SEEd Standards Crosswalk
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Current Utah Science Standards (Last updated 2010)Utah Science with Engineering Education Standards DRAFT (2018)Next Generation Science Standards (2012)
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Engineering a design solution is not currently discussed in the K-2 Utah Science StandardsEngineering is integrated into content standards for a stronger application use by students. K-2-ETS1-1: Ask questions, make observations, and gather information about a situation people want to change to define a simple problem that can be solved through the development of a new or improved object or tool.
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Engineering a design solution is not currently discussed in the K-2 Utah Science StandardsEngineering is integrated into content standards for a stronger application use by students. K-2-ETS1-2: Develop a simple sketch, drawing, or physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve a given problem.
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Engineering a design solution is not currently discussed in the K-2 Utah Science StandardsEngineering is integrated into content standards for a stronger application use by students. K-2-ETS1-3: Analyze data from tests of two objects designed to solve the same problem to compare the strengths and weaknesses of how each performs.
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K-2-3: Compare changes in weather over time. K.1.1 Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about local, observable weather conditions to describe patterns over time. Emphasize the students' collection and sharing of data about temperature, wind, and precipitation, including the changes from day to day and season to season. Examples could include data collected through personal observations, the use of tools such as thermometers, windsocks, and rain gauges. K-ESS2-1: Use and share observations of local weather conditions to describe patterns over time.
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Organisms affecting their environment are not currently discussed in the K-2 Utah Science Standards K.2.3 Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about how plants and animals (including humans) affect their environment in order to survive. Examples could include a squirrel digging in the ground to hide their food, plant roots breaking concrete, or humans using a tent while camping. K-ESS2-2: Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals (including humans) can change the environment to meet their needs.
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Organisms and needs for survival are not currently discussed in the K-2 Utah Science Standards K.2.2 Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about patterns in the relationships between the needs of different living things and the places they live. Emphasize that living things (plants and animals) need water, air, and resources and they live in places that have the things they need. Examples could include growing plants in various locations and comparing the results or comparing animals and the places they live. K-ESS3-1: Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants or animals (including humans) and the places they live.
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Weather forecasting is not currently discussed in the K-2 Utah Science Standards K.1.2 Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information on how weather patterns affect human behavior. Examples of local severe weather could include extreme heat, high winds, flash floods, thunderstorms, and snowstorms. K-ESS3-2: Ask questions to obtain information about the purpose of weather forecasting to prepare for, and respond to, severe weather.
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Impact on environment is not currently discussed in the K-2 Utah Science Standards K.2.4 Plan and carry out an investigation about the cause and effect relationship that living things have with land, water, and air resources. Then design and communicate solutions to potential problems. Examples could include how to remove ice from a shady area, how to supply water to dry areas, or how to remove debris from habitat. K-ESS3-3: Communicate solutions that will reduce the impact of humans on land, water, air, and/or other living things in the local environment.
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K-4-1: Investigate living things. K.2.1 Analyze and interpret data, to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive. Emphasize the similarities and differences between the survival needs of all living things (plants and animals). Examples could include that many plants do not consume food, but animals do; plants acquire water through roots, while many animals drink water. K-LS1-1: Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.
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K-3-1: Identify how non-living things move. K.3.1 Plan and conduct an investigation to compare the effects of different strengths or different directions of forces (pushes and pulls) on the motion of an object. When teaching the concept of push and pull, the idea of strength should be kept separate from the idea of direction and should not include non-contact forces (magnets). K-PS2-1: Plan and conduct an investigation to compare the effects of different strengths or different directions of pushes and pulls on the motion of an object.
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Push and pull forces are not currently discussed in the K-2 Utah Science Standards K.3.2 Analyze data to determine how a design solution causes a change in the speed or direction of an object with a push or a pull. Examples of problems requiring a solution could include having a marble or other object move a certain distance, follow a particular path, or knock down other objects. Examples of solutions could include tools, such as a ramp to increase the speed of the object and a structure that would cause an object such as a marble or ball to turn. K-PS2-2: Analyze data to determine if a design solution works as intended to change the speed or direction of an object with a push or a pull.
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Sunlight's effect on Earth is not currently discussed in the K-2 Utah Science Standards K.1.3 Carry out an investigation, making observations, to determine the effect of sunlight energy on Earth's surfaces. An example could include measuring temperature through touch, using thermometers, or other methods, in various locations or on different materials throughout the day. K-PS3-1: Make observations to determine the effect of sunlight on Earth's surface
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Sunlight's effect on Earth is not currently discussed in the K-2 Utah Science Standards K.1.4 Design and construct a solution that will reduce the warming effect of sunlight on an area. Emphasize the use of tools and materials to test and build a structure. Examples of structures could include umbrellas, canopies, and tents. K-PS3-2: Use tools and materials to design and build a structure that will reduce the warming effect of sunlight on an area.
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K-2-2: Observe and describe changes in day and night.1.1.2 Obtain, evaluate, and communicate the patterns observed at different times of the year in order to relate the amount of daylight to the time of year. Emphasize the variation in daylight patterns at different times of the day and different times of the year. Examples could include varying locations and regions throughout the state, country and world.1-ESS1-2: Make observations at different times of the year to related the amount of daylight to the time of year.
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K-4-2: Describe the parts of living things.2.2.4 Design a solution to a human problem by mimicking the structure and function of plants and/or animals and how they use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs. Examples could include a human wearing a jacket to mimic the fur of an animal, or sucking water through a straw to mimic the roots of a tree.1-LS1-1: Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.
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K-2-1: Investigate non-living things.2.3.1 Plan and carry out an investigation to classify different kinds of materials based on patterns of their observable properties. Examples could include sorting materials based on similar properties, such as strength, color, flexibility, hardness, texture, etc.2-PS1-1: Plan and conduct an investigation to describe and classify different kinds of materials by their observable properties.
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K-3-2: Describe parts of non-living things.2.3.3 Plan and carry out an investigation of how an object, made of a small set pieces, can be disassembled and reshaped into a new object with a different function. Examples of pieces could include blocks, building bricks, or other assorted small objects.2-PS1-3: Make observations to construct an evidence-based account of how an object made of a small set of pieces can be disassembled and made into a new object.
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K-1-1: Generating Evidence: Using the processes of scientific investigationNature of Science is part of the Science/Engineering Practices and Crosscutting Concepts found in every Utah SEEd StandardNature of Science is part of the Science/Engineering Practices and Crosscutting Concepts found in every NGSS Standard
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K-1-2: Communicating Science: Communicating effectively using science language and reasoningNature of Science is part of the Science/Engineering Practices and Crosscutting Concepts found in every Utah SEEd StandardNature of Science is part of the Science/Engineering Practices and Crosscutting Concepts found in every NGSS Standard
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K-1-3: Knowing in Science: Understanding the nature of scienceNature of Science is part of the Science/Engineering Practices and Crosscutting Concepts found in every Utah SEEd StandardNature of Science is part of the Science/Engineering Practices and Crosscutting Concepts found in every NGSS Standard
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