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Route name/mission:
Map:

Num in Group: Scouters: Scouts:
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Contact: name & number
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Date/start time:Est time return:
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Location/Landmark/Check pointGrid reference.
Lat,Long(Easting,Northing)
Altitude(m)BearingHeight Climbed
(m)
DistanceEstimated
Speed/Pace
(km/h)
Est. Duration
and time of day
(mins, hour:min)
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Leg(m)Total(m)
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Start:
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Escape Routes/Emergency notes:





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TOTAL:total height gaintotal distanceend time
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Weather forecast:
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Sunrise, sunset:
Balally 137th Scouts
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Naismith's Rule (Sionnach Variant)
If you know what speed you tend to walk at you can work out how long a leg
of your route will take, as we can calculate both the horizontal distance and the
vertical height climbed from the map. This is a helpful navigational technique
over longer distances where counting paces could be difficult if not anti -social.
It is also used when route planning.

The rule was devised by William W. Naismith, a Scottish mountaineer, in 1892.
The basic rule is as follows:
Allow 1 hour for every 3 miles (5 km) forward,
plus 1 hour for every 2000 feet (600 metres) of ascent.
When walking in groups, calculate for the speed of the slowest person.

The speed you walk at will depend on
* the fitness of the group
* the load carried
* conditions underfoot (heather, bog, snow)
* weather conditions (strong winds behind or against you)

Experience is your only guide to estimating the speed you are walking at.

Here is a guide:

2km per hour
rough ground / heavy pack
1km = 30 mins (100m = 3 mins)


3km per hour
average pace with pack
1km = 20 mins (100m = 2 mins)


4km per hour
good pace / good ground
1km = 15 mins (100m = 1.5 mins)


5km per hour
fast / day pack
lkm = 12 mins (100m = 1.2 mins)


For height climbed
allow 1 minute for every 10 metres climbed

On the 1 :50,000 OS maps each contour interval is 10m

Pacing
If you know how many double paces
you take per 100m this can be a very
useful tool in navigation over short distances
and where the incline is not so
steep that you have to zig zag. On average
it will be about 130 paces or 65
double paces per 100m but everyone's
pace will vary a little.

Counting double paces means that only
half the amount of counting is necessary.
If for example my route is 300m,
this will mean walking 65 double paces
three times. Avoid multiplying this out
as mistakes occur in mental aritmetic
when you're tired, wet and cold.

You will need some sort of counters
such as pebbles, twigs etc or you can
get a "tachometer" attachment for your
Silva compass.

You can workout your pacing by marking
out 100 metres using a surveyor's
tape and pacing it out. Do this in open
country as well as up and down hill and
on the level as there will be a slight
difference. You will then be able to
adapt your pacing for different types
of terrain and gradient.

When navigating use a combination of
techniques depending on the terrain, the
weather etc.








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