosystems (SoilReg) / The effect of host genetics factors on shaping porcine gut microbiota
78
ChristineBeemelmanns
Hans Knöll Institute
JenaGermanyGroup Head
https://www.leibniz-hki.de/en/institut-staff-details.html?member=87
Isolation and determination of the structure of signal molecules and antimicrobial natural products *** Characterisation of interactions between microbes and eukaryotes *** Total synthesis of natural products and chemical derivatisation *** Secondary metabolites from insect-associated microbes *** Secondary metabolites from marine microbes *** Structural identification of morphogenic signaling molecules *** Natural product synthesis
79
Ilse DeniseJacobsen
Hans Knöll Institute
JenaGermanyProfessor
https://www.leibniz-hki.de/en/institut-staff-details.html?member=85
Immunology and infection biology of pathogenic fungi *** In vivo and ex vivo infection models *** Mucosal pathogen-host-interaction
80
KirstenKüsel
Friedrich-Schiller University
JenaGermanyProfessor
http://www.geomicrobiology.de/Group+Members/Kirsten+K%C3%BCsel.html
Microorganisms control most of the global biogeochemical cycles necessary to sustain life. Iron minerals especially dominate the solid phase of porous media and their redox cycling supports key biogeochemical processes which influence the fate of organic matter or contaminant elements. Based on my interdisciplinary background, my research group is focused on the microbial processes and biogeochemistry of a variety of ecosystems from freshwater lakes and sediments, peatlands, and both pristine and heavy metal contaminated streams and aquifers. We use both molecular and cultivation-based techniques to unravel the structure/function relationships of the inherent microbial communities.
81
KerstinVoigt
Hans Knöll Institute
JenaGermany
Head of Collection
https://www.leibniz-hki.de/en/institut-staff-details.html?member=90
Infection biology of Lichtheimia corymbifera *** Influence of endosymbiotic bacteria on the natural product potential of Conidiobolus coronatus *** Evolution of the pathogenicity of zygomycetes
82
ChristinaWarinner
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
JenaGermany
Associate Professor
http://christinawarinner.com/
Dr. Warinner is pioneering the study of ancient human microbiota, and in 2014 she published the first detailed metagenomic and metaproteomic characterization of the ancient human oral microbiome. In 2015, she published a seminal study on the identification of milk proteins in ancient dental calculus and the reconstruction of prehistoric European dairying practices. In the same year, she also was part of a large team that the published the first South American hunter-gatherer gut microbiome and identified Treponema as a key missing ancestral microbe in industrialized societies.
83
TalDaganKiel University KielGermanyProfessor
https://www.metaorganism-research.com/researchers/prof-dr-tal-dagan/
Domestication driven metaorganism evolution in wheat, rhizosphere, plant microbiota, phyllosphere, plant domestication, Triticum
84
UteHentschel
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research
KielGermanyProfessor
http://www.geomar.de/en/mitarbeiter/fb3/mi/uhentschel/
Marine animals live in intimate contact with their aquatic environment that is characterized by diverse and abundant microorganisms. My research goals are to provide an understanding on the physiology, metabolism and molecular mechanisms of interaction between marine animals and their microbial partners, by taking a function-driven approach. A combination of modern molecular biology techniques, in particular the –omics repertoire, in vivo experimentation, and regular field work is employed towards this goal. Sponges (phylum Porifera) serve as excellent experimental models towards these goals because of their impressive microbial and chemical diversity that not only contributes to their nutritional ecology but has also elicited the interest of the pharmaceutical industry. Our efforts are directed at providing a deeper understanding of the high-complexity microbial ecosystems within sponges, and at providing research strategies to a sustainable use of this natural resource. Specific research areas are: * Marine invertebrate-microbe interactions * Microbiology of marine sponges * Uncultivated microorganisms * Omics (metagenomics, single cell genomics, (meta)-transcriptomics) * Drug discovery from marine actinomycetes
85
Eva
Holtgrewe Stukenbrock
Kiel University / Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Biology
KielGermanyProfessor
https://www.metaorganism-research.com/researchers/prof-dr-eva-holtgrewe-stukenbrock/
Domestication-driven metaorganism evolution of wheat
86
MurielTeeseling, van
Philipps University
MarburgGermanyPostdoc
http://www.thanbichlerlab.org/
Planctomycetes verrucomicrobia cell biology cell wall so layer
87
BarbelStecher
University of Munich
MunichGermany
Assistant Professor
http://www.mvp.uni-muenchen.de/en/research/medical-microbiology-and-hospital-epidemiology/group-stecher/
Microbiome, low complexity bacterial community
88
Liane GBenning
German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ)
PotsdamGermanyProfessor
http://www.gfz-potsdam.de/en/section/interface-geochemistry
My research addresses the quantitative elucidation of biogeochemical reactions at low to hydrothermal temperatures and in both, inorganic and biologic systems. My group focuses on two main aspects: (1) the mechanisms and kinetics of mineral nucleation and growth and the associated speciation, sequestration or release/transport of various elements in Earth surface environments; (2) the preservation and adaptations of microbial life in extreme environments in geothermal and arctic settings.
89
JanaSeifert
Hohenheim University
StuttgartGermanyJunior Professor
https://www.uni-hohenheim.de/en/organization/person/jun-prof-dr-jana-seifert
Evaluation of DNA extraction kits and phylogenetic diversity of the porcine gastrointestinal tract *** Microbial Regulation of Soil Functions in Agro-Ecosystems (SoilReg) *** Metaproteomic analyses of the microbiota in monogastric animals (chicken, pig) at different phosphate levels in the feed (METAPHOR) *** Livestock microbiome
90
RuthLey
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology
TübingenGermanyDirector
http://www.leylab.com/
We are broadly interested in how interactions between humans and their gut microbiota influence phenotypes. Host interactions with the microbiome are deeply implicated in modern metabolic plagues: metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. If we could better understand how the microbiome impacts host metabolism, we could address therapeutically an underlying driver of the biggest health problems that we face today. Eukaryotic species have harnessed the microbiota to extend their phenotypes, yet gut microbiomes are immensely complex. When new hosts (infants) emerge, microbes are assembled into their microbiomes from the environment. The microbiome is challenged during disturbances, augmented by newly arriving microbes, and its residents are aided by their synthropic partners. Host exudates including peptides, mucus, and antibodies, all have been implicated in shaping the composition of these communities. In turn the host can be irreversibly reliant on its microbiome for immune development, nutrient release, and a growing list of other aspects of metabolism. The specifics of the mix at any given time can have profound impacts on host metabolism and health. The role of host genetic variation in shaping the microbiome remains to be discerned. In the Ley lab, we are broadly interested in how host genetics control the microbiome in the human gut. We explore how interactions between host genetic status and the microbiome influence host metabolic phenotypes. To do so, we employ genetics, genomics, metabolomics, gnotobiotics (i.e., transplantation of microbes into germ free mice) and tools of mucosal immunology.
91
CynthiaSharma
University of Würzburg
WürzburgGermanyGroup Leader
http://www.imib-wuerzburg.de/research/sharma/group-leader/
Helicobacter, Campylobacter, non-coding RNA
92
PujaYadav
Central University of Haryana, Mahendergarh
HaryanaIndia
Assistant Professor
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Puja_Yadav
Keywords: Host-Pathogen Interaction, G quadruplex. To understand how these secondary structures regulate gene expression in microbes
93
Mary
O'Connell Motherway
University of Cork
CorkIreland
Senior Research Fellow
http://apc.ucc.ie/Mary_OConnellMotherway/
Her research interests include functional genomics of and host colonisation by bifidobacteria.
94
PaulineScanlan
APC Microbiome Institute, University College Cork
CorkIreland
Research Fellow
http://apc.ucc.ie/profile-pauline-scanlan/
Pauline Scanlan recently joined the APC Microbiome Institute as a Royal Society-Science Foundation Ireland University Research Fellow. She has a BSc in Plant and Microbial Biotechnology and a PhD in Medicine from University College Cork. In 2008, she moved to the Department of Zoology, Oxford University, where she spent four years working on an ERC-funded project exploring the infection genetics of bacteria-phage interactions. On her return to Ireland, Pauline secured her own funding as a Marie Curie Fellow at Teagasc Food Research Centre at Moorepark, where she investigated the role of the microbial eukaryotes such as Blastocystis and fungi in human health and disease, as well as bacteria-phage co-evolution. Pauline’s current research project focuses on the role of inter-species interactions and antagonistic coevolution in shaping the ecology and evolution (and ultimately inter-individual variation) of the gut microbiota. Keywords: inter-species interactions and antagonistic coevolution inshaping the ecology and evolution (and ultimately inter-individual variation) of the gut microbiota.
95
FionaWalsh
Maynooth University
MaynoothIrelandLecturer
https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/biology/our-people/fiona-walsh
Antimicrobial resistance genes in environmental microbiomes
96
GillianGardiner
Waterford Institute of Technology
WaterfordIrelandLecturer
https://www.wit.ie/about_wit/contact_us/staff_directory/gillian_gardiner
My research interests include: Salmonella in pigs, alternatives to antibiotics for pigs (e.g. probiotics, prebiotics); the pig intestinal microbiota; antimicrobials from marine and other sources. Keywords: swine, gut microbiome, Salmonella, probiotics, prebiotics
97
FionaBrennan
Teagasc (Irish Agriculture and Food Development authority)
WexfordIreland
Research Scientist
https://brennanfp.wixsite.com/soilmicrobiology
Soil microbiome; soil-microbe plant interactions; enteric pathogens
98
LihiSegalDay TwoAdanimIsrael
Co-Founder, CEO
https://www.daytwo.com/about/
We provide personalized nutrition and actionable insights that allow you to live healthier and maintain normal blood sugar levels. Discover surprising food possibilities, while living your life with smarter nutritional and activity choices. We do this by studying your individual metrics and gut microbiome – that vast collection of bacteria that you host. Turns out your microbiome has a big impact on your health, and we translate your unique gut bacteria into personalized actionable insights.
99
DebbieLindell
Technion - Israel Institute of Technology
HaifaIsrael
Associate Professor
http://biology.technion.ac.il/?cmd=staff.47&act=read&id=194&page_id=93
Host-virus interactions in marine cyanobacteria: Ecology, Physiology and Genome Evolution
100
IlanaBerman-Frank
Bar Ilan University
Ramat GanIsrael
Associate Professor
http://www.ilanaberman.com/
Microbial (bacterioplankton and phytoplankton) members of aquatic environments, Trichodesmium blooms, Nitrogen Fixation in the Mediterranean and Red Seas, Programmed cell death, Marine Diazotrophs in face of environmental changes,
Loading...
Main menu