Fall 2013 Undergraduate English Courses (ALWAYS CHECK BANNER FOR THE MOST UP-TO-DATE LISTINGS)
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SubjCrseSecCRNInstructorTitleDaysTimeDescriptionTexts
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ENGL1000284418Donald E. Palumbo Appreciating LiteratureMWF09:00 am-09:50 amThis course will focus on fiction. We will read about a dozen short stories, one novella, and one novel. There will be numerous reading quizzes and three in-class essay exams. We will also see three or four film versions of the stories we are reading. The class will divide into six small discussion groups to consider the three longest short stories, the novella, and the novel.The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction
The Man Who Would Be King and Other Stories, by Rudyard Kipling
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, by P. K. Dick
The Man Who Would Be King (film)
Apocalypse Now (film)
The Dead (film)
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ENGL100060180010Helena M. Feder Appreciating Literature- DEonlineWhat does it mean to “appreciate literature”? Understand? Enjoy? Interpret? And what counts as “literature”? Love poetry? Science Fiction? Fairy tales? What is the difference between art and entertainment? This introductory course will explore these and other questions as we read poems, short fiction, a novel, and a play over the course of the semester.

This ONLINE course will feature two podcasts per week (posted Tuesday and Thursday afternoons, except during class holidays, breaks, exam days, etc.) that correspond to the reading assignment dates. These are podcasts of a face-to-face section of the course; you will hear a mini-lectures and student presentations, as if you are in a face to face course on campus.
Glengarry Glen Ross, by David Mamet. Grove Press
Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry vol.1
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, Philip K. Dick (Del Ray, paperback)
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ENGL1000384423John Hoppenthaler Appreciating LiteratureTR12:30 pm-01:45 pmENGL 1000 surveys literary monsters! This course is designed to meet GC humanities requirements; it’s a basic class in reading, analyzing, enjoying, and appreciating imaginative literary texts. This summer, we’ll explore the literary concept of the monster through the classic novels Frankenstein (or the Modern Prometheus) by Mary Shelly, Dracula by Bram Stoker, Grendel by John Gardner, and a selection from the epic poem, Beowulf. Frankenstein
Dracula
Grendel
selection from Beowulf
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ENGL1000180009Ronald W. Hoag Appreciating LiteratureTR09:30 am-10:45 amLecture and discussion. "Close reading" explorations in the genres of fiction, poetry, drama, and film with attention to the aims and trechniques of the writer's craft and to the approaches and tools of the reader's effort to understand and interpret. We analyze a short play, a movie, twenty-some poems, and ten short stories. There is just one book, reasonably priced at $36.00 new.

Literature: The Human Experience (Shorter 9th Edition)
edited by Richard Abcarian and Marvin Klotz
Bedford/St. Martin's, publisher
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ENGL1000484426TBAApprec Lit: Global UnderstandiMWF08:00 am-08:50 am
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ENGL2000384573James W. Kirkland Interpreting Literature (WI)TR02:00 pm-03:15 pm
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ENGL2000584577Julie Fay Interpreting Literature (WI)MW02:00 pm-03:15 pm
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ENGL2000680159Julie Fay Interpreting Literature (WI)online
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ENGL2000484576Marame Gueye Interpreting Literature (WI)TR11:00 am-12:15 pm
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ENGL200060180160Marame Gueye Interpreting Literature(WI)-DEonline
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ENGL2000184569Sandra K. Tawake Interpreting Literature (WI)MWF10:00 am-10:50 am
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ENGL2000284570Sandra K. Tawake Interpreting Literature (WI)MWF01:00 pm-01:50 pm
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ENGL2100184579Sean M. Morris Major British Writers (WI)TR09:30 am-10:45 am
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ENGL2200184581Peter J. Franks Major American Writers (WI)MWF03:00 pm-03:50 pmThis course explores major American fiction and poetry, focusing on themes of liberation, social transformation, and identity. Periods considered include the American Renaissance, the Progressive Era, and the Jazz Age. In addition to the fiction listed, poets might include Whitman, Poe, Hughes, Pound, and H.D. Kate Chopin, The Awakening
James Weldon Johnson, Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man
Nella Larsen, Quicksand and Passing
F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby
William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying
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ENGL2200284582Reginald W. Watson Major American Writers (WI)TR12:30 pm-01:45 pmCourse Objective:
To explore various writers who have been identified as excellent examples and models for literary studies in American society. In this course, you will be required to read selected political, social, and creative works that best represent American literary traditions. You will also be required to write and think critically, while going through a series of quizzes and examinations that will test your knowledge of literature, terminology, and history related to the literary time periods and authors.
Text: Concise Anthology of American Literature 7th Edition.
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ENGL2700184584Solveig J. Bosse Introduction to Language StudiesMWF11:00 am-11:50 amWe will be looking at the sound system and the words of English. We'll address question like: How are the sounds of English produced? What is the function of the sounds in the language? What other features (intonation, stress) play a role in the language? How are words of English formed? What do words consist of? How can new words enter the language?
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ENGL2710184586Michael J. Aceto English GrammarTR09:30 am-10:45 am
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ENGL2740184587Michael J. Aceto Language in the USATR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
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ENGL2900384599Anna Froula Introduction to Film StudiesMW02:01 pm-03:15 pm
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ENGL2900284594James C. Holte Introduction to Film StudiesM06:30 pm-09:30 pm
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ENGL2900184589Amanda A. KleinIntroduction to Film StudiesMWF01:00 pm-01:50 pmThe goal of this course, as its title suggests, is to “introduce” you to the broad field of film studies, including formal analysis, genre studies, film history and theory. By the end of the semester you will have the basic critical tools necessary for understanding and analyzing the language of motion pictures. Ideally, this course will enable you to not only gain a richer understanding of the films you watch but also the television shows, You Tube videos, commercials, and other media you encounter on a daily basis.
Casablanca (1942, Michael Curtiz)
Touch of Evil (1958, Orson Welles)
Breathless (1960, Jean-Luc Godard)
The Virgin Suicides (1999, Sofia Coppola)
The Bicycle Thieves (1948, Vittorio De Sica)
Walk Hard (2007, Jake Kasdan)
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ENGL3000184609Thomas L. Herron History of British Literature to 1700MWF02:00 pm-02:50 pm
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ENGL3010184611Anne Mallory History of British Literature, 1700-1900MWF10:00 am-10:50 am
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ENGL3020184615Edgar T. Shields History of American Literature to 1900TR03:30 pm-04:45 pmBackground for English majors and minors by examining the various periods of American literature and their relationship to the history and cultures of the times, from the first European and Native American contacts to 1900. In addition, research skills for historically-based literary and cultural study will be taught, including reference works, databases of primary source materials, and basic archival work.Rather than using an anthology, all readings will be available through online sources.
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ENGL3040184617Matthew B. Cox Intro to Prof Writing (WI)TR02:00 pm-03:15 pmENGL3040 will introduce you to the rhetorical principles and professional practices of professional writing. In this class, we will address questions like:
• How do we define “professional writing”?
• What kinds of things do professional writers do? Where and how do they do these things? What kinds of professional writing will I do in future careers and jobs?
• What are the core concepts of professional writing (such as culture, community, and technology), and what do these concepts look like in practice?
• What kinds of documents, design principles, digital tools, writing strategies, and research skills should professional writers be familiar with?
All readings will be provided online or on Blackboard.
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ENGL3260284627Reginald W. Watson African American Lit (WI)TR02:00 pm-03:15 pmCourse Objective:
The Black American Literature tradition has, in the past, been largely overlooked on all levels of education. It has only been recently that efforts have been made to increase public and educational awareness of the African-American’s contributions to literature. This course is designed to present a few of the many black-authored works so that a thorough and critical analysis can be made. In this course you will learn how to read, write, and think critically so that you can respond competently through either written or verbal expression. The goal of this course is to help you gain a full appreciation and understanding of the African-American tradition.

Texts
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave Written by Himself Frederick Douglass
Their Eyes Were Watching God Zora Neale Hurston
Native Son Richard Wright
Beloved Toni Morrison
Black Voices: An Anthology of Afro-American Literature Chapman (optional)
A Turbulent Voyage Floyd W. Hayes, III
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ENGL3260184621Seodial Deena African American Lit (WI)MWF10:00 am-10:50 am
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ENGL3300184633Laureen Tedesco Women and Lit (WI)MW03:30 pm-04:45 pmThis class will examine representations of girlhood in European fairy tales and in American children's and young adult literature from the nineteenth-century to the present. Beginning with a nineteenth-century depiction of white, middle class girlhood, we'll read a range of books about girls' coming-of-age and their choices about marriage or romance and education. We'll read several African-American texts, a Latina novel in verse, a fantasy, a futuristic sci-fi novel, a problem novel, and Charles Perrault's fairy tales.Shannon Hale, Princess Academy
Sharon Draper, November Blues
Scott Westerfeld, Uglies
Sarah Dessen, This Lullaby
Laurie Halse Anderson, Speak
Guadalupe Garcia McCall, Under the Mesquite
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ENGL3300284638Nicole N. Sidhu Women and Lit (WI)TR11:00 am-12:15 pmThe class aims to introduce you to some of the major issues and concerns of women’s writing in English through the study of selected works. The authors we study come from both the distant past and the recent present. They are diverse in race, ethnicity, and nationality. Amongst the questions we will address as we read and think about these texts are: How does literature by women speak to issues that affect women? How does it engage with the misogynist elements of Western culture? Is there a discernable tradition of women’s writing? What does it mean to write as a woman? How do other issues -- such as family, race, and class --intersect with women’s issues in the texts we study? The class is designated Writing Intensive, thus students will complete a number of writing assignments and we will spend class time learning to write analytic essays on literature. The class will be run as a combination of lecture and discussion.Eve Ensler, The Vagina Monologues
Marie de France, Lais
Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own
Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre
Toni Morrison, Beloved
Margaret Atwood, Handmaid’s Tale
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ENGL3330184642Robert J. Siegel Early Twentieth-Century DramaTR12:30 pm-01:45 pmThe course will read European and American plays from Ibsen to WWII. We'll cover playwrights such as Pirandello, Shaw, O'Neill, and Brecht.
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ENGL3420184647Brian D. GloverThe Short StoryTR09:30 am-10:45 amIn this course, you will study some of the most famous and canonical short stories in English. You will also, as part of a group project, read and study many new stories currently being published in recent periodicals.Stories by Baldwin, Bambara, Cheever, Melville, O'Connor, Welty and many more. New stories may come from _The New Yorker_, _The Southern Review_, _African-American Review_, _AGNI_, _Granta_, and _Vice_.
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ENGL3470184657Edgar T. Shields Modern Fantasy (WI) w/5350TR02:00 pm-03:15 pmThe Frontier in American Literature and Film

A combined offering of ENGL 3470, Modern Fantasy/Popular Literature, and ENGL 5350, Special Studies in Film.

The idea of the frontier in American literature and film and its influence on American culture, mythology and national identity, evolving from colonial-era writings to twenty-first century literary and cinematic works.

ENGL 3470 carries Writing Intensive and Foundations Humanities credit. ENGL 5350 is a graduate course which undergraduates may use as a Film Studies Minor elective.
The book and film list has not yet been set, but may include:

1) Mary Rowlandson, A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682)
2) David Crockett, Narrative of the Life of David Crockett (1834)
3) Nat Love, The Life and Adventures of Nat Love, Better Known in the Cattle Country as "Deadwood Dick" (1907)
4) The Searchers (1956)
5) True Grit(s) (1968, novel; 1969, film; 2010, film)
6) Full Metal Jacket (1987)
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ENGL3480184659Donald E. Palumbo Science FictionMWF11:00 am-11:50 amThis course will cover four science fiction novels and four science fiction films. The class will divide into six small groups to brainstorm the novels, but will brainstorm the films as a class. There will be easy reading quizzes on the four novels, and there will be three in-class essay exams.Flowers for Algernon (novel)
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (novel)
The Stars My Destination (novel)
Dune (novel)
Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (film)
Back to the Future (film)
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ENGL3570184660Andrea Kitta American Folklore (WI)MW02:00 pm-03:15 pm
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ENGL3570284662James W. Kirkland American Folklore (WI)TR09:30 am-10:45 am
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ENGL3600184664David Wilson-Okamura Classics from Homer to DanteMWF10:00 am-10:50 am
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ENGL3700184666Michael J. Aceto Hist of the Engl Lang w/6505TR11:00 am-12:15 pm
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ENGL3730184668Solveig J. Bosse Struct Engl:Phono Morph w/6526MW03:30 pm-04:45 pmWe will be looking at the sound system and the words of English. We'll address question like: How are the sounds of English produced? What is the function of the sounds in the language? What other features (intonation, stress) play a role in the language? How are words of English formed? What do words consist of? How can new words enter the language?
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ENGL3760184670Ludmila Cope Linguistic Theory for Speech and Hearing CliniciansTR12:30 pm-01:45 pmThe purpose of this course is to introduce prospective speech and hearing clinicians to the methods and techniques of linguistic analysis, especially as applied to the phonological, morphological and syntactic structures of English. This may or may not be your first serious encounter with the subject. In either case, you will be able to succeed as long as you are willing to study the material and ask questions in and out of class.
Klammer, T. P., Schulz, M. R., & Volpe, A. D. (2009) .6th edition. Analyzing English grammar. New York: Pearson/Longman. 9780205685943
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ENGL381060184684Dana K. Harrington Advanced Compositiononline
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ENGL3810184681Joyce I. Middleton Advanced Composition (WI)MW03:30 pm-04:45 pm
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ENGL3815184686Amber F. Thomas Introduction to Creative WritingMW02:00 pm-03:15 pmEnglish 3815 is a dynamic course in which students will develop creative writing skills through individual creative writing projects, group discussions, and the study of contemporary literature. Students will use strategies that real writers use to produce works of fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, and drama. This course will assist students in uncovering their unique creative perspectives and what they want to say through their writing. The environment in this class is one of support and encouragement, welcoming self-expression and development.Creative Writing: Four Genres in Brief by David Starkey (2nd Edition)
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ENGL3815284688Robert J. Siegel Introduction to Creative WritingTR11:00 am-12:15 pmWe will read and write in all the major genres of Creative Writing: Fiction, nonfiction, script writing, and poetry. Students will be required to critique each other's writing in a workshop setting.
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ENGL3820180157TBAScientific Writing (WI)TR09:30 am-10:45 am
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ENGL3820280158TBAScientific Writing (WI)TR02:00 pm-03:15 pm
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ENGL3830184691Robert J. Siegel Introduction to Play WritingTR02:00 pm-03:15 pmWe'll work on the basics of playwriting: The difference between dialog and conversation, creating believable characters, scene construction and plot construction. Students will finish a one-act play or the first act of a full length play.We will read at least four contemporary plays.
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ENGL3835184694Wendy Sharer Persuasive Writing (WI)TR11:00 am-12:15 pm
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ENGL3840184697John Hoppenthaler Introduction to Poetry WritingTR03:30 pm-04:45 pmHave you wondered if poetry writing is for you? More and more folks have realized that a pursuit of creative writing isn't only useful for those who want to teach; rather, they have come to realize that writing creatively is a pursuit in which one can actively engage no matter what one wishes to do for a living. Poets today are doctors, lawyers, musicians, and more. ENGL 3840 is exactly the right course for you to give it a try. Our Lady of the Ruins by Traci Brimhall
Searching for the Gulf Hotel by Richard Blanco
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ENGL3850284704J L. Whisnant Introduction to Fiction WritingTR05:00 pm-06:15 pm
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ENGL3850184701Liza A. Wieland Introduction to Fiction WritingTR11:00 am-12:15 pmThis course is designed to introduce you to the short story form.
IMPORTANT: The stories you turn in for this class MUST be what is loosely called "realistic” or “literary” fiction: stories about characters who are real human beings, set somewhere that human beings have actually been, and with characters who can only do what real human beings can actually do. No genre fiction: horror, fantasy, westerns, romance, science fiction, no super heroes, no vampires or witches or spells-and-wands magic, no talking animals or plants. I will make exception for stories set in the not-too-distant future and stories in the tradition of magic realism, as exemplified by work like “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez (which is on the reading list).
Alice LaPlante, Method and Madness: The Making of a Story WW Norton 2009, 2007
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ENGL3860184706Donald A. Albright Introduction to Nonfiction WritingMW03:30 pm-04:45 pmIntroduction to writing creative nonfiction for popular audiences. Using techniques most often associated with fiction writing, cnf is now considered the "4th genre" of written literary expression. Students should have above average writing skills and be willing to participate in workshops & other discussions of their work and that of others.In Short, an anthology of short pieces of creative nonfiction. PRINT
Brevity: A Journal of Concise Literary Nonfiction. ON-LINE JOURNAL
Junk: A Literary Fix. ON-LINE JOURNAL
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ENGL3870184707Donna J. Kain Intro Editing & Abstract (WI)MWF11:00 am-11:50 amThis course will introduce you to basic principles of editing for grammar, syntax, organization, professional style, emphasis, and audience awareness. We focus on common methods and conventions for hard-copy and electronic methods of editing. You will improve your editing and close reading skills and gain basic understanding of editing in organizational and professional settings. We will learn about about the field of editing, hear from editors, and apply what you have learned.The Copyeditor's Handbook: A Guide for Book Publishing and Corporate Communications
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ENGL3880180161TBAWriting for Business and IndustryMWF09:00 am-09:50 am
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ENGL3880280162TBAWriting for Business and IndustryMWF10:00 am-10:50 am
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ENGL3880380163TBAWriting for Business and IndustryMWF11:00 am-11:50 am
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ENGL3880480164TBAWriting for Business and IndustryMWF12:00 pm-12:50 pm
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ENGL3880580165TBAWriting for Business and IndustryMWF01:00 pm-01:50 pm
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ENGL3880680166TBAWriting for Business and IndustryMW02:00 pm-03:15 pm
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ENGL3880780167TBAWriting for Business and IndustryMW03:30 pm-04:45 pm
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ENGL3880880168TBAWriting for Business and IndustryTR08:00 am-09:15 am
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ENGL3880980169TBAWriting for Business and IndustryTR09:30 am-10:45 am
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ENGL38801080170TBAWriting for Business and IndustryTR11:00 am-12:15 pm
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ENGL38801180171TBAWriting for Business and IndustryTR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
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ENGL38801280172TBAWriting for Business and IndustryTR02:00 pm-03:15 pm
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ENGL38801380173TBAWriting for Business and IndustryTR03:30 pm-04:45 pm
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ENGL38801480174TBAWriting for Business and Industryonline
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ENGL388060180175TBAWriting for Business and Industryonline
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ENGL388060280176TBAWriting for Business and Industryonline
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ENGL388060380177TBAWriting for Business and Industryonline
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ENGL388060480178TBAWriting for Business and Industryonline
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ENGL388060580179TBAWriting for Business and Industryonline
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ENGL388060680180TBAWriting for Business and Industryonline
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ENGL4020184708Nicole N. Sidhu Chaucer (WI) w/6116W06:30 pm-09:30 pmThis course will introduce students to the writing of Geoffrey Chaucer, Middle English, and the culture of late fourteenth-century England. Our focus will be on the Canterbury Tales, the most influential and widely-read poem of late medieval English literature. The Canterbury Tales is not just one work, but a collection of works, a set of tales supposedly told by a group of pilgrims on a journey to Canterbury. It features an amazing array of literary genres, including romances detailing the feats of knights and ladies, funny obscene stories, saints’ lives, inspiring tales of endurance and heroics, sermons, and comical beast fables. By turns funny, tragic, witty, and moving, the Canterbury Tales is an extraordinarily sensitive register of its culture’s struggles and harmonies. Among the many issues that we will examine in the Tales are: sexuality and love (both idealized and obscene); the nature of the human will; spirituality (including its meaning and uses in social contexts); the act of writing; the status of women; political authority, and social conformity. The format of the class will be a combination of lecture and discussion.The Canterbury Tales
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ENGL4070184710David Wilson-Okamura Shakespeare: The HistoriesMWF11:00 am-11:50 am
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ENGL4080184712Marianne Montgomery Shakespeare: The ComediesTR12:30 pm-01:45 pmIn this course, we’ll read a representative sample of Shakespeare’s comedies. This is primarily a course in learning to read Shakespeare with close attention to both dramatic form and thematic content. We’ll consider the plays as historical documents of early modern England and as dramatic fictions whose concerns—from marriage to social expectations to racial and religious identity—still speak to us today. The Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure
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ENGL4090184714Thomas L. Herron Shakespeare: The TragediesMWF01:00 pm-01:50 pm
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ENGL4200184716Ronald W. Hoag American Lit 1820-1865 (WI)TR11:00 am-12:15 pmA survey of some of the best literature by many of the best writers of the American Romantic Period, including Washington Irving, Edgar Allan Poe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and others. Lecture and discussion, literary history and close analysis of texts.

Reading assignments are reasonable, not overwhelming.
Norton Anthology of American Literature, 8th Edition, Volume B, 1820-1865
(includes Walden and The Scarlet Letter)
The Blithedale Romance
Moby-Dick

Total cost of all three books is less than $65 (retail price of new copies).


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ENGL4300184718Thomas E. Douglass Recent British Amer Writer(WI)MWF11:00 am-11:50 am
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ENGL4340184720Kristy L. Ulibarri Ethnic American Lit (WI)MW02:00 pm-03:15 pmThis course will look at the ethnic American experience by reading literature about immigration and migration. The course will primarily focus on literature from the 20th and 21st century, although we will start off with a brief study of colonialism in the Americas and the rise of “a nation of immigrants.” We will interrogate discourses and ideas about borders, immigration law, cultures of fear, and citizenship. As a Writing Intensive course, we will be following WI Model 1. Anzia Yezierska’s Bread Givers
Mario Puzo’s The Godfather
Hisaye Yamamoto’s Thirteen Syllables
Cristina Garcia’s Dreaming In Cuban
Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower
Luis Urrea’s Into the Beautiful North
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ENGL4710184721TBATeaching English as a Second Language: Theories and PrinciplesMWF10am-10:50am
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ENGL4720184724Ludmila Cope Appl Ling Lang Teach w/6529online
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ENGL4890180181Brent R. Henze Practicum: Careers in Writ(WI)TBAInternship: Contact TPCINTERN@ecu.edu for more information
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ENGL4891180182Brent R. Henze Practicum: Careers in Writ(WI)TBAInternship: Contact TPCINTERN@ecu.edu for more information
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ENGL4910184728Anna Froula Survey of Film Styles and Movements: Humor and Satire in Film and Television (WI)TR12:30 pm-01:45 pmThis course explores the form, function and modes of humor and satire in film and popular culture. We will explore how satiric films and television shows perform critical social commentary through various conventions, tropes, and genres. Monty Python’s Life of Brian (Terry Jones, 1979), The Great Dictator (Charlie Chaplin, 1940), Bamboozled (Spike Lee, 2000), American Psycho (Mary Harron, 2000), Blazing Saddles (Mel Brooks, 1974)Team America, World Police (Trey Parker, 2004)
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ENGL4950284732Kenneth M. Parille Literature for ChildrenTR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
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ENGL4950384733Laureen Tedesco Literature for ChildrenMWF01:00 pm-01:50 pmThis introduction to children's literature uses a textbook on reviewing children's books as the basis for talking about eight children's books in various genres: fiction (fantasy and realism), non-fiction, poetry, and picture book. After reading and talking about these books and writing book reviews of two other children's books, students will read fairy tales and write a literary analysis of a fairy-tale or a fairy-tale revision.Kathleen T. Horning's From Cover to Cover: Evaluating and Reviewing Children's Books.
Maria Tatar's The Classic Fairy Tales
Molly Bang's When Sophie Gets Angry - Really, Really Angry
Sharon Creech's Hate That Cat
Susan Campbell Bartolettie's Hitler Youth
Kate deCamilla's The Tale of Despereaux
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ENGL495060184735Laureen Tedesco Literature for Children - DEonlineThis introduction to children's literature uses a textbook on reviewing children's books as the basis for talking about eight children's books in various genres: fiction (fantasy and realism), non-fiction, poetry, and picture book. After reading and talking about these books and writing book reviews of two other children's books, students will read fairy tales and write a literary analysis of a fairy-tale or a fairy-tale revision.Kathleen T. Horning's From Cover to Cover: Evaluating and Reviewing Children's Books.
Maria Tatar's The Classic Fairy Tales
Molly Bang's When Sophie Gets Angry - Really, Really Angry
Sharon Creech's Hate That Cat
Susan Campbell Bartolettie's Hitler Youth
Kate deCamilla's The Tale of Despereaux
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ENGL4950184730TBALiterature for ChildrenMWF09:00 am-09:50 am
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ENGL4999184737Marianne Montgomery English Professional SeminarW01:00 pm-01:50 pmIn this 1 credit course designed for December 2012 and May 2013 graduating seniors, you'll explore career and graduate school options; prepare resumes, cover letters, writing samples, and your senior portfolio; and reflect on the skills you've developed as an English major. Katharine Brooks, You Majored in What?: Mapping Your Path from Chaos to Career
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ENGL5230184738John SteenSouthern Regional LiteratureMWF09:00 am-09:50 amBetween the 1920s and the 1950s, a group of Southerners who called themselves “The Fugitives” transformed American literature. Not only did writers like Allen Tate and Robert Penn Warren gain national fame, they helped to establish English as a major in most American universities. Working with original materials from ECU’s own Stuart Wright Collection, our course will examine the Fugitives and their influence on recent poetry, race, and the environment. I'll Take My Stand: The South and The Agrarian Tradition
Praising it New: The Best of the New Criticism
All The King's Men by Robert Penn Warren
Poems of Allen Tate, Randall Jarrell, Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Lowell, and Frank O'Hara
Critical essays by Jane Gallop, Frank Lentricchia, Lawrence Buell

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ENGL5350184742Anna Froula Special Stud in Film w/3470TR02:00 pm-03:15 pmThe Frontier in American Literature and Film

A combined offering of ENGL 3470, Modern Fantasy/Popular Literature, and ENGL 5350, Special Studies in Film.

The idea of the frontier in American literature and film and its influence on American culture, mythology and national identity, evolving from colonial-era writings to twenty-first century literary and cinematic works.

ENGL 3470 carries Writing Intensive and Foundations Humanities credit. ENGL 5350 is a graduate course which undergraduates may use as a Film Studies Minor elective.
The book and film list has not yet been set, but may include:

1) Mary Rowlandson, A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682)
2) David Crockett, Narrative of the Life of David Crockett (1834)
3) Nat Love, The Life and Adventures of Nat Love, Better Known in the Cattle Country as "Deadwood Dick" (1907)
4) The Searchers (1956)
5) True Grit(s) (1968, novel; 1969, film; 2010, film)
6) Full Metal Jacket (1987)
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ENGL5840184746Amber F. Thomas Advanced Poetry WritingR06:30 pm-09:30 pmEnglish 5840 is a writing intensive course designed to facilitate the development of new writing through the vital encouragement of faculty and peers in a workshop setting. English 5840 is a dynamic course in which students will advance creative writing skills through active participation in individual creative writing projects, group discussions, and the study of contemporary poetry. Students will use strategies that real writers use to produce poetry writing. This course will assist students in uncovering their unique creative perspectives and what they want to say through their poetry writing. The environment in this class is one of support and encouragement, welcoming self-expression and development.Students will select from a list of journals and books in an effort to uncover current trends in poetry writing and publishing.
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ENGL5850184748Liza A. Wieland Advanced Fiction WritingTR12:30 pm-01:45 pmIn this class, you will write at least two short stories of at least 2000 words each. IMPORTANT: The stories you turn in for this class MUST be what is loosely called "realistic” or “literary” fiction: stories about characters who are real human beings, set somewhere that human beings have actually been, and with characters who can only do what real human beings can actually do. No genre fiction: horror, fantasy, westerns, romance, science fiction, no super heroes, no vampires or witches or spells-and-wands magic, no talking animals or plants. I will make exception for stories set in the not-too-distant future and stories in the tradition of magic realism, as exemplified by work like “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez (which is on the reading list).
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ENGL5860184749Donald A. Albright Advanced Nonfiction WritingM06:30 pm-09:30 pmAn advanced course in writing creative nonfiction, designed especially for MA students in the creative writing area of concentration. Much of the semester is comprised of workshop treatments of classroom authors' work. Minimum of 35 double-spaced pages of polished cnf required of graduate students by semester's end. Undergraduates who have done well in 3860 and are comfortable in workshop settings are welcome to join us; their final page requirement is 25 pp.Best of Creative Nonfiction, vol. 4.
Various handouts and online publications.
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ETHN35011, 601Su-Ching Huang Special Topics in Ethnic Studies: Filmic Representations of EthnicitiesonlineThis course explores the assimilation or unassimilability of various ethnic groups in the US through both independent and Hollywood cinema. We'll compare Hollywood representation of various ethnic groups (e.g., African American, Native American, Asian American, Latin@, Arab American) with works by "ethnic" filmmakers and consider how these “ethnic” filmmakers challenge or revise those ethnic images with their own. By reexamining the definitions of “ethnic” and “American,” we'll explore the tensions between the two and consider how such categories have changed over time. This course carries Foundations:Humanities credit.Required Textbook
Benshoff, Harry M., and Sean Griffin. America on Film: Representing Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality at the Movies. 2nd ed. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.

Films
Aladdin (1992, Ron Clements & John Musker)
Crash (2005, Paul Haggis)
The Debut (2000, Gene Cajayon)
The Lion King (1994, Roger Allers, Rob Minkoff)
The Only Good Indian (2009, Kevin Willmott)
Slaying the Dragon: Reloaded (2011, Elaine Kim)
The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (2005, Tommy Lee Jones)
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