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Convert: TitleConversion: TitleBoth: SubjectBoth: ContributorConvert: NamesConvert: Birth dateConvert: Birth placeConvert :Death dateConvert: Death placeConvert: SexConvert: EthnicityConvert: RaceConvert: Legal statusConvert: Family relationsConvert: OccupationConvert: ReligionsConvert: Biographical TextConvert: Biographical QuotationBoth: BibliographyConversion: Type of conversionConversion: RitualConversion: Date of conversionConversion: Origin religionConversion: Destination religionConversion: Place of conversionConversion: Description of conversionConvert: TagsConvert: Files
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Rosetta TylerConversion of Rosetta Tyler to Roman CatholicismTyler, RosettaMullen, LincolnTyler, RosettafemalewhitefreeTyler, Abigail Barber (mother)|Tyler,Noah (husband)Protestant|Roman Catholic"The following year Virgil returned to Claremont from New York, taking with him Father Charles Ffrench, a Dominican who was officiating there at St. Peter's church. The priest remained a week in Daniel Barber's house preaching and saying Mass, with the result that he had seven converts, including Mrs. Daniel Barber and her children, Mrs. Noah Tyler, who was Daniel Barber's sister [?], and her eldest daughter Rosetta. Mrs. Tyler was the mother of William Tyler, first Bishop of Hartford, Connecticut. Her husband and six other children were subsequently converted, and four of the daughters became Sisters of Charity." (<em>Catholic Encylopedia</em>)|"His [William Tyler's] mother [Abigail Barber Tyler] was a daughter of the Rev. Daniel Barber, and sister of the Rev. Virgil Barber." (Richard Henry Clarke, Lives of the Deceased Bishops, 2:274)"<a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Catholic_Encyclopedia_(1913)/The_Barber_Family">The Barber Family</a>," <em>Catholic Encyclopedia</em> (1913).|Louis de Goesbriand, ed., Catholic Memoirs of Vermont and New Hampshire (1886)|Theodore J. Rouillard, <em> Virgil H. Barber: My God and My All: The Lives and Marriage of Sister Mary Augustine and Father Virgil H. Barber: A Pious Romance</em> (T.J. Rouillard, 1994).Conversion between religion1818ProtestantRoman CatholicClaremont, NHstub, import, unprocessed-converts
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Noah TylerConversion of Noah Tyler to Roman CatholicismTyler, NoahMullen, LincolnTyler, NoahmalewhitefreeTyler, Abigail Barber (wife)|Tyler, Rosetta (daughter)Protestant|Roman CatholicNoah Tyler followed his wife, Abigail Tyler, in converting to Catholicism."The following year Virgil returned to Claremont from New York, taking with him Father Charles Ffrench, a Dominican who was officiating there at St. Peter's church. The priest remained a week in Daniel Barber's house preaching and saying Mass, with the result that he had seven converts, including Mrs. Daniel Barber and her children, Mrs. Noah Tyler, who was Daniel Barber's sister [?], and her eldest daughter Rosetta. Mrs. Tyler was the mother of William Tyler, first Bishop of Hartford, Connecticut. Her husband and six other children were subsequently converted, and four of the daughters became Sisters of Charity." (<em>Catholic Encylopedia</em>)|"His [William Tyler's] mother [Abigail Barber Tyler] was a daughter of the Rev. Daniel Barber, and sister of the Rev. Virgil Barber." (Richard Henry Clarke, Lives of the Deceased Bishops, 2:274)"<a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Catholic_Encyclopedia_(1913)/The_Barber_Family">The Barber Family</a>," <em>Catholic Encyclopedia</em> (1913).|Louis de Goesbriand, ed., Catholic Memoirs of Vermont and New Hampshire (1886)Conversion between religion1818?ProtestantRoman CatholicClaremont, NHstub, import
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William TylerConversion of William Tyler to Roman CatholicismTyler, William, 1806-1849Mullen, LincolnTyler, William1806-06-05Derby, VT1849-06-18Providence, RImalewhitefreeTyler, Rosetta (mother)Bishop of Hartford, CTEpiscopal|Roman CatholicWilliam Tyler converted to Catholicism when he was fifteen or sixteen, as part of the conversions of the Barber family to whom he was related through his mother. He was ordained in 1829 by Bishop Fenwick in the diocese of Massachusetts and Maine. In 1844 he became the first Roman Catholic bishop of Hartford, Connecticut, being apppointed by Pope Gregory XVI and consecrated by Bishop Fenwick. His diocese included all of Connecticut and Rhode Island.Richard Henry Clarke, "Right Rev. William Tyler, D.D" <em>Lives of the Deceased Bishops of the Catholic Church in the United States</em> (New York, 1888), 272–90. <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=_oMXAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA272#v=onepage">Google Books</a>.|"<a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Catholic_Encyclopedia_(1913)/The_Barber_Family">The Barber Family</a>" and "<a href="http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07144a.htm">Hartford</a>" <em>Catholic Encyclopedia</em> (1913).Conversion between religion1821?|1822?ProtestantRoman CatholicClaremont, NHstub, import
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Mary BarberConversion of Mary Barber to Roman CatholicismBarber, Mary, 1810-1848Mullen, LincolnBarber, Mary|Mary Bededicta, Sister1810-011848?|1844-05-09?Quebec, CanadafemalewhitefreeBarber, Virgil Horace (father)|Barber, Jerusha Booth (mother)|Barber, Abigail (sister)|Barber, Susan (sister)|Barber, Samuel (brother)|Barber, Josephine (sister)Nun (Ursuline)Episcopal|Roman CatholicThe children of Virgil Horace Barber and Jerusha Booth Barber were received into the Roman Catholic church in 1816, when both of their parents converted in New York. The older girls, Mary, Abigail, and Susan, joined their mother in the Visitation convent in Georgetown, DC. Josephine, an infant, was cared for by a family member. The son, Samuel, lived with his father in the Jesuit college. Mary Barber became an Ursuline nun in the Mt. Benedict convent in Charlestown, Massachusetts. She died in a convent in an Ursuline convent in Quebec."<a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Catholic_Encyclopedia_(1913)/The_Barber_Family">The Barber Family</a>," <em>Catholic Encyclopedia</em> (1913).|Louis de Goesbriand, ed., Catholic Memoirs of Vermont and New Hampshire (1886)|Theodore J. Rouillard, <em> Virgil H. Barber: My God and My All: The Lives and Marriage of Sister Mary Augustine and Father Virgil H. Barber: A Pious Romance</em> (T.J. Rouillard, 1994).Conversion between religionBaptism1816EpiscopalRoman CatholicNew York, NYstub, import
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Abigail BarberConversion of Abigail Barber to Roman CatholicismBarber, Mary Abigail, 1811-1880Mullen, LincolnBarber, Abigail|Barber, Mary Abigail (?)|Francis Xavier, Sister18111879-12-08?|1880-03-03?Quebec, CanadafemalewhitefreeBarber, Virgil Horace (father)|Barber, Jerusha Booth (mother)|Barber, Mary (sister)|Barber, Susan (sister)|Barber, Samuel (brother)|Barber, Josephine (sister)Nun (Ursuline)Episcopal|Roman CatholicThe children of Virgil Horace Barber and Jerusha Booth Barber were received into the Roman Catholic church in 1816, when both of their parents converted in New York. The older girls, Mary, Abigail, and Susan, joined their mother in the Visitation convent in Georgetown, DC. Josephine, an infant, was cared for by a family member. The son, Samuel, lived with his father in the Jesuit college. Abigail Barber became an Ursuline nun, and died in in Quebec."<a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Catholic_Encyclopedia_(1913)/The_Barber_Family">The Barber Family</a>," <em>Catholic Encyclopedia</em> (1913).|Louis de Goesbriand, ed., Catholic Memoirs of Vermont and New Hampshire (1886)|Theodore J. Rouillard, <em> Virgil H. Barber: My God and My All: The Lives and Marriage of Sister Mary Augustine and Father Virgil H. Barber: A Pious Romance</em> (T.J. Rouillard, 1994).Conversion between religionBaptism1816EpiscopalRoman CatholicNew York, NYstub, import
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Susan BarberConversion of Susan Barber to Roman CatholicismBarber, Susan, 1813-1837Mullen, LincolnBarber, Susan|Mary St. Joseph, Sister1813-01-041837-01-24Trois-Rivières, CanadafemalewhitefreeBarber, Virgil Horace (father)|Barber, Jerusha Booth (mother)|Barber, Mary (sister)|Barber, Abigail (sister)|Barber, Samuel (brother)|Barber, Josephine (sister)Nun (Ursuline)Episcopal|Roman CatholicThe children of Virgil Horace Barber and Jerusha Booth Barber were received into the Roman Catholic church in 1816, when both of their parents converted in New York. The older girls, Mary, Abigail, and Susan, joined their mother in the Visitation convent in Georgetown, DC. Josephine, an infant, was cared for by a family member. The son, Samuel, lived with his father in the Jesuit college. Susan became an Ursuline nun and died in a convent at Three Rivers, Canada."<a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Catholic_Encyclopedia_(1913)/The_Barber_Family">The Barber Family</a>," <em>Catholic Encyclopedia</em> (1913).|Louis de Goesbriand, ed., Catholic Memoirs of Vermont and New Hampshire (1886)|Theodore J. Rouillard, <em> Virgil H. Barber: My God and My All: The Lives and Marriage of Sister Mary Augustine and Father Virgil H. Barber: A Pious Romance</em> (T.J. Rouillard, 1994).Conversion between religionBaptism1816EpiscopalRoman CatholicNew York, NYstub, import
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Samuel BarberConversion of Samuel Barber to Roman CatholicismBarber, Samuel, 1814-1864Mullen, LincolnBarber, Samuel1814-03-091864-02-23St. Thomas's Manor, MDmalewhitefreeBarber, Virgil Horace (father)|Barber, Jerusha Booth (mother)|Barber, Mary (sister)|Barber, Abigail (sister)|Barber, Susan (sister)|Barber, Josephine (sister)Priest (Roman Catholic)|JesuitEpiscopal|Roman CatholicThe children of Virgil Horace Barber and Jerusha Booth Barber were received into the Roman Catholic church in 1816, when both of their parents converted in New York. The older girls, Mary, Abigail, and Susan, joined their mother in the Visitation convent in Georgetown, DC. Josephine, an infant, was cared for by a family member. The son, Samuel, lived with his father in the Jesuit college. Samuel graduated from Georgetown in 1831, entered the Jesuits as a novice, and was ordained in Rome, returning to Georgetown in 1840."<a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Catholic_Encyclopedia_(1913)/The_Barber_Family">The Barber Family</a>," <em>Catholic Encyclopedia</em> (1913).|Louis de Goesbriand, ed., Catholic Memoirs of Vermont and New Hampshire (1886)|Theodore J. Rouillard, <em> Virgil H. Barber: My God and My All: The Lives and Marriage of Sister Mary Augustine and Father Virgil H. Barber: A Pious Romance</em> (T.J. Rouillard, 1994).Conversion between religionBaptism1816EpiscopalRoman CatholicNew York, NYstub, import
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Josephine BarberConversion of Josephine Barber to Roman CatholicismBarber, JosephineMullen, LincolnBarber, Josephine1816femalewhitefreeBarber, Virgil Horace (father)|Barber, Jerusha Booth (mother)|Barber, Mary (sister)|Barber, Abigail (sister)|Barber, Susan (sister)|Barber, Samuel (brother)Nun (Visitandine)Episcopal|Roman CatholicThe children of Virgil Horace Barber and Jerusha Booth Barber were received into the Roman Catholic church in 1816, when both of their parents converted in New York. The older girls, Mary, Abigail, and Susan, joined their mother in the Visitadine convent in Georgetown, DC. Josephine, an infant, was cared for by a family member. The son, Samuel, lived with his father in the Jesuit college. Josephine Barber became an Visitadine nun in Georgetown, DC."<a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Catholic_Encyclopedia_(1913)/The_Barber_Family">The Barber Family</a>," <em>Catholic Encyclopedia</em> (1913).|Louis de Goesbriand, ed., Catholic Memoirs of Vermont and New Hampshire (1886)|Theodore J. Rouillard, <em> Virgil H. Barber: My God and My All: The Lives and Marriage of Sister Mary Augustine and Father Virgil H. Barber: A Pious Romance</em> (T.J. Rouillard, 1994).Conversion between religionBaptism1816EpiscopalRoman CatholicNew York, NYstub, import
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