WHO Draft Aging Strategy Comparison
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Draft Global Strategy and Action Plan on Ageing and HealthDraft 0Draft 1Draft 2World report on ageing and health
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http://www.who.int/entity/ageing/global-strategy/GSAP-ageing-health-draft.pdf?ua=1http://www.who.int/entity/ageing/ageing-global-strategy-draft1-ru.pdf?ua=1http://who.int/ageing/ageing-global-strategy-revised-draft-for-who-eb.pdf?ua=1http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/186463/1/9789240694811_eng.pdf?ua=1
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VisionA world in which everyone experiences Healthy AgeingA world in which everyone experiences Healthy Ageing25. The strategy’s vision is a world in which everyone can live a long and healthy life
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15. The changes that constitute and influence ageing are complex. At a biological level, the gradual accumulation of a wide variety of molecular and cellular damage leads to a gradual decrease in physiological reserves, an increased risk of many diseases and a general decline in capacity. But these changes are neither linear nor consistent, and they are only loosely associated with age in years. Thus, while some 70-year-olds may enjoy good physical and mental capacity, others may be frail and require significant support to meet their basic needs.
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Intrinsic capacity definitionIntrinsic capacity refers to the composite of all the physical and mental capacities that an individual can draw on at any point in timeIntrinsic capacity refers to the composite of all the physical and mental capacities that an individual can draw on at any point in time17. intrinsic capacity of the individual (i.e. the combination of all the individual’s physical and mental – including psychosocial – capacities)
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Intrinsic capacity explanation Intrinsic capacity at any point in time is determined by many factors, including underlying physiological and psychological changes, health-related behaviours and the presence or absence of disease. These in turn are strongly influenced by the environments in which people have lived throughout their lives.
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Functional AbilityFunctional ability is defined as health related attributes that enable people to be and to do what they have reason to value. “Functional Ability” comprises the health related attributes that enable people to be and to do what they have reason to value. It is made up of the intrinsic capacity of the individual, relevant environmental characteristics and the individual.interaction between these characteristics and the“Functional Ability” comprises the health related attributes that enable people to be and to do what they have reason to value. It is made up of the intrinsic capacity of the individual, relevant environmental characteristics and the individual.interaction between these characteristics and theThis functional ability is determined by the intrinsic capacity of the individual (i.e. the combination of all the individual’s physical and mental – including psychosocial – capacities), the environments he or she inhabits (understood in the broadest sense and including physical, social and policy environments), and the interaction between these.Functional ability comprises the health related attributes that enable people to be and to do what they have reason to value. It is made up of the intrinsic capacity of the individual, relevant environmental characteristics and the interactions between the individual and these characteristics.
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Healthy Ageing, definition“Healthy Ageing” is defined as the process of developing and maintaining the functional ability that enables well-being in older age.“Healthy Ageing” is defined as the process of developing and maintaining the functional ability that enables well-being in older age.This strategy frames this response through the concept of Healthy Ageing, which is described in detail in the World report on ageing and health. This is defined as “the process of developing and maintaining the functional ability that enables well-being in older age.”This report defines Healthy Ageing as the process of developing and maintaining the functional ability that enables well-being in older age
http://www.who.int/ageing/events/world-report-2015-launch/en/
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Healthy Ageing, explainationHealthy ageing is not defined by a specific level or threshold of functioning or health. Healthy ageing reflects the ongoing interaction between an individual and the environments they inhabit, shaped by many factors as illustrated in Figure 1.Healthy ageing is not defined by a specific level or threshold of functioning or health. Healthy ageing reflects the ongoing interaction between an individual and the environments they inhabit, with opportunities for healthy ageing shaped by many factors including broader determinants of health and intermediary factors, as illustrated in Figure 1.Healthy Ageing is a process that spans the entire life course and that can be relevant to everyone, not just those who are currently free of disease.
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Strategic Goals 5. Improving measurement, monitoring and research on Healthy Ageing
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QuestionsN/AN/A89. What biological or cellular advances can be made accessible and relevant to the widest range of people, particularly those with least resources?
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Strategis Objective 5.1N/A5.1 Agreeing on metrics, measures and analytical approaches for Healthy Ageing5.1: Agree on ways to measure, analyse, describe and monitor Healthy Ageing
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N/AN/A95. Transparent discussions on values and priorities are needed, involving older people and other stakeholders, to inform how operational definitions and metrics on a long and healthy life can be constructed and implemented within monitoring, surveillance and research.
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Strategic Objective 5.2N/A5.2 The second approach will be to improve research understanding of the gaps between intrinsic capacity and functional ability in specific contextsStrategic Objective 5.2. Strengthen research capacities and incentives for innovation
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N/AN/A97. For all countries, fostering Healthy Ageing also requires promoting innovation, voluntary knowledge exchange and technology transfer, and attracting resources (people, institutions and financing) to address the major challenges faced. Development of innovations (in areas ranging from assistive technologies and pharmaceuticals to care models and forecasting of scenarios) must be inclusive of older people well into the oldest age groups, in terms of design and evaluation that recognize the different physiology of older men and women.
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N/AN/A99. Much innovation relevant to older people will occur in disciplines other than gerontology and geriatrics. Yet outdated stereotypes of older age often limit the capacity of researchers in many fields to consider and identify opportunities for intervention. Even in health disciplines, ageist attitudes can limit research progress.
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N/AN/A100. Global research priorities that enable a better understanding of population ageing and health in the 21st century are needed, to address the determinants of healthy ageing and evaluate interventions to improve them. Researchers and other knowledge producers should be well informed and equipped. Resources will also need to be shifted to emerging areas or to address fundamental gaps, and findings must be easily accessible worldwide.
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N/AN/A102. As a start, population-based studies of older people at home, in communities and in institutions can identify the levels and distribution of intrinsic capacity and functional ability, how these are changing over time, and to what extent older people’s needs for and expectations of health services and care are being met. This information should be collected in ways that allow valid and reliable comparison between settings and over time.
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N/AN/A104. Increasing recognition that many of the determinants of Healthy Ageing lie earlier in life has prompted interest in how life course approaches might be used to identify critical periods for action. This analysis should include how inequities and vulnerabilities (or strengths and resilience) are accumulated and determined. Greater use of longitudinal cohort studies can clarify cause-and-effect relationships and consider what development processes shape initial and lasting differences in health. Such studies, combined with natural experiments and evaluations, may also clarify the sequencing and effectiveness of interventions that can mitigate and overcome vulnerabilities, or further support desired outcomes.
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N/AN/A. 105. Finally, better clinical research is urgently needed on the etiology of, and treatments for, the key health conditions of older age, including musculoskeletal and sensory impairments, cardiovascular disease and risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes, mental disorders, dementia and cognitive declines, cancer, and geriatric syndromes such as frailty. This must include much better consideration of the specific physiological differences of older men and women and the high likelihood that they will be experiencing mutimorbidities. This could also be extended to include possible interventions to modify the underlying physiological and psychological changes associated with ageing.
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See Appendix 1 = Plan for more changes!!!
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