CIMA/NWA Session Joint Annual Mtg Proposal Planner 2017
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Name: Session ProposerContact InformationTentative Session Title or Topic IdeaTentative Session DescriptionName(s) of interested partiesContact InformationNotes & Suggestions
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Peter Michelpeter.michel@unlv.eduDocumenting the mining boom in the
Inter-Mountain West
The discovery of gold and silver transformed isolated
and unpopulated western regions into booming towns
connected by a network of railroads. The records of the
mining companies document the transformation of the
region into bustling frontier urban centers with diverse
populations, creating a business enterprise whose
financial investment and speculation fueled national and
international stock markets and contributed to the
financial boom and crash that characterized the
American economy at the turn of the century.
Erin Passehl-Stoddart, Head, Special Collections and Archives, University of Idahoestoddart@uidaho.eduWe have many mining collections; possible topics for us include challenges that come with preserving mining records, many uses of mining records, documenting a major economic impact in Idaho, etc.
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Austin Schulzaustin.schulz@state.or.usWhat would MacGyver do? Strategies for digitizing defunct or proprietary formats.Archivists often encounter defunct and/or proprietary formats, but are unsure what steps to take to provide long-term access. Original playback machines are becoming increasingly scarce and costly to maintain. These records of our history may be lost and forever locked away in their original format, inaccessible to future generations.

Facing a lack of functioning playback equipment, staff time, knowledge of the equipment, and funding for professional reproduction we must channel our inner MacGyver for solutions!

This panel will discuss how to meet the challenge of obsolete technology. What format issues have you encountered at your institution? Have you developed solutions others will find helpful in their own collections? Let's share our experiences - both successes and failures - as we learn that despite our different institutions and backgrounds, we all face many of the same challenges.
Cynde Moya - Living Computers: Museum + Labs Chris Muller - Muller Media Conversions Jim Duran - Boise State University
cyndem@livingcomputers.org chris.muller@mullermedia.com jimduran@boisestate.edu
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Chris Petersenchris.petersen@oregonstate.eduNew directions in oral historyA panel for folks who are doing interesting things with oral history. Oregon State University is approaching its 150th birthday and the OSU Libraries have created a very large university history-related oral history collection as part of the upcoming celebration. This collection is being presented through a dedicated portal that uses METS, MODS, TEI and XSL to present video recorded interviews alongside transcripts represented via html and PDF. Images, abstracts, biographical sketches, and grouping of interviews by affiliation and theme have also been built into the functionality of the portal.

If there are others out there who have been experimenting with or implementing new approaches to the practice of oral history, this would be an ideal opportunity to share what you're doing. Potential topics could include novel ideas related to collecting or conducting interviews, preserving them, and making them available (OHMS?). Or maybe you just have a neat new collection that you would like to present? That could fit here too.
Randy Williams Cynthia Lopez randy.williams@usu.edu lopezc@pacificu.eduElection Reflections project: https://archives.usu.edu/folklo/ElectionReflections.php Washington County Unified Oral Histories Project http://exhibits.lib.pacificu.edu/exhibits/show/oral-histories/more-information-about-the-ora
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Theresa Reatheresa.rea@state.or.usNot your parent's archives..Outreach is a crucial component of a healthy archives program. The antiquated mindset of “build it and they will come” does not reach new audiences in the 21st century. Let’s share some creative ways we have engaged users with original materials. How have we sparked imagination and made archives fun, interesting and relevant? How do Archives Month celebrations and other outreach programs energize collaboration among archivists, and help us advocate for our institutions and profession? How can these activities inform public perceptions of archives and archivists? How can we use outreach efforts to attract non-traditional users?Ashlyn Velte, University of Idaho
Gina Strack, Utah State Archives
Clint Pumphrey, Utah State University
avelte@uidaho.edu
gmstrack@utah.gov
clint.pumphrey@usu.edu
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Gina Strackgmstrack@utah.govArchival Authority RecordsWhether authority control is done through cataloging or described within finding aids, knowing the context of materials is key to understanding their creation, form, and value. The second edition of DACS recognized this by expanding and upgrading archival authority records from how to simply form the name of a creator to full contextual information. This also aligns with Enociding Archival Context for Corporations, Persons, and Families to encode description of creators on its own with the rich information discovered by archivists while processing.

The Utah State Archives has recently embarked on a project to complete system support for EAC-CPF and begin producing and sharing archival authority records. The Archives will present background and proposed future directions in this exciting new direction for archival description.

Other institutions are invited to share any similar projects on any aspect of authority control, including the use of linked data, that could complement this topic.
Lindsay Oden, University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Hannah Robinson, University of Nevada, Las Vegaslindsay.oden@unlv.edu, hannah.robinson@unlv.eduWe (Lindsay and Hannah) are putting together a proposal about preserving Native American naming conventions in authority records. We are concerned largely with using Native American endonyms for bands, tribes, and nations in our descriptions and authorities, especially when the official names of tribes or nations (as listed in the Library of Congress, for example) were established by outside forces. The trouble we have had with several of our collections at UNLV is how to include both endonym and exonym in the authority record without either erasing an important piece of Native American cultural heritage or making the finding aid difficult to access for patrons. We have created a system we believe will not only help contextualize each authority record, but also make the finding aids easily accessible by lay-people and dedicated researchers alike.
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Ruth Vondracek
ruth.vondracek@oregonstate.edu
Reunite the Past: Digitize it!We are looking for others to join us in either a panel or a session of lightening talks to discuss collaborative digitization projects. Our part would address the following:
The unique but complementary historical collections of the Oregon Historical Society (OHS) and the Oregon State University Special Collections and Archives Research Center (SCARC) offer numerous opportunities for collaboration. In an effort to share Oregon’ rich
history with the broader community OHS and SCARC are immersed in two grant-funded projects to digitally unite important historical manuscript and photograph collections: the Oregon Heritage grant for the digitization of the Oregon Farm Bureau Foundation for Education’s Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program records and the IMLS- LSTA sponsored grant project to digitize naturalists and photographers, William L. Finley,  Irene
Finley and Herman T. Bohlman papers and photographs. 

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Andrew Needhamandrew.h.needham@state.or.usArchives and PoliticsGovernmental transparency is an increasingly important element, especially during times of change. With the transition to digital records, issues of access add to the complexity.

Records are more politically charged but also the demand for records has not decreased over the years. With digital records, the demand is even higher. As more politicians are seeking to restrict their public records, the archivist and records manager are put in a difficult position.

In this session, we will look at the obvious and not so obvious challenges and implications in balancing the complexities of digital and paper based political collections, including issues of donation processes, donor restrictions and processing time.
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Darcy Pumphrey
darcy.pumphrey@usu.edu
Connecting Archives to the CurriculumWe are looking for others to join in a panel to discuss ways in which institutions are integrating archives into the classroom. What are some of your successes and lessons learned? What methods have you implemented and what resources have been required? Our focus will be on our work with students to create digital exhibits with Omeka:

Beginning in the spring of 2015, librarians and staff at Utah State University began working with instructors to incorporate a digital tool, Omeka, into their course curriculum. Rather than the traditional paper, the final project of each course is student-created digital exhibits. The students select (often from USU’s Special Collections & Archives) or create (e.g. interviews) the materials for their digital exhibits. During the semester students not only learn about their project topic, but they also gain an understanding of copyright, how to present information to a global and online audience, how to use a digital tool to display their research, and how to create basic metadata.

Through feedback from students and professors, librarians and support staff have continually worked to improve the presentation and delivery of this type of curriculum integration project. We will describe strategies for implementing similar programs as well as discuss some of the lessons learned and challenges experienced with using Omeka as a digital tool in the classroom.
Ellen M. Ryan, Head of Special Collections and Archives, Idaho State University ryanelle@isu.eduMy focus would be on working with students from the College of Business and their projects with Arcadia Publishing, especially lessons learned.
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Daniel Davisdaniel.davis@usu.eduCollections from Heck: Processing Nightmares in the Archives. Don’t we all have that one collection that we put in a corner, dreading the day when we must process it, putting it off, and off, until finally we’re forced to confront the collection from H-E-Double Hockey Sticks! I have a photo collection that has been a thorn in my side for years. Every time I start to process it in earnest (usually as a New Years resolution), I quit in disgust after two weeks. Do you have a weird, wacky, bizarre (inappropriate!?) collection that is nearly impossible to process? In this panel we’ll discuss what makes these collections so difficult and what we did to create finding aid dreams from our processing nightmares.Jacquelyn Sundstrand, Manuscripts & Archives Librarian, University of Nevada, Reno Special Collectionsjsund@unr.edu
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Dylan Burnsdylan.burns@usu.eduHow Many Likes Equal a Visit? Archival Adventures in Social MediaStarting in Fall 2016, Utah State University introduced a Tumblr to exhibit its vibrant and unique special collections. Less time intensive than full online exhibits, Tumblr's photo-first and short text format fits well with showcasing single interesting items. How does incorporating Tumblr into special collections librarianship change our interactions with the public, how we interact with our colleagues, and how we view our collections? Keeping in mind the short nature of these posts with attention-grabbing subjects and language, is it possible to keep things "serious" while still remaining relevant and exciting to non-academic users? In this panel, we will discuss how social media could enhance or stand-in for physical visits to the archives for those many miles away from campus and how social media, reaching new visitors, can fulfill larger fundamental university goals of service and outreach for a modern land-grant institution.
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Janet Hauckjhauck@whitworth.eduWhat do Archives have in Common with Digital Commons?I would like to team with any archivists who are developing collection policies with your institutional repository librarians. Given the growing and changing role of IR's, along with the growth of institutions' archival involvement with IR's, it is wonderfully challenging to see where the two come together. How have you collaborated so that the whole becomes greater than the sum of its parts?
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