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RBMS2020 Conference Program Planning provides this spreadsheet to serve as an informal tool to connect individuals who want to brainstorm ideas for session proposals and/or find collaborators for session proposals. It is monitored by the Marketing Subcommittee of the RBMS20 Conference Program Planning Committee, but it is not part of the official proposal process.

Find the full Call for Proposals and proposal form at http://bit.ly/RBMS20CFP.
I would like to join this session / discuss more
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DateYour NameYour Contact Info (email)Session TypeMy idea is...Session KeywordsSession Collaborators (if identified)Person 1

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Person 2

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9/4/2019 22:02:50Example Proposer example @ emailaddress . comPanelI would like to propose a panel session with a speaker from a public library, a second speaker from a small institution, and a speaker who works in an academic library. Speakers will focus on successful experiences as leaders and administrators, mentor/mentee experiences, and/or efforts to leadLeadership, next generation, teaching, mentorName, name @ email. comName 2, nname@ emails
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9/19/2019Amy F. Brownbrownbbz@bc.edupartipant driven session"My Favorite Mistake: Technical Services Edition" -- lightning talks from 6-7 participants in various stages of their careers discussing an elucidating mistake (big or small) and how they learned from, adjusted around, and coped with the consequences.mistake, learning, cataloging, technical servicesDanijela Matkovic danijela.matkovic@yale.edu
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9/21/2019Rosemary K. J. Davis and Meaghan O'Riordanrosemary.davis@yale.edu; meaghan.oriordan@emory.eduseminar[PROPOSAL IS FULL] "Caring for Collections: The Role of Accessioning in Effective Stewardship" - We are currently engaged in a research project with this working title. We’re interested in making accessioning work more visible in every way, primarily by illuminating the sorts of labor and relationships required in order to steward archival collections during the initial phases of acquisitions and accessioning. For RBMS, we would like to work with others lifting the veil on invisible labor (including with print collections) and talk about how making that work visible also produces better experience, description, and access for stakeholders.accessioning; stewardship; collection stewardship; relationships; labor; invisible laborMelanie Wisner, mmwisner@fas.harvard.eduAngela White, angwhite@iupui.eduElizabeth Ott, elott@email.unc.eduFULLFULL
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1/9/20Greg Schmidtschmigr@auburn.edupanel?What to do when you discover ugly/embarrassing information about your institution or about powerful individuals in the course of your work? How should the archives navigate the politically charged effort to diversify the narrative of remembrance? This proposed panel will engage attendees in discussing several case studies where archives have found themselves with the power to have an impact in the shaping of cultural memory.

From Auburn University, Greg Schmidt, Special Collections Librarian will share the story of discovering evidence that would embarrass the institution and the current Governor of Alabama. In Auburn’s case, we discovered an audio recording where the current Governor was identified as wearing blackface in college (1967); something she has previously denied. What is the responsibility of the archivist to the historical record vis a vis their responsibility to protecting their institution? Are there best practices for when ugly truths come to light?

Many American institutions of higher education, Auburn included, benefitted from white supremacy. Auburn hFrom the wealth derived from slavery, convict leasing, and investments in industries profiting from human suffering. Other collections shed non-flattering light on individuals, churches, and organizations. Curators are often aware of the "ugly history" documented in their collections. But newly discovered "ugly history" has the potential to come to light through our activities; through description of collections, through digitization of historic media, and through harvesting of electronic communications. Ugly history may be unearthed by researchers, too. Whatever the path of discovery happens to be, newly surfaced information may either embarrass the institution or, in the case of Auburn University, embarrass a powerful individual such as the sitting State Governor who also happens to be the Chair of our Board of Trustees. Are there best practices for archives when they are drawn into the highly charged discussion of rememberance?

This session will feature panel of speakers who can talk about their particular “case study” in ugly discoveries, then engage the panelists and attendees in a discussion on best practices.
peoples choiceSandra Varry, Heritage & University Archivist, Florida State University svarry@fsu.edu
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