GradeBand 3-5 Standards Documentation
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Strand (write the strand title)NGSS Standard Clarification Statement / Assessment Boundary (from NGSS PDF)Current Utah Standard Alignment (if similar standard exists)Samples from Other States (fill in with any examples found from other states)SEEd Strand ParagraphUtah SEEd Standard (write the new standard here)Engineering Standard Integration
Writing Sources DocumentationJustification for SEEd Standard
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GRADE LEVEL OVERVIEW
Utah Science With Engineering Education (SEEd) Standards
The third grade SEEd standards provide a framework for student understanding of phenomena in earth, life, and physical science using the lens of cause and effect. Students will analyze data of weather conditions to build an understanding of climate patterns in different regions of the world. Using their understanding of weather and climate, students will design solutions to minimize the effects of weather-related hazards. Students will also analyze data and develop models to explain how traits are inherited from parents and influenced by the environment. Students will develop explanations for how organisms’ traits can affects their ability to survive in particular environments. Students will design solutions to problems caused by changes in an environment. Students will continue to use the lens of cause and effect to explore the relationships between force and motion. Students will investigate the forces that objects exert on each other, gravitational, electric, and magnetic forces and how these forces affect motion. Through investigating weather, traits, and forces students will expand their understanding of cause and effect relationships in the natural and designed world.
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"Weather & Climate"3-ESS2-1: Analyze and interpret data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season. (Alignment 1/3)[Clarification Statement: Examples of data could include average temperature, precipitation, and wind direction.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment of graphical displays is limited to pictographs and bar graphs. Assessment does not include climate change.]4-2-1: Observe, measure, and record the basic elements of weather.Weather is a minute-by-minute, day-by-day variation of the atmosphere’s condition on a local scale. Scientists record patterns of the weather across different times and areas so that they can make weather forecasts. Climate describes the ranges of an area's typical weather conditions and the extent to which those conditions vary over years to centuries. Severe weather can impact humans in a variety ways. While humans can not eliminate severe weather they can design solutions to reduce its impact. Standard 3.1.1 Analyze and interpret data to reveal patterns that indicate typical weather conditions expected during a particular season. Examples of data could include average temperature, precipitation, or wind direction. New York, NGSS, and GA for emphasis statement. GA included measurement in metric and standardRephrased to include more specifics on the type of data that students could analyze.This standard will be built upon in 6th grade.
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3-ESS2-2: Obtain and combine information to describe climates in different regions of the world.No Alignment in 3-5 Utah Science Standards
Standard 3.1.2 Obtain and communicate information to describe climate patterns in different regions of the world. Emphasis is on how climate patterns can be used to predict typical weather conditions.
NGSS rewritten to include all three dimensionsFocus on CCC patterns included which students can then use to predict. This standard will be built upon in 6th grade.
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3-ESS3-1: Make a claim about the merit of a design solution that reduces the impacts of a weather-related hazard.
3-5-ETS1-1: Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.
3-5-ETS1- 2. Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.
3-5-ETS1- 3. Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.
No Engineering in 3-5 Utah Science Standards Standard 3.1.3 Design a solution that reduces the effects of a weather-related hazard. Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem, plan and carry out fair tests to identify aspects of the model or prototype that can be improved, and evaluate the solutions based on how well each meets the criteria and constraints of the problem. Examples could include barriers to prevent flooding or wind-resistant roofs.NGSS rewritten for integrated engineeringStrand written to include all parts of the engineering design process to give students the oportunity to complete the whole process and teachers an understanding that all pieces should be taught for an authentic experience.
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[Clarification Statement: Examples of design solutions to weather-related hazards could include barriers to prevent flooding, wind resistant roofs, and lightning rods.]No Alignment in 3-5 Utah Science StandardsCombined with previous standardEngage in argument from evidence to support a claim about the merit of a design solution that reduces the effects of a weather-related hazard.
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"Inherited Traits and Adaptations"3-LS1-1: Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.[Clarification Statement: Changes organisms go through during their life form a pattern.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment of plant life cycles is limited to those of flowering plants. Assessment does not include details of human reproduction.]No Alignment in 3-5 Utah Science StandardsPlants and animals have unique and diverse life cycles, but they all follow a pattern of birth, growth, reproduction, and death. Different organisms vary in how they look and function because they have different inherited information. An organism’s traits are inherited from its parents and can be influenced by the environment. Variations in traits between individuals in a population may provide advantages in surviving and reproducing in particular environments. When the environment changes some organisms do not survive, some move to new locations, and some have traits that allow them to survive and remain in the changed environment.Standard 3.2.1 Develop models to describe patterns of change organisms go through during their life cycles. Emphasize that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles, but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.Influenced by NGSSIncorporated CCC patterns to make the performance task three-dimensional. Built upon in 7th grade.
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3-LS2-1: Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.None4-5-4: Observe and record the behavior of Utah animals. (Alignment 1/2)REMOVED Redundant topic that was incorporated into another section.
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3-LS3-1: Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence that plants and animals have traits inherited from parents and that variation of these traits exists in a group of similar organisms. (Alignment 1/2)[Clarification Statement: Patterns are the similarities and differences in traits shared between offspring and their parents, or among siblings. Emphasis is on organisms other than humans.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include genetic mechanisms of inheritance and prediction of traits. Assessment is limited to non-human examples.]5-5-1: Using supporting evidence, show that traits are transferred from a parent organism to its offspring.Standard 3.2.2 Analyze data to identify patterns to provide evidence that plants and animals have traits inherited from parents. Examples of patterns could include the similarities and differences in traits between parent organisms and offspring and variation of traits in groups of similar organisms. Emphasis is on plants and non-human animals.MA grade 4 reviewed for emphasis statementExamples and emphasis statement included for clarity. Reproduction is addressed in 7th grade.
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3-LS3-1: Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence that plants and animals have traits inherited from parents and that variation of these traits exists in a group of similar organisms. (Alignment 2/2)
Repeated aboveAsk questions about the cause of variations of traits that exist in a group of similar organisms. Emphasize that organisms vary in how they look and function because they have different inherited information. Assessment does not include genetic mechanisms of inheritance or prediction of traits.NGSS rewritten to include all three dimensionsChanged the SEP and CCC for clarity of student performance.This standard will be built upon in 7th grade.
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3-LS3-2. Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the
environment.
[Clarification Statement: Examples of the environment affecting a trait could include white hares in winter / summer, a change of temperature in the ocean hurting coral survival, etc.]Standard 3.2.3 Construct an explanation supported by evidence that the environment can affect the traits of an organism. Examples could include normally tall plants grown with insufficient water are stunted, and a pet dog that is given too much food and little exercise may become overweight.NGSS rewritten to include all three dimensionsExample statement included for clarity. This standard will be built upon in 7th grade.
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3-LS4-2: Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.normally tall plants grown with insufficient water are stunted; and, a pet dog that is given too much food and little exercise may become overweight.]No Alignment in 3-5 Utah Science StandardsStandard 3.2.4 Construct an explanation supported by evidence for how variations in traits can affect the ability of an individual to survive and reproduce. Examples could include a plant that has the trait of larger thorns may be less likely to be eaten by predators and pass that trait to offspring, and an animal that has better camouflage may be more likely to survive and produce offspring.

NGSS rewritten to include all three dimensionsFocus on variation of a trait more clearly articulates what students should focus on.This standard will be built upon in 7th grade.
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3-LS4-3: Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all. (Alignment 1/2)Clarification Statement: Examples of evidence could include needs and characteristics of the organisms and habitats involved. The organisms and their habitat make up a system in which the parts depend on each other.4-5-1: Describe the physical characteristics of Utah's wetlands, forests, and deserts.Standard 3.2.5 Engage in argument from evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all. Emphasize that organisms have adaptations that affect how well they survive in a particular environment.NGSS rewritten to include all three dimensionsCCC fit best in the emphasis statement. Built upon in 6th grade.
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3-LS4-4: Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.Clarification Statement: Examples of environmental changes could include changes in land characteristics, water distribution, temperature, food, and other organisms. Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to a single environmental change. Assessment does not include the greenhouse effect or climate change.No Alignment in 3-5 Utah Science StandardsStandard 3.2.6 Design a solution to a problem caused by a change in the environment that affects the types of plants and animals living there. Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem and evaluate the solutions based on how well each meets the criteria and constraints of the problem. Examples of environmental changes could include changes in land use, water availability, temperature, food, and other organisms.NGSS rewritten to include integrated engineering Strand written to include all parts of the engineering design process to give students the oportunity to complete the whole process and teachers an understanding that all pieces should be taught for an authentic experience.
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"Forces and Motion"3-PS2-1: Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object.[Clarification Statement: Examples could include an unbalanced force on one side of a ball can make it start moving; and, balanced forces pushing on a box from both sides will not produce any motion at all.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to one variable at a time: number, size, or direction of forces. Assessment does not include quantitative force size, only qualitative and relative. Assessment is limited to gravity being addressed as a force that pulls objects down.]3-3-1: Demonstrate how forces cause changes in speed or direction of objects. (Alignment 1/2)Forces act on objects and have both a strength and a direction. An object at rest typically has multiple forces acting on it, but they are balanced, resulting in a zero net force on the object. Forces that are unbalanced, can cause changes in an object’s speed or direction of motion. The patterns of an object’s motion in various situations can be observed, measured, and used to predict future motion. Forces are exerted when objects come in contact with each other, however some forces can act on objects that are not in contact. The gravitational force of Earth, acting on an object near Earth’s surface pulls that object toward the planet’s center. Electric and magnetic forces between a pair of objects can act at a distance. The strength of these non-contact forces depends on the properties of the objects and the distance between the objects.Standard 3.3.1 Plan and carry out investigations that provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object. Examples could include an unbalanced force on one side of a ball can make it start moving; and, balanced forces pushing on a box from both sides will not produce any motion at all. Emphasize using fair tests by changing only one variable at a time.
NGSS rewritten for all 3 dimensions. MA and GA referred to for wording.Examples and emphasis included for clarity. Core ideas for forces will build in 7th grade.
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3-PS2-2: Make observations and/or measurements of an object’s motion to provide evidence that a pattern can be used to predict future motion.[Clarification Statement: Examples of motion with a predictable pattern could include a child swinging in a swing, a ball rolling back and forth in a bowl, and two children on a see-saw.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include technical terms such as period and frequency.]No Alignment in 3-5 Utah Science StandardsStandard 3.3.2 Analyze data from observations and measurements of an object’s motion to identify patterns that can be used to predict future motion. Examples of motion with a predictable pattern could include a child swinging in a swing, a ball rolling back and forth in a bowl, and two children on a see-saw.
NGSS rewritten to include three dimensions. GA and MA referred to for wording.Included SEP analyze data, to help direct student performance of making observations. Will be built upon in 7th grade.
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5-PS2-1: Support an argument that the gravitational force exerted by Earth on objects is directed down. (Alignment 2/2)[Clarification Statement: “Down” is a local description of the direction that points toward the center of the spherical Earth.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include mathematical representation of gravitational force.]3-4-2: Describe the effects of gravity on the motion of an object.Standard 3.3.3 Construct an explanation supported by evidence that the gravitational force exerted by Earth causes objects to be directed down, toward the center of the spherical Earth. Emphasize that “down” is a local description depending on one’s position on Earth.NGSS rewritten to include three dimensions. GA and MA referred to for wording.Will be addressed again in 6th and 7th grades.
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3-PS2-3: Ask questions to determine cause and effect relationships of electrical or magnetic interactions between two objects not in contact with each other. (Alignment 2/3)[Clarification Statement: Examples of an electric force could include the force on hair from an electrically charged balloon and the electrical forces between a charged rod and pieces of paper; examples of a magnetic force could include the force between two permanent magnets, the force between an electromagnet and steel paperclips, and the force exerted by one magnet versus the force exerted by two magnets. Examples of cause and effect relationships could include how the distance between objects affects strength of the force and how the orientation of magnets affects the direction of the magnetic force.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to forces produced by objects that can be manipulated by students, and electrical interactions are limited to static electricity.]5-3-2: Describe how the magnetic field of Earth and a magnet are similar.Standard 3.3.4 Plan and carry out an investigation to determine cause and effect relationships of electrical or magnetic interactions between two objects not in contact with each other. Examples could include the force on hair from an electrically charged balloon, how the orientation of magnets affects the direction of the force, and how the distance between objects affects strength of the force.NGSS rewritten to include three dimensions. GA and MA referred to for wording.Interactions based on observable evidence. Ideas around fields and gravitational interactions will build in 7th grade
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3-PS2-4: Define a simple design problem that can be solved by applying scientific ideas about magnets.Clarification Statement: Examples of problems could include constructing a latch to keep a door shut and creating a device to keep two moving objects from touching each other.]No Alignment in 3-5 Utah Science StandardsStandard 3.3.5 Define a problem that can be solved by applying scientific ideas about magnets. Identify the criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost. Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to the problem. Examples of problems could include constructing a latch that functions to keep a door shut and creating a structure to prevent two moving objects from touching each other.Strand written to include all parts of the engineering design process to give students the oportunity to complete the whole process and teachers an understanding that all pieces should be taught for an authentic experience.
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3-5-ETS1-2: Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.No Engineering in 3-5 Utah Science Standards
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3-5-ETS1-3: Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.No Engineering in 3-5 Utah Science Standards
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