Lead Pipe | Collaborating with Faculty Part 2 | Selected Models
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Article Citation or Project & LocationPartnership LevelCollaboration AreaAbstract or Summary
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Bailey, R., Blunt, G., & Magner, M. (2011). Librarian and Faculty Collaboration on Video Projects. Kentucky Libraries, 75(1), 16-18. CooperationTechnology AssistanceThe article focuses on the collaborations on video projects by the Morehead State University's Camden-Carroll Library (CCL) and faculty. It says various video projects done through the collaborations of CCL Librarians with Health, Wellness, and Human Performance (HWHP) including video instruction, vodcasts, and video lessons. It presents the sustainable benefits of the collaboration such as the demonstration of skills by librarians and the community can gain a valuable resource.
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Black, C., Crest, S., & Volland, M. (2001). Building on a successful information literacy infrastructure on the foundation of librarian-faculty collaboration. Research Strategies, 18(3), 215-225. CollaborationInformation Literacy InstructionBuilding a successful information literacy infrastructure begins by creating a foundation of strong faculty-librarian relationships in conjunction with faculty development programs. Chronicles the faculty-librarian collaboration at Towson University in the development and teaching of information literacy instruction. Reports that results from the faculty survey and information literacy instruction statistics indicate that this close collaboration yields a seamless blend of core subject information and information-seeking and evaluation skills.
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Fonseca, A. J., & Viator, V. P. (2009). Escaping the island of lost faculty: Collaboration as a means of visibility. Collaborative Librarianship, 1(3), 81-90.CollaborationProfessional ActivitiesAcademic librarians are often physically and intellectually isolated at their institutions, and they need to accept much of the blame. Professional literature shows that librarians continue to argue against the responsibilities of tenure, despite the fact that in two of the three usual rubrics of tenure and promotion-namely publication and service-the expectations for both teaching faculty and librarians are generally the same. In addition, academic librarians will not be treated equally unless they begin to think and work outside of the physical academic library. This article argues for a multidisciplinary approach to academic librarianship, with an emphasis on collaboration as a means to develop visibility through presentations at every level, publications in multidisciplinary peer-reviewed journals, professional memberships in organizations outside of librarianship, and active, vocal committee participation. By reinventing themselves as both subject/discipline and research methods experts, academic librarians will achieve greater exposure as bona fide scholars at their institutions.
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Gaspar, D. B., & Wetzel, K. A. (2009). A Case Study in Collaboration: Assessing Academic Librarian/Faculty Partnerships. College & Research Libraries, 70(6), 578-590. CollaborationInformation Literacy InstructionUndergraduates attending The George Washington University are required to take courses in the University Writing Program. When it was introduced in 2004, this innovative program institutionalized collaboration between librarians and writing professors. The program was designed to support the university's strategic goal to enhance challenge, discovery, and quality in student education. Beginning in 2005, instruction librarians crafted a survey to elicit anonymous feedback from their faculty partners to measure the impact of the library partnership on student learning. The survey is administered annually to explore faculty perceptions and monitor trends. Responses to the survey identify significant strengths resulting from this collaboration as well as specific topics needing further attention.
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Horava, T. (2005). A New Approach to Faculty -- Librarian Collaboration: A "New Professors' Fund" for Collection Development. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 31(5), 482-485. CooperationCollection DevelopmentThe article reports that the University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario implemented a "New Professors' Fund" as a targeted strategy for establishing a collaborative relationship between new faculty and librarians. Collaboration between faculty and librarians is a common place in library literature and in the academic environment. Collaboration between a librarian and a faculty member has several important attributes: mutual goals, mutual respect, advance planning, and substantive contributions by both parties for designing instructional goals and activities and then carrying them out. Collaboration between the librarian and the new faculty member has its own particular dynamic, since first impressions can lead to long-term perceptions and patterns of interaction. New faculty have different expectations and experience than their older colleagues. This impacts on their approach to research and teaching and their relationship with the library. These faculty members will help shape the culture and dynamic of the university.
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Kobzina, N. G. (2010). A Faculty—Librarian Partnership: A Unique Opportunity for Course Integration. Journal of Library Administration, 50(4), 293-314. doi:10.1080/01930821003666965CooperationInformation Literacy InstructionLibrarians at the University of California, Berkeley have created a partnership with faculty in the teaching of a special course, “Introduction to Environmental Studies.” This class is interdisciplinary in nature, covering science and the humanities, and has offered a unique opportunity for library staff to develop a special program incorporating the teaching of analytical skills along with research skills for specific subject areas. The continuous collaboration with faculty and the challenges of working with students with very varied backgrounds and interests are the main points of discussion in this article.
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Lucas, D. (2011). Faculty In-service: How to Boost Academic Library Services. Collaborative Librarianship, 3(2), 117-122.CooperationFaculty InstructionThis article discusses a collaborative approach to educate college faculty about the library to encourage faculty to engage and participate in services such as library instruction, interlibrary loan, course reserves, and research desk assistance. The more faculty know about the library, the more that they use them. Well informed faculty create students who will also be interested in the library. In-servicing is recom-mended because it allows librarians to market the library. Creating a well-planned library in-service also creates an opportunity to highlight a librarian’s teaching and research skills.
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Miller, R., O'Donnell, E., Pomea, N., Rawson, J., Shepard, R., & Thomes, C. (2010). Library-Led Faculty Workshops: Helping Distance Educators Meet Information Literacy Goals in the Online Classroom. Journal of Library Administration, 50(7/8), 830-856. doi:10.1080/01930826.2010.488977CooperationFaculty InstructionAt University of Maryland University College (UMUC), librarians have designed and led a number of multiday, asynchronous online workshops for faculty. The workshops teach faculty how to meet information literacy goals in the virtual classroom. Through hands-on activities and discussion among their colleagues, participants in the faculty workshops learn about the university's information literacy standards, library resources and services, free Web tools, and how best to design class assignments involving library research. Library-led faculty workshops at UMUC have increased library visibility and furthered collaboration between faculty and librarians. This article discusses 5 workshops, detailing workshop content and logistics and demonstrating how librarians can help distance faculty further information literacy goals for students.
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Mounce, M. (2010). Working Together: Academic Librarians and Faculty Collaborating to Improve Students' Information Literacy Skills: A Literature Review 2000-2009. Reference Librarian, 51(4), 300-320. doi:10.1080/02763877.2010.501420VariedThe purpose of this article is to provide a literature review of articles that include examples of academic librarians collaborating with faculty for the integration of information literacy instruction into faculty members’ courses. This literature review is international in scope and reviews articles published from 2000 through 2009. Also discussed are the transition from bibliographic instruction to information literacy, information literacy requirements, and relevant Association of College & Research Libraries documents.
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Pritchard, P. A. (2010). The Embedded Science Librarian: Partner in Curriculum Design and Delivery. Journal of Library Administration, 50(4), 373-396. doi:10.1080/01930821003667054CollaborationInformation Literacy InstructionInformation literacy is essential for success in undergraduate science programs, but teaching faculty are generally ill-prepared or unwilling to provide intentional support in their courses. Librarians are uniquely qualified to help. In this article, the author presents one example of a faculty-librarian collaboration in which the science librarian is embedded in a first-year, undergraduate course in nanoscience, both as a codesigner of the curriculum and a member of the teaching team. She traces her progress from new appointee to faculty partner, and describes the unique, electronic-journal project they designed to promote the development of information and academic literacies.
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Ratto, B., & Lynch, A. (2011). Collaboration unleashes e-book database potential for replacing traditional textbook options. Poster session presented at the Association of College and Research Libraries Conference, Philadelphia, PA. CooperationCollection DevelopmentWhile there may be no definitive role for academic libraries in the e-textbook or open educational resource environment, this poster session demonstrates how the Shapiro Library collaborated with teaching faculty in order to better leverage quality content already available to students via electronic library resources to serve as the foundational “textbook” for an introductory business course. Not only did this connection provide students with significant financial relief as they did not have to purchase or rent traditional textbook materials, this model also benefitted students as it allowed them to experiment with learning styles in a digital environment. Moreover, the library saw increased awareness and use of its subscription e-book databases.
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Yu, T. (2009). A new model of faculty-librarian collaboration: the faculty member as library specialist. New Library World, 110(9/10), 441-448.CooperationFaculty InstructionPurpose-The purpose of this paper is to show how the library at Jinwen University of Science and Technology (JUST) in Taiwan introduced the use of a new model "Faculty member as library specialist". This is done in an attempt to determine the value of a new approach of faculty-librarian collaboration for promoting the library's resources and services. In addition, some ideas and suggestions are proposed regarding the issue of faculty-librarian collaboration for library staff around the world.
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Zhang, W. (2001). Building partnerships in liberal arts education: library team teaching. Reference Services Review, 29(2), 141-149. CollaborationInformation Literacy InstructionThe academic library in the information age will be a teaching library, and educating students in the information literacy skills of identifying, locating, accessing, and evaluating information has become a fundamental responsibility for academic librarians. Examines the framework for library bibliographic instruction, analyzes current information literacy initiatives, and reviews efforts of the Olin Library at Rollins College promote active learning and critical thinking skills through partnerships with classroom faculty and professionals in information technology and services.
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