Barrow Data
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZAAABACADAEAFAGAHAIAJAKALAMANAOAPAQARASATAUAVAWAX
1
LatitudeLongitude
Grinsell / Goddard
Other Name
RCH
Short Description
Notes
Generated Title
Generated Infowindow Text
MarkerRCH GroupRCH #RCH ¶GG GroupGG #
GG # Value
HE PS #HE PS URLNMR #WS MonUID #WS HER #
Additional Notes
WS URL
Old Sched #
New Sched #
Schedule URL
WiltsMuseum 1
WiltsMuseum 2
WiltsMuseum 3
WiltsMuseum 4
WiltsMuseum 5
WiltsMuseum 6
WiltsMuseum 7
WiltsMuseum 8
WiltsMuseum 9
WiltsMuseum 10
WiltsMuseum 11
WiltsMuseum ImgLink 1
WiltsMuseum ImgLink 2
WiltsMuseum ImgLink 3
WiltsMuseum ImgLink 4
WiltsMuseum ImgLink 5
WiltsMuseum ImgLink 6
WiltsMuseum ImgLink 7
WiltsMuseum ImgLink 8
WiltsMuseum ImgLink 9
WiltsMuseum ImgLink 10
WiltsMuseum ImgLink 11
WiltsMuseum Accessions
Lat/Long as Text
2
51.17789963-1.891790668
Winterbourne Stoke G61
Winterbourne Stoke West 1
AM: Disc barrow (previously disturbed) with primary cremation in cist. The central tump also has a ditch around it. A later intrusive (Saxon) burial with iron knife disturbed the cremation. The barrow was further disturbed by a later earthwork enclosure. PS: Bronze Age disc barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 61. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (Barrow number 1) who recorded as primary cremation and a Saxon inhumation accompanied by a knife. Field investigations in 1974 found the mound to have a diameter of 11 metres and a height of 0.6 metres. The berm was 6 metres wide; the outer ditch 8 metres wide and 0.4 metres deep; the outer bank was 0.3 metres high. The disc barrow had been multilated by the Medieval enclosure. The barrow was also included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 1 is a large and wide Druid barrow, in which it appeared that the primary interment had been moved to make room for the subsequent deposit of a skeleton, which also had been disturbed at some still later period. In examining the cist which contained the skeleton, we observed that the feet had not been displaced; near them was an iron knife; and in our further researches we found at the bottom of the cist several fragments of burned bones, belonging to the remains of the original interment.
Winterbourne Stoke G61
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G61</strong></p><p>AM: Disc barrow (previously disturbed) with primary cremation in cist. The central tump also has a ditch around it. A later intrusive (Saxon) burial with iron knife disturbed the cremation. The barrow was further disturbed by a later earthwork enclosure. PS: Bronze Age disc barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 61. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (Barrow number 1) who recorded as primary cremation and a Saxon inhumation accompanied by a knife. Field investigations in 1974 found the mound to have a diameter of 11 metres and a height of 0.6 metres. The berm was 6 metres wide; the outer ditch 8 metres wide and 0.4 metres deep; the outer bank was 0.3 metres high. The disc barrow had been multilated by the Medieval enclosure. The barrow was also included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke West 1 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 113)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 1 is a large and wide Druid barrow, in which it appeared that the primary interment had been moved to make room for the subsequent deposit of a skeleton, which also had been disturbed at some still later period. In examining the cist which contained the skeleton, we observed that the feet had not been displaced; near them was an iron knife; and in our further researches we found at the bottom of the cist several fragments of burned bones, belonging to the remains of the original interment. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765463'>765463</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 78</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE651'>MWI7062 - SU04SE651</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019'>1015019 (old #28921)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.177899°N 1.891790°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke West 1113
Winterbourne Stoke G
6161765463http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765463SU 04 SE 78MWI7062SU04SE651http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE651289211015019https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101501951.177899°N 1.891790°W
3
51.17753995-1.89179151
Winterbourne Stoke G62
Winterbourne Stoke West 2
AM: Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation with linen cloth in a very large urn. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 62. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). It was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 2) who recorded a cremation which was wrapped in a cloth and a collared urn. Field investigations in 1974 located a ditched bowl barrow 22 metres in diameter and 1.6 metres high. The ditch was 0.4 metres deep. The barrow was also included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 2, like many of the others in this group, is much mutilated, and of large diameter, but not more than four feet in elevation. It contained an interment of burned bones secured within a very large brown urn rudely ornamented, which was broken by taking out. A considerable quantity of linen cloth was perceptible among the bones.
Winterbourne Stoke G62
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G62</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation with linen cloth in a very large urn. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 62. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). It was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 2) who recorded a cremation which was wrapped in a cloth and a collared urn. Field investigations in 1974 located a ditched bowl barrow 22 metres in diameter and 1.6 metres high. The ditch was 0.4 metres deep. The barrow was also included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke West 2 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 113)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 2, like many of the others in this group, is much mutilated, and of large diameter, but not more than four feet in elevation. It contained an interment of burned bones secured within a very large brown urn rudely ornamented, which was broken by taking out. A considerable quantity of linen cloth was perceptible among the bones. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765254'>765254</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 71</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE644'>MWI7055 - SU04SE644</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019'>1015019 (old #28921)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.177539°N 1.891791°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke West 2113
Winterbourne Stoke G
6262765254http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765254SU 04 SE 71MWI7055SU04SE644http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE644289211015019https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101501951.177539°N 1.891791°W
4
51.17727018-1.891792141
Winterbourne Stoke G63
Winterbourne Stoke West 3
AM: Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation in oval cist with linen cloth. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 63. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 3) who recorded a cremation which was wrapped in a cloth. Field investigations in 1974 located a ditched bowl barrow with a diameter of 24 metres and a height of 0.8 metres. The ditch was 0.4 metres. The barrow was also included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 3, a flat barrow, mutilated, and about the same elevation as the last, contained within an oval cist, a simple interment of burned bones, and shreds of linen cloth.
Winterbourne Stoke G63
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G63</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation in oval cist with linen cloth. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 63. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 3) who recorded a cremation which was wrapped in a cloth. Field investigations in 1974 located a ditched bowl barrow with a diameter of 24 metres and a height of 0.8 metres. The ditch was 0.4 metres. The barrow was also included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke West 3 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 113)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 3, a flat barrow, mutilated, and about the same elevation as the last, contained within an oval cist, a simple interment of burned bones, and shreds of linen cloth. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765266'>765266</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 72</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE645'>MWI7056 - SU04SE645</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019'>1015019 (old #28921)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.177270°N 1.891792°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke West 3113
Winterbourne Stoke G
6363765266http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765266SU 04 SE 72MWI7056SU04SE645http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE645289211015019https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101501951.177270°N 1.891792°W
5
51.17709008-1.891506449
Winterbourne Stoke G63a
Winterbourne Stoke West 4
AM: Saucer barrow excavated with no result. (Possibly sepulchral). PS: Bronze Age saucer barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 63a. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 4) who recorded no finds or structures. Field investigations in 1974 found the mound to have a diameter of 6 metres and a height of 0.2 metres. The outer ditch was 3 metres wide and 0.4 metres deep, there was no surveyable outer bank. The barrow was also included in a survey by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age saucer barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 4 afforded no sepulchral remains, and probably was not intended for a barrow.
Winterbourne Stoke G63a
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G63a</strong></p><p>AM: Saucer barrow excavated with no result. (Possibly sepulchral). PS: Bronze Age saucer barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 63a. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 4) who recorded no finds or structures. Field investigations in 1974 found the mound to have a diameter of 6 metres and a height of 0.2 metres. The outer ditch was 3 metres wide and 0.4 metres deep, there was no surveyable outer bank. The barrow was also included in a survey by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age saucer barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke West 4 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 113)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 4 afforded no sepulchral remains, and probably was not intended for a barrow. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765528'>765528</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 81</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE654'>MWI7065 - SU04SE654</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019'>1015019 (old #28921)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.177090°N 1.891506°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke West 4113
Winterbourne Stoke G
63a63765528http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765528SU 04 SE 81MWI7065SU04SE654http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE654289211015019https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101501951.177090°N 1.891506°W
6
51.17709034-1.891792562
Winterbourne Stoke G64a
Winterbourne Stoke West 5
AM: Twin bowl barrow with no interments. 1st with primary deposit in a small cist of several shell beads, 2 encrinite beads, 48 clay beads and a small bronze dagger; 2nd with primary deposit in a larger cist of bones of sheep. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 64a and as two possible confluent bowl barrows. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83) The barrow was excavated by Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 5) who recorded two cists. One was found to contain a dagger and beads, the other contained sheep bones. Some of the finds are in Devizes Museum, accession number 1035-7. Field investigations in 1974 located a sub-oval bowl barrow. The mound measured 22 metres east-west by 12 metres transversely and was 0.8 metres high. The ditch was 0.4 metres deep. It was confluent with barrows 63 and 64b (SU 04 SE 72 and 74). The barrow was also included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 5, a circular flat barrow, contained a double cist ; the smallest of which produced a little dagger of brass, and a variety of beads, amongst which were two joints of the vertebral column of a petrified encrinus. The beads, in number about four dozen, were neatly made of clay, but not well burned, except two of the largest, which had been ornamented with faint striae. Besides the above were a great quantity of curious little shells, in shape like the Hirlas horn used by the Britons, which were perforated lengthways, and formed probably the necklace of some female. (TUMULI PLATE XIII.) The large cist contained only the bones of a sheep.
Winterbourne Stoke G64a
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G64a</strong></p><p>AM: Twin bowl barrow with no interments. 1st with primary deposit in a small cist of several shell beads, 2 encrinite beads, 48 clay beads and a small bronze dagger; 2nd with primary deposit in a larger cist of bones of sheep. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 64a and as two possible confluent bowl barrows. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83) The barrow was excavated by Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 5) who recorded two cists. One was found to contain a dagger and beads, the other contained sheep bones. Some of the finds are in Devizes Museum, accession number 1035-7. Field investigations in 1974 located a sub-oval bowl barrow. The mound measured 22 metres east-west by 12 metres transversely and was 0.8 metres high. The ditch was 0.4 metres deep. It was confluent with barrows 63 and 64b (SU 04 SE 72 and 74). The barrow was also included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke West 5 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 113)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 5, a circular flat barrow, contained a double cist ; the smallest of which produced a little dagger of brass, and a variety of beads, amongst which were two joints of the vertebral column of a petrified encrinus. The beads, in number about four dozen, were neatly made of clay, but not well burned, except two of the largest, which had been ornamented with faint striae. Besides the above were a great quantity of curious little shells, in shape like the Hirlas horn used by the Britons, which were perforated lengthways, and formed probably the necklace of some female. (TUMULI PLATE XIII.) The large cist contained only the bones of a sheep. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765286'>765286</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 73</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE646'>MWI7057 - SU04SE646</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019'>1015019 (old #28921)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.67}'><img src='img/STHEAD.67.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.67' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.68}'><img src='img/STHEAD.68.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.68' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.69}'><img src='img/STHEAD.69.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.69' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.177090°N 1.891792°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke West 5113
Winterbourne Stoke G
64a64765286http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765286SU 04 SE 73MWI7057SU04SE646http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE646289211015019https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019STHEAD.67STHEAD.68STHEAD.69
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.67}'><img src='img/STHEAD.67.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.67' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.68}'><img src='img/STHEAD.68.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.68' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.69}'><img src='img/STHEAD.69.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.69' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.67}'><img src='img/STHEAD.67.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.67' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.68}'><img src='img/STHEAD.68.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.68' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.69}'><img src='img/STHEAD.69.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.69' height='150'></a> </p>
51.177090°N 1.891792°W
7
51.17691037-1.891649927
Winterbourne Stoke G64b
Winterbourne Stoke West 6
AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation in oval cist with a rude little (broken) cup 'resembling a saucer'. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 63b (?? 64b). It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 6) who recorded a cremation and a miniature cup which is in Devizes Museum, accession number 173. Field investigations in 1974 located a ditched bowl barrow 15 metres in diameter and 0.6 metres high. The ditch was 0.3 metres deep and destroyed on the east side. The barrow was also included in a survey by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 6 is a flat circular barrow, in which we found an oval cist, containing burned bones, and a rude little cup, resembling a saucer, which was broken.
Winterbourne Stoke G64b
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G64b</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation in oval cist with a rude little (broken) cup 'resembling a saucer'. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 63b (?? 64b). It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 6) who recorded a cremation and a miniature cup which is in Devizes Museum, accession number 173. Field investigations in 1974 located a ditched bowl barrow 15 metres in diameter and 0.6 metres high. The ditch was 0.3 metres deep and destroyed on the east side. The barrow was also included in a survey by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke West 6 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 114)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 6 is a flat circular barrow, in which we found an oval cist, containing burned bones, and a rude little cup, resembling a saucer, which was broken. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765295'>765295</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 74</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE647'>MWI7058 - SU04SE647</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019'>1015019 (old #28921)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.69a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.69a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.69a' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.176910°N 1.891649°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke West 6114
Winterbourne Stoke G
64b64765295http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765295SU 04 SE 74MWI7058SU04SE647http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE647289211015019https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019STHEAD.69a
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.69a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.69a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.69a' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.69a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.69a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.69a' height='150'></a> </p>
51.176910°N 1.891649°W
8
51.17673052-1.891650349
Winterbourne Stoke G64
Winterbourne Stoke West 7
PS: Bronze Age pond barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 64. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is located within the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (Barrow number 7) who recorded no finds or structures. Field investigations in 1974 located a pond barrow with an outer bank. It had an overall diameter of 14 metres, a depth of 0.4 metres and a bank 0.2 metres high. The barrow was also included in a survey by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age pond barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 7 is a small pond barrow.
Winterbourne Stoke G64
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G64</strong></p><p>PS: Bronze Age pond barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 64. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is located within the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (Barrow number 7) who recorded no finds or structures. Field investigations in 1974 located a pond barrow with an outer bank. It had an overall diameter of 14 metres, a depth of 0.4 metres and a bank 0.2 metres high. The barrow was also included in a survey by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age pond barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke West 7 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 114)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 7 is a small pond barrow.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765537'>765537</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 82</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE655'>MWI7066 - SU04SE655</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019'>1015019 (old #28921)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.176730°N 1.891650°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke West 7114
Winterbourne Stoke G
6464765537http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765537SU 04 SE 82MWI7066SU04SE655http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE655289211015019https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101501951.176730°N 1.891650°W
9
51.17690971-1.890934661
Winterbourne Stoke G66
Winterbourne Stoke West 8
AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation in upright (MBA) Enlarged Food Vessel in a circular cist with some black beads and a small bronze dagger with bone pommel. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 66. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 8) who recorded a cremation in a collared urn situated within a pit and accompanied by a dagger and beads. All except the beads are present in Devizes Museum, accession number 227, 346-7. Field investigations in 1974 located a ditched bowl barrow with a diameter of 26 metres, and a height of 1.2 metres. The ditch was 0.4 metres deep. The barrow was also included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 8, a very irregular flat barrow, three feet high, produced near the centre a large urn standing upright within a circular cist, and containing, amongst an interment of burned bones, a small brass dagger, with a bone top to it, neatly finished, with five holes on the side for so many rivets, by which it was fastened to a wooden handle. The urn found in this tumulus was very large, and elegantly formed; (TUMULi PLATE XIII.) it contained a few black beads that had undergone the action of fire, and was so closely cemented to the chalk, that we had great difficulty in detaching it from the cist.
Winterbourne Stoke G66
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G66</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation in upright (MBA) Enlarged Food Vessel in a circular cist with some black beads and a small bronze dagger with bone pommel. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 66. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 8) who recorded a cremation in a collared urn situated within a pit and accompanied by a dagger and beads. All except the beads are present in Devizes Museum, accession number 227, 346-7. Field investigations in 1974 located a ditched bowl barrow with a diameter of 26 metres, and a height of 1.2 metres. The ditch was 0.4 metres deep. The barrow was also included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke West 8 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 114)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 8, a very irregular flat barrow, three feet high, produced near the centre a large urn standing upright within a circular cist, and containing, amongst an interment of burned bones, a small brass dagger, with a bone top to it, neatly finished, with five holes on the side for so many rivets, by which it was fastened to a wooden handle. The urn found in this tumulus was very large, and elegantly formed; (TUMULi PLATE XIII.) it contained a few black beads that had undergone the action of fire, and was so closely cemented to the chalk, that we had great difficulty in detaching it from the cist. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765366'>765366</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 76</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE649'>MWI7060 - SU04SE649</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019'>1015019 (old #28921)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.86}'><img src='img/STHEAD.86.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.86' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.86a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.86a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.86a' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.176909°N 1.890934°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke West 8114
Winterbourne Stoke G
6666765366http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765366SU 04 SE 76MWI7060SU04SE649http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE649289211015019https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019STHEAD.86STHEAD.86a
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.86}'><img src='img/STHEAD.86.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.86' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.86a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.86a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.86a' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.86}'><img src='img/STHEAD.86.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.86' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.86a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.86a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.86a' height='150'></a> </p>
51.176909°N 1.890934°W
10
51.17726952-1.891076869
Winterbourne Stoke G65
Winterbourne Stoke West 9
AM: Bowl barrow with 2 primary cremations in 2 small round cists, one with a reversible incense cup. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 65. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 9) who recorded two primary cremations. One of the cremations was accompanied by an incense cup with twisted chord impressions on the body and rim bevel. This is in Devizes Museum accession number 254. Field investigations in 1974 located a ditched bowl barrow, 17 metres in diameter and 0.9 metres high. The ditch was 0.3 metres deep. Both the ditch and mound had been destroyed by the scarp of the Medieval enclosure. The barrow had also been included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 9, a flat circular barrow, contained two small round cists, in each of which was deposited an interment of burned bones; in one we found a curious little double cup in the other, no articles whatever.
Winterbourne Stoke G65
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G65</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with 2 primary cremations in 2 small round cists, one with a reversible incense cup. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 65. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated within the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 9) who recorded two primary cremations. One of the cremations was accompanied by an incense cup with twisted chord impressions on the body and rim bevel. This is in Devizes Museum accession number 254. Field investigations in 1974 located a ditched bowl barrow, 17 metres in diameter and 0.9 metres high. The ditch was 0.3 metres deep. Both the ditch and mound had been destroyed by the scarp of the Medieval enclosure. The barrow had also been included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke West 9 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 114)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 9, a flat circular barrow, contained two small round cists, in each of which was deposited an interment of burned bones; in one we found a curious little double cup in the other, no articles whatever. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765321'>765321</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 75</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE648'>MWI7059 - SU04SE648</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019'>1015019 (old #28921)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.71}'><img src='img/STHEAD.71.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.71' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.177269°N 1.891076°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke West 9114
Winterbourne Stoke G
6565765321http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765321SU 04 SE 75MWI7059SU04SE648http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE648289211015019https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019STHEAD.71
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.71}'><img src='img/STHEAD.71.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.71' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.71}'><img src='img/STHEAD.71.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.71' height='150'></a> </p>
51.177269°N 1.891076°W
11
51.17690931-1.890505492
Winterbourne Stoke G67
Winterbourne Stoke West 10
AM: Disc barrow with primary cremation, wrapped in linen and fixed by a bronze pin, in inverted urn with 5 shale rings (one perforated for suspension), a shale bead, an amber bead, several faience beads and a V-bored shale button. Also encroached by later earthwork. PS: Bronze Age disc barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 67. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and has been partially destroyed by the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (Barrow number 10) who recorded a primary cremation wrapped in cloth with a bronze pin, shale rings and amber beads under an inverted pot. Field investigations in 1974 located a mound 8 metres in diameter and 0.6 metres high. The berm was 4 metres wide; the ditch and outer bank 6 metres wide, 0.4 metres deep and 0.3 metres high. The barrow was also included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age disc barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 10 was opened by Mr. Cunnington in the year 1804. In its form, it resembles the second class of Druid Barrows, is neatly ditched round, having the vallum without, and the tumulus rising gradually to its apex from the ditch. It contained an urn inverted over the burned bones, which had been wrapped up in a linen cloth, to protect them; and with the bones were found a small brass pin, employed probably for fastening the cloth, five rings of a dark brown colour, one of which was perforated for suspension, (TUMULI, PLATE XIII.) a small cone of the same materials perforated also for the same purpose, and several pully beads of glass, with one of jet, and another of amber.
Winterbourne Stoke G67
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G67</strong></p><p>AM: Disc barrow with primary cremation, wrapped in linen and fixed by a bronze pin, in inverted urn with 5 shale rings (one perforated for suspension), a shale bead, an amber bead, several faience beads and a V-bored shale button. Also encroached by later earthwork. PS: Bronze Age disc barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 67. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and has been partially destroyed by the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (Barrow number 10) who recorded a primary cremation wrapped in cloth with a bronze pin, shale rings and amber beads under an inverted pot. Field investigations in 1974 located a mound 8 metres in diameter and 0.6 metres high. The berm was 4 metres wide; the ditch and outer bank 6 metres wide, 0.4 metres deep and 0.3 metres high. The barrow was also included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age disc barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke West 10 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 114)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 10 was opened by Mr. Cunnington in the year 1804. In its form, it resembles the second class of Druid Barrows, is neatly ditched round, having the vallum without, and the tumulus rising gradually to its apex from the ditch. It contained an urn inverted over the burned bones, which had been wrapped up in a linen cloth, to protect them; and with the bones were found a small brass pin, employed probably for fastening the cloth, five rings of a dark brown colour, one of which was perforated for suspension, (TUMULI, PLATE XIII.) a small cone of the same materials perforated also for the same purpose, and several pully beads of glass, with one of jet, and another of amber. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765496'>765496</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 79</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE652'>MWI7063 - SU04SE652</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019'>1015019 (old #28921)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70c}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70c.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70c' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70e}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70e.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70e' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.176909°N 1.890505°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke West 10114
Winterbourne Stoke G
6767765496http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765496SU 04 SE 79MWI7063SU04SE652http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE652289211015019https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019STHEAD.70STHEAD.70aSTHEAD.70cSTHEAD.70e
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70a' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70c}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70c.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70c' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70e}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70e.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70e' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70c}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70c.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70c' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70e}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70e.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70e' height='150'></a> </p>
51.176909°N 1.890505°W
12
51.17672907-1.890076752
Winterbourne Stoke G69
Winterbourne Stoke West 11
AM: Bowl barrow with outer bank with primary cremation in oblong cist. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 69. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated outside of the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 11) who located a primary cremation within a rectangular cist. Field investigations in 1974 located a ditched bowl barrow with a diameter of 26 metres and a height of 1.1 metres. The ditch was 0.7 metres deep. The barrow was also included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 11. This barrow, more perfect in its external form than the rest, contained within an oblong cist, a simple interment of burned bones.
Winterbourne Stoke G69
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G69</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with outer bank with primary cremation in oblong cist. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 69. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated outside of the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 11) who located a primary cremation within a rectangular cist. Field investigations in 1974 located a ditched bowl barrow with a diameter of 26 metres and a height of 1.1 metres. The ditch was 0.7 metres deep. The barrow was also included in a survey carried out by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke West 11 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 114)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 11. This barrow, more perfect in its external form than the rest, contained within an oblong cist, a simple interment of burned bones. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765443'>765443</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 77</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE650'>MWI7061 - SU04SE650</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019'>1015019 (old #28921)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.176729°N 1.890076°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke West 11114
Winterbourne Stoke G
6969765443http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765443SU 04 SE 77MWI7061SU04SE650http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE650289211015019https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101501951.176729°N 1.890076°W
13
51.17636898-1.889648458
Winterbourne Stoke G68
Winterbourne Stoke West 12
AM: Disc barrow with primary cremation in a very large inverted urn with 2 shale rings (not perforated), 3 shale beads, an large amber bead, 4 faience beads and an incense cup. Also encroached by later earthwork. PS: Bronze Age disc barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 68. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated outside the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 12) who recorded a primary cremation with an incense cup, two shale rings and amber and faience beads. All the finds, except the beads, are present in Devizes Museum, accession number 255, 944-5. Field investigations in 1974 found the barrow to be largely destroyed. The mound was 18 metres in diameter and 0.4 metres high; the outer scarp of the ditch 44 metres in diameter and 0.8 metres high. The southern portion was destroyed by ploughing, a track mutilated part of the northern half. The barrow was also included in a survey by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age disc barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 12. The vallum of this large Druid barrow is so much defaced, and the elevation of the mound so very trifling, that it might easily escape general notice. It contained a very large rude urn, sixteen inches and a half deep, inverted over an interment of burned bones, and within it a smaller vase. With them were found two black rings similar to those before described, but not perforated for suspension, a large amber bead perforated, four pully beads, and three of a black colour. The three last mentioned barrows are situated on the outside of the bank and ditch, which, at first sight, bear an equivocal appearance from their singular shape, resembling a pentagon, which I have before stated as being a favourite form with the Britons ; but on a close investigation of them, they appear decidedly of a more modern date than the barrows. The name of the hill, CONIGAR and the vulgar tradition of this spot having once been appropriated to a rabbit-warren, will corroborate this conjecture, and ascertain the origin of this earthen enclosure.
Winterbourne Stoke G68
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G68</strong></p><p>AM: Disc barrow with primary cremation in a very large inverted urn with 2 shale rings (not perforated), 3 shale beads, an large amber bead, 4 faience beads and an incense cup. Also encroached by later earthwork. PS: Bronze Age disc barrow listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 68. It is part of the Winterbourne Stoke (West) Barrow Cemetery and is situated outside the Medieval enclosure, The Coniger (SU 04 SE 83). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in 1809 (barrow number 12) who recorded a primary cremation with an incense cup, two shale rings and amber and faience beads. All the finds, except the beads, are present in Devizes Museum, accession number 255, 944-5. Field investigations in 1974 found the barrow to be largely destroyed. The mound was 18 metres in diameter and 0.4 metres high; the outer scarp of the ditch 44 metres in diameter and 0.8 metres high. The southern portion was destroyed by ploughing, a track mutilated part of the northern half. The barrow was also included in a survey by RCHME field staff in 1992. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age disc barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke West 12 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 114)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 12. The vallum of this large Druid barrow is so much defaced, and the elevation of the mound so very trifling, that it might easily escape general notice. It contained a very large rude urn, sixteen inches and a half deep, inverted over an interment of burned bones, and within it a smaller vase. With them were found two black rings similar to those before described, but not perforated for suspension, a large amber bead perforated, four pully beads, and three of a black colour. The three last mentioned barrows are situated on the outside of the bank and ditch, which, at first sight, bear an equivocal appearance from their singular shape, resembling a pentagon, which I have before stated as being a favourite form with the Britons ; but on a close investigation of them, they appear decidedly of a more modern date than the barrows. The name of the hill, CONIGAR and the vulgar tradition of this spot having once been appropriated to a rabbit-warren, will corroborate this conjecture, and ascertain the origin of this earthen enclosure. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765511'>765511</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 80</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE653'>MWI7064 - SU04SE653</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019'>1015019 (old #28921)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70b' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.329}'><img src='img/STHEAD.329.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.329' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.329a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.329a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.329a' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.176368°N 1.889648°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke West 12114
Winterbourne Stoke G
6868765511http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=765511SU 04 SE 80MWI7064SU04SE653http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE653289211015019https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015019STHEAD.70bSTHEAD.329STHEAD.329a
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70b' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.329}'><img src='img/STHEAD.329.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.329' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.329a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.329a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.329a' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70b' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.329}'><img src='img/STHEAD.329.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.329' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.329a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.329a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.329a' height='150'></a> </p>
51.176368°N 1.889648°W
14
51.180181-1.882061
Winterbourne Stoke G60
Winterbourne Stoke East 1
AM: Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare, and a primary cremation discovered within the barrow. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: In the barrows No. 1 and 2, the rites of cremation had been practised, but no circumstances worthy of any particular detail occurred. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle.
Winterbourne Stoke G60
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G60</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare, and a primary cremation discovered within the barrow. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke East 1 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 115)</strong></p><p>RCH: In the barrows No. 1 and 2, the rites of cremation had been practised, but no circumstances worthy of any particular detail occurred. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=859362'>859362</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 117</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE660'>MWI7071 - SU04SE660</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015020'>1015020 (old #28922)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180181°N 1.882061°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke East 1115
Winterbourne Stoke G
6060859362http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=859362SU 04 SE 117MWI7071SU04SE660http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE660289221015020https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101502051.180181°N 1.882061°W
15
51.1802284-1.882381
Winterbourne Stoke G59
Winterbourne Stoke East 2
AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, (Grinsell's Winterbourne Stoke 59), one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. The barrow was excavated by Hoare and a primary cremation discovered within the barrow. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: In the barrows No. 1 and 2, the rites of cremation had been practised, but no circumstances worthy of any particular detail occurred. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle.
Winterbourne Stoke G59
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G59</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, (Grinsell's Winterbourne Stoke 59), one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. The barrow was excavated by Hoare and a primary cremation discovered within the barrow. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke East 2 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 115)</strong></p><p>RCH: In the barrows No. 1 and 2, the rites of cremation had been practised, but no circumstances worthy of any particular detail occurred. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=859326'>859326</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 115</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE661'>MWI7072 - SU04SE661</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015020'>1015020 (old #28922)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180228°N 1.882381°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke East 2115
Winterbourne Stoke G
5959859326http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=859326SU 04 SE 115MWI7072SU04SE661http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE661289221015020https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101502051.180228°N 1.882381°W
16
51.180281-1.882541
Winterbourne Stoke G59a
Winterbourne Stoke East 3
AM: Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation with a small food vessel urn (MBA). PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare and a primary cremation discovered within the barrow. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 3 and 4 had been opened by shepherds, and contained interments of burned bones. In the former was found a little cup, which Mr. Cunnington purchased. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle.
Winterbourne Stoke G59a
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G59a</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation with a small food vessel urn (MBA). PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare and a primary cremation discovered within the barrow. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke East 3 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 115)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 3 and 4 had been opened by shepherds, and contained interments of burned bones. In the former was found a little cup, which Mr. Cunnington purchased. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=859338'>859338</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 116</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE662'>MWI7073 - SU04SE662</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015020'>1015020 (old #28922)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.276}'><img src='img/STHEAD.276.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.276' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180281°N 1.882541°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke East 3115
Winterbourne Stoke G
59a59859338http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=859338SU 04 SE 116MWI7073SU04SE662http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE662289221015020https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015020STHEAD.276
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.276}'><img src='img/STHEAD.276.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.276' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.276}'><img src='img/STHEAD.276.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.276' height='150'></a> </p>
51.180281°N 1.882541°W
17
51.18031874-1.882681
Winterbourne Stoke G58
Winterbourne Stoke East 4
AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation. (Possibly wrongly attributed by Grinsell and is G58a instead). PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, (Grinsell's Winterbourne Stoke 58), one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. A cremation was found within the barrow. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 3 and 4 had been opened by shepherds, and contained interments of burned bones. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle.
Winterbourne Stoke G58
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G58</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation. (Possibly wrongly attributed by Grinsell and is G58a instead). PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, (Grinsell's Winterbourne Stoke 58), one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. A cremation was found within the barrow. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke East 4 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 115)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 3 and 4 had been opened by shepherds, and contained interments of burned bones. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=831556'>831556</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 113</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE663'>MWI7074 - SU04SE663</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015020'>1015020 (old #28922)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180318°N 1.882681°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke East 4115
Winterbourne Stoke G
5858831556http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=831556SU 04 SE 113MWI7074SU04SE663http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE663289221015020https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101502051.180318°N 1.882681°W
18
51.180391-1.882831
Winterbourne Stoke G58a
Winterbourne Stoke East 5
AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation with bone point in a small urn (LBA pot). (Possibly G58 instead, wrongly attributed by Grinsell). PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, (Grinsell's Winterbourne Stoke 58a), one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. A primary cremation was found within the barrow. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 5 contained an urn very imperfectly baked, and within it an interment of burned bones, and a very small arrow head of bone. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle.
Winterbourne Stoke G58a
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G58a</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation with bone point in a small urn (LBA pot). (Possibly G58 instead, wrongly attributed by Grinsell). PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, (Grinsell's Winterbourne Stoke 58a), one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. A primary cremation was found within the barrow. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke East 5 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 115)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 5 contained an urn very imperfectly baked, and within it an interment of burned bones, and a very small arrow head of bone. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=831563'>831563</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 114</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE659'>MWI7070 - SU04SE659</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015020'>1015020 (old #28922)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70d}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70d.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70d' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.82}'><img src='img/STHEAD.82.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.82' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Additional Notes: </strong>WSH: NGR incorrect as of May 2016</p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180391°N 1.882831°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke East 5115
Winterbourne Stoke G
58a58831563http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=831563SU 04 SE 114MWI7070SU04SE659
WSH: NGR incorrect as of May 2016
http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE659289221015020https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015020STHEAD.70dSTHEAD.82
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70d}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70d.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70d' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.82}'><img src='img/STHEAD.82.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.82' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.70d}'><img src='img/STHEAD.70d.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.70d' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.82}'><img src='img/STHEAD.82.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.82' height='150'></a> </p>
51.180391°N 1.882831°W
19
51.180511-1.883611
Winterbourne Stoke G55a
Winterbourne Stoke East 6
AM: Bowl barrow with evidence of ceremonial burning. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, (Grinsell's Winterbourne Stoke 55a), one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. WSH: Bibliographic reference – Grinsell, L.V., 1957. Victoria County History, Volume: Volume 1, Part: Part 1, p203 (incorrect NGR)
RCH: In No. 6 the ceremony of burning had been adopted. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle.
Winterbourne Stoke G55a
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G55a</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with evidence of ceremonial burning. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, (Grinsell's Winterbourne Stoke 55a), one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. WSH: Bibliographic reference – Grinsell, L.V., 1957. Victoria County History, Volume: Volume 1, Part: Part 1, p203 (incorrect NGR)</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke East 6 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 115)</strong></p><p>RCH: In No. 6 the ceremony of burning had been adopted. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=831532'>831532</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 110</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE665'>MWI7076 - SU04SE665</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015020'>1015020 (old #28922)</a></p><p><strong>Additional Notes: </strong>WSH: NGR incorrect as of May 2016</p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180511°N 1.883611°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke East 6115
Winterbourne Stoke G
55a55831532http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=831532SU 04 SE 110MWI7076SU04SE665
WSH: NGR incorrect as of May 2016
http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE665289221015020https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101502051.180511°N 1.883611°W
20
51.180741-1.884191
Winterbourne Stoke G56
Winterbourne Stoke East 7
AM: Bowl barrow with primary crouched male inhumation (N./S.) in cist with large antlers on right side (1ft) above. A secondary cremation was later placed in the mound with broken `drinking cup'. Later, a secondary infant inhumation (head to S.) was placed directly above the cremation. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure.The barrow was found to contain a primary inhumation and secondary cremation and inhumation. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 7. This large barrow produced three interments. At the depth of four feet and a half, we discovered the skeleton of an infant, with its head laid towards the south ; and immediately beneath it, a deposit of burned bones, and a drinking cup, which was unfortunately broken. At the depth of eight feet, and in the native bed of chalk, we came to the primary interment, viz. the skeleton of a man lying from north to south, with his legs gathered up according to the primitive custom. On his right side, and about a foot or more above the bones, was an enormous stag's horn. This was certainly the original deposit; though we find the same mode of interment, as well as cremation adopted at a subsequent period near the surface of the barrow. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle.
Winterbourne Stoke G56
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G56</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary crouched male inhumation (N./S.) in cist with large antlers on right side (1ft) above. A secondary cremation was later placed in the mound with broken `drinking cup'. Later, a secondary infant inhumation (head to S.) was placed directly above the cremation. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure.The barrow was found to contain a primary inhumation and secondary cremation and inhumation. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke East 7 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 115)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 7. This large barrow produced three interments. At the depth of four feet and a half, we discovered the skeleton of an infant, with its head laid towards the south ; and immediately beneath it, a deposit of burned bones, and a drinking cup, which was unfortunately broken. At the depth of eight feet, and in the native bed of chalk, we came to the primary interment, viz. the skeleton of a man lying from north to south, with his legs gathered up according to the primitive custom. On his right side, and about a foot or more above the bones, was an enormous stag's horn. This was certainly the original deposit; though we find the same mode of interment, as well as cremation adopted at a subsequent period near the surface of the barrow. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=831540'>831540</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 111</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE656'>MWI7067 - SU04SE656</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015020'>1015020 (old #28922)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180741°N 1.884191°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke East 7115
Winterbourne Stoke G
5656831540http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=831540SU 04 SE 111MWI7067SU04SE656http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE656289221015020https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101502051.180741°N 1.884191°W
21
51.180191-1.883231
Winterbourne Stoke G57
Winterbourne Stoke East 8
AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (head to N.) on ground surface covered with 'vegetable earth'. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, (Grinsell's Winterbourne Stoke 57), one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. A primary inhumation was found within the barrow.The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 8 is a large old-fashioned bowl-shaped tumulus, the base diameter being nearly one hundred feet. It contained a skeleton lying on the floor with its head towards the north, and much decayed from its having been covered with vegetable earth. Mr. Cunnington, supposing that this barrow contained more interments, made a second trial, but procured no further information. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle.
Winterbourne Stoke G57
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G57</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (head to N.) on ground surface covered with 'vegetable earth'. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, (Grinsell's Winterbourne Stoke 57), one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. A primary inhumation was found within the barrow.The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke East 8 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 116)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 8 is a large old-fashioned bowl-shaped tumulus, the base diameter being nearly one hundred feet. It contained a skeleton lying on the floor with its head towards the north, and much decayed from its having been covered with vegetable earth. Mr. Cunnington, supposing that this barrow contained more interments, made a second trial, but procured no further information. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=831543'>831543</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 112</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE657'>MWI7068 - SU04SE657</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015020'>1015020 (old #28922)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180191°N 1.883231°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke East 8116
Winterbourne Stoke G
5757831543http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=831543SU 04 SE 112MWI7068SU04SE657http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE657289221015020https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101502051.180191°N 1.883231°W
22
51.179711-1.88348862
Winterbourne Stoke G60a
Winterbourne Stoke East 9
AM: Bowl barrow with no finds. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. WSH: Bibliographic reference – Grinsell, L.V., 1957. Victoria County History, Volume: Volume 1, Part: Part 1, p203 (incorrect NGR)
RCH: The remaining three barrows within this enclosure, viz. 9, 10, 11, which I have before mentioned as being placed nearly at equal distances from the vallum, and forming a kind of triangle, afforded, on opening, no one appearance of sepulchral remains ; and for what purpose they could have been raised, it is impossible for me to determine; it is rather singular that eight out of the eleven tumuli which are enclosed within this work should have each proved sepulchral, and these not so. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle.
Winterbourne Stoke G60a
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G60a</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with no finds. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. WSH: Bibliographic reference – Grinsell, L.V., 1957. Victoria County History, Volume: Volume 1, Part: Part 1, p203 (incorrect NGR)</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke East 9 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 116)</strong></p><p>RCH: The remaining three barrows within this enclosure, viz. 9, 10, 11, which I have before mentioned as being placed nearly at equal distances from the vallum, and forming a kind of triangle, afforded, on opening, no one appearance of sepulchral remains ; and for what purpose they could have been raised, it is impossible for me to determine; it is rather singular that eight out of the eleven tumuli which are enclosed within this work should have each proved sepulchral, and these not so. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=859367'>859367</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 118</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE664'>MWI7075 - SU04SE664</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015020'>1015020 (old #28922)</a></p><p><strong>Additional Notes: </strong>WSH: NGR incorrect as of May 2016</p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.179711°N 1.883488°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke East 9116
Winterbourne Stoke G
60a60859367http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=859367SU 04 SE 118MWI7075SU04SE664
WSH: NGR incorrect as of May 2016
http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE664289221015020https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101502051.179711°N 1.883488°W
23
51.18023066-1.884511
Winterbourne Stoke G60b
Winterbourne Stoke East 10
AM: Bowl barrow with no finds. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: The remaining three barrows within this enclosure, viz. 9, 10, 11, which I have before mentioned as being placed nearly at equal distances from the vallum, and forming a kind of triangle, afforded, on opening, no one appearance of sepulchral remains ; and for what purpose they could have been raised, it is impossible for me to determine; it is rather singular that eight out of the eleven tumuli which are enclosed within this work should have each proved sepulchral, and these not so. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle.
Winterbourne Stoke G60b
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G60b</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with no finds. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke East 10 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 116)</strong></p><p>RCH: The remaining three barrows within this enclosure, viz. 9, 10, 11, which I have before mentioned as being placed nearly at equal distances from the vallum, and forming a kind of triangle, afforded, on opening, no one appearance of sepulchral remains ; and for what purpose they could have been raised, it is impossible for me to determine; it is rather singular that eight out of the eleven tumuli which are enclosed within this work should have each proved sepulchral, and these not so. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=859375'>859375</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 119</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE666'>MWI7077 - SU04SE666</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015020'>1015020 (old #28922)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180230°N 1.884511°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke East 10116
Winterbourne Stoke G
60b60859375http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=859375SU 04 SE 119MWI7077SU04SE666http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE666289221015020https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101502051.180230°N 1.884511°W
24
51.180811-1.882841
Winterbourne Stoke G60c
Winterbourne Stoke East 11
AM: Bowl barrow with no finds. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: The remaining three barrows within this enclosure, viz. 9, 10, 11, which I have before mentioned as being placed nearly at equal distances from the vallum, and forming a kind of triangle, afforded, on opening, no one appearance of sepulchral remains ; and for what purpose they could have been raised, it is impossible for me to determine; it is rather singular that eight out of the eleven tumuli which are enclosed within this work should have each proved sepulchral, and these not so. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle.
Winterbourne Stoke G60c
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G60c</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with no finds. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, one of a group of eleven barrows contained within a Medieval or Post Medieval embanked enclosure. The earthwork remains of this Bronze Age bowl barrow were mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke East 11 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 116)</strong></p><p>RCH: The remaining three barrows within this enclosure, viz. 9, 10, 11, which I have before mentioned as being placed nearly at equal distances from the vallum, and forming a kind of triangle, afforded, on opening, no one appearance of sepulchral remains ; and for what purpose they could have been raised, it is impossible for me to determine; it is rather singular that eight out of the eleven tumuli which are enclosed within this work should have each proved sepulchral, and these not so. By the annexed plan, we perceive that No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, run nearly in a parallel line from east to west. No. 8 is a little to the south of the above lines, and No. 9, 10, 11, placed at equal distances from the outward ditch and bank, form a triangle. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=859383'>859383</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 120</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE658'>MWI7069 - SU04SE658</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015020'>1015020 (old #28922)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180811°N 1.882841°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke East 11116
Winterbourne Stoke G
60c60859383http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=859383SU 04 SE 120MWI7069SU04SE658http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE658289221015020https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101502051.180811°N 1.882841°W
25
51.18525826-1.876607017
Winterbourne Stoke G51
Winterbourne Stoke Down 1
AM: Bowl barrow with a large primary cremation. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow situated on Winterbourne Stoke Down. The barrow survives as an earthwork mound 0.5m high, 12m in diameter and is surrounded by a quarry ditch which now survives as a slight depression. The barrow was part excavated in the C19. The barrow lies within a Late Prehistoic or Roman field system. The barrow was surveyed at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: The first barrow that occurs on leaving the British villages, is No. 1, situated at a short distance from the bank and ditch before mentioned, and near the road leading to Shrewton ; it contained a very large interment of burned bones.
Winterbourne Stoke G51
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G51</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with a large primary cremation. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow situated on Winterbourne Stoke Down. The barrow survives as an earthwork mound 0.5m high, 12m in diameter and is surrounded by a quarry ditch which now survives as a slight depression. The barrow was part excavated in the C19. The barrow lies within a Late Prehistoic or Roman field system. The barrow was surveyed at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke Down 1 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 117)</strong></p><p>RCH: The first barrow that occurs on leaving the British villages, is No. 1, situated at a short distance from the bank and ditch before mentioned, and near the road leading to Shrewton ; it contained a very large interment of burned bones.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=215078'>215078</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 38</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE642'>MWI7053 - SU04SE642</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015023'>1015023 (old #28929)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.185258°N 1.876607°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke Down 1117
Winterbourne Stoke G
5151215078http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=215078SU 04 SE 38MWI7053SU04SE642http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE642289291015023https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101502351.185258°N 1.876607°W
26
51.18408425-1.871888599
Winterbourne Stoke G52
Winterbourne Stoke Down 2
AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed). PS: A bowl barrow located on Winterbourne Stoke Down. The barrow is visible as an oval mound 0.3m high, the extent of which is now difficult to determine on the ground. Surrounding the mound is a quarry ditch which survives as a buried feature. The barrow lies within an extensive late Prehistoric coaxial field system. The barrow was also seen as a low earthwork mound with an approximate diameter of 15m when mapped from aerial photographs. This was carried out at 1:10,000 scale as part of the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 2 appeared to have had a prior opening.
Winterbourne Stoke G52
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G52</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed). PS: A bowl barrow located on Winterbourne Stoke Down. The barrow is visible as an oval mound 0.3m high, the extent of which is now difficult to determine on the ground. Surrounding the mound is a quarry ditch which survives as a buried feature. The barrow lies within an extensive late Prehistoric coaxial field system. The barrow was also seen as a low earthwork mound with an approximate diameter of 15m when mapped from aerial photographs. This was carried out at 1:10,000 scale as part of the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke Down 2 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 117)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 2 appeared to have had a prior opening.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=214993'>214993</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 11</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE634'>MWI7045 - SU04SE634</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015024'>1015024 (old #28930)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.184084°N 1.871888°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke Down 2117
Winterbourne Stoke G
5252214993http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=214993SU 04 SE 11MWI7045SU04SE634http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE634289301015024https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101502451.184084°N 1.871888°W
27
51.18435213-1.870170931
Winterbourne Stoke G53
Winterbourne Stoke Down 3
AM: Long barrow with primary (?) cremation (at East end) on ground surface 'platform' mixed in and covered by chalky marl and flints (2ft high). Several bones tinged green suggesting the presence of bronze. Further east were 2 cists containing wood ashes. PS: The earthwork remains of a long barrow orientated east-west. A 36m length of mound survives as a visible earthwork which varies in height from 1.5m to c.1m. The remainder of the mound is visible as a slight rise in the field surface. This long barrow was mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 3 is a long, or rather triangular barrow, standing nearly east and west, the broad end towards the former point ; it measures 104 feet in length, 64 feet in width at the large end, 45 feet at the small end, and does not exceed three or four feet in elevation. This tumulus has been much mutilated, partly by former antiquaries, and partly by cowherds or shepherds, who had excavated the eastern end, by making huts for shelter. Our first section was made at the western end, but produced nothing. On making a second, we perceived the earth had been disturbed, and pursuing the section, found two or three fragments of burned bones. We next observed a rude conical pile of large flints, imbedded in a kind of mortar made of the marly chalk dug near the spot. This rude pile was not more than four or five feet in the base, and about two feet high on the highest part, and was raised upon a floor, on which had been an intense fire, so as to make it red like brick. At first we conceived that this pile might have been raised over an interment, but after much labour in removing the greater part of it, we very unexpectedly found the remains of the Briton below, and were much astonished at seeing several pieces of burned bones intermixed with the great masses of mortar, a circumstance extremely curious, and so novel, that we know not how to decide upon the original intent of this barrow. The primary interment might have been disturbed before, or we might have missed it ; the Britons might perhaps have burned the body by an intense fire on the spot, where the earth was made red ; and the calcined bones might then have been collected together, and mixed in the mortar, which, with flints, formed the rude cone over the fire-place. If this opinion is right, the Britons in this case adopted a very singular method for preserving the dead. We have left some of the mortar containing the burned bones, near the top of the barrow, to satisfy the curiosity of any person who might wish to examine it. Though nearly the whole of the bones had a slight tinge of green, we could not discover any articles of brass. On exploring this barrow further to the east, we found two deep cists containing an immense quantity of wood ashes, and large pieces of charred wood, but no other signs of interment.
Winterbourne Stoke G53
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G53</strong></p><p>AM: Long barrow with primary (?) cremation (at East end) on ground surface 'platform' mixed in and covered by chalky marl and flints (2ft high). Several bones tinged green suggesting the presence of bronze. Further east were 2 cists containing wood ashes. PS: The earthwork remains of a long barrow orientated east-west. A 36m length of mound survives as a visible earthwork which varies in height from 1.5m to c.1m. The remainder of the mound is visible as a slight rise in the field surface. This long barrow was mapped at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke Down 3 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 117)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 3 is a long, or rather triangular barrow, standing nearly east and west, the broad end towards the former point ; it measures 104 feet in length, 64 feet in width at the large end, 45 feet at the small end, and does not exceed three or four feet in elevation. This tumulus has been much mutilated, partly by former antiquaries, and partly by cowherds or shepherds, who had excavated the eastern end, by making huts for shelter. Our first section was made at the western end, but produced nothing. On making a second, we perceived the earth had been disturbed, and pursuing the section, found two or three fragments of burned bones. We next observed a rude conical pile of large flints, imbedded in a kind of mortar made of the marly chalk dug near the spot. This rude pile was not more than four or five feet in the base, and about two feet high on the highest part, and was raised upon a floor, on which had been an intense fire, so as to make it red like brick. At first we conceived that this pile might have been raised over an interment, but after much labour in removing the greater part of it, we very unexpectedly found the remains of the Briton below, and were much astonished at seeing several pieces of burned bones intermixed with the great masses of mortar, a circumstance extremely curious, and so novel, that we know not how to decide upon the original intent of this barrow. The primary interment might have been disturbed before, or we might have missed it ; the Britons might perhaps have burned the body by an intense fire on the spot, where the earth was made red ; and the calcined bones might then have been collected together, and mixed in the mortar, which, with flints, formed the rude cone over the fire-place. If this opinion is right, the Britons in this case adopted a very singular method for preserving the dead. We have left some of the mortar containing the burned bones, near the top of the barrow, to satisfy the curiosity of any person who might wish to examine it. Though nearly the whole of the bones had a slight tinge of green, we could not discover any articles of brass. On exploring this barrow further to the east, we found two deep cists containing an immense quantity of wood ashes, and large pieces of charred wood, but no other signs of interment. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=215063'>215063</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 33</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE100'>MWI6918 - SU04SE100</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015021'>1015021 (old #28926)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.75a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.75a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.75a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.75b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.75b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.75b' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.184352°N 1.870170°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke Down 3117
Winterbourne Stoke G
5353215063http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=215063SU 04 SE 33MWI6918SU04SE100http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE100289261015021https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015021STHEAD.75aSTHEAD.75b
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.75a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.75a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.75a' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.75b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.75b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.75b' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.75a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.75a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.75a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.75b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.75b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.75b' height='150'></a> </p>
51.184352°N 1.870170°W
28
51.18255149-1.868172968
Winterbourne Stoke G53a
Winterbourne Stoke Down 4
AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed). PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow 600m south west of Airmans Corner on Winterbourne Stoke Down. It is visible as a scatter of small flints and chalk 12m in diameter and 0.3m high. The earthwork remains of this barrow mapped from aerial photographs. The site and surrounding later Prehistoric or Roman field system were surveyed at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 4 had been opened by a shepherd, and its history is unknown.
Winterbourne Stoke G53a
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G53a</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed). PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow 600m south west of Airmans Corner on Winterbourne Stoke Down. It is visible as a scatter of small flints and chalk 12m in diameter and 0.3m high. The earthwork remains of this barrow mapped from aerial photographs. The site and surrounding later Prehistoric or Roman field system were surveyed at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke Down 4 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 117)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 4 had been opened by a shepherd, and its history is unknown.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=215081'>215081</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 39</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE643'>MWI7054 - SU04SE643</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1015022'>1015022 (old #28927)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.182551°N 1.868172°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke Down 4117
Winterbourne Stoke G
53a53215081http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=215081SU 04 SE 39MWI7054SU04SE643http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE643289271015022https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101502251.182551°N 1.868172°W
29
51.18110538-1.861739053
Winterbourne Stoke G54
Winterbourne Stoke Down 5
AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation in large oblong cist (missing ribs and vertaebra) with 2 whetstones, a beaker (type A), a shale cone and pulley ring, and the skeleton of an infant; a foot above was a secondary skeleton of a young person (over the northeast end) and a secondary cremation (over the southern side). PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow with primary inhumation and secondary burials, (Grinsell's Winterbourne Stoke 54). The earthwork remains of this bowl barrow measuring approximately 33m in diameter were mapped from aerial photographs. The site lies on the eastern edge of a later Prehistoric or Roman field system. These features were surveyed at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 5. This large circular barrow is situated a few yards west of the road leading from Salisbury to Devizes, is flat at the top, five feet in elevation, and 110 feet in base diameter. When on the top of this tumulus, you perceive several depressions on the surface, from which, and its large dimensions, we conceived it must have been a family sepulchre, and so it proved to be. We opened it by a large square section near the centre, and in digging down to within a foot of the floor, we found the skeleton of a young person, deposited over the north-west edge of a very large and deep oblong cist ; and upon the same level, on the south side, we discovered an interment of burned bones. On clearing the earth to the depth of five feet, we reached the floor of the barrow., in which a cist of the depth of four feet was cut in the native chalk, and at the depth of two feet on the southern side of the cist, was deposited the skeleton of an infant, apparently but a few months old. From the positions in which these interments were placed, it is evident they had been deposited at different times, and were subsequent to the primary one, in search of which we next proceeded. On clearing away the earth from the large cist, we found the head of a skeleton lying on the north side, but to our surprise, no vertaebra or ribs; further on were the thigh bones, legs, Scc. At the feet was a little rude drinking cup, nearly perfect, and two pieces of a dark coloured slaty kind of stone, lying parallel with each other, which are engraved in TUMULI PLATE XIV. We also found a large black cone, and an article like a pully, both of jet, and a piece of flint rudely chipped, as if intended for a dagger or spear. This tumulus, if more minutely examined, might very probably produce other interments, but from its great width, the operation would be attended with a very heavy expense.
Winterbourne Stoke G54
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G54</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation in large oblong cist (missing ribs and vertaebra) with 2 whetstones, a beaker (type A), a shale cone and pulley ring, and the skeleton of an infant; a foot above was a secondary skeleton of a young person (over the northeast end) and a secondary cremation (over the southern side). PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow with primary inhumation and secondary burials, (Grinsell's Winterbourne Stoke 54). The earthwork remains of this bowl barrow measuring approximately 33m in diameter were mapped from aerial photographs. The site lies on the eastern edge of a later Prehistoric or Roman field system. These features were surveyed at 1:10,000 scale as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke Down 5 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 118)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 5. This large circular barrow is situated a few yards west of the road leading from Salisbury to Devizes, is flat at the top, five feet in elevation, and 110 feet in base diameter. When on the top of this tumulus, you perceive several depressions on the surface, from which, and its large dimensions, we conceived it must have been a family sepulchre, and so it proved to be. We opened it by a large square section near the centre, and in digging down to within a foot of the floor, we found the skeleton of a young person, deposited over the north-west edge of a very large and deep oblong cist ; and upon the same level, on the south side, we discovered an interment of burned bones. On clearing the earth to the depth of five feet, we reached the floor of the barrow., in which a cist of the depth of four feet was cut in the native chalk, and at the depth of two feet on the southern side of the cist, was deposited the skeleton of an infant, apparently but a few months old. From the positions in which these interments were placed, it is evident they had been deposited at different times, and were subsequent to the primary one, in search of which we next proceeded. On clearing away the earth from the large cist, we found the head of a skeleton lying on the north side, but to our surprise, no vertaebra or ribs; further on were the thigh bones, legs, Scc. At the feet was a little rude drinking cup, nearly perfect, and two pieces of a dark coloured slaty kind of stone, lying parallel with each other, which are engraved in TUMULI PLATE XIV. We also found a large black cone, and an article like a pully, both of jet, and a piece of flint rudely chipped, as if intended for a dagger or spear. This tumulus, if more minutely examined, might very probably produce other interments, but from its great width, the operation would be attended with a very heavy expense.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=215084'>215084</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 40</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE641'>MWI7052 - SU04SE641</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1008949'>1008949 (old #10307)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.39}'><img src='img/STHEAD.39.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.39' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.72}'><img src='img/STHEAD.72.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.72' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.76}'><img src='img/STHEAD.76.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.76' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.178}'><img src='img/STHEAD.178.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.178' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.210}'><img src='img/STHEAD.210.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.210' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.181105°N 1.861739°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke Down 5118
Winterbourne Stoke G
5454215084http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=215084SU 04 SE 40MWI7052SU04SE641http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE641103071008949https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1008949STHEAD.39STHEAD.72STHEAD.76STHEAD.178STHEAD.210
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.39}'><img src='img/STHEAD.39.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.39' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.72}'><img src='img/STHEAD.72.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.72' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.76}'><img src='img/STHEAD.76.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.76' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.178}'><img src='img/STHEAD.178.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.178' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.210}'><img src='img/STHEAD.210.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.210' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.39}'><img src='img/STHEAD.39.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.39' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.72}'><img src='img/STHEAD.72.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.72' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.76}'><img src='img/STHEAD.76.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.76' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.178}'><img src='img/STHEAD.178.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.178' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.210}'><img src='img/STHEAD.210.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.210' height='150'></a> </p>
51.181105°N 1.861739°W
30
51.18056246-1.858879351
Winterbourne Stoke G27
Winterbourne Stoke Down 6
AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with no record. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks, forming part of an east / west alignment of round barrows on Winterbourne Stoke Down. The barrow measures circa 35m in diameter and comprises a broad low circular mound or platform, circa 1m high, surrounded by a broad shallow ditch. Slight traces of an outer bank are visible to the east and west. Excavations for Sir Richard Colt Hoare in the early 19th century found that the barrow had been disturbed previously (Barrow 6: 1812). The round barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 27 by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957). It is the westernmost of three extant round barrows (see Monument Numbers 870329 and 219708). The site was mapped at a scale of 1:10,000 from aerial photographs as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and the mapping subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at Level 1 in May and July 2011 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 6, which we found had been explored by some prior investigator.
Winterbourne Stoke G27
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G27</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with no record. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks, forming part of an east / west alignment of round barrows on Winterbourne Stoke Down. The barrow measures circa 35m in diameter and comprises a broad low circular mound or platform, circa 1m high, surrounded by a broad shallow ditch. Slight traces of an outer bank are visible to the east and west. Excavations for Sir Richard Colt Hoare in the early 19th century found that the barrow had been disturbed previously (Barrow 6: 1812). The round barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 27 by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957). It is the westernmost of three extant round barrows (see Monument Numbers 870329 and 219708). The site was mapped at a scale of 1:10,000 from aerial photographs as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and the mapping subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at Level 1 in May and July 2011 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke Down 6 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 118)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 6, which we found had been explored by some prior investigator.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=214999'>214999</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 13</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE677'>MWI7088 - SU04SE677</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1008950'>1008950 (old #10308)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180562°N 1.858879°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke Down 6118
Winterbourne Stoke G
2727214999http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=214999SU 04 SE 13MWI7088SU04SE677http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE677103081008950https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/100895051.180562°N 1.858879°W
31
51.180651-1.857734564
Winterbourne Stoke G26
Winterbourne Stoke Down 7
AM: Bell barrow (previously disturbed) with primary (?) cremation and fragment of large urn (possibly disturbed before). PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow survives as earthworks, forming part of an east / west alignment of round barrows on Winterbourne Stoke Down (see Monument Numbers 219708 and 214999). The round barrow measures circa 50m in diameter and comprises a mound, circa 3.2m high, which sits on a circular platform surrounded by a ring ditch. A slight outer bank is visible to the east and west. Extensive animal burrowing has caused a slumping of the south-eastern quadrant. Excavations for Sir Richard Colt Hoare in the early 19th century located part of a very large urn and some burnt bones, although it appeared the barrow had been disturbed previously (Barrow 7: 1812). The round barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 26 by Goddard (1913), who described it a fine bell-shaped barrow, and as a bell barrow by Grinsell (1957). The site was mapped at a scale of 1:10,000 from aerial photographs as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and the mapping revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at Level 1 in May 2011 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 7 is a fine bell-shaped barrow, 122 feet in diameter, and 9 feet in elevation. After great labour in making a spacious excavation, we unfortunately missed the interment; but from finding the fragment of a very large urn, and a few burned bones, we have some reason to think the barrow might have been opened before.
Winterbourne Stoke G26
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G26</strong></p><p>AM: Bell barrow (previously disturbed) with primary (?) cremation and fragment of large urn (possibly disturbed before). PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow survives as earthworks, forming part of an east / west alignment of round barrows on Winterbourne Stoke Down (see Monument Numbers 219708 and 214999). The round barrow measures circa 50m in diameter and comprises a mound, circa 3.2m high, which sits on a circular platform surrounded by a ring ditch. A slight outer bank is visible to the east and west. Extensive animal burrowing has caused a slumping of the south-eastern quadrant. Excavations for Sir Richard Colt Hoare in the early 19th century located part of a very large urn and some burnt bones, although it appeared the barrow had been disturbed previously (Barrow 7: 1812). The round barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 26 by Goddard (1913), who described it a fine bell-shaped barrow, and as a bell barrow by Grinsell (1957). The site was mapped at a scale of 1:10,000 from aerial photographs as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and the mapping revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at Level 1 in May 2011 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke Down 7 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 118)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 7 is a fine bell-shaped barrow, 122 feet in diameter, and 9 feet in elevation. After great labour in making a spacious excavation, we unfortunately missed the interment; but from finding the fragment of a very large urn, and a few burned bones, we have some reason to think the barrow might have been opened before. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870329'>870329</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 318</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW718'>MWI12881 - SU14SW718</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011039'>1011039 (old #10344)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180651°N 1.857734°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke Down 7118
Winterbourne Stoke G
2626870329http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870329SU 14 SW 318MWI12881SU14SW718http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW718103441011039https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101103951.180651°N 1.857734°W
32
51.18073935-1.856446692
Winterbourne Stoke G25
Winterbourne Stoke Down 8
AM :Bowl/ Bell (?) barrow with primary cremation (of 2 people?) in shallow oblong cist. A secondary cremation in a globular Deverell- Rimbury urn (LBA) was later found on the north (?) side. A secondary inhumation was also found in the south side 'about halfway up that part of the mound'. A square polished stone and a whetstone was found in the moundfill. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as earthworks; it is the easternmost of an east / west alignment of three round barrows on Winterbourne Stoke Down (see Monument Numbers 870329 and 214999). The round barrow measures circa 40m in diameter and comprises a mound, circa 2.5 metres high, which is partially surrounded by a ring ditch 0.5m deep. There is no sign of any outer bank. The barrow was used as a quarry in the early 20th century and has suffered damage from burrowing animals, making its original form difficult to distinguish. It has slumped to the north-east, giving the mound a horse-shoe shaped summit and obscuring the ditch for this quadrant. A break in slope around the western side of the mound could indicate that it was constructed in two phases, or could be the result of slumping after quarrying. Excavations for Sir Richard Colt Hoare in the early 19th century located a primary cremation, possibly of two individuals (Barrow 8: 1812). An inverted Deverell-Rimbury urn covering burnt bones was found in 1916 and a subsequent visit found a secondary inhumation (Passmore 1924). The round barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 25 by Goddard (1913), who described it as bell-shaped, but listed as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957). The site was mapped at a scale of 1:10,000 from aerial photographs as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and the mapping revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at Level 1 in May 2011 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 8. This barrow, rather inclined to the bell shape, is 82, feet in diameter, and 7.5ft in elevation. It contained within a shallow oblong cist, the burned bones (as we conceived) of two persons piled together, but without arms or trinkets. In excavating the earth from this barrow, our men found a piece of square stone polished on one side, having two marks cut into it, also a whetstone.
Winterbourne Stoke G25
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G25</strong></p><p>AM :Bowl/ Bell (?) barrow with primary cremation (of 2 people?) in shallow oblong cist. A secondary cremation in a globular Deverell- Rimbury urn (LBA) was later found on the north (?) side. A secondary inhumation was also found in the south side 'about halfway up that part of the mound'. A square polished stone and a whetstone was found in the moundfill. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as earthworks; it is the easternmost of an east / west alignment of three round barrows on Winterbourne Stoke Down (see Monument Numbers 870329 and 214999). The round barrow measures circa 40m in diameter and comprises a mound, circa 2.5 metres high, which is partially surrounded by a ring ditch 0.5m deep. There is no sign of any outer bank. The barrow was used as a quarry in the early 20th century and has suffered damage from burrowing animals, making its original form difficult to distinguish. It has slumped to the north-east, giving the mound a horse-shoe shaped summit and obscuring the ditch for this quadrant. A break in slope around the western side of the mound could indicate that it was constructed in two phases, or could be the result of slumping after quarrying. Excavations for Sir Richard Colt Hoare in the early 19th century located a primary cremation, possibly of two individuals (Barrow 8: 1812). An inverted Deverell-Rimbury urn covering burnt bones was found in 1916 and a subsequent visit found a secondary inhumation (Passmore 1924). The round barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 25 by Goddard (1913), who described it as bell-shaped, but listed as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957). The site was mapped at a scale of 1:10,000 from aerial photographs as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and the mapping revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at Level 1 in May 2011 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke Down 8 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 118)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 8. This barrow, rather inclined to the bell shape, is 82, feet in diameter, and 7.5ft in elevation. It contained within a shallow oblong cist, the burned bones (as we conceived) of two persons piled together, but without arms or trinkets. In excavating the earth from this barrow, our men found a piece of square stone polished on one side, having two marks cut into it, also a whetstone.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219708'>219708</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 96</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW717'>MWI12880 - SU14SW717</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011040'>1011040 (old #10345)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180739°N 1.856446°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke Down 8118
Winterbourne Stoke G
2525219708http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219708SU 14 SW 96MWI12880SU14SW717http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW717103451011040https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101104051.180739°N 1.856446°W
33
51.18037737-1.854587957
Winterbourne Stoke G24?
Winterbourne Stoke Down 9
AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (head to N.) in (4ft deep) cist. Another primary (?) adult inhumation (head to S.) lay on the surface (?). A secondary cremation was then placed in the mound beneath an inverted food-vessel urn (enlarged, MBA) at each side of which were antlers from 2 stags. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 24. Excavations in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare found primary and secondary inhumations, plus a secondary cremation beneath an inverted Enlarged Food Vessel. The skulls of the two inhumations were later recovered by Thurnam. There is some doubt as to the correct location of Winterbourne Stoke 24. Grinsell and the Ordnance Survey site it to SU 10274236, the former recording a small, low mound; the latter stating that it had been ploughed out by 1970. Blore et al (1995) and Wiltshire SMR claim that there is no evidence for a mound at this location, and identify Winterbourne Stoke 24 with the barrow recorded as SU 14 SW 130.
RCH: No. 9, a small barrow not above sixteen inches in elevation, produced, six feet apart, the horns of two large stags, and between them a sepulchral urn inverted over a pile of burned bones. This urn is rudely made, yet elegant in its outline. On digging deeper, we discovered the skeleton of an adult lying with its head to the south ; and on pursuing our researches to the depth of four feet in the native bed of chalk, we found another skeleton with its head placed towards the north ; but each of these interments was unaccompanied by any warlike or decorative articles.
Winterbourne Stoke G24?
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G24?</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (head to N.) in (4ft deep) cist. Another primary (?) adult inhumation (head to S.) lay on the surface (?). A secondary cremation was then placed in the mound beneath an inverted food-vessel urn (enlarged, MBA) at each side of which were antlers from 2 stags. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 24. Excavations in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare found primary and secondary inhumations, plus a secondary cremation beneath an inverted Enlarged Food Vessel. The skulls of the two inhumations were later recovered by Thurnam. There is some doubt as to the correct location of Winterbourne Stoke 24. Grinsell and the Ordnance Survey site it to SU 10274236, the former recording a small, low mound; the latter stating that it had been ploughed out by 1970. Blore et al (1995) and Wiltshire SMR claim that there is no evidence for a mound at this location, and identify Winterbourne Stoke 24 with the barrow recorded as SU 14 SW 130.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke Down 9 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 119)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 9, a small barrow not above sixteen inches in elevation, produced, six feet apart, the horns of two large stags, and between them a sepulchral urn inverted over a pile of burned bones. This urn is rudely made, yet elegant in its outline. On digging deeper, we discovered the skeleton of an adult lying with its head to the south ; and on pursuing our researches to the depth of four feet in the native bed of chalk, we found another skeleton with its head placed towards the north ; but each of these interments was unaccompanied by any warlike or decorative articles. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219711'>219711</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 97</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW716'>MWI12879 - SU14SW716</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.263}'><img src='img/STHEAD.263.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.263' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180377°N 1.854587°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke Down 9119
Winterbourne Stoke G
24?24219711http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219711SU 14 SW 97MWI12879SU14SW716http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW716STHEAD.263
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.263}'><img src='img/STHEAD.263.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.263' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.263}'><img src='img/STHEAD.263.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.263' height='150'></a> </p>
51.180377°N 1.854587°W
34
51.18055508-1.852870599
Winterbourne Stoke G24?
Winterbourne Stoke Down 9
AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (head to N.) in (4ft deep) cist. Another primary (?) adult inhumation (head to S.) lay on the surface (?). A secondary cremation was then placed in the mound beneath an inverted food-vessel urn (enlarged, MBA) at each side of which were antlers from 2 stags. PS: Probable Bronze Age bowl barrow, comprising a mound 0.3 metres high and 19 metres in diameter, surrounded by the soilmark of a ditch. Excavations in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare found primary and secondary inhumations, plus a secondary cremation beneath an inverted Enlarged Food Vessel. The skulls of the two inhumations were later revovered by Thurnam. Blore et al (1995) and Wiltshire SMR identify this mound with Winterbourne Stoke 24, which the Ordnance Survey recorded as SU 14 SW 97, and located at SU 10274236.
RCH: No. 9, a small barrow not above sixteen inches in elevation, produced, six feet apart, the horns of two large stags, and between them a sepulchral urn inverted over a pile of burned bones. This urn is rudely made, yet elegant in its outline. On digging deeper, we discovered the skeleton of an adult lying with its head to the south ; and on pursuing our researches to the depth of four feet in the native bed of chalk, we found another skeleton with its head placed towards the north ; but each of these interments was unaccompanied by any warlike or decorative articles.
Winterbourne Stoke G24?
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G24?</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (head to N.) in (4ft deep) cist. Another primary (?) adult inhumation (head to S.) lay on the surface (?). A secondary cremation was then placed in the mound beneath an inverted food-vessel urn (enlarged, MBA) at each side of which were antlers from 2 stags. PS: Probable Bronze Age bowl barrow, comprising a mound 0.3 metres high and 19 metres in diameter, surrounded by the soilmark of a ditch. Excavations in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare found primary and secondary inhumations, plus a secondary cremation beneath an inverted Enlarged Food Vessel. The skulls of the two inhumations were later revovered by Thurnam. Blore et al (1995) and Wiltshire SMR identify this mound with Winterbourne Stoke 24, which the Ordnance Survey recorded as SU 14 SW 97, and located at SU 10274236.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke Down 9 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 119)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 9, a small barrow not above sixteen inches in elevation, produced, six feet apart, the horns of two large stags, and between them a sepulchral urn inverted over a pile of burned bones. This urn is rudely made, yet elegant in its outline. On digging deeper, we discovered the skeleton of an adult lying with its head to the south ; and on pursuing our researches to the depth of four feet in the native bed of chalk, we found another skeleton with its head placed towards the north ; but each of these interments was unaccompanied by any warlike or decorative articles. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219806'>219806</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 130</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW725'>MWI12888 - SU14SW725</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011043'>1011043 (old #10474)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.263}'><img src='img/STHEAD.263.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.263' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180555°N 1.852870°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke Down 9119
Winterbourne Stoke G
24?24219806http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219806SU 14 SW 130MWI12888SU14SW725http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW725104741011043https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011043STHEAD.263
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.263}'><img src='img/STHEAD.263.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.263' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.263}'><img src='img/STHEAD.263.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.263' height='150'></a> </p>
51.180555°N 1.852870°W
35
51.17920698-1.85344713
Winterbourne Stoke G23a?
Winterbourne Stoke Down 10
AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with primary cremation in oblong cist arched over with chalk. A Saxon spiral patterned glass bead may or not have been with the interment. PS: Site of a possible Bronze Age bowl barrow, described as a mound 14 metres in diameter and 0.3 metres high. It has been suggested (in Blore et al 1995 & Wiltshire SMR) that this is in fact Winterbourne Stoke 23a, which both Grinsell and the Ordnance Survey had located nearby, apparently in error. See SU 14 SW 98 for further details.
RCH: No. 10. In this small tumulus, which appears to have been partially opened before, we found an oblong cist, which was arched over with the chalk that had been thrown out of it; and in the further part of it, a few fragments of burned bones, and a large glass bead, of the same imperfect vitrification as the pully beads so often before mentioned, and resembling also in matter, the little figures that are found with the mummies in Egypt, and are to be seen in the British Museum. This very curious bead has two circular lines of opaque sky blue and white, which seem to represent a serpent intwined round a centre, which is perforated. This was certainly one of the GLAIN NEIDYR Of the Britons, derived from glain, what is pure and holy, and neid,yr, a snake. Under the word glain, Mr. Owen, in his Welsh Dictionary, has given the following article: The main glain, transparent stones, or adder-stones, were worn by the different orders of the Bards, each having its appropriate colour. There is no certainty that they were worn from superstition originally; perhaps that was the circumstance which gave rise to it. Whatever might have been the cause, the notion of their rare virtues was universal in all places where the Bardic religion was taught. It maystill be questioned whether they are the production of nature or art." Mr. Mason, the poet, thus alludes to these stones, ................ But tell me yet From the grot of charms and spells, Where our matron sister dwells, Brennus, has thy holy hand; Safely brought the Druid wand, And the potent adder-stone, Gender'd fore th' autumnal moon? When in undulating twine; The foaming snakes prolific join; When they hiss, and when they bear Their wond'rous egg aloof in air;
Winterbourne Stoke G23a?
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G23a?</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with primary cremation in oblong cist arched over with chalk. A Saxon spiral patterned glass bead may or not have been with the interment. PS: Site of a possible Bronze Age bowl barrow, described as a mound 14 metres in diameter and 0.3 metres high. It has been suggested (in Blore et al 1995 & Wiltshire SMR) that this is in fact Winterbourne Stoke 23a, which both Grinsell and the Ordnance Survey had located nearby, apparently in error. See SU 14 SW 98 for further details.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke Down 10 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 119)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 10. In this small tumulus, which appears to have been partially opened before, we found an oblong cist, which was arched over with the chalk that had been thrown out of it; and in the further part of it, a few fragments of burned bones, and a large glass bead, of the same imperfect vitrification as the pully beads so often before mentioned, and resembling also in matter, the little figures that are found with the mummies in Egypt, and are to be seen in the British Museum. This very curious bead has two circular lines of opaque sky blue and white, which seem to represent a serpent intwined round a centre, which is perforated. This was certainly one of the GLAIN NEIDYR Of the Britons, derived from glain, what is pure and holy, and neid,yr, a snake. Under the word glain, Mr. Owen, in his Welsh Dictionary, has given the following article: The main glain, transparent stones, or adder-stones, were worn by the different orders of the Bards, each having its appropriate colour. There is no certainty that they were worn from superstition originally; perhaps that was the circumstance which gave rise to it. Whatever might have been the cause, the notion of their rare virtues was universal in all places where the Bardic religion was taught. It maystill be questioned whether they are the production of nature or art." Mr. Mason, the poet, thus alludes to these stones, ................ But tell me yet From the grot of charms and spells, Where our matron sister dwells, Brennus, has thy holy hand; Safely brought the Druid wand, And the potent adder-stone, Gender'd fore th' autumnal moon? When in undulating twine; The foaming snakes prolific join; When they hiss, and when they bear Their wond'rous egg aloof in air;</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219444'>219444</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 8</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW723'>MWI12886 - SU14SW723</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011044'>1011044 (old #10475)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.79}'><img src='img/STHEAD.79.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.79' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.179206°N 1.853447°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke Down 10119
Winterbourne Stoke G
23a?23219444http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219444SU 14 SW 8MWI12886SU14SW723http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW723104751011044https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011044STHEAD.79
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.79}'><img src='img/STHEAD.79.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.79' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.79}'><img src='img/STHEAD.79.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.79' height='150'></a> </p>
51.179206°N 1.853447°W
36
51.17884568-1.852160727
Winterbourne Stoke G23a?
Winterbourne Stoke Down 10
AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with primary cremation in oblong cist arched over with chalk. A Saxon spiral patterned glass bead may or not have been with the interment. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 23a. Excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century, who found a possible primary cremation. Also found was a glass bead of probable Saxon date. There is some confusion over the location of this barrow. Blore et al (1995) and Wiltshire SMR suggest that both Grinsell and the Ordnance Survey were incorrect in locating this barrow at SU 10444220 and SU 10434219 respectively. Instead they identify the barrow with the mound recorded as SU 14 SW 8, arguing that there is no trace of a barrow at the Grinsell/OS NGR. WSH: A possible round barrow. The Ordnance Survey and Grinsell wrongly call this RCH 10. See SU14SW723. There is no aerial photographic evidence for this site.
RCH: No. 10. In this small tumulus, which appears to have been partially opened before, we found an oblong cist, which was arched over with the chalk that had been thrown out of it; and in the further part of it, a few fragments of burned bones, and a large glass bead, of the same imperfect vitrification as the pully beads so often before mentioned, and resembling also in matter, the little figures that are found with the mummies in Egypt, and are to be seen in the British Museum. This very curious bead has two circular lines of opaque sky blue and white, which seem to represent a serpent intwined round a centre, which is perforated. This was certainly one of the GLAIN NEIDYR Of the Britons, derived from glain, what is pure and holy, and neid,yr, a snake. Under the word glain, Mr. Owen, in his Welsh Dictionary, has given the following article: The main glain, transparent stones, or adder-stones, were worn by the different orders of the Bards, each having its appropriate colour. There is no certainty that they were worn from superstition originally; perhaps that was the circumstance which gave rise to it. Whatever might have been the cause, the notion of their rare virtues was universal in all places where the Bardic religion was taught. It maystill be questioned whether they are the production of nature or art." Mr. Mason, the poet, thus alludes to these stones, ................ But tell me yet From the grot of charms and spells, Where our matron sister dwells, Brennus, has thy holy hand; Safely brought the Druid wand, And the potent adder-stone, Gender'd fore th' autumnal moon? When in undulating twine; The foaming snakes prolific join; When they hiss, and when they bear Their wond'rous egg aloof in air;
Winterbourne Stoke G23a?
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G23a?</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with primary cremation in oblong cist arched over with chalk. A Saxon spiral patterned glass bead may or not have been with the interment. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 23a. Excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century, who found a possible primary cremation. Also found was a glass bead of probable Saxon date. There is some confusion over the location of this barrow. Blore et al (1995) and Wiltshire SMR suggest that both Grinsell and the Ordnance Survey were incorrect in locating this barrow at SU 10444220 and SU 10434219 respectively. Instead they identify the barrow with the mound recorded as SU 14 SW 8, arguing that there is no trace of a barrow at the Grinsell/OS NGR. WSH: A possible round barrow. The Ordnance Survey and Grinsell wrongly call this RCH 10. See SU14SW723. There is no aerial photographic evidence for this site.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke Down 10 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 119)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 10. In this small tumulus, which appears to have been partially opened before, we found an oblong cist, which was arched over with the chalk that had been thrown out of it; and in the further part of it, a few fragments of burned bones, and a large glass bead, of the same imperfect vitrification as the pully beads so often before mentioned, and resembling also in matter, the little figures that are found with the mummies in Egypt, and are to be seen in the British Museum. This very curious bead has two circular lines of opaque sky blue and white, which seem to represent a serpent intwined round a centre, which is perforated. This was certainly one of the GLAIN NEIDYR Of the Britons, derived from glain, what is pure and holy, and neid,yr, a snake. Under the word glain, Mr. Owen, in his Welsh Dictionary, has given the following article: The main glain, transparent stones, or adder-stones, were worn by the different orders of the Bards, each having its appropriate colour. There is no certainty that they were worn from superstition originally; perhaps that was the circumstance which gave rise to it. Whatever might have been the cause, the notion of their rare virtues was universal in all places where the Bardic religion was taught. It maystill be questioned whether they are the production of nature or art." Mr. Mason, the poet, thus alludes to these stones, ................ But tell me yet From the grot of charms and spells, Where our matron sister dwells, Brennus, has thy holy hand; Safely brought the Druid wand, And the potent adder-stone, Gender'd fore th' autumnal moon? When in undulating twine; The foaming snakes prolific join; When they hiss, and when they bear Their wond'rous egg aloof in air;</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219714'>219714</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 98</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW715'>MWI12878 - SU14SW715</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.79}'><img src='img/STHEAD.79.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.79' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.178845°N 1.852160°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke Down 10119
Winterbourne Stoke G
23a?23219714http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219714SU 14 SW 98MWI12878SU14SW715http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW715STHEAD.79
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.79}'><img src='img/STHEAD.79.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.79' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.79}'><img src='img/STHEAD.79.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.79' height='150'></a> </p>
51.178845°N 1.852160°W
37
51.17848957-1.855023065
Winterbourne Stoke G23
Winterbourne Stoke Down 11
PS: A Bronze Age pond barrow, listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 23. The monument is 36 metres overall diameter. The central depression is 0.6m deep and the bank, which has been ploughed out in places though still visible as a soil mark, is up to 0.3m high.
RCH: No. 11 is a pond barrow.
Winterbourne Stoke G23
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G23</strong></p><p>PS: A Bronze Age pond barrow, listed by Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 23. The monument is 36 metres overall diameter. The central depression is 0.6m deep and the bank, which has been ploughed out in places though still visible as a soil mark, is up to 0.3m high.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke Down 11 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 120)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 11 is a pond barrow.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219717'>219717</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 99</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW720'>MWI12883 - SU14SW720</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011041'>1011041 (old #10346)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.178489°N 1.855023°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke Down 11120
Winterbourne Stoke G
2323219717http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219717SU 14 SW 99MWI12883SU14SW720http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW720103461011041https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101104151.178489°N 1.855023°W
38
51.17273864-1.858331001
Winterbourne Stoke G1
Winterbourne Stoke 1
PS: A Neolithic long barrow survives as earthworks at the south-western end of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It comprises a long mound, up to 3m high, 83.7m long and 26.9m wide, which extends south-west / north-east and is flanked to either side by ditches. The mound has the appearance of two conjoined round barrows, but this is the result of extensive damage by excavation, animal burrowing and quarrying for chalk in the early 20th century. The long barrow was excavated by Thurnam in 1863, who found a primary inhumation and six secondary burials. The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke Down 1 by Hoare (1812), and as Winterbourne Stoke 1 by Goddard (1913), Cunnington (1914), and Grinsell (1957). The long barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping project. The long barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 1 is a long barrow, situated between the angle of the cross roads, which we did not open, being so well satisfied about the history of this species of tumuli.
Winterbourne Stoke G1
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G1</strong></p><p>PS: A Neolithic long barrow survives as earthworks at the south-western end of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It comprises a long mound, up to 3m high, 83.7m long and 26.9m wide, which extends south-west / north-east and is flanked to either side by ditches. The mound has the appearance of two conjoined round barrows, but this is the result of extensive damage by excavation, animal burrowing and quarrying for chalk in the early 20th century. The long barrow was excavated by Thurnam in 1863, who found a primary inhumation and six secondary burials. The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke Down 1 by Hoare (1812), and as Winterbourne Stoke 1 by Goddard (1913), Cunnington (1914), and Grinsell (1957). The long barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping project. The long barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 1 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 121)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 1 is a long barrow, situated between the angle of the cross roads, which we did not open, being so well satisfied about the history of this species of tumuli.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219696'>219696</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 92</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW125'>MWI12485 - SU14SW125</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011841'>1011841 (old #10462)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.172738°N 1.858331°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 1121
Winterbourne Stoke G
11219696http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219696SU 14 SW 92MWI12485SU14SW125http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW125104621011841https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101184151.172738°N 1.858331°W
39
51.1736382-1.858614337
Winterbourne Stoke G2
Winterbourne Stoke 2
AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation on ground surface with a small cup. PS: An early Bronze Age bell barrow survives as earthworks at the south-western end of the secondary alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 32m and comprises a circular mound which sits south-west of centre on a platform, surrounded by an incomplete ring ditch. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare who found a primary cremation and a small pottery vessel (Barrow 2: 1812). The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 2 by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957). It was mapped at a scale of 1:10,000 from aerial photographs as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 2 is a fine barrow, 93 feet in diameter, and 8 in elevation. The interment of burned bones which it contained, was piled up in a little heap upon the floor of the barrow, and amongst them was a small urn.
Winterbourne Stoke G2
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G2</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation on ground surface with a small cup. PS: An early Bronze Age bell barrow survives as earthworks at the south-western end of the secondary alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 32m and comprises a circular mound which sits south-west of centre on a platform, surrounded by an incomplete ring ditch. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare who found a primary cremation and a small pottery vessel (Barrow 2: 1812). The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 2 by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957). It was mapped at a scale of 1:10,000 from aerial photographs as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 2 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 121)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 2 is a fine barrow, 93 feet in diameter, and 8 in elevation. The interment of burned bones which it contained, was piled up in a little heap upon the floor of the barrow, and amongst them was a small urn. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=866633'>866633</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 122</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE668'>MWI7079 - SU04SE668</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011843'>1011843 (old #10464)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.173638°N 1.858614°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 2121
Winterbourne Stoke G
22866633http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=866633SU 04 SE 122MWI7079SU04SE668http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE668104641011843https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101184351.173638°N 1.858614°W
40
51.175977-1.859322467
Winterbourne Stoke G21b
Winterbourne Stoke 3
AM: Bowl barrow with secondary cremation in LBA urn decorated with arches. The primary interment was not found - possibly destroyed by the road. PS: An early Bronze Age bowl barrow partly survives as earthworks within the Winterbourne Stoke group of late Neolithic / early Bronze Age round barrows (Monument Number 215072). The round barrow comprises a D-shaped mound which has been truncated to the west by the A360 road. The mound stands 1.3m high: its summit measures circa 4.5m across and its base is 18.4m in diameter. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare, who found a secondary cremation in an urn (Barrow 3: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 21b by Goddard (1913) and Grinsell (1957), and was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 3 had been partly intersected in forming the turnpike road. Near the top of this barrow was an urn rudely formed, with an ornament on the rim in relief, like the shape of an horse-shoe, and enclosing a deposit of burned bones; we missed the primary interment.
Winterbourne Stoke G21b
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G21b</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with secondary cremation in LBA urn decorated with arches. The primary interment was not found - possibly destroyed by the road. PS: An early Bronze Age bowl barrow partly survives as earthworks within the Winterbourne Stoke group of late Neolithic / early Bronze Age round barrows (Monument Number 215072). The round barrow comprises a D-shaped mound which has been truncated to the west by the A360 road. The mound stands 1.3m high: its summit measures circa 4.5m across and its base is 18.4m in diameter. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare, who found a secondary cremation in an urn (Barrow 3: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 21b by Goddard (1913) and Grinsell (1957), and was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 3 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 121)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 3 had been partly intersected in forming the turnpike road. Near the top of this barrow was an urn rudely formed, with an ornament on the rim in relief, like the shape of an horse-shoe, and enclosing a deposit of burned bones; we missed the primary interment.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=866785'>866785</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 128</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE674'>MWI7085 - SU04SE674</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011047'>1011047 (old #10483)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175977°N 1.859322°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 3121
Winterbourne Stoke G
21b21866785http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=866785SU 04 SE 128MWI7085SU04SE674http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE674104831011047https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101104751.175977°N 1.859322°W
41
51.17588691-1.859179688
Winterbourne Stoke G21a
Winterbourne Stoke 4
AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation. PS: An early Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks within the Winterbourne Stoke group of late Neolithic / early Bronze Age round barrows (Monument Number 215072). The round barrow comprises a small mound which stands 0.4m high: its summit measures 3m and its base is 11m in diameter. It has suffered damage from vehicles in the 20th century. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare, who found a cremation (Barrow 4: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 21a by Goddard (1913) and Grinsell (1957). It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 4, as well as No. 5 and 6, produced simple interments by cremation.
Winterbourne Stoke G21a
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G21a</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation. PS: An early Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks within the Winterbourne Stoke group of late Neolithic / early Bronze Age round barrows (Monument Number 215072). The round barrow comprises a small mound which stands 0.4m high: its summit measures 3m and its base is 11m in diameter. It has suffered damage from vehicles in the 20th century. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare, who found a cremation (Barrow 4: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 21a by Goddard (1913) and Grinsell (1957). It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 4 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 121)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 4, as well as No. 5 and 6, produced simple interments by cremation. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=866776'>866776</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 127</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE675'>MWI7086 - SU04SE675</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011047'>1011047 (old #10483)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175886°N 1.859179°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 4121
Winterbourne Stoke G
21a21866776http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=866776SU 04 SE 127MWI7086SU04SE675http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE675104831011047https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101104751.175886°N 1.859179°W
42
51.17579664-1.858893871
Winterbourne Stoke G19
Winterbourne Stoke 5
AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation. PS: An early Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks within the Winterbourne Stoke group of late Neolithic / early Bronze Age round barrows (Monument Number 215072). It comprises a circular mound 0.8m high: the summit measures 3.5m in diameter and the base is 13.8m. Breaks in slope on its eastern side suggest it is of more than one phase of construction and an outer ditch, circa 3m wide, is suggested by a small scarp, facing the mound to its NNE. Use of a vehicle track has damaged its western side. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 5: 1812), who located some burnt bones. The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 19 by Goddard (1913) and Grinsell (1957). It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 4, as well as No. 5 and 6, produced simple interments by cremation.
Winterbourne Stoke G19
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G19</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation. PS: An early Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks within the Winterbourne Stoke group of late Neolithic / early Bronze Age round barrows (Monument Number 215072). It comprises a circular mound 0.8m high: the summit measures 3.5m in diameter and the base is 13.8m. Breaks in slope on its eastern side suggest it is of more than one phase of construction and an outer ditch, circa 3m wide, is suggested by a small scarp, facing the mound to its NNE. Use of a vehicle track has damaged its western side. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 5: 1812), who located some burnt bones. The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 19 by Goddard (1913) and Grinsell (1957). It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 5 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 121)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 4, as well as No. 5 and 6, produced simple interments by cremation. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=866654'>866654</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 124</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE671'>MWI7082 - SU04SE671</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011047'>1011047 (old #10483)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175796°N 1.858893°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 5121
Winterbourne Stoke G
1919866654http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=866654SU 04 SE 124MWI7082SU04SE671http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE671104831011047https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101104751.175796°N 1.858893°W
43
51.1756168-1.858894405
Winterbourne Stoke G21
Winterbourne Stoke 6
AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation. PS: An early Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks within the Winterbourne Stoke group of late Neolithic / early Bronze Age round barrows (Monument Number 215072). It has an overall diameter of 26.5m and comprises a circular mound and a surrounding ring ditch. The mound stands 1.3m high: its summit measures 4m and the base is 17m in diameter. The ditch measures between 0.1m to 0.3m deep and circa 4.5m wide. The presence of an outer bank is suggested by a shallow scarp facing away from the mound to its south-west, although this could be a later vehicle track. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found a primary cremation (Barrow 6: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 21 by Goddard (1913) and Grinsell (1957). It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and this mapping revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 4, as well as No. 5 and 6, produced simple interments by cremation.
Winterbourne Stoke G21
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G21</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation. PS: An early Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks within the Winterbourne Stoke group of late Neolithic / early Bronze Age round barrows (Monument Number 215072). It has an overall diameter of 26.5m and comprises a circular mound and a surrounding ring ditch. The mound stands 1.3m high: its summit measures 4m and the base is 17m in diameter. The ditch measures between 0.1m to 0.3m deep and circa 4.5m wide. The presence of an outer bank is suggested by a shallow scarp facing away from the mound to its south-west, although this could be a later vehicle track. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found a primary cremation (Barrow 6: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 21 by Goddard (1913) and Grinsell (1957). It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and this mapping revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 6 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 121)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 4, as well as No. 5 and 6, produced simple interments by cremation. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=866676'>866676</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 126</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE673'>MWI7084 - SU04SE673</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011047'>1011047 (old #10483)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175616°N 1.858894°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 6121
Winterbourne Stoke G
2121866676http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=866676SU 04 SE 126MWI7084SU04SE673http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE673104831011047https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101104751.175616°N 1.858894°W
44
51.17570621-1.858464989
Winterbourne Stoke G20
Winterbourne Stoke 7
AM: Bowl barrow with primary adult inhumation (N./S.) in chalk-cut cist with `drinking cup' at feet. A secondary inhumation of a child with basin-like vessel was placed 4 ft. above floor of barrow. PS: An early Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks within the Winterbourne Stoke group of late Neolithic / early Bronze Age round barrows (Monument Number 215072). It comprises a D-shaped mound, with a smaller oval mound to the east suggesting the full extent of the original round mound, east of which is a fragment of ditch. The earthworks suggest the top of the mound had a diameter of 12m, with the base 19m. The mound is 0.7m high and the ditch is circa 5m wide. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 7: 1812), who found a primary inhumation with a "drinking cup" (Beaker) at its feet and a secondary inhumation of a child with a "basin-like vessel". The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 20 by Goddard (1913) and Grinsell (1957). The site was mapped at a scale of 1:10,000 from aerial photographs as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 7. At the depth of four feet from the floor of this barrow, was found the skeleton of a child, with a bason-like urn ; and in a cist cut in the native chalk was the primary deposit of an adult skeleton, lying from north to south, with a drinking cup at his feet.
Winterbourne Stoke G20
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G20</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary adult inhumation (N./S.) in chalk-cut cist with `drinking cup' at feet. A secondary inhumation of a child with basin-like vessel was placed 4 ft. above floor of barrow. PS: An early Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks within the Winterbourne Stoke group of late Neolithic / early Bronze Age round barrows (Monument Number 215072). It comprises a D-shaped mound, with a smaller oval mound to the east suggesting the full extent of the original round mound, east of which is a fragment of ditch. The earthworks suggest the top of the mound had a diameter of 12m, with the base 19m. The mound is 0.7m high and the ditch is circa 5m wide. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 7: 1812), who found a primary inhumation with a "drinking cup" (Beaker) at its feet and a secondary inhumation of a child with a "basin-like vessel". The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 20 by Goddard (1913) and Grinsell (1957). The site was mapped at a scale of 1:10,000 from aerial photographs as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project, and subsequently revised at 1:2500 scale for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 7 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 121)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 7. At the depth of four feet from the floor of this barrow, was found the skeleton of a child, with a bason-like urn ; and in a cist cut in the native chalk was the primary deposit of an adult skeleton, lying from north to south, with a drinking cup at his feet. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=832689'>832689</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 125</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE670'>MWI7081 - SU04SE670</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011047'>1011047 (old #10483)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175706°N 1.858464°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 7121
Winterbourne Stoke G
2020832689http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=832689SU 04 SE 125MWI7081SU04SE670http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE670104831011047https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101104751.175706°N 1.858464°W
45
51.17606641-1.858893047
Winterbourne Stoke G17
Winterbourne Stoke 8
AM: Saucer barrow with primary cremation in oval cist (4.5x2ft) with no ashes and a 'richly ornamented' drinking cup. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as earthworks within the Winterbourne Stoke group of late Neolithic / early Bronze Age round barrows (Monument Number 215072). The round barrow measures circa 32m in overall diameter and comprises a circular mound surrounded by a ring ditch, with an incomplete outer bank. The mound stands 1.1m high: its summit measures 4m and its base is 17m in diameter. A berm around the eastern half of the mound, 2m wide, separates it from the ditch; this suggests an original bell form, although the western half suggests a bowl form. The ditch measures circa 6m wide and just 0.05m deep. The outer bank survives to a maximum height of circa 0.05m and is circa 4m wide. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 8: 1812) who found a primary cremation, near to which was a "drinking cup" (Beaker). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 17, a disc barrow, by Goddard (1913) and as a saucer barrow by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 8. This is one of that species we have styled Druid barrows of the second class. In the centre it had an oval cist, four and a half feet long, and two feet wide, with an even floor of chalk: and in the middle of it was a heap of burned bones, but no ashes. At the distance of a foot was a fine drinking cup, richly ornamented, but unfortunately broken on removing.
Winterbourne Stoke G17
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G17</strong></p><p>AM: Saucer barrow with primary cremation in oval cist (4.5x2ft) with no ashes and a 'richly ornamented' drinking cup. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as earthworks within the Winterbourne Stoke group of late Neolithic / early Bronze Age round barrows (Monument Number 215072). The round barrow measures circa 32m in overall diameter and comprises a circular mound surrounded by a ring ditch, with an incomplete outer bank. The mound stands 1.1m high: its summit measures 4m and its base is 17m in diameter. A berm around the eastern half of the mound, 2m wide, separates it from the ditch; this suggests an original bell form, although the western half suggests a bowl form. The ditch measures circa 6m wide and just 0.05m deep. The outer bank survives to a maximum height of circa 0.05m and is circa 4m wide. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 8: 1812) who found a primary cremation, near to which was a "drinking cup" (Beaker). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 17, a disc barrow, by Goddard (1913) and as a saucer barrow by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 8 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 121)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 8. This is one of that species we have styled Druid barrows of the second class. In the centre it had an oval cist, four and a half feet long, and two feet wide, with an even floor of chalk: and in the middle of it was a heap of burned bones, but no ashes. At the distance of a foot was a fine drinking cup, richly ornamented, but unfortunately broken on removing. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=866791'>866791</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 129</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE676'>MWI7087 - SU04SE676</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011047'>1011047 (old #10483)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.176066°N 1.858893°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 8121
Winterbourne Stoke G
1717866791http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=866791SU 04 SE 129MWI7087SU04SE676http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE676104831011047https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101104751.176066°N 1.858893°W
46
51.17615581-1.858463612
Winterbourne Stoke G18
Winterbourne Stoke 9
AM: Saucer barrow with primary cremation. PS: A Bronze Age saucer barrow survives as earthworks within the Winterbourne Stoke group of late Neolithic / early Bronze Age round barrows (Monument Number 215072). The round barrow measures 23.5m in overall diameter and comprises a low mound, the southern half of which is flanked by a shallow ditch. The mound stands just 0.3m above the surrounding ground surface. Its summit measures circa 4m NNW / SSE by 3m wide and its base is circa 16.5m in diameter. The ditch is circa 7m wide and 0.2m deep. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found a primary cremation (Barrow 9: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 18, a disc barrow, by Goddard (1913) and as a saucer barrow by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 9 contained a simple interment of burned bones.
Winterbourne Stoke G18
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G18</strong></p><p>AM: Saucer barrow with primary cremation. PS: A Bronze Age saucer barrow survives as earthworks within the Winterbourne Stoke group of late Neolithic / early Bronze Age round barrows (Monument Number 215072). The round barrow measures 23.5m in overall diameter and comprises a low mound, the southern half of which is flanked by a shallow ditch. The mound stands just 0.3m above the surrounding ground surface. Its summit measures circa 4m NNW / SSE by 3m wide and its base is circa 16.5m in diameter. The ditch is circa 7m wide and 0.2m deep. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found a primary cremation (Barrow 9: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 18, a disc barrow, by Goddard (1913) and as a saucer barrow by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 9 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 121)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 9 contained a simple interment of burned bones.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=866805'>866805</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 04 SE 130</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE672'>MWI7083 - SU04SE672</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011047'>1011047 (old #10483)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.176155°N 1.858463°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 9121
Winterbourne Stoke G
1818866805http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=866805SU 04 SE 130MWI7083SU04SE672http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU04SE672104831011047https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101104751.176155°N 1.858463°W
47
51.17453603-1.857467227
Winterbourne Stoke G16
Winterbourne Stoke 10
AM: Bowl barrow with no result. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as earthworks within the secondary alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 20m and comprises a roughly circular mound, 0.3m high: its summit is south-east of centre and measures circa 7m in diameter. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 10: 1812), but it proved "unproductive". It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 16 by Goddard (1913) and by as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957), although its low height could also suggest an original saucer form. The barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: It appears doubtful if No, 10 was sepulchral, as on making a large section in it, we could perceive no signs of interment.
Winterbourne Stoke G16
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G16</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with no result. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as earthworks within the secondary alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 20m and comprises a roughly circular mound, 0.3m high: its summit is south-east of centre and measures circa 7m in diameter. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 10: 1812), but it proved "unproductive". It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 16 by Goddard (1913) and by as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957), although its low height could also suggest an original saucer form. The barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 10 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 121)</strong></p><p>RCH: It appears doubtful if No, 10 was sepulchral, as on making a large section in it, we could perceive no signs of interment. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870462'>870462</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 337</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW833'>MWI12996 - SU14SW833</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.174536°N 1.857467°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 10121
Winterbourne Stoke G
1616870462http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870462SU 14 SW 337MWI12996SU14SW833http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW833103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101236851.174536°N 1.857467°W
48
51.17444662-1.857896649
Winterbourne Stoke G16a
Winterbourne Stoke 11
AM: Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation with a semicircular perforated bone pin and incense cup. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as earthworks within the secondary alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall maximum diameter of 20m and comprises a circular mound, 0.3m high: its summit is north-east of centre and measures circa 7.5m in diameter. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 11: 1812), who found a primary cremation with an incense cup (in Devizes Museum) and a curved perforated bone pin. The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 16a by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957). The barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. There appears to have been some confusion over its location: the Ordnance Survey card puts it at SU 1034 4170, circa 200m east of the cemetery, but the Devizes Museum catalogue and Wiltshire HER give SU 1003 4170
RCH: In No. 11 we found a deposit of burned bones, a small cup of thick British pottery, richly ornamented, but unfortunately broken, and a bone pin of a different form from any we have yet found, being bent in a semicircular form, and perforated at the head.
Winterbourne Stoke G16a
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G16a</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation with a semicircular perforated bone pin and incense cup. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as earthworks within the secondary alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall maximum diameter of 20m and comprises a circular mound, 0.3m high: its summit is north-east of centre and measures circa 7.5m in diameter. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 11: 1812), who found a primary cremation with an incense cup (in Devizes Museum) and a curved perforated bone pin. The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 16a by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957). The barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. There appears to have been some confusion over its location: the Ordnance Survey card puts it at SU 1034 4170, circa 200m east of the cemetery, but the Devizes Museum catalogue and Wiltshire HER give SU 1003 4170</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 11 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 121)</strong></p><p>RCH: In No. 11 we found a deposit of burned bones, a small cup of thick British pottery, richly ornamented, but unfortunately broken, and a bone pin of a different form from any we have yet found, being bent in a semicircular form, and perforated at the head.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870465'>870465</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 338</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW834'>MWI12997 - SU14SW834</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.79a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.79a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.79a' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.174446°N 1.857896°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 11121
Winterbourne Stoke G
16a16870465http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870465SU 14 SW 338MWI12997SU14SW834http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW834103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368STHEAD.79a
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.79a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.79a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.79a' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.79a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.79a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.79a' height='150'></a> </p>
51.174446°N 1.857896°W
49
51.17381631-1.857183352
Winterbourne Stoke G3
Winterbourne Stoke 12
AM: Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as much damaged earthworks at the south-western end of the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It comprises an elongated and mutilated low mound, orientated south-west / north-east, which stands circa 0.3m high: its summit measures 22m long by 18.5m wide and its base is circa 28m long by 24m wide. The low broad mound suggests its original form may have been a saucer or platform barrow. The barrow?s south-eastern side has been artificially straightened by fencing and the summit is littered with small mounds between two facing scarps that extend along the main axis, suggesting a combination of vehicle, animal and excavation damage. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found a primary cremation (Barrow 12:1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 3 by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957), who noted it was truncated. The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 12, a very low barrow, produced only a simple interment by cremation.
Winterbourne Stoke G3
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G3</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as much damaged earthworks at the south-western end of the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It comprises an elongated and mutilated low mound, orientated south-west / north-east, which stands circa 0.3m high: its summit measures 22m long by 18.5m wide and its base is circa 28m long by 24m wide. The low broad mound suggests its original form may have been a saucer or platform barrow. The barrow?s south-eastern side has been artificially straightened by fencing and the summit is littered with small mounds between two facing scarps that extend along the main axis, suggesting a combination of vehicle, animal and excavation damage. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found a primary cremation (Barrow 12:1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 3 by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957), who noted it was truncated. The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 12 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 121)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 12, a very low barrow, produced only a simple interment by cremation.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870372'>870372</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 322</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW818'>MWI12981 - SU14SW818</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.173816°N 1.857183°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 12121
Winterbourne Stoke G
33870372http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870372SU 14 SW 322MWI12981SU14SW818http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW818103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101236851.173816°N 1.857183°W
50
51.17381509-1.856182042Wilsford G1a
Winterbourne Stoke 13
AM: Saucer barrow excavated with no record. PS: Site of a probable saucer barrow, listed by Grinsell as Wilsford 1a and located in Winterbourne Stoke Clump. It was drawn on Colt Hoare's plan of the Winterbourne Stoke Group (SU 14 SW 35) as a saucer barrow, and excavated by him in the early 19th century. He found it "unproductive". Grinsell was unable to locate it and the grid reference cited is therefore an estimate based on Colt Hoare's map. This location falls within the area mapped from aerial photographs by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The site is covered by trees, and no further information about this feature could be obtained from aerial photographic evidence.
RCH: No. 13 nothing was found.
Wilsford G1a
<p><strong>Wilsford G1a</strong></p><p>AM: Saucer barrow excavated with no record. PS: Site of a probable saucer barrow, listed by Grinsell as Wilsford 1a and located in Winterbourne Stoke Clump. It was drawn on Colt Hoare's plan of the Winterbourne Stoke Group (SU 14 SW 35) as a saucer barrow, and excavated by him in the early 19th century. He found it "unproductive". Grinsell was unable to locate it and the grid reference cited is therefore an estimate based on Colt Hoare's map. This location falls within the area mapped from aerial photographs by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The site is covered by trees, and no further information about this feature could be obtained from aerial photographic evidence.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 13 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 121)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 13 nothing was found.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=1119359'>1119359</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 541</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW815'>MWI12978 - SU14SW815</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.173815°N 1.856182°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 13121Wilsford G1a11119359http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=1119359SU 14 SW 541MWI12978SU14SW815http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW815103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101236851.173815°N 1.856182°W
51
51.17408573-1.856896425
Winterbourne Stoke G3a
Winterbourne Stoke 14
AM: Pond barrow overlapping G4 Bell Barrow. PS: A Bronze Age pond barrow survives as earthworks within the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 20.5m and comprises a slight bank which almost completely encloses a circular hollow, except to the south-west. The bank is only 0.1m high and a maximum of 6m wide. The hollow reaches a depth of 0.7m below the external ground surface: it is circa 8.5m in diameter, with a flat bottom, 4m in diameter, which contains a smaller circular hollow, north of centre. The round barrow clearly overlies the edge of the ditch around Winterbourne Stoke 4 (Monument Number 870384), with a corresponding effect on the berm. The pond barrow is therefore a later addition. There is no record of any excavation. It was Sir Richard Colt Hoare's Winterbourne Stoke Down barrow 14 (1812) and was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 3a by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 14 is a pond barrow.
Winterbourne Stoke G3a
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G3a</strong></p><p>AM: Pond barrow overlapping G4 Bell Barrow. PS: A Bronze Age pond barrow survives as earthworks within the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 20.5m and comprises a slight bank which almost completely encloses a circular hollow, except to the south-west. The bank is only 0.1m high and a maximum of 6m wide. The hollow reaches a depth of 0.7m below the external ground surface: it is circa 8.5m in diameter, with a flat bottom, 4m in diameter, which contains a smaller circular hollow, north of centre. The round barrow clearly overlies the edge of the ditch around Winterbourne Stoke 4 (Monument Number 870384), with a corresponding effect on the berm. The pond barrow is therefore a later addition. There is no record of any excavation. It was Sir Richard Colt Hoare's Winterbourne Stoke Down barrow 14 (1812) and was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 3a by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 14 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 121)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 14 is a pond barrow.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870374'>870374</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 323</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW819'>MWI12982 - SU14SW819</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.174085°N 1.856896°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 14121
Winterbourne Stoke G
3a3870374http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870374SU 14 SW 323MWI12982SU14SW819http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW819103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101236851.174085°N 1.856896°W
52
51.17426522-1.856609787
Winterbourne Stoke G4
Winterbourne Stoke 15
AM: Bell barrow (identical to G5 except ...) with primary cremation in wooden coffin (3.5x2ft) on ground surface with a bone pin, bone tweezers, a grooved dagger and a flat dagger with a bone rivetted pommel, all separate from the bones (with ditches touching). The wooden box may have had bronze fittings and was covered with blue clay. Five or more secondary (intrusive) inhumations were found a short depth from the surface. PS: A large Bronze Age bell barrow survives as earthworks within the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 55.5m and comprises a large circular mound, 3.7m high, of at least two phases, which sits on a circular platform defined by an irregular ring ditch. The ditch is overlain to the south-west by Winterbourne Stoke 3a (Monument Number 870374) and abuts that around Winterbourne Stoke 5 (Monument Number 870392) to the north-east. A hollow in the summit is probably from early 19th century excavations for Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found a primary cremation in a clay-covered elm and/or oak box (Barrow 15: 1812). The box also contained a bronze dagger, a bronze knife-dagger, bone tweezers, a bone pin and 2 fragments of sheet bronze. Five intrusive skeletons, though to be Anglo-Saxon, were also found in the mound. The ditch and berm are overlaid by linear banks probably representing fence lines. The round barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 4 by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 15. On clearing the earth from our section in this beautiful bell-shaped tumulus, and after four days labour, we came to an interment differing from any we had yet met with ; for instead of finding the burned bones of the deceased, enclosed within the native chalk, or in a sepulchral urn, we perceived they had been deposited in a box or coffin of wood, about three feet and a half long, by two feet wide, and placed upon the native turf ; the whole was then covered with a coat of blueish clay, and the mound constructed. On removing the clay, and the mouldering fragments of the wood," we first discovered two small pieces of ivory, with rivets of brass through each, which I think appertained to the tips of a bow ; and afterwards a beautiful spear head of brass, the most perfect and the largest we have as yet found ; + close to this was another lance head, which was unfortunately broken; it lay above a foot from the bones, near which was a long pin of ivory, not perforated, but neatly polished and pointed at the thinnest end; and another instrument of the same material, resembling the tweezers engraved in TUMULI PLATE III. The human bones had been piled up in a heap, and intermixed with them were some rivets, and small strips of brass, which probably belonged originally to the box. In making the section of this barrow, the workmen found the remains of five or more skeletons, at a short depth beneath the surface of the sepulchral mound. This, and the preceding barrow, both for superiority of size, and elegance of form, may be justly considered as the two finest tumuli in this group: they stand so contiguous to each other, that their circumvallations somewhat interfere...
Winterbourne Stoke G4
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G4</strong></p><p>AM: Bell barrow (identical to G5 except ...) with primary cremation in wooden coffin (3.5x2ft) on ground surface with a bone pin, bone tweezers, a grooved dagger and a flat dagger with a bone rivetted pommel, all separate from the bones (with ditches touching). The wooden box may have had bronze fittings and was covered with blue clay. Five or more secondary (intrusive) inhumations were found a short depth from the surface. PS: A large Bronze Age bell barrow survives as earthworks within the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 55.5m and comprises a large circular mound, 3.7m high, of at least two phases, which sits on a circular platform defined by an irregular ring ditch. The ditch is overlain to the south-west by Winterbourne Stoke 3a (Monument Number 870374) and abuts that around Winterbourne Stoke 5 (Monument Number 870392) to the north-east. A hollow in the summit is probably from early 19th century excavations for Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found a primary cremation in a clay-covered elm and/or oak box (Barrow 15: 1812). The box also contained a bronze dagger, a bronze knife-dagger, bone tweezers, a bone pin and 2 fragments of sheet bronze. Five intrusive skeletons, though to be Anglo-Saxon, were also found in the mound. The ditch and berm are overlaid by linear banks probably representing fence lines. The round barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 4 by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 15 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 122)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 15. On clearing the earth from our section in this beautiful bell-shaped tumulus, and after four days labour, we came to an interment differing from any we had yet met with ; for instead of finding the burned bones of the deceased, enclosed within the native chalk, or in a sepulchral urn, we perceived they had been deposited in a box or coffin of wood, about three feet and a half long, by two feet wide, and placed upon the native turf ; the whole was then covered with a coat of blueish clay, and the mound constructed. On removing the clay, and the mouldering fragments of the wood," we first discovered two small pieces of ivory, with rivets of brass through each, which I think appertained to the tips of a bow ; and afterwards a beautiful spear head of brass, the most perfect and the largest we have as yet found ; + close to this was another lance head, which was unfortunately broken; it lay above a foot from the bones, near which was a long pin of ivory, not perforated, but neatly polished and pointed at the thinnest end; and another instrument of the same material, resembling the tweezers engraved in TUMULI PLATE III. The human bones had been piled up in a heap, and intermixed with them were some rivets, and small strips of brass, which probably belonged originally to the box. In making the section of this barrow, the workmen found the remains of five or more skeletons, at a short depth beneath the surface of the sepulchral mound. This, and the preceding barrow, both for superiority of size, and elegance of form, may be justly considered as the two finest tumuli in this group: they stand so contiguous to each other, that their circumvallations somewhat interfere... </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870384'>870384</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 324</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW820'>MWI12983 - SU14SW820</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.21}'><img src='img/STHEAD.21.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.21' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.21a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.21a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.21a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.22}'><img src='img/STHEAD.22.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.22' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.78a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.78a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.78a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.80}'><img src='img/STHEAD.80.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.80' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.174265°N 1.856609°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 15122
Winterbourne Stoke G
44870384http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870384SU 14 SW 324MWI12983SU14SW820http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW820103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368STHEAD.21STHEAD.21aSTHEAD.22STHEAD.78aSTHEAD.80
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.21}'><img src='img/STHEAD.21.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.21' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.21a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.21a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.21a' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.22}'><img src='img/STHEAD.22.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.22' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.78a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.78a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.78a' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.80}'><img src='img/STHEAD.80.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.80' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.21}'><img src='img/STHEAD.21.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.21' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.21a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.21a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.21a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.22}'><img src='img/STHEAD.22.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.22' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.78a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.78a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.78a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.80}'><img src='img/STHEAD.80.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.80' height='150'></a> </p>
51.174265°N 1.856609°W
53
51.1746242-1.856036476
Winterbourne Stoke G5
King Barrow
Winterbourne Stoke 16
AM: Bell barrow (identical to G4 except...) with primary inhumation (head to NE.) in a wooden oak and elm coffin (N. to S.) in oblong cist with a bronze awl and bone handle on its chest together with a grooved dagger and gilt decorated sheath, another grooved dagger lay by its thigh and a five-handled jar of red ware (Breton type) was left of its head. Above the coffin was a bundle of fossil wood. A secondary deposit/cremation of an MBA collared urn was found in a rabbit scrape. PS: A large Bronze Age bell barrow survives as earthworks within the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 51m and comprises a mound, 3.1m high and of at least two phases, which sits on a roughly circular platform defined by a ring ditch that appears slightly cut by that around Winterbourne Stoke 4 to the south-west (Monument Number 870384). The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who gave it the title "king barrow" due to the rich finds (Barrow 16: 1812). His men found a primary inhumation within an elm tree-trunk coffin, accompanied by 2 bronze daggers, a bronze awl with a bone handle, and sherds of a 5-handled Breton style pottery vessel. The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 5 by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 16. This, and the preceding barrow, both for superiority of size, and elegance of form, may be justly considered as the two finest tumuli in this group: they stand so contiguous to each other, that their circumvallations somewhat interfere. The first mentioned, is 89 feet in base diameter, and 14 feet in elevation: the one, now the object of our inquiry, measures in its base diameter 112 feet, and about 15 feet in elevation. On making our section, we were surprised to meet with a large and heavy piece of fossil wood, of a calcareous nature, resembling a bunch of twigs. I cannot learn that there is any substance of the kind in this neighbourhood, and I am sure the earth of which the barrow is composed, could never have generated it. At the depth of nearly 15 feet, and immediately under the spot where the fossil wood was found, we came to a shallow oblong cist, in which a skeleton had been deposited within the rude trunk of an elm-tree, with its head lying to the north-east. On the left side of the head, a beautiful urn had been deposited, but crushed to pieces by the heavy pressure of earth upon it. We were however fortunate in collecting sufficient fragments to enable Mr. Crocker to make out an exact drawing of its form and outline. (TUMULI PLATE XV.) This sepulchral urn is different both in shape and colour to any we have ever found in the British sepulchres. It resembles in tint the fine red Samian pottery, and appears to have been turned in a lathe ; the form of the neck is neat, and the five handles are like those we see on the Roman vessels ; yet with all these appearances, we have one criterion to judge by, which, I think, will prove it to be of British manufacture, viz. that it is not more than half baked, and the fractures discover a black and sooty appearance within, not having been burned in a kiln, like the pottery of the Romans. Near the breast of the skeleton, lay the brass dagger No. 2. which had been guarded by a case of wood, part of which appeared to have been highly ornamented, as we found a bit of wood near it that had indentations which certainly had been gilt. The handle seems to have been made of boxwood, and rounded somewhat like that of a large knife. Near it lay a brass pin with an ivory handle, No. 3. On the same side, but near the thigh, was a fine spear-head of brass, No. 4, very perfect, and most elegantly moulded, (for I have no doubt of these articles having been cast in moulds), and another article of ivory. The rich contents of this tumulus has induced us to crown it with royal honours, and to give it the title of KING BARROW. I have often been asked, if the largest barrows were not found, on opening, to be the most productive in their contents? The question is very natural, and I have rather wished to second that supposition ; but as yet I have not a sufficient basis for that hypothesis. In the present instance, indeed, there is some ground for the above remark. This box was placed in a direction from north to south. The wood of which it was composed appeared to be elm, yet we found also some pieces of oak. The knots and bark still adhering to the tree, we were able to ascertain with certainty its distinct species: some naturalists, however, suppose, that the elm was introduced from the Continent into England, at a comparatively modern period.
Winterbourne Stoke G5 (King Barrow)
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G5 (King Barrow)</strong></p><p>AM: Bell barrow (identical to G4 except...) with primary inhumation (head to NE.) in a wooden oak and elm coffin (N. to S.) in oblong cist with a bronze awl and bone handle on its chest together with a grooved dagger and gilt decorated sheath, another grooved dagger lay by its thigh and a five-handled jar of red ware (Breton type) was left of its head. Above the coffin was a bundle of fossil wood. A secondary deposit/cremation of an MBA collared urn was found in a rabbit scrape. PS: A large Bronze Age bell barrow survives as earthworks within the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 51m and comprises a mound, 3.1m high and of at least two phases, which sits on a roughly circular platform defined by a ring ditch that appears slightly cut by that around Winterbourne Stoke 4 to the south-west (Monument Number 870384). The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who gave it the title "king barrow" due to the rich finds (Barrow 16: 1812). His men found a primary inhumation within an elm tree-trunk coffin, accompanied by 2 bronze daggers, a bronze awl with a bone handle, and sherds of a 5-handled Breton style pottery vessel. The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 5 by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 16 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 122)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 16. This, and the preceding barrow, both for superiority of size, and elegance of form, may be justly considered as the two finest tumuli in this group: they stand so contiguous to each other, that their circumvallations somewhat interfere. The first mentioned, is 89 feet in base diameter, and 14 feet in elevation: the one, now the object of our inquiry, measures in its base diameter 112 feet, and about 15 feet in elevation. On making our section, we were surprised to meet with a large and heavy piece of fossil wood, of a calcareous nature, resembling a bunch of twigs. I cannot learn that there is any substance of the kind in this neighbourhood, and I am sure the earth of which the barrow is composed, could never have generated it. At the depth of nearly 15 feet, and immediately under the spot where the fossil wood was found, we came to a shallow oblong cist, in which a skeleton had been deposited within the rude trunk of an elm-tree, with its head lying to the north-east. On the left side of the head, a beautiful urn had been deposited, but crushed to pieces by the heavy pressure of earth upon it. We were however fortunate in collecting sufficient fragments to enable Mr. Crocker to make out an exact drawing of its form and outline. (TUMULI PLATE XV.) This sepulchral urn is different both in shape and colour to any we have ever found in the British sepulchres. It resembles in tint the fine red Samian pottery, and appears to have been turned in a lathe ; the form of the neck is neat, and the five handles are like those we see on the Roman vessels ; yet with all these appearances, we have one criterion to judge by, which, I think, will prove it to be of British manufacture, viz. that it is not more than half baked, and the fractures discover a black and sooty appearance within, not having been burned in a kiln, like the pottery of the Romans. Near the breast of the skeleton, lay the brass dagger No. 2. which had been guarded by a case of wood, part of which appeared to have been highly ornamented, as we found a bit of wood near it that had indentations which certainly had been gilt. The handle seems to have been made of boxwood, and rounded somewhat like that of a large knife. Near it lay a brass pin with an ivory handle, No. 3. On the same side, but near the thigh, was a fine spear-head of brass, No. 4, very perfect, and most elegantly moulded, (for I have no doubt of these articles having been cast in moulds), and another article of ivory. The rich contents of this tumulus has induced us to crown it with royal honours, and to give it the title of KING BARROW. I have often been asked, if the largest barrows were not found, on opening, to be the most productive in their contents? The question is very natural, and I have rather wished to second that supposition ; but as yet I have not a sufficient basis for that hypothesis. In the present instance, indeed, there is some ground for the above remark. This box was placed in a direction from north to south. The wood of which it was composed appeared to be elm, yet we found also some pieces of oak. The knots and bark still adhering to the tree, we were able to ascertain with certainty its distinct species: some naturalists, however, suppose, that the elm was introduced from the Continent into England, at a comparatively modern period. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870392'>870392</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 325</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW821'>MWI12984 - SU14SW821</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.23}'><img src='img/STHEAD.23.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.23' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.24}'><img src='img/STHEAD.24.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.24' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.25}'><img src='img/STHEAD.25.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.25' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.73}'><img src='img/STHEAD.73.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.73' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.78}'><img src='img/STHEAD.78.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.78' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.174624°N 1.856036°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 16122
Winterbourne Stoke G
55870392http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870392SU 14 SW 325MWI12984SU14SW821http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW821103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368STHEAD.23STHEAD.24STHEAD.25STHEAD.73STHEAD.78
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.23}'><img src='img/STHEAD.23.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.23' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.24}'><img src='img/STHEAD.24.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.24' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.25}'><img src='img/STHEAD.25.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.25' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.73}'><img src='img/STHEAD.73.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.73' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.78}'><img src='img/STHEAD.78.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.78' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.23}'><img src='img/STHEAD.23.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.23' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.24}'><img src='img/STHEAD.24.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.24' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.25}'><img src='img/STHEAD.25.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.25' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.73}'><img src='img/STHEAD.73.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.73' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.78}'><img src='img/STHEAD.78.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.78' height='150'></a> </p>
51.174624°N 1.856036°W
54
51.1748051-1.856894212
Winterbourne Stoke G15
Winterbourne Stoke 17
AM: Disc barrow with primary cremation. PS: A Bronze Age disc barrow survives as earthworks near the north-eastern end of the secondary alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 56.5m and comprises a small central mound which sits on a circular platform that is defined by a ring ditch, with fragments of an outer bank. A crescent ditch to the south-east of the mound could suggest an earlier phase. The barrow appears to be overlain by the edge of Winterbourne Stoke 14 to the north (Monument Number 870450), although here the earthworks are much denuded. The round barrow was excavated by Sir Richard Colt Hoare in the early 19th century, who located a primary cremation (Barrow 17: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 15 by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 17. Adjoining the two last bowl-shaped barrows, are two of the Druid kind. The one produced a simple interment of burned bones.
Winterbourne Stoke G15
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G15</strong></p><p>AM: Disc barrow with primary cremation. PS: A Bronze Age disc barrow survives as earthworks near the north-eastern end of the secondary alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 56.5m and comprises a small central mound which sits on a circular platform that is defined by a ring ditch, with fragments of an outer bank. A crescent ditch to the south-east of the mound could suggest an earlier phase. The barrow appears to be overlain by the edge of Winterbourne Stoke 14 to the north (Monument Number 870450), although here the earthworks are much denuded. The round barrow was excavated by Sir Richard Colt Hoare in the early 19th century, who located a primary cremation (Barrow 17: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 15 by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 17 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 122)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 17. Adjoining the two last bowl-shaped barrows, are two of the Druid kind. The one produced a simple interment of burned bones. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870457'>870457</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 336</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW832'>MWI12995 - SU14SW832</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.174805°N 1.856894°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 17122
Winterbourne Stoke G
1515870457http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870457SU 14 SW 336MWI12995SU14SW832http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW832103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101236851.174805°N 1.856894°W
55
51.17525435-1.856606719
Winterbourne Stoke G14
Winterbourne Stoke 18
AM: Disc barrow with 3 tumps: a central tump with primary cremation with a small cup and 2 or 3 amber beads; one tump with a primary cremation and 2 or 3 beads; and one tump with just a primary cremation. PS: A Bronze Age disc barrow survives as earthworks near the north-eastern end of the secondary alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 56.6m and comprises three small mounds which sit on a circular platform that is defined by a ring ditch surrounded by an outer bank. The bank overlies Winterbourne Stoke 13 to the east (Monument Number 870447) and appears to overlie the edge of Winterbourne Stoke 15 (Monument Number 870457) to the south-west, although here the earthworks are much denuded. All three mounds were excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 18:1812). The central mound contained a cremation with a miniature pottery vessel and amber beads (in Devizes Museum). The other two mounds contained cremations. The round barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 14 by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 18, contains within its area three small tumuli, in each of which, at the depth of 18 inches, we found interments of burned bones. In the largest, which is in the centre, was a small urn, and two or three large beads of amber, in the form of half a circle and half an oval. In the second we also found two or three beads, and in the third, only burned bones.
Winterbourne Stoke G14
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G14</strong></p><p>AM: Disc barrow with 3 tumps: a central tump with primary cremation with a small cup and 2 or 3 amber beads; one tump with a primary cremation and 2 or 3 beads; and one tump with just a primary cremation. PS: A Bronze Age disc barrow survives as earthworks near the north-eastern end of the secondary alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 56.6m and comprises three small mounds which sit on a circular platform that is defined by a ring ditch surrounded by an outer bank. The bank overlies Winterbourne Stoke 13 to the east (Monument Number 870447) and appears to overlie the edge of Winterbourne Stoke 15 (Monument Number 870457) to the south-west, although here the earthworks are much denuded. All three mounds were excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 18:1812). The central mound contained a cremation with a miniature pottery vessel and amber beads (in Devizes Museum). The other two mounds contained cremations. The round barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 14 by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 18 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 123)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 18, contains within its area three small tumuli, in each of which, at the depth of 18 inches, we found interments of burned bones. In the largest, which is in the centre, was a small urn, and two or three large beads of amber, in the form of half a circle and half an oval. In the second we also found two or three beads, and in the third, only burned bones. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870450'>870450</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 335</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW831'>MWI12994 - SU14SW831</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.48}'><img src='img/STHEAD.48.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.48' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.99}'><img src='img/STHEAD.99.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.99' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.249a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.249a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.249a' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175254°N 1.856606°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 18123
Winterbourne Stoke G
1414870450http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870450SU 14 SW 335MWI12994SU14SW831http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW831103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368STHEAD.48STHEAD.99STHEAD.249a
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.48}'><img src='img/STHEAD.48.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.48' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.99}'><img src='img/STHEAD.99.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.99' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.249a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.249a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.249a' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.48}'><img src='img/STHEAD.48.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.48' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.99}'><img src='img/STHEAD.99.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.99' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.249a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.249a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.249a' height='150'></a> </p>
51.175254°N 1.856606°W
56
51.17525365-1.85603453
Winterbourne Stoke G13
Winterbourne Stoke 19
AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (head to W.) on surface next to empty oblong cist. A secondary or subsequent primary inhumation lay above. Further up, a secondary cremation was placed beneath an inverted food vessel; 2 other cremations were also found. In the moundfill was found a perforated mace head of decomposed greenstone. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks near the north-eastern end of the secondary alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 37m and comprises a circular mound 2m high which is surrounded by a ring ditch. The summit of the mound is 3m and the base measures 26m in diameter. Breaks in slope suggest the mound was constructed in perhaps three phases, although the mound has also been damaged by burrowing rabbits. The ditch measures circa 5m wide and 0.4m deep and there is a fragment of an outer bank to the NNW. It appears to be overlain by Winterbourne Stoke 14 (Monument Number 870450) to the west. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 19: 1812), who found a primary inhumation, plus a secondary inhumation and a cremation beneath an inverted Enlarged Food Vessel. A perforated cushion macehead of greenstone was also found (the macehead and Food Vessel are in Devizes Museum). The round barrow was listed Winterbourne Stoke 13 by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 19. This tumulus measures 97 feet in diameter, and 7 feet in elevation. At the depth of nearly three feet, we discovered a sepulchral urn covering a little pile of burned bones, and almost immediately under them, lay a skeleton ; but before the workmen came to the urn, they had found two interments of burned bones in the east and west corners of their sections. At the depth of seven feet, viz. on the floor of the barrow, lay a skeleton, with its head towards the west, and near it was a small oblong cist, without any deposit in it. Amongst the earth thrown out of this barrow, we found a perforated pebble-stone, about two inches long, and very neatly polished ; it has one corner broken off, and some cracks, as if it had been burned. It does not appear suited either to domestic or military purposes. The Britons seem to have attached particular qualities to certain stones; and this, probably, may have been suspended as an amulet from the neck.
Winterbourne Stoke G13
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G13</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (head to W.) on surface next to empty oblong cist. A secondary or subsequent primary inhumation lay above. Further up, a secondary cremation was placed beneath an inverted food vessel; 2 other cremations were also found. In the moundfill was found a perforated mace head of decomposed greenstone. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks near the north-eastern end of the secondary alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 37m and comprises a circular mound 2m high which is surrounded by a ring ditch. The summit of the mound is 3m and the base measures 26m in diameter. Breaks in slope suggest the mound was constructed in perhaps three phases, although the mound has also been damaged by burrowing rabbits. The ditch measures circa 5m wide and 0.4m deep and there is a fragment of an outer bank to the NNW. It appears to be overlain by Winterbourne Stoke 14 (Monument Number 870450) to the west. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 19: 1812), who found a primary inhumation, plus a secondary inhumation and a cremation beneath an inverted Enlarged Food Vessel. A perforated cushion macehead of greenstone was also found (the macehead and Food Vessel are in Devizes Museum). The round barrow was listed Winterbourne Stoke 13 by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 19 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 123)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 19. This tumulus measures 97 feet in diameter, and 7 feet in elevation. At the depth of nearly three feet, we discovered a sepulchral urn covering a little pile of burned bones, and almost immediately under them, lay a skeleton ; but before the workmen came to the urn, they had found two interments of burned bones in the east and west corners of their sections. At the depth of seven feet, viz. on the floor of the barrow, lay a skeleton, with its head towards the west, and near it was a small oblong cist, without any deposit in it. Amongst the earth thrown out of this barrow, we found a perforated pebble-stone, about two inches long, and very neatly polished ; it has one corner broken off, and some cracks, as if it had been burned. It does not appear suited either to domestic or military purposes. The Britons seem to have attached particular qualities to certain stones; and this, probably, may have been suspended as an amulet from the neck. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870447'>870447</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 334</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW829'>MWI12992 - SU14SW829</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.249}'><img src='img/STHEAD.249.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.249' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.130}'><img src='img/STHEAD.130.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.130' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175253°N 1.856034°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 19123
Winterbourne Stoke G
1313870447http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870447SU 14 SW 334MWI12992SU14SW829http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW829103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368STHEAD.249STHEAD.130
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.249}'><img src='img/STHEAD.249.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.249' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.130}'><img src='img/STHEAD.130.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.130' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.249}'><img src='img/STHEAD.249.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.249' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.130}'><img src='img/STHEAD.130.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.130' height='150'></a> </p>
51.175253°N 1.856034°W
57
51.17543331-1.855890918
Winterbourne Stoke G12
Winterbourne Stoke 20
PS: A Bronze Age pond barrow survives as earthworks at the north-eastern end of the secondary alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 29.5m and comprises a bank, 6m wide, which forms a complete ring around a circular hollow, 0.5m deep and 16m in diameter, with a floor circa 9m in diameter. A concrete block near the centre is marked "A.M. No2" and was probably inserted by the military in the early 20th century. There is no record of any excavations, although it was included as barrow 20 by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (1812) and listed as Winterbourne Stoke 12 by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 20 is a pond barrow.
Winterbourne Stoke G12
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G12</strong></p><p>PS: A Bronze Age pond barrow survives as earthworks at the north-eastern end of the secondary alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 29.5m and comprises a bank, 6m wide, which forms a complete ring around a circular hollow, 0.5m deep and 16m in diameter, with a floor circa 9m in diameter. A concrete block near the centre is marked "A.M. No2" and was probably inserted by the military in the early 20th century. There is no record of any excavations, although it was included as barrow 20 by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (1812) and listed as Winterbourne Stoke 12 by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 20 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 124)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 20 is a pond barrow.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870446'>870446</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 333</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW830'>MWI12993 - SU14SW830</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175433°N 1.855890°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 20124
Winterbourne Stoke G
1212870446http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870446SU 14 SW 333MWI12993SU14SW830http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW830103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101236851.175433°N 1.855890°W
58
51.17543279-1.855461764
Winterbourne Stoke G11
Winterbourne Stoke 21
AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with (dispersed) primary (?) cremation. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks immediately west of the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 22m and comprises a low mound, barely 0.5m high, with a summit 7.5m in diameter. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found that it had been opened previously (Barrow 21: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 11 by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957), although its original form may have been altered by ploughing. The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 21, from the fragments of burned bones dispersed promiscuously about the soil, affords sufficient evidence of a prior opening.
Winterbourne Stoke G11
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G11</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with (dispersed) primary (?) cremation. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks immediately west of the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 22m and comprises a low mound, barely 0.5m high, with a summit 7.5m in diameter. The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found that it had been opened previously (Barrow 21: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 11 by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957), although its original form may have been altered by ploughing. The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 21 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 124)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 21, from the fragments of burned bones dispersed promiscuously about the soil, affords sufficient evidence of a prior opening. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870445'>870445</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 332</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW828'>MWI12991 - SU14SW828</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175432°N 1.855461°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 21124
Winterbourne Stoke G
1111870445http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870445SU 14 SW 332MWI12991SU14SW828http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW828103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101236851.175432°N 1.855461°W
59
51.17507293-1.855319839
Winterbourne Stoke G6
Winterbourne Stoke 22
AM: Bowl barrow with primary young (or female) inhumation (N./S.) on prepared ground surface and covered by a conical cairn of flints (containing several bones, presumed reaching up from the body). PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks within the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 24.5m and comprises a roughly circular mound which is completely surrounded by a ring ditch. The mound stands 1.7m high and has been severely damaged by animals burrowing around its south-eastern quadrant, creating or enlarging a ledge. Its summit measures 6m long by 4m wide and its base is 16m in diameter. The ditch measures between 1.5m and 2m wide and is 0.1m deep. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found a primary inhumation covered by a cairn of flints, laid on the original ground surface which had been stripped of turf (Barrow 22: 1812). The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 6 by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 22. The interment which this barrow contained, presented some kind of novelty and variety. It appeared as if the native turf had been first taken off, the body placed on the chalk, and a large conical pile of flints raised over it. From finding some of the bones above the floor, and amongst the flints, we might almost be led to suppose, that the Briton here interred, had suffered a similar death to that of Achan. The skeleton was laid from north to south, and from the size of the bones, appeared to be that of a young person, or a female.
Winterbourne Stoke G6
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G6</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary young (or female) inhumation (N./S.) on prepared ground surface and covered by a conical cairn of flints (containing several bones, presumed reaching up from the body). PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as earthworks within the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 24.5m and comprises a roughly circular mound which is completely surrounded by a ring ditch. The mound stands 1.7m high and has been severely damaged by animals burrowing around its south-eastern quadrant, creating or enlarging a ledge. Its summit measures 6m long by 4m wide and its base is 16m in diameter. The ditch measures between 1.5m and 2m wide and is 0.1m deep. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found a primary inhumation covered by a cairn of flints, laid on the original ground surface which had been stripped of turf (Barrow 22: 1812). The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 6 by Goddard (1913) and by Grinsell (1957). It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 22 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 124)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 22. The interment which this barrow contained, presented some kind of novelty and variety. It appeared as if the native turf had been first taken off, the body placed on the chalk, and a large conical pile of flints raised over it. From finding some of the bones above the floor, and amongst the flints, we might almost be led to suppose, that the Briton here interred, had suffered a similar death to that of Achan. The skeleton was laid from north to south, and from the size of the bones, appeared to be that of a young person, or a female. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870405'>870405</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 326</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW822'>MWI12985 - SU14SW822</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175072°N 1.855319°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 22124
Winterbourne Stoke G
66870405http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870405SU 14 SW 326MWI12985SU14SW822http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW822103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101236851.175072°N 1.855319°W
60
51.17525259-1.855176225
Winterbourne Stoke G7
Winterbourne Stoke 23
AM: Bowl barrow with no finds. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as ploughed earthworks within the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 25m and comprises a low mound, just 0.3m high, with a broad shallow ditch to the east. The mound's summit is 10m and its base is 18m in diameter. The ditch is less than 0.1m deep and measures circa 9m wide. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found it "unproductive" (Barrow 23: 1812). It was listed Winterbourne Stoke 7 by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957), although its low height could also suggest an original saucer form. It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 23 and 24 - turned out unproductive.
Winterbourne Stoke G7
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G7</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with no finds. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as ploughed earthworks within the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 25m and comprises a low mound, just 0.3m high, with a broad shallow ditch to the east. The mound's summit is 10m and its base is 18m in diameter. The ditch is less than 0.1m deep and measures circa 9m wide. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found it "unproductive" (Barrow 23: 1812). It was listed Winterbourne Stoke 7 by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957), although its low height could also suggest an original saucer form. It was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 23 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 124)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 23 and 24 - turned out unproductive.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870411'>870411</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 327</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW823'>MWI12986 - SU14SW823</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175252°N 1.855176°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 23124
Winterbourne Stoke G
77870411http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870411SU 14 SW 327MWI12986SU14SW823http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW823103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101236851.175252°N 1.855176°W
61
51.1756121-1.855032061
Winterbourne Stoke G7a
Winterbourne Stoke 24
AM: Bowl barrow with no finds. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as earthworks immediately west of the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 26.5m and comprises a low mound, 0.5m high, with a summit 8m in diameter. It has been damaged by ploughing and fencing placed over its eastern side. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found it "unproductive" (Barrow 24: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 7a by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957). The barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 23 and 24 - turned out unproductive.
Winterbourne Stoke G7a
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G7a</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with no finds. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as earthworks immediately west of the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 26.5m and comprises a low mound, 0.5m high, with a summit 8m in diameter. It has been damaged by ploughing and fencing placed over its eastern side. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found it "unproductive" (Barrow 24: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 7a by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957). The barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 24 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 124)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 23 and 24 - turned out unproductive.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870415'>870415</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 328</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW824'>MWI12987 - SU14SW824</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175612°N 1.855032°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 24124
Winterbourne Stoke G
7a7870415http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870415SU 14 SW 328MWI12987SU14SW824http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW824103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101236851.175612°N 1.855032°W
62
51.17570131-1.85445957
Winterbourne Stoke G8
Winterbourne Stoke 25
AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (N./S.) on ground surface with 2 bone beads, 2 whetstones, a bronze pin, a flat pebble, 2 fossil shells, a beaver incisor, a piece of stalactite and two cups (including a grape cup) by its head. Dog and deer bones were found in the moundfill. A secondary cremation had been excavated directly into the feet of the primary inhumation. PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow survives as earthworks within the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 39m and comprises a roughly circular mound which sits on a platform that is defined by a ring ditch. The mound stands 1m high: its summit measures 8m across and its base circa 20.5m in diameter. Its southern side has slumped to meet the top of the ditch, probably due to animal burrowing. The berm is widest to the north-west, where it is 6m wide, and the platform measures a maximum of 28.5m in diameter. The ditch is circa 0.3m deep and between 5m and 6m wide: it has fairly straight, gently sloping sides and a fairly flat bottom. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found a primary burial deposit comprising two inhumations with a variety of grave goods (some in Devizes Museum: Barrow 25: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 8 by Goddard (1913), who described it as a bowl barrow, and listed as such by Grinsell (1957). The barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 25 is a. large and rude bowl-shaped barrow, 107 feet in diameter, and 6 in elevation. Its surface being uneven, we were led to suppose it had been opened. In making a large section into it, the workmen threw out the bones of several dogs, and some of deer, and on the floor found a human skeleton, which had been originally interred from north to south, but many of the bones had been displaced, probably owing to a recent interment of burned bones, which had been deposited near the feet of this skeleton. On the right side of its head were two small earthen cups, one of which was broken ; the other preserved entire ; the first, though of rude materials, and scarcely half burned, was very neatly ornamented; the other, is of a singular form and pattern: it is of a yellowish colour, and perforated in several places. Near these cups was a curious ring or bracelet of bone or ivory, stained with red, which was unfortunately broken into several pieces. With the above articles were two oblong beads made from bone, and two whetstones ; one of the silicious kind, almost as fine as a hone, and neatly formed ; the other, of a fine grained white silicious stone. Near the above were a brass pin, a pair of petrified fossil cockle shells, a piece of stalactite, and a hard flat stone of the pebble kind, such as we frequently find both in the towns, as well as in the tumuli of the Briton.
Winterbourne Stoke G8
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G8</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (N./S.) on ground surface with 2 bone beads, 2 whetstones, a bronze pin, a flat pebble, 2 fossil shells, a beaver incisor, a piece of stalactite and two cups (including a grape cup) by its head. Dog and deer bones were found in the moundfill. A secondary cremation had been excavated directly into the feet of the primary inhumation. PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow survives as earthworks within the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 39m and comprises a roughly circular mound which sits on a platform that is defined by a ring ditch. The mound stands 1m high: its summit measures 8m across and its base circa 20.5m in diameter. Its southern side has slumped to meet the top of the ditch, probably due to animal burrowing. The berm is widest to the north-west, where it is 6m wide, and the platform measures a maximum of 28.5m in diameter. The ditch is circa 0.3m deep and between 5m and 6m wide: it has fairly straight, gently sloping sides and a fairly flat bottom. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found a primary burial deposit comprising two inhumations with a variety of grave goods (some in Devizes Museum: Barrow 25: 1812). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 8 by Goddard (1913), who described it as a bowl barrow, and listed as such by Grinsell (1957). The barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. The round barrow was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in August 2009 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 25 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 124)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 25 is a. large and rude bowl-shaped barrow, 107 feet in diameter, and 6 in elevation. Its surface being uneven, we were led to suppose it had been opened. In making a large section into it, the workmen threw out the bones of several dogs, and some of deer, and on the floor found a human skeleton, which had been originally interred from north to south, but many of the bones had been displaced, probably owing to a recent interment of burned bones, which had been deposited near the feet of this skeleton. On the right side of its head were two small earthen cups, one of which was broken ; the other preserved entire ; the first, though of rude materials, and scarcely half burned, was very neatly ornamented; the other, is of a singular form and pattern: it is of a yellowish colour, and perforated in several places. Near these cups was a curious ring or bracelet of bone or ivory, stained with red, which was unfortunately broken into several pieces. With the above articles were two oblong beads made from bone, and two whetstones ; one of the silicious kind, almost as fine as a hone, and neatly formed ; the other, of a fine grained white silicious stone. Near the above were a brass pin, a pair of petrified fossil cockle shells, a piece of stalactite, and a hard flat stone of the pebble kind, such as we frequently find both in the towns, as well as in the tumuli of the Briton. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870419'>870419</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 329</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW825'>MWI12988 - SU14SW825</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.49}'><img src='img/STHEAD.49.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.49' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.49a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.49a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.49a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.49b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.49b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.49b' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.187}'><img src='img/STHEAD.187.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.187' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.187a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.187a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.187a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.187b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.187b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.187b' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.226}'><img src='img/STHEAD.226.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.226' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175701°N 1.854459°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 25124
Winterbourne Stoke G
88870419http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870419SU 14 SW 329MWI12988SU14SW825http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW825103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368STHEAD.49STHEAD.49aSTHEAD.49bSTHEAD.187STHEAD.187aSTHEAD.187bSTHEAD.226
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.49}'><img src='img/STHEAD.49.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.49' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.49a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.49a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.49a' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.49b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.49b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.49b' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.187}'><img src='img/STHEAD.187.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.187' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.187a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.187a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.187a' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.187b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.187b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.187b' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.226}'><img src='img/STHEAD.226.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.226' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.49}'><img src='img/STHEAD.49.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.49' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.49a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.49a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.49a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.49b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.49b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.49b' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.187}'><img src='img/STHEAD.187.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.187' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.187a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.187a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.187a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.187b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.187b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.187b' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.226}'><img src='img/STHEAD.226.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.226' height='150'></a> </p>
51.175701°N 1.854459°W
63
51.17606046-1.854029292
Winterbourne Stoke G9
Winterbourne Stoke 26
AM: Bowl barrow with primary skeleton (N./S.) in oblong cist in wooden coffin (shaped like a boat) with a bronze dagger, a bronze awl, a necklace of amber and shale beads and a small urn. PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow survives as earthworks within the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 40m and comprises a circular mound, 1.6m high, which sits slightly off-centre on a platform that is defined by a ring ditch. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 26: 1812), who found a primary inhumation in a boat-shaped wooden coffin, with shale and amber beads, a bronze knife dagger, a bronze awl and a small pottery vessel, which is the only find to survive (Devizes Museum). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 9 by Goddard (1913), who described it as a bowl barrow, and was listed as such by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in Februaru 2010 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 26 is a fine bowl-shaped barrow, 97 feet in diameter, and nine feet and a half in elevation. Mr. Cunnington attempted to open it in the year 1804, but missed the interment, when, as it turned out, he was within one foot of it. Fortune now favoured our researches, and discovered to us in an oblong cist, a skeleton lying from north to south, within a shallow case of wood, of a boat-like form. Round its neck were found a great variety of amber and jet beads, a lance head, and pin of brass, with a little urn of a very neat form, which was broken to pieces.
Winterbourne Stoke G9
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G9</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary skeleton (N./S.) in oblong cist in wooden coffin (shaped like a boat) with a bronze dagger, a bronze awl, a necklace of amber and shale beads and a small urn. PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow survives as earthworks within the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 40m and comprises a circular mound, 1.6m high, which sits slightly off-centre on a platform that is defined by a ring ditch. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 26: 1812), who found a primary inhumation in a boat-shaped wooden coffin, with shale and amber beads, a bronze knife dagger, a bronze awl and a small pottery vessel, which is the only find to survive (Devizes Museum). It was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 9 by Goddard (1913), who described it as a bowl barrow, and was listed as such by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in Februaru 2010 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 26 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 124)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 26 is a fine bowl-shaped barrow, 97 feet in diameter, and nine feet and a half in elevation. Mr. Cunnington attempted to open it in the year 1804, but missed the interment, when, as it turned out, he was within one foot of it. Fortune now favoured our researches, and discovered to us in an oblong cist, a skeleton lying from north to south, within a shallow case of wood, of a boat-like form. Round its neck were found a great variety of amber and jet beads, a lance head, and pin of brass, with a little urn of a very neat form, which was broken to pieces. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870427'>870427</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 330</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW826'>MWI12989 - SU14SW826</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.334}'><img src='img/STHEAD.334.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.334' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.176060°N 1.854029°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 26124
Winterbourne Stoke G
99870427http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870427SU 14 SW 330MWI12989SU14SW826http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW826103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368STHEAD.334
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.334}'><img src='img/STHEAD.334.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.334' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.334}'><img src='img/STHEAD.334.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.334' height='150'></a> </p>
51.176060°N 1.854029°W
64
51.17641961-1.853598993
Winterbourne Stoke G10
Winterbourne Stoke 27
AM: Bowl barrow with 2 primary (one male) inhumations (head to N.) in oblong cist (5x4x2.5ft deep) with a type A beaker by head. 6 secondary (?) inhumations side by side (2 of which were young) were then excavated into the cist. Later, an intrusive secondary cremation beneath an inverted urn was excavated into the cist. 2 dog inhumations were found near the surface. PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow, known as Winterbourne Stoke 10, survives as earthworks at the north-eastern end of the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 35m and comprises a roughly circular mound, 1.5m high, which sits north of centre on a platform that is defined by a ring ditch. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 27: 1812), who located a primary burial deposit comprising two inhumations with a Beaker. In addition there were six secondary inhumations and one cremation beneath an inverted urn. The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 10 by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in February 2010 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 27. This large tumulus is about 90 feet in its base diameter, and in elevation seven. It has several depressions on the top, from which, and the discoveries made in it, I am inclined to think it must have been a family sepulchre. We commenced our researches by making a large section from east to west, and at the depth of two feet (though at some distance from each other), found the skeletons of two dogs, as we conjectured, but being deposited in the vegetable earth, they were much decayed. At the depth of seven feet, we came to the floor of the barrow, where we discovered a large oblong cist, five feet long, four feet wide, and two and a half feet deep, neatly cut in the chalk; and on clearing away the earth round this cist, we perceived a sepulchral urn inverted in a half circle, cut in the side of the large cist, which, on taking out, we found had been placed in the lap of a skeleton, which lay at the depth of about a foot within the cist, its head towards the north. The Urn contained burned bones, and was of a very rude make, but from the pressure of the earth was broken in two pieces. On removing it and the skeleton, we found five more skeletons lying almost side by side ; two of which were young persons ; and when we reached the floor of the cist, we found, what I consider to be the primary interment, viz. two skeletons lying by the side of each other, with their heads to the north, and both extremely well preserved. One of them (from the size of the bones), was a tall and stout man ; all their teeth were very firm, and remarkably even. At their head was placed a drinking cup. From the manner which these several bodies were interred, and from. the position of the urn, containing the burned bones, we had positive proof that the two different modes of burial had been practised in this barrow at different periods; also that the urn was deposited at a period subsequent to all the other interments; for after interring the first bodies on the floor of the cist, the vast quantity of chalk dug out of it, was again thrown in to cover them, and this chalk would naturally rise above the level of the adjoining soil. When the other bodies were interred at a subsequent period, the vegetable mould, of which the tumulus was composed, was dug through, as also about a foot or more of the chalk out of the original cist ; and after depositing the latter bodies over the original interment, the earth mixed with the chalk, would be thrown over, and being thus mixed, would make a line of distinction, being different in colour to the vegetable mould composing the tumulus, and the chalk out of the cist ; and this distinction was very obvious. That the urn containing the burned bones was the third deposit, we have also sufficient proof, as all the earth that covered it, as well as that corner of the cist in which it stood, was vegetable mould.
Winterbourne Stoke G10
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G10</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with 2 primary (one male) inhumations (head to N.) in oblong cist (5x4x2.5ft deep) with a type A beaker by head. 6 secondary (?) inhumations side by side (2 of which were young) were then excavated into the cist. Later, an intrusive secondary cremation beneath an inverted urn was excavated into the cist. 2 dog inhumations were found near the surface. PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow, known as Winterbourne Stoke 10, survives as earthworks at the north-eastern end of the main alignment of the Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads round barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219525). It has an overall diameter of 35m and comprises a roughly circular mound, 1.5m high, which sits north of centre on a platform that is defined by a ring ditch. The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Sir Richard Colt Hoare (Barrow 27: 1812), who located a primary burial deposit comprising two inhumations with a Beaker. In addition there were six secondary inhumations and one cremation beneath an inverted urn. The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 10 by Goddard (1913) and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was mapped from aerial photographs at a scale of 1:10,000 as part of the RCHME: Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP project and this mapping revised at a scale of 1:2500 for the English Heritage Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 in February 2010 as part of English Heritage's Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 27 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 125)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 27. This large tumulus is about 90 feet in its base diameter, and in elevation seven. It has several depressions on the top, from which, and the discoveries made in it, I am inclined to think it must have been a family sepulchre. We commenced our researches by making a large section from east to west, and at the depth of two feet (though at some distance from each other), found the skeletons of two dogs, as we conjectured, but being deposited in the vegetable earth, they were much decayed. At the depth of seven feet, we came to the floor of the barrow, where we discovered a large oblong cist, five feet long, four feet wide, and two and a half feet deep, neatly cut in the chalk; and on clearing away the earth round this cist, we perceived a sepulchral urn inverted in a half circle, cut in the side of the large cist, which, on taking out, we found had been placed in the lap of a skeleton, which lay at the depth of about a foot within the cist, its head towards the north. The Urn contained burned bones, and was of a very rude make, but from the pressure of the earth was broken in two pieces. On removing it and the skeleton, we found five more skeletons lying almost side by side ; two of which were young persons ; and when we reached the floor of the cist, we found, what I consider to be the primary interment, viz. two skeletons lying by the side of each other, with their heads to the north, and both extremely well preserved. One of them (from the size of the bones), was a tall and stout man ; all their teeth were very firm, and remarkably even. At their head was placed a drinking cup. From the manner which these several bodies were interred, and from. the position of the urn, containing the burned bones, we had positive proof that the two different modes of burial had been practised in this barrow at different periods; also that the urn was deposited at a period subsequent to all the other interments; for after interring the first bodies on the floor of the cist, the vast quantity of chalk dug out of it, was again thrown in to cover them, and this chalk would naturally rise above the level of the adjoining soil. When the other bodies were interred at a subsequent period, the vegetable mould, of which the tumulus was composed, was dug through, as also about a foot or more of the chalk out of the original cist ; and after depositing the latter bodies over the original interment, the earth mixed with the chalk, would be thrown over, and being thus mixed, would make a line of distinction, being different in colour to the vegetable mould composing the tumulus, and the chalk out of the cist ; and this distinction was very obvious. That the urn containing the burned bones was the third deposit, we have also sufficient proof, as all the earth that covered it, as well as that corner of the cist in which it stood, was vegetable mould. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870444'>870444</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 331</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW827'>MWI12990 - SU14SW827</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368'>1012368 (old #10306)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.274}'><img src='img/STHEAD.274.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.274' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.176419°N 1.853598°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 27125
Winterbourne Stoke G
1010870444http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870444SU 14 SW 331MWI12990SU14SW827http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW827103061012368https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012368STHEAD.274
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.274}'><img src='img/STHEAD.274.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.274' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.274}'><img src='img/STHEAD.274.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.274' height='150'></a> </p>
51.176419°N 1.853598°W
65
51.17515565-1.849597595Wilsford G1b
Amesbury G11a
Amesbury 12
AM: Bowl Barrow with primary cremation mixed with ashes in upright urn 'badly baked' with a twisted bronze wire bracelet with hook terminals. PS: Group of four Bronze Age round barrows, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 11a to 11d, and also as Wilsford (South) 1b to e, although the recorded grid reference suggest all four lay on the Wilsford side of the parish boundary. Colt Hoare excavated one, which contained an upright urn with a cremation, and an object of twisted bronze wire, presumably a bracelet of some kind. All four barrows have since been levelled.
RCH: Leaving the Winterbourn Stoke group and proceeding in a line towards Stonehenge No. 12 is a group of small tumuli, in one of which, immediately under the turf, we found a very rude urn, badly baked, and containing ashes, burned bones, and two pieces of twisted brass wire, which probably once formed a ring: this urn was not inverted. We attempted to open another, but finding that, together with the remainder of the group, it had been ploughed over, we gave up our researches, as, owing to the slight elevation of these barrows above the level of the ground, their contents would most probably have been destroyed by the continued operations of agriculture.
Wilsford G1b (Amesbury G11a)
<p><strong>Wilsford G1b (Amesbury G11a)</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl Barrow with primary cremation mixed with ashes in upright urn 'badly baked' with a twisted bronze wire bracelet with hook terminals. PS: Group of four Bronze Age round barrows, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 11a to 11d, and also as Wilsford (South) 1b to e, although the recorded grid reference suggest all four lay on the Wilsford side of the parish boundary. Colt Hoare excavated one, which contained an upright urn with a cremation, and an object of twisted bronze wire, presumably a bracelet of some kind. All four barrows have since been levelled. </p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 12 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 126)</strong></p><p>RCH: Leaving the Winterbourn Stoke group and proceeding in a line towards Stonehenge No. 12 is a group of small tumuli, in one of which, immediately under the turf, we found a very rude urn, badly baked, and containing ashes, burned bones, and two pieces of twisted brass wire, which probably once formed a ring: this urn was not inverted. We attempted to open another, but finding that, together with the remainder of the group, it had been ploughed over, we gave up our researches, as, owing to the slight elevation of these barrows above the level of the ground, their contents would most probably have been destroyed by the continued operations of agriculture.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219528'>219528</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 36</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW803'>MWI12966 - SU14SW803</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012394'>1012394 (old #10443)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.208}'><img src='img/STHEAD.208.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.208' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175155°N 1.849597°W</p>
redAmesbury 12126Wilsford G1b1219528http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219528SU 14 SW 36MWI12966SU14SW803http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW803104431012394https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012394STHEAD.208
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.208}'><img src='img/STHEAD.208.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.208' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.208}'><img src='img/STHEAD.208.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.208' height='150'></a> </p>
51.175155°N 1.849597°W
66
51.17711888-1.838289822
Amesbury G11e?
Amesbury 13
AM: Disc barrow with primary cremation. Destroyed many years ago, before 1913. PS: Bronze Age barrow, possibly a disc barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 11E. Apparently located to the west of Stonehenge, its precise position is uncertain. There are no indications of its whereabouts on the ground or on aerial photographs at any of the suggested grid references. Excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century, it contained a primary cremation. WSH: An undated barrow seen only in 19th century. At approximately SU11334207 but Crawford indicates its location at SU11264193. There are no indications of this barrow on the ground. See also SU14SW62F a cropmark seen to north.
RCH: No. 13 is a Druid barrow, which contained a simple interment of burned bones.
Amesbury G11e?
<p><strong>Amesbury G11e?</strong></p><p>AM: Disc barrow with primary cremation. Destroyed many years ago, before 1913. PS: Bronze Age barrow, possibly a disc barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 11E. Apparently located to the west of Stonehenge, its precise position is uncertain. There are no indications of its whereabouts on the ground or on aerial photographs at any of the suggested grid references. Excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century, it contained a primary cremation. WSH: An undated barrow seen only in 19th century. At approximately SU11334207 but Crawford indicates its location at SU11264193. There are no indications of this barrow on the ground. See also SU14SW62F a cropmark seen to north.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 13 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 126)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 13 is a Druid barrow, which contained a simple interment of burned bones.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219531'>219531</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 37</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SWU01'>MWI13162 - SU14SWU01</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.177118°N 1.838289°W</p>
redAmesbury 13126Amesbury G11e?11219531http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219531SU 14 SW 37MWI13162SU14SWU01http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SWU0151.177118°N 1.838289°W
67
51.17865047-1.840430392
Amesbury G11e?
Amesbury 13
AM: Disc barrow with primary cremation. Destroyed many years ago, before 1913. PS: A levelled bowl barrow situated on the crest of Stonehenge Down. The barrow is now difficult to identify on the ground, however the surrounding ditch survives as a buried feature and is visible on aerial photographs, and the overall diameter is calculated to be 12m. The alleged barrow falls within the area mapped from aerial photographs by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project, but was not recorded by either survey. No further information about this feature was obtained from aerial photographic evidence during the EH survey. An entry in the Wiltshire SMR appears to be the origin of this record, but it is tentative, describing only a circular feature, and does not seem to justify the more positive interpretation given in English Heritage Record Form 8-MAR-1995. WSH: An undated, circular feature visible on aerial photographs. Primary aerial photographic sources could not be consulted, so existing National Grid Reference had to be accepted. See also record SU14SWU01 referring to a barrow to south identified by Hoare.
RCH: No. 13 is a Druid barrow, which contained a simple interment of burned bones.
Amesbury G11e?
<p><strong>Amesbury G11e?</strong></p><p>AM: Disc barrow with primary cremation. Destroyed many years ago, before 1913. PS: A levelled bowl barrow situated on the crest of Stonehenge Down. The barrow is now difficult to identify on the ground, however the surrounding ditch survives as a buried feature and is visible on aerial photographs, and the overall diameter is calculated to be 12m. The alleged barrow falls within the area mapped from aerial photographs by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project, but was not recorded by either survey. No further information about this feature was obtained from aerial photographic evidence during the EH survey. An entry in the Wiltshire SMR appears to be the origin of this record, but it is tentative, describing only a circular feature, and does not seem to justify the more positive interpretation given in English Heritage Record Form 8-MAR-1995. WSH: An undated, circular feature visible on aerial photographs. Primary aerial photographic sources could not be consulted, so existing National Grid Reference had to be accepted. See also record SU14SWU01 referring to a barrow to south identified by Hoare.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 13 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 126)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 13 is a Druid barrow, which contained a simple interment of burned bones.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=1066507'>1066507</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 515</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW62F'>MWI12716 - SU14SW62F</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012393'>1012393 (old #10442)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.178650°N 1.840430°W</p>
redAmesbury 13126Amesbury G11e?111066507http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=1066507SU 14 SW 515MWI12716SU14SW62Fhttp://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW62F104421012393https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101239351.178650°N 1.840430°W
68
51.175851-1.836201Amesbury G1Amesbury 14
AM: Paired Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 1, and part of the barrow cemetery SU 14 SW 38. Excavation by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century recovered a cremation, possibly primary. The barrow is still extant as an earthwork mound. The northernmost of a group of three bowl barrows located immediately north of the A303 on Stonehenge Down. Two of the three barrows are aligned north-south; the third, smaller, barrow stands immediately to the east of the southern mound. This barrow measures 23 metres in diameter and 1.8 metres high. It is surrounded by a ditch 4 metres wide and 0.5 metres deep. See also SU 14 SW 432 and SU 14 SW 433. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. Surveyed at 1:1000: this bowl barrow stands 1.9m high, with a 0.2m deep and 12m wide ditch visible on the E; a break of slope and slight ledge on the side of the mound may indicate a secondary addition; the ditch is partly obscured by military trenching.
RCH: No. 14 a group consisting of eight barrows of different sizes, and close to the road leading to Amesbury. The adjoining large tumulus produced an interment by cremation, which had in former times been disturbed by rabbits. Some others in this group, though scarcely elevated above the ground, produced deposits of burned bones; in one of them, just under the turf, was found a brass spear head, and two of the others had been opened before.
Amesbury G1
<p><strong>Amesbury G1</strong></p><p>AM: Paired Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 1, and part of the barrow cemetery SU 14 SW 38. Excavation by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century recovered a cremation, possibly primary. The barrow is still extant as an earthwork mound. The northernmost of a group of three bowl barrows located immediately north of the A303 on Stonehenge Down. Two of the three barrows are aligned north-south; the third, smaller, barrow stands immediately to the east of the southern mound. This barrow measures 23 metres in diameter and 1.8 metres high. It is surrounded by a ditch 4 metres wide and 0.5 metres deep. See also SU 14 SW 432 and SU 14 SW 433. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. Surveyed at 1:1000: this bowl barrow stands 1.9m high, with a 0.2m deep and 12m wide ditch visible on the E; a break of slope and slight ledge on the side of the mound may indicate a secondary addition; the ditch is partly obscured by military trenching.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 14 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 126)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 14 a group consisting of eight barrows of different sizes, and close to the road leading to Amesbury. The adjoining large tumulus produced an interment by cremation, which had in former times been disturbed by rabbits. Some others in this group, though scarcely elevated above the ground, produced deposits of burned bones; in one of them, just under the turf, was found a brass spear head, and two of the others had been opened before.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942722'>942722</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 431</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW836'>MWI12999 - SU14SW836</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012369'>1012369 (old #10312)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175851°N 1.836201°W</p>
redAmesbury 14126Amesbury G11942722http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942722SU 14 SW 431MWI12999SU14SW836http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW836103121012369https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101236951.175851°N 1.836201°W
69
51.175551-1.836101Amesbury G2Amesbury 14
AM: Paired Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation in a box of wood placed in a shallow oblong cist. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 2, and part of the barrow cemetery SU 14 SW 38. Excavated in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare, who found a cremation contained within a wooden box placed on the original ground surface beneath the mound. The barrow is still extant as an earthwork. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. Surveyed at 1:1000: bowl barrow 27m in diameter and up to 1.5m high, with no trace of surrounding ditch.
RCH: No. 14 a group consisting of eight barrows of different sizes, and close to the road leading to Amesbury. Two of these barrows are superior in size to the rest; the one nearest the road is large and bowl shaped ; eighty feet in base diameter, and eight and a half in elevation, though it appears to be much higher. The men made a large section, supposing the interment would be found at a considerable depth, but they met with it at eight feet and a half, in a shallow oblong cist, where the burned bones had been interred in a box of wood.
Amesbury G2
<p><strong>Amesbury G2</strong></p><p>AM: Paired Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation in a box of wood placed in a shallow oblong cist. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 2, and part of the barrow cemetery SU 14 SW 38. Excavated in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare, who found a cremation contained within a wooden box placed on the original ground surface beneath the mound. The barrow is still extant as an earthwork. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. Surveyed at 1:1000: bowl barrow 27m in diameter and up to 1.5m high, with no trace of surrounding ditch.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 14 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 126)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 14 a group consisting of eight barrows of different sizes, and close to the road leading to Amesbury. Two of these barrows are superior in size to the rest; the one nearest the road is large and bowl shaped ; eighty feet in base diameter, and eight and a half in elevation, though it appears to be much higher. The men made a large section, supposing the interment would be found at a considerable depth, but they met with it at eight feet and a half, in a shallow oblong cist, where the burned bones had been interred in a box of wood.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942724'>942724</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 432</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW837'>MWI13000 - SU14SW837</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012369'>1012369 (old #10312)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175551°N 1.836101°W</p>
redAmesbury 14126Amesbury G22942724http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942724SU 14 SW 432MWI13000SU14SW837http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW837103121012369https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101236951.175551°N 1.836101°W
70
51.17549693-1.83586361Amesbury G3Amesbury 14
AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation (?) in upright 'Stonehenge Urn' covered with triangular stone slab. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 3, and part of the barrow cemetery SU 14 SW 38. This may be the barrow from which Colt Hoare recovered the so-called 'Stonehenge Urn', a Middle Bronze Age barrel urn circa 60 centimetres high and containing a cremation. When found, it was reportedly upright, and its mouth was sealed by a large triangular stone. Fragmentary remains of the barrow are still visible on the ground. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. Surveyed at 1:1000: only part of this slight mound remains; the barrow appears to have been no more than 8m in diameter and remains little more than 0.1m high.
RCH: No. 14 a group consisting of eight barrows of different sizes, and close to the road leading to Amesbury. The tumulus nearest that place produced the largest sepulchral urn we have ever yet found, it measures fifteen inches in diameter at the top, and is 22 1/2 inches high ; it varies also most decidedly in shape and pattern from any others in our collection ; on which account we have distinguished it by the name of the STONEHENGE URN. It contained an interment of burned bones, and was not inverted ; but the deposit was secured by a large triangular stone, placed over the mouth of the urn. It is engraved in TUMULI PLATE XVI.
Amesbury G3
<p><strong>Amesbury G3</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation (?) in upright 'Stonehenge Urn' covered with triangular stone slab. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 3, and part of the barrow cemetery SU 14 SW 38. This may be the barrow from which Colt Hoare recovered the so-called 'Stonehenge Urn', a Middle Bronze Age barrel urn circa 60 centimetres high and containing a cremation. When found, it was reportedly upright, and its mouth was sealed by a large triangular stone. Fragmentary remains of the barrow are still visible on the ground. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. Surveyed at 1:1000: only part of this slight mound remains; the barrow appears to have been no more than 8m in diameter and remains little more than 0.1m high.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 14 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 126)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 14 a group consisting of eight barrows of different sizes, and close to the road leading to Amesbury. The tumulus nearest that place produced the largest sepulchral urn we have ever yet found, it measures fifteen inches in diameter at the top, and is 22 1/2 inches high ; it varies also most decidedly in shape and pattern from any others in our collection ; on which account we have distinguished it by the name of the STONEHENGE URN. It contained an interment of burned bones, and was not inverted ; but the deposit was secured by a large triangular stone, placed over the mouth of the urn. It is engraved in TUMULI PLATE XVI.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942726'>942726</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 433</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW838'>MWI13001 - SU14SW838</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012369'>1012369 (old #10312)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.257}'><img src='img/STHEAD.257.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.257' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.175496°N 1.835863°W</p>
redAmesbury 14126Amesbury G33942726http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942726SU 14 SW 433MWI13001SU14SW838http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW838103121012369https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012369STHEAD.257
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.257}'><img src='img/STHEAD.257.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.257' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.257}'><img src='img/STHEAD.257.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.257' height='150'></a> </p>
51.175496°N 1.835863°W
71
51.17701662-1.829563784Amesbury G10Amesbury 15
AM: Oval Twin Disc barrow (previously disturbed). First Tump with primary cremation in cist. A secondary (?) inhumation lay above. PS: Bronze Age oval twin disc barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 10, located on Stonehenge Down to the south-west of Stonehenge. Excavation by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century recovered a primary cremation from one of the mounds, though it is not clear which. Geophysical survey in 1993-4 recorded a slightly oval surrounding ditch. The earthworks have suffered some damage. A central mound measuring 16 metres by 12 metres, and up to 0.5 metres high, can no longer be clearly identified as two distinct barrow mounds. The surrounding bank and ditch measures 43 to 45 metres in overall diameter. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: On approaching STONEHENGE, we come to a fine group of barrows, several of which have had their external appearance much defaced by rabbits. No. 15, is a Druid barrow, in which we found a deposit of burned human bones within a cist. It had been opened before, and some scattered fragments of bone, led us to suppose that a skeleton had been found, though the other interment had escaped unnoticed.
Amesbury G10
<p><strong>Amesbury G10</strong></p><p>AM: Oval Twin Disc barrow (previously disturbed). First Tump with primary cremation in cist. A secondary (?) inhumation lay above. PS: Bronze Age oval twin disc barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 10, located on Stonehenge Down to the south-west of Stonehenge. Excavation by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century recovered a primary cremation from one of the mounds, though it is not clear which. Geophysical survey in 1993-4 recorded a slightly oval surrounding ditch. The earthworks have suffered some damage. A central mound measuring 16 metres by 12 metres, and up to 0.5 metres high, can no longer be clearly identified as two distinct barrow mounds. The surrounding bank and ditch measures 43 to 45 metres in overall diameter. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 15 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 127)</strong></p><p>RCH: On approaching STONEHENGE, we come to a fine group of barrows, several of which have had their external appearance much defaced by rabbits. No. 15, is a Druid barrow, in which we found a deposit of burned human bones within a cist. It had been opened before, and some scattered fragments of bone, led us to suppose that a skeleton had been found, though the other interment had escaped unnoticed.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219687'>219687</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 89</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW866'>MWI13029 - SU14SW866</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012385'>1012385 (old #10370)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.177016°N 1.829563°W</p>
redAmesbury 15127Amesbury G1010219687http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219687SU 14 SW 89MWI13029SU14SW866http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW866103701012385https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101238551.177016°N 1.829563°W
72
51.17800822-1.831276847Amesbury G4Amesbury 16
AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation in a circular cist with a bronze dagger, bronze awl and a piece of blue-stone, all covered with whitish soil (wood?). Two secondary (?) inhumations were placed on the ground surface with antlers and more sarsen chippings. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 4 and part of a group immediately south west of Stonehenge recorded as SU 14 SW 88. Excavations by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century loctaed a primary cremation accompanied by a bronze dagger and an awl. A large piece of bluestone was found in the soil immediately above the cremation deposit. A secondary burial deposit featured two inhumations on the old ground surface, accompanied by antlers and sarsen chips. Bluestone chips had apparently been found in the mound previously by Stukeley (in the 1720s?). The barrow mound has been damaged almost beyond recognition, presumably by the roadway immediately to the west. Geophysical survey in the Stonehenge area in 1993-4 recorded a ring ditch of 29.5 metres diameter. The barrow mound survives as an earthwork and is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs, where it appears as two closely spaced concentric ditches. The barrow is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs, where it appears as two closely spaced concentric ditches with an overall diameter of 28m. It has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 16 is a mutilated flat barrow, 76 feet in diameter, and only 3 feet in elevation. This appears to have been one of those opened by Dr. Stukeley, and thus mentioned by him in his account of STONEHENGE (page 46). " And in a very great and old fashioned barrow, west from STONEHENGE, among such matters, I found bits of red and blue marble chippings of the stones of the temple ; so that, probably, the interred was one of the builders." During our researches in this tumulus, we perceived that a long section had been made, and found the bones of two skeletons which had been interred on the floor, also several pieces of stag's horns, animal bones, etc. as well as some fragments of sarsen stones, similar to those which form the great trilothons of STONEHENGE. On clearing out the earth from this section, we observed a small heap of whiter soil, which having removed, we came to the primary interment of burned bones within a fine circular cist, and found a spear head of brass in fine preservation, and a pin of the same metal. It is somewhat singular, that these burned bones (a more than usual quantity) should have laid unmolested in a barrow where there were a hundred rabbit holes. On removing the earth from over the cist, we found a large piece of one of the blue stones of STONEHENGE, which Sowerby the naturalist calls a horn stone, which, with the sarsen stone, is a very singular occurrence, and decidedly proves that the adjoining temple was erected previous to the tumulus. Some persons acquainted with the soil in this part of Wiltshire, might think the finding of sarsen stones no uncommon event, and I should perhaps have thought the same, had these specimens been rounded by attrition ; but the stones found within this barrow, are pieces chipped off, (I am sorry to say) like those now daily knocked off from the great fallen trilithon. With regard to the blue stone, we are certain this species is not to be found in the southern district of Wiltshire. In opening the fine bell-shaped barrow N. E. Of STONEHENGE, we also found one or two pieces of the chippings of these stones, as well as in the waggon tracks round the area of the temple. These circumstances tend to give a much higher aera of antiquity to our celebrated building, than some antiquaries would be willing to allow, and evidently prove that at the period when the tumuli adjoining Stonehenge were raised, the plain was covered with the chippings of the stones that had been employed in the formation of the stone circle.
Amesbury G4
<p><strong>Amesbury G4</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation in a circular cist with a bronze dagger, bronze awl and a piece of blue-stone, all covered with whitish soil (wood?). Two secondary (?) inhumations were placed on the ground surface with antlers and more sarsen chippings. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 4 and part of a group immediately south west of Stonehenge recorded as SU 14 SW 88. Excavations by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century loctaed a primary cremation accompanied by a bronze dagger and an awl. A large piece of bluestone was found in the soil immediately above the cremation deposit. A secondary burial deposit featured two inhumations on the old ground surface, accompanied by antlers and sarsen chips. Bluestone chips had apparently been found in the mound previously by Stukeley (in the 1720s?). The barrow mound has been damaged almost beyond recognition, presumably by the roadway immediately to the west. Geophysical survey in the Stonehenge area in 1993-4 recorded a ring ditch of 29.5 metres diameter. The barrow mound survives as an earthwork and is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs, where it appears as two closely spaced concentric ditches. The barrow is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs, where it appears as two closely spaced concentric ditches with an overall diameter of 28m. It has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 16 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 127)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 16 is a mutilated flat barrow, 76 feet in diameter, and only 3 feet in elevation. This appears to have been one of those opened by Dr. Stukeley, and thus mentioned by him in his account of STONEHENGE (page 46). " And in a very great and old fashioned barrow, west from STONEHENGE, among such matters, I found bits of red and blue marble chippings of the stones of the temple ; so that, probably, the interred was one of the builders." During our researches in this tumulus, we perceived that a long section had been made, and found the bones of two skeletons which had been interred on the floor, also several pieces of stag's horns, animal bones, etc. as well as some fragments of sarsen stones, similar to those which form the great trilothons of STONEHENGE. On clearing out the earth from this section, we observed a small heap of whiter soil, which having removed, we came to the primary interment of burned bones within a fine circular cist, and found a spear head of brass in fine preservation, and a pin of the same metal. It is somewhat singular, that these burned bones (a more than usual quantity) should have laid unmolested in a barrow where there were a hundred rabbit holes. On removing the earth from over the cist, we found a large piece of one of the blue stones of STONEHENGE, which Sowerby the naturalist calls a horn stone, which, with the sarsen stone, is a very singular occurrence, and decidedly proves that the adjoining temple was erected previous to the tumulus. Some persons acquainted with the soil in this part of Wiltshire, might think the finding of sarsen stones no uncommon event, and I should perhaps have thought the same, had these specimens been rounded by attrition ; but the stones found within this barrow, are pieces chipped off, (I am sorry to say) like those now daily knocked off from the great fallen trilithon. With regard to the blue stone, we are certain this species is not to be found in the southern district of Wiltshire. In opening the fine bell-shaped barrow N. E. Of STONEHENGE, we also found one or two pieces of the chippings of these stones, as well as in the waggon tracks round the area of the temple. These circumstances tend to give a much higher aera of antiquity to our celebrated building, than some antiquaries would be willing to allow, and evidently prove that at the period when the tumuli adjoining Stonehenge were raised, the plain was covered with the chippings of the stones that had been employed in the formation of the stone circle.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=933186'>933186</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 396</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW728'>MWI12891 - SU14SW728</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012387'>1012387 (old #10389)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.28}'><img src='img/STHEAD.28.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.28' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.178008°N 1.831276°W</p>
redAmesbury 16127Amesbury G44933186http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=933186SU 14 SW 396MWI12891SU14SW728http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW728103891012387https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012387STHEAD.28
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.28}'><img src='img/STHEAD.28.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.28' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.28}'><img src='img/STHEAD.28.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.28' height='150'></a> </p>
51.178008°N 1.831276°W
73
51.17863664-1.830559258
Amesbury G10a
Amesbury 17
PS: Suggested location of a Neolithic long barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 10a. The mound was excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century without result. Ordnance Survey field investigation in 1971 recorded a denuded low oval mound 26 metres in length and a maximum of 30 centimetres high. The mound has since been scheduled as an oval barrow. However, geophysical survey in 1993-4 failed to record any trace of flanking ditches, and nothing has been observed on aerial photographs, although features representing Colt Hoare's trenches appear to have been located. Nevertheless, the slight oval mound recorded by the OS is still visible on the surface, measuring 24 by 20m and 0.2m high. The possible barrow is just discernible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 17 is a long barrow, in which we made no discovery.
Amesbury G10a
<p><strong>Amesbury G10a</strong></p><p>PS: Suggested location of a Neolithic long barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 10a. The mound was excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century without result. Ordnance Survey field investigation in 1971 recorded a denuded low oval mound 26 metres in length and a maximum of 30 centimetres high. The mound has since been scheduled as an oval barrow. However, geophysical survey in 1993-4 failed to record any trace of flanking ditches, and nothing has been observed on aerial photographs, although features representing Colt Hoare's trenches appear to have been located. Nevertheless, the slight oval mound recorded by the OS is still visible on the surface, measuring 24 by 20m and 0.2m high. The possible barrow is just discernible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 17 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 128)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 17 is a long barrow, in which we made no discovery.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219590'>219590</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 56</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW105'>MWI12440 - SU14SW105</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012384'>1012384 (old #10369)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.178636°N 1.830559°W</p>
redAmesbury 17128Amesbury G10a10219590http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219590SU 14 SW 56MWI12440SU14SW105http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW105103691012384https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101238451.178636°N 1.830559°W
74
51.177894-1.829961Amesbury G5Amesbury 18
PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 5 and part of the barrow group south west of Stonehenge recorded as SU 14 SW 88. Excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century without result. Geophysical survey in 1993-4 confirmed the presence of a surrounding ditch 39 metres in diameter. The mound survives to a height of 0.5 metres and the ditch is partly visible, 0.1m deep. The barrow is also visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs, where it appears as two closely spaced concentric ditches. It has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. LVG: Amesbury 5, a bowl barrow 108ft in diameter and 1ft high with a slight ditch.
RCH: No. 18 is injured by rabbits.
Amesbury G5
<p><strong>Amesbury G5</strong></p><p>PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 5 and part of the barrow group south west of Stonehenge recorded as SU 14 SW 88. Excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century without result. Geophysical survey in 1993-4 confirmed the presence of a surrounding ditch 39 metres in diameter. The mound survives to a height of 0.5 metres and the ditch is partly visible, 0.1m deep. The barrow is also visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs, where it appears as two closely spaced concentric ditches. It has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. LVG: Amesbury 5, a bowl barrow 108ft in diameter and 1ft high with a slight ditch.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 18 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 128)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 18 is injured by rabbits.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=933191'>933191</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 397</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW727'>MWI12890 - SU14SW727</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012383'>1012383 (old #10368)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.177894°N 1.829961°W</p>
redAmesbury 18128Amesbury G55933191http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=933191SU 14 SW 397MWI12890SU14SW727http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW727103681012383https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101238351.177894°N 1.829961°W
75
51.178198-1.829627Amesbury G6Amesbury 19
AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with oblong cist (primary interment removed). PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 6 and part of the barrow group to the south west of Stonehenge recorded as SU 14 SW 88. Excavations were carried out by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century, and apparently also the previous century by either Stukeley or Lord Pembroke. Apparently an inhumation was recovered from an "oblong cist", presumably a chalk-cut grave. Geophysical survey in 1993-4 confirmed that the barrow was surrounded by a double ring ditch, the inner ring apparently featuring gaps to the north west and south east. A central feature recorded might represent the primary burial pit or later disturbance. The mound survives as an earthwork 0.7 metres high and about 30 metres in diameter. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 19 seems to have been one of those opened either by Lord Pembroke, or Dr. Stukeley, who had been successful in finding the interment in an oblong cist.
Amesbury G6
<p><strong>Amesbury G6</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with oblong cist (primary interment removed). PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 6 and part of the barrow group to the south west of Stonehenge recorded as SU 14 SW 88. Excavations were carried out by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century, and apparently also the previous century by either Stukeley or Lord Pembroke. Apparently an inhumation was recovered from an "oblong cist", presumably a chalk-cut grave. Geophysical survey in 1993-4 confirmed that the barrow was surrounded by a double ring ditch, the inner ring apparently featuring gaps to the north west and south east. A central feature recorded might represent the primary burial pit or later disturbance. The mound survives as an earthwork 0.7 metres high and about 30 metres in diameter. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 19 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 128)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 19 seems to have been one of those opened either by Lord Pembroke, or Dr. Stukeley, who had been successful in finding the interment in an oblong cist.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=933195'>933195</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 398</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW729'>MWI12892 - SU14SW729</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012383'>1012383 (old #10368)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.178198°N 1.829627°W</p>
redAmesbury 19128Amesbury G66933195http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=933195SU 14 SW 398MWI12892SU14SW729http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW729103681012383https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101238351.178198°N 1.829627°W
76
51.178388-1.828948Amesbury G8Amesbury 20
AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with primary (?) inhumation. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 8 and part of the barrow group south west of Stonehenge and recorded as SU 14 SW 88. Excavations by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century located a primary inhumation. The barrow had apparently been disturbed on a previous occasion. Geophyisical survey in 1993-4 located a surrounding ditch of irregular, sub-circular form with at least two breaks in its circuit. The mound survives as an earthwork about 13 metres in diameter and 0.2 metres high. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 20. This barrow had been opened before, and contained the interment of a skeleton.
Amesbury G8
<p><strong>Amesbury G8</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with primary (?) inhumation. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 8 and part of the barrow group south west of Stonehenge and recorded as SU 14 SW 88. Excavations by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century located a primary inhumation. The barrow had apparently been disturbed on a previous occasion. Geophyisical survey in 1993-4 located a surrounding ditch of irregular, sub-circular form with at least two breaks in its circuit. The mound survives as an earthwork about 13 metres in diameter and 0.2 metres high. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 20 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 128)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 20. This barrow had been opened before, and contained the interment of a skeleton. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=933204'>933204</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 400</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW731'>MWI12894 - SU14SW731</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012383'>1012383 (old #10368)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.178388°N 1.828948°W</p>
redAmesbury 20128Amesbury G88933204http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=933204SU 14 SW 400MWI12894SU14SW731http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW731103681012383https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101238351.178388°N 1.828948°W
77
51.178021-1.829374Amesbury G7Amesbury 21
PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 7 and part of the barrow group located south west of Stonehenge and recorded as SU 14 SW 88. Excavations by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century were apparently unproductive. Geophyisical survey in 1993-4 recorded a broadly oval shaped ditch around the barrow, aligned NNW-SSE with at least two causeways towards its southern end. The mound survives as an earthwork 12 metres in diameter and 0.3 metres high. The barrow survives as a slight earthwork and is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs, where it appears as a broad oval ditch with a gap at its southern end. The barrow is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs, where it appears as a broad oval ditch 20m x 15m, with a gap in its southern end. It has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. A combination of earthwork and geophysical survey suggest that this barrow, which survives as a mound 0.2m high, has henge-like affinities and may have earlier origins (see <a target="_blank" href="http://research.historicengland.org.uk/redirect.aspx?id=6033|Stonehenge%20World%20Heritage%20Site%20Landscape%20Project:%20Stonehenge%20Down%20and%20the%20Triangle,%20Amesbury,%20Wiltshire">EH Research Report 105/2011</a>).
RCH: No. 21 and 22 were unproductive.
Amesbury G7
<p><strong>Amesbury G7</strong></p><p>PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 7 and part of the barrow group located south west of Stonehenge and recorded as SU 14 SW 88. Excavations by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century were apparently unproductive. Geophyisical survey in 1993-4 recorded a broadly oval shaped ditch around the barrow, aligned NNW-SSE with at least two causeways towards its southern end. The mound survives as an earthwork 12 metres in diameter and 0.3 metres high. The barrow survives as a slight earthwork and is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs, where it appears as a broad oval ditch with a gap at its southern end. The barrow is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs, where it appears as a broad oval ditch 20m x 15m, with a gap in its southern end. It has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. A combination of earthwork and geophysical survey suggest that this barrow, which survives as a mound 0.2m high, has henge-like affinities and may have earlier origins (see <a target="_blank" href="http://research.historicengland.org.uk/redirect.aspx?id=6033|Stonehenge%20World%20Heritage%20Site%20Landscape%20Project:%20Stonehenge%20Down%20and%20the%20Triangle,%20Amesbury,%20Wiltshire">EH Research Report 105/2011</a>).</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 21 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 128)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 21 and 22 were unproductive.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=933199'>933199</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 399</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW730'>MWI12893 - SU14SW730</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012383'>1012383 (old #10368)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.178021°N 1.829374°W</p>
redAmesbury 21128Amesbury G77933199http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=933199SU 14 SW 399MWI12893SU14SW730http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW730103681012383https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101238351.178021°N 1.829374°W
78
51.178132-1.828687Amesbury G9Amesbury 22
AM: Bowl barrow opened without result. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 9 and part of the barrow group to the south west of Stonehenge recorded as SU 14 SW 88. Excavations by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century were unproductive. Geophysical survey in 1993-4 recorded an irregular sub-circular surrounding ditch with several interruptions in its circuit. The mound itself is extremely mutilated and survives only as vague undulations. The ditch surrounding the barrow is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs. The barrow's broad perimeter ditch, 25m in diameter, is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. Very badly damaged barrow with mutilated earthworks. Geophysical survey shows considerable complexity in the surrounding ditch, suggesting that it might have originated as a henge monument (see <a target="_blank" href="http://research.historicengland.org.uk/redirect.aspx?id=6033|Stonehenge%20World%20Heritage%20Site%20Landscape%20Project:%20Stonehenge%20Down%20and%20the%20Triangle,%20Amesbury,%20Wiltshire">EH Research Report 105/2011</a>).
RCH: No. 21 and 22 were unproductive.
Amesbury G9
<p><strong>Amesbury G9</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow opened without result. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 9 and part of the barrow group to the south west of Stonehenge recorded as SU 14 SW 88. Excavations by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century were unproductive. Geophysical survey in 1993-4 recorded an irregular sub-circular surrounding ditch with several interruptions in its circuit. The mound itself is extremely mutilated and survives only as vague undulations. The ditch surrounding the barrow is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs. The barrow's broad perimeter ditch, 25m in diameter, is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. Very badly damaged barrow with mutilated earthworks. Geophysical survey shows considerable complexity in the surrounding ditch, suggesting that it might have originated as a henge monument (see <a target="_blank" href="http://research.historicengland.org.uk/redirect.aspx?id=6033|Stonehenge%20World%20Heritage%20Site%20Landscape%20Project:%20Stonehenge%20Down%20and%20the%20Triangle,%20Amesbury,%20Wiltshire">EH Research Report 105/2011</a>).</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 22 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 128)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 21 and 22 were unproductive.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=933206'>933206</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 401</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW732'>MWI12895 - SU14SW732</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012383'>1012383 (old #10368)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.178132°N 1.828687°W</p>
redAmesbury 22128Amesbury G99933206http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=933206SU 14 SW 401MWI12895SU14SW732http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW732103681012383https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101238351.178132°N 1.828687°W
79
51.178689-1.823622Amesbury G11Amesbury 23
AM: Bell barrow with primary cremation beneath a large inverted urn with bone tweezers. Pieces of bluestone were found in moundfill. PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow situated 100 metres east of Stonehenge south of the A344. The mound is surrounded by a berm and a ditch. The barrow is 23 metres in diameter and 3 metres high with a surrounding berm 5 metres wide. Surrounding the berm is a ditch 6 metres wide and 0.75 metres deep. The overall diameter is 45 metres. The barrow was partially excavated during the 19th century. Finds included a primary cremation with bone tweezers beneath an urn and fragments of blue stone. The bone tweezers are in Devizes Museum. The monument has recently been geophysically surveyed and it is likely that further remains of archaeological material lie within. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: Mr Cunnington attempted to explore this fine bell-shaped barrow some years ago, but was unsuccessful. On a second trial, I found that in his former operations he had left off within a few inches of a large rude sepulchral Urn inverted over a pile of burned bones, amongst which was an elegant pair of ivory tweezers.
Amesbury G11
<p><strong>Amesbury G11</strong></p><p>AM: Bell barrow with primary cremation beneath a large inverted urn with bone tweezers. Pieces of bluestone were found in moundfill. PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow situated 100 metres east of Stonehenge south of the A344. The mound is surrounded by a berm and a ditch. The barrow is 23 metres in diameter and 3 metres high with a surrounding berm 5 metres wide. Surrounding the berm is a ditch 6 metres wide and 0.75 metres deep. The overall diameter is 45 metres. The barrow was partially excavated during the 19th century. Finds included a primary cremation with bone tweezers beneath an urn and fragments of blue stone. The bone tweezers are in Devizes Museum. The monument has recently been geophysically surveyed and it is likely that further remains of archaeological material lie within. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 23 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 128)</strong></p><p>RCH: Mr Cunnington attempted to explore this fine bell-shaped barrow some years ago, but was unsuccessful. On a second trial, I found that in his former operations he had left off within a few inches of a large rude sepulchral Urn inverted over a pile of burned bones, amongst which was an elegant pair of ivory tweezers.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219690'>219690</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 90</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW753'>MWI12916 - SU14SW753</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012386'>1012386 (old #10371)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.139}'><img src='img/STHEAD.139.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.139' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.178689°N 1.823622°W</p>
redAmesbury 23128Amesbury G1111219690http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219690SU 14 SW 90MWI12916SU14SW753http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW753103711012386https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012386STHEAD.139
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.139}'><img src='img/STHEAD.139.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.139' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.139}'><img src='img/STHEAD.139.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.139' height='150'></a> </p>
51.178689°N 1.823622°W
80
51.18131257-1.816099406
Amesbury G39a
Amesbury 24
AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with 2 primary inhumations (an adult and child) in a very shallow cist. PS: Bronze Age round barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 39A, and located south of the Avenue (SU 14 SW 275). It was excavated in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare, who found the previously disturbed skeletons of an adult and child. The barrow is no longer extant as an earthwork, but has been observed as a cropmark on aerial photographs. The barrow defined by a single ditch about 16m in diameter, and is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs. It has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 24 is a very flat barrow, in which were the skeletons of an adult and a child, deposited in a very shallow cist, and which had been disturbed by a prior opening.
Amesbury G39a
<p><strong>Amesbury G39a</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with 2 primary inhumations (an adult and child) in a very shallow cist. PS: Bronze Age round barrow, listed by Grinsell as Amesbury 39A, and located south of the Avenue (SU 14 SW 275). It was excavated in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare, who found the previously disturbed skeletons of an adult and child. The barrow is no longer extant as an earthwork, but has been observed as a cropmark on aerial photographs. The barrow defined by a single ditch about 16m in diameter, and is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs. It has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 24 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 159)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 24 is a very flat barrow, in which were the skeletons of an adult and a child, deposited in a very shallow cist, and which had been disturbed by a prior opening.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219992'>219992</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 202</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW754'>MWI12917 - SU14SW754</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012388'>1012388 (old #10435)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.181312°N 1.816099°W</p>
redAmesbury 24159Amesbury G39a39219992http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219992SU 14 SW 202MWI12917SU14SW754http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW754104351012388https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101238851.181312°N 1.816099°W
81
51.18050171-1.815101145Amesbury G40Amesbury 25
AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (head to N.) in shallow cist with a bone pin and a drinking cup by its right side. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow, Amesbury 40, situated 400 metres west of New King Barrow cemetery. The mound is oval in shape originally 30 metres diameter but has been disturbed by agricultural activity, including ploughing, the construction of a boundary and animal burrowing. A surrounding quarry ditch that has now been infilled but is about 4m wide would have made the total diameter about 38m. Past excavation during the 19th century revealed a primary inhumation, drinking cup and bone pin. The barrow has been damaged by ploughing and the construction of a field boundary, but is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 25 is a wide bowl-shaped barrow, in which we found, within a shallow cist, a skeleton with its head towards the north, and a drinking cup by its right side, and near it a neatly formed pin or needle of bone.
Amesbury G40
<p><strong>Amesbury G40</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (head to N.) in shallow cist with a bone pin and a drinking cup by its right side. PS: Bronze Age bowl barrow, Amesbury 40, situated 400 metres west of New King Barrow cemetery. The mound is oval in shape originally 30 metres diameter but has been disturbed by agricultural activity, including ploughing, the construction of a boundary and animal burrowing. A surrounding quarry ditch that has now been infilled but is about 4m wide would have made the total diameter about 38m. Past excavation during the 19th century revealed a primary inhumation, drinking cup and bone pin. The barrow has been damaged by ploughing and the construction of a field boundary, but is visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 25 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 159)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 25 is a wide bowl-shaped barrow, in which we found, within a shallow cist, a skeleton with its head towards the north, and a drinking cup by its right side, and near it a neatly formed pin or needle of bone.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219744'>219744</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 108</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW759'>MWI12922 - SU14SW759</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1008946'>1008946 (old #10302)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.180501°N 1.815101°W</p>
redAmesbury 25159Amesbury G4040219744http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219744SU 14 SW 108MWI12922SU14SW759http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW759103021008946https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/100894651.180501°N 1.815101°W
82
51.1775314-1.813253237Amesbury G39Amesbury 26
AM: Bowl barrow with primary young adult male cremation in circular pile on ground surface with a V-perforated shale cone, a V-perforated amber cone, 2 fusiform shale beads and 18 oblate amber beads. Next to this was an oval area (13.6ft dia) covered by charcoal including some carbonized wooden planks. The ditch was broad and shallow but deeper in SE quarter. 2 post holes (1ft dia each) were in the SE quarter and 1 post hole (9x10in deep) was in the NE quarter. Moundfill consisted of a loam core containing occupation debris (possibly deliberately placed) and a chalk cap. Occupation debris included pottery sherds, flint tools, knapping debris, burnt sarsen, bone points and animal bones. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow truncated to the south by widening of the A303; it was listed as Amesbury 39 by Goddard (1913) and Grinsell (1957). The surviving mound is 33 metres in diameter and 1m high. It was been excavated twice: once in the 19th century and more recently in 1960 in advance of the A303 being widened. An outer quarry ditch had been in-filled, but survives as a buried feature about 5m in width. Finds include a primary cremation with amber, shale and jet objects and bone pins, sherds of Windmill Hill ware, Peterborough ware, and grooved ware. Other finds, mainly from topsoil, included Neolithic flints, pottery and animal remains, Iron Age pottery and Romano-British potsherds plus a coin of Arcadius. The surrounding ditch appeared to feature post-sockets in its base. Fragments of carbonised planks were also found within the centre of the mound and were radiocarbon dated (HAR-1237 1670bc +/- 90). The outer ditch of the barrow, and some traces of early excavation, can be seen as a cropmark on aerial photographs and the barrow was recorded over the winter of 2009-2010 as part of English Heritage?s Stonehenge WHS Landscape project. The outer ditch (circa 5m in diameter) of the barrow, and traces of early excavations, are visible as cropmarks on aerial photographs, and have been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No 26 is situated on the borders of the turnpike road and produced a large interment of burned bones on the floor, with a cone of jet, two oblong beads of the same substance, eighteen of amber and a very small cone of the same.
Amesbury G39
<p><strong>Amesbury G39</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary young adult male cremation in circular pile on ground surface with a V-perforated shale cone, a V-perforated amber cone, 2 fusiform shale beads and 18 oblate amber beads. Next to this was an oval area (13.6ft dia) covered by charcoal including some carbonized wooden planks. The ditch was broad and shallow but deeper in SE quarter. 2 post holes (1ft dia each) were in the SE quarter and 1 post hole (9x10in deep) was in the NE quarter. Moundfill consisted of a loam core containing occupation debris (possibly deliberately placed) and a chalk cap. Occupation debris included pottery sherds, flint tools, knapping debris, burnt sarsen, bone points and animal bones. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow truncated to the south by widening of the A303; it was listed as Amesbury 39 by Goddard (1913) and Grinsell (1957). The surviving mound is 33 metres in diameter and 1m high. It was been excavated twice: once in the 19th century and more recently in 1960 in advance of the A303 being widened. An outer quarry ditch had been in-filled, but survives as a buried feature about 5m in width. Finds include a primary cremation with amber, shale and jet objects and bone pins, sherds of Windmill Hill ware, Peterborough ware, and grooved ware. Other finds, mainly from topsoil, included Neolithic flints, pottery and animal remains, Iron Age pottery and Romano-British potsherds plus a coin of Arcadius. The surrounding ditch appeared to feature post-sockets in its base. Fragments of carbonised planks were also found within the centre of the mound and were radiocarbon dated (HAR-1237 1670bc +/- 90). The outer ditch of the barrow, and some traces of early excavation, can be seen as a cropmark on aerial photographs and the barrow was recorded over the winter of 2009-2010 as part of English Heritage?s Stonehenge WHS Landscape project. The outer ditch (circa 5m in diameter) of the barrow, and traces of early excavations, are visible as cropmarks on aerial photographs, and have been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 26 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 159)</strong></p><p>RCH: No 26 is situated on the borders of the turnpike road and produced a large interment of burned bones on the floor, with a cone of jet, two oblong beads of the same substance, eighteen of amber and a very small cone of the same.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219438'>219438</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 6</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW761'>MWI12924 - SU14SW761</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1008947'>1008947 (old #10303)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160d}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160d.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160d' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160e}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160e.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160e' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160f}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160f.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160f' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160g}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160g.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160g' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.177531°N 1.813253°W</p>
redAmesbury 26159Amesbury G3939219438http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219438SU 14 SW 6MWI12924SU14SW761http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW761103031008947https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1008947STHEAD.160dSTHEAD.160eSTHEAD.160fSTHEAD.160g
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160d}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160d.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160d' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160e}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160e.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160e' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160f}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160f.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160f' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160g}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160g.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160g' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160d}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160d.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160d' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160e}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160e.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160e' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160f}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160f.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160f' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160g}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160g.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160g' height='150'></a> </p>
51.177531°N 1.813253°W
83
51.18292342-1.811228484Amesbury G41Amesbury 27
AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with 4 primary (?) inhumations (2 adults and 2 children) with a flat ornamented bronze bracelet on the arm of one adult. PS: An Early Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as an earthwork; it was listed as Amesbury 41 by Goddard (1913) and Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century for Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found a possible primary burial deposit consisting of the skeletons of two adults and two children. One of the adults featured a bronze bracelet on its wrist [the bracelet is now in Devizes Museum]. It comprises a slightly oval mound, which measures 24m north / south by 19m wide and 0.7m high; evidently spread by ploughing in the mid-20th century. Geophysical surveys in 2011 also suggest other features within the mound, which was enclosed by a roughly oval ditch, indicating a multiphase monument use of which probably extended back into the Neolithic. The barrow is visible as an earthwork and a cropmark on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It appears as a circular mound enclosed by a ditch, with an overall diameter of about 30m.
RCH: Near the old King's Barrows is a solitary tumulus, No. 27, which appeared to have had a prior opening, and to have contained originally, the skeletons of two adults, and two children. Round the arm of one of the former was an ornamented bracelet of brass, which the labourers unfortunately trod upon, before they perceived it, and broke it into three pieces, but it has been repaired, and preserved in our Museum.
Amesbury G41
<p><strong>Amesbury G41</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow (previously disturbed) with 4 primary (?) inhumations (2 adults and 2 children) with a flat ornamented bronze bracelet on the arm of one adult. PS: An Early Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as an earthwork; it was listed as Amesbury 41 by Goddard (1913) and Grinsell (1957). The round barrow was excavated in the early 19th century for Sir Richard Colt Hoare, who found a possible primary burial deposit consisting of the skeletons of two adults and two children. One of the adults featured a bronze bracelet on its wrist [the bracelet is now in Devizes Museum]. It comprises a slightly oval mound, which measures 24m north / south by 19m wide and 0.7m high; evidently spread by ploughing in the mid-20th century. Geophysical surveys in 2011 also suggest other features within the mound, which was enclosed by a roughly oval ditch, indicating a multiphase monument use of which probably extended back into the Neolithic. The barrow is visible as an earthwork and a cropmark on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project. It appears as a circular mound enclosed by a ditch, with an overall diameter of about 30m.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 27 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 159)</strong></p><p>RCH: Near the old King's Barrows is a solitary tumulus, No. 27, which appeared to have had a prior opening, and to have contained originally, the skeletons of two adults, and two children. Round the arm of one of the former was an ornamented bracelet of brass, which the labourers unfortunately trod upon, before they perceived it, and broke it into three pieces, but it has been repaired, and preserved in our Museum.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219747'>219747</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 109</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW760'>MWI12923 - SU14SW760</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1008948'>1008948 (old #10304)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.182923°N 1.811228°W</p>
redAmesbury 27159Amesbury G4141219747http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219747SU 14 SW 109MWI12923SU14SW760http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW760103041008948https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1008948STHEAD.160
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160' height='150'></a> </p>
51.182923°N 1.811228°W
84
51.18420985-1.829251185Amesbury G43Amesbury 28
PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow, known as Amesbury 43, survives as earthworks and forms part of the Cursus barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow measures 60m in diameter and comprises a roughly circular central mound, 3.4m high, which sits on a plinth and is surrounded by a concentric ring ditch. Berms separate the mound from the edge of the plinth, and the bottom of the plinth and the ditch. The barrow was opened by Lord Pembroke in 1722, reopened by Stukeley in 1723 and is Colt Hoare's Barrow 28. It was listed as Amesbury 43 by Goddard and by Grinsell (as a bell barrow). In 1913 Maud Cunnington noted it was in good condition having never been ploughed. The north and eastern parts of the barrow have been damaged by construction of the mid-18th century turnpike road (Monument Number 959704). The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: On approaching the CURSUS, we find a numerous continuation of barrows, flanking the southern side of it; the first of which is No. 28, and one of those opened by Lord Pembroke, in the year 1722.
Amesbury G43
<p><strong>Amesbury G43</strong></p><p>PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow, known as Amesbury 43, survives as earthworks and forms part of the Cursus barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow measures 60m in diameter and comprises a roughly circular central mound, 3.4m high, which sits on a plinth and is surrounded by a concentric ring ditch. Berms separate the mound from the edge of the plinth, and the bottom of the plinth and the ditch. The barrow was opened by Lord Pembroke in 1722, reopened by Stukeley in 1723 and is Colt Hoare's Barrow 28. It was listed as Amesbury 43 by Goddard and by Grinsell (as a bell barrow). In 1913 Maud Cunnington noted it was in good condition having never been ploughed. The north and eastern parts of the barrow have been damaged by construction of the mid-18th century turnpike road (Monument Number 959704). The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 28 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 160)</strong></p><p>RCH: On approaching the CURSUS, we find a numerous continuation of barrows, flanking the southern side of it; the first of which is No. 28, and one of those opened by Lord Pembroke, in the year 1722.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942691'>942691</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 425</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW744'>MWI12907 - SU14SW744</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012586'>1012586 (old #10452)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.184209°N 1.829251°W</p>
redAmesbury 28160Amesbury G4343942691http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942691SU 14 SW 425MWI12907SU14SW744http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW744104521012586https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101258651.184209°N 1.829251°W
85
51.184161-1.830092Amesbury G44Amesbury 29
AM: Twin Bell barrow. First Mound (W.) with primary cremation in oblong cist (2ftx15inx18in deep) with 6 horn beads (4 perforated and two flat and circular) all burned (like the other mound's objects). The floor of the barrow was also covered with ashes. Later a secondary male inhumation (head to N.) was placed just below the mound surface (in a mix of chalk and 'garden mould' indicating an intrusion). Second Mound (E.) with primary (?) cremation (of a young girl of 14yrs?) under enlarged food vessel urn (MBA) with a bronze awl, a flat dagger, a gold mounted amber disk, amber beads, stud and space-plates, faience beads, shale beads (including pulley beads) and beads of `yellow glass' (quartz calcite?) all having been burnt. Moundfill consisted of a layer of vegetable earth over the urn, covered by a layer of flints (1ft thick), another layer of earth and a cap of chalk. PS: A Bronze Age twin bell barrow, known as Amesbury 44, survives as earthworks and forms part of the Cursus barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219681). It comprises two barrow mounds which are completely surrounded by a single ring ditch. The barrows measure an overall length of 42m and width of 34m. The larger, westernmost mound stands 2.3m high and the lower, eastern, mound stands 1.6m high. Both mounds were dug into by Stukeley in 1723 for Lord Pembroke, and the western mound was re-excavated by Cunnington in 1803 (Barrow 29). The western mound contained a primary cremation with six horn beads, plus an intrusive inhumation 14 inches below the surface of the mound. The smaller eastern mound contained a cremation in an urn, accompanied by a javelin or spear -head, a pin and numerous beads. The barrow was listed as Amesbury 44 by Goddard (as a twin barrow) and by Grinsell (as a twin bell barrow). In 1913 Maud Cunnington noted it was in good condition having never been ploughed. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: On approaching the CURSUS, we find a numerous continuation of barrows, flanking the southern side of it; the first of which is No. 28, and one of those opened by Lord Pembroke, in the year 1722, as well as No. 29, of which I shall copy the account given by STUKELEY, in his description of STONEHENGE, page 44.... "In the year 1723, by Thomas Earl of Pembroke's order, I begun upon a barrow north of STONEHENGE, in that group south of the Cursus. It is one of the double barrows there, and the more easterly and lower of the two ; likewise somewhat less. It was reasonable to believe, this was the sepulture of a man and his wife ; and that the lesser was the female ; and so it proved, at least a daughter. We made a large cut on the top, from east to west, and after the turf was taken off, we came to the layer of chalk, then to fine garden mould. About three feet below the surface was a layer of flints, humouring the convexity of the barrow. These flints are gathered from the surface of the downs in some places, especially where it has been ploughed. This being about a foot thick, rested on a layer of soft mould another foot, in which was enclosed an urn full of bones. The urn was of unbaked clay, of a dark reddish colour, and crumbled into pieces. It had been rudely wrought with small mouldings round the verge, and other circular channels on the outside, with several indentures between, made with a pointed tool, (see Plate XXXII. where I have drawn all things found in this barrow.). The bones had been burned, and crowded all together in a little heap, not so much as a hat crown would contain. The collar-bone, and one side of the under jaw, are graved in their true magnitude. It appears to have been a girl of about 14 years old, by their bulk, and the great quantity of female ornaments mixed with the bones, all which we gathered. Beads of all sorts, and in great number, of glass of divers colours, most yellow, one black; many single, many in long pieces notched between, so as to resemble a string of beads, and these were generally of a blue colour. There were many of amber, of all shapes and sizes; flat squares, long squares, round, oblong, little and great. Likewise many of earth, of different shapes, magnitude, and colour; some little and white, many large and flattish like a button, others like a pully; but all had holes to run a string through, either through their diameter, or sides. Many of the button sort seem to have been covered 'with metal, there being a rim worked in them, wherein to turn the edge of the covering. One of these was covered with a thin film of pure gold. These were the young lady's ornaments ; and all had undergone the fire, so that what would easily consume, fell to pieces as soon as handled ; much of the amber was burned half through. This person was a heroine, for we found the head of her javelin in brass. At bottom are two holes for the pins that fastened it to the staff. Besides, there was a sharp bodkin, round at one end, square at the other, where it went into a handle. I still preserve whatever is permanent of these trinkets; but we recomposed the ashes of the illustrious defunct, and covered them with earth, leaving visible marks at top, of the barrow having been opened, to dissuade any other from again disturbing them; and this was our practice in all the rest. Then we opened the next barrow to it, enclosed in the same ditch, which we supposed the husband or father of this lady. At fourteen inches deep, the mould being mixed with chalk, we came to the entire skeleton of a man; the skull and all the bones exceedingly rotten, and perished through length of time ; though this was a barrow of the latest sort, as we conjecture. The body lay north and south, the head to the north." Not dissuaded by the external appearances, and convinced by experience that all interments found near the surface were subsequent deposits, Mr. CUNNINGTON, in 1803, explored the second tumulus, by making a section rather to the south of the centre, when at the depth of six feet, he came to the floor of the barrow, which was covered with ashes ; and on digging still further to the south, he found a fine oblong cist, about eighteen inches deep, fifteen-inches wide, and two feet long; and in it a complete interment of burned bones, and with them six beads apparently of horn, four of which were perforated ; the other two were circular, and rather flat, but all appeared as though they had been burned. Dr. STUKELEY made the same observation respecting the articles found in the other barrow ; but he must have been mistaken as to the amber, for we know that fire would entirely consume it.
Amesbury G44
<p><strong>Amesbury G44</strong></p><p>AM: Twin Bell barrow. First Mound (W.) with primary cremation in oblong cist (2ftx15inx18in deep) with 6 horn beads (4 perforated and two flat and circular) all burned (like the other mound's objects). The floor of the barrow was also covered with ashes. Later a secondary male inhumation (head to N.) was placed just below the mound surface (in a mix of chalk and 'garden mould' indicating an intrusion). Second Mound (E.) with primary (?) cremation (of a young girl of 14yrs?) under enlarged food vessel urn (MBA) with a bronze awl, a flat dagger, a gold mounted amber disk, amber beads, stud and space-plates, faience beads, shale beads (including pulley beads) and beads of `yellow glass' (quartz calcite?) all having been burnt. Moundfill consisted of a layer of vegetable earth over the urn, covered by a layer of flints (1ft thick), another layer of earth and a cap of chalk. PS: A Bronze Age twin bell barrow, known as Amesbury 44, survives as earthworks and forms part of the Cursus barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219681). It comprises two barrow mounds which are completely surrounded by a single ring ditch. The barrows measure an overall length of 42m and width of 34m. The larger, westernmost mound stands 2.3m high and the lower, eastern, mound stands 1.6m high. Both mounds were dug into by Stukeley in 1723 for Lord Pembroke, and the western mound was re-excavated by Cunnington in 1803 (Barrow 29). The western mound contained a primary cremation with six horn beads, plus an intrusive inhumation 14 inches below the surface of the mound. The smaller eastern mound contained a cremation in an urn, accompanied by a javelin or spear -head, a pin and numerous beads. The barrow was listed as Amesbury 44 by Goddard (as a twin barrow) and by Grinsell (as a twin bell barrow). In 1913 Maud Cunnington noted it was in good condition having never been ploughed. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 29 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 160)</strong></p><p>RCH: On approaching the CURSUS, we find a numerous continuation of barrows, flanking the southern side of it; the first of which is No. 28, and one of those opened by Lord Pembroke, in the year 1722, as well as No. 29, of which I shall copy the account given by STUKELEY, in his description of STONEHENGE, page 44.... "In the year 1723, by Thomas Earl of Pembroke's order, I begun upon a barrow north of STONEHENGE, in that group south of the Cursus. It is one of the double barrows there, and the more easterly and lower of the two ; likewise somewhat less. It was reasonable to believe, this was the sepulture of a man and his wife ; and that the lesser was the female ; and so it proved, at least a daughter. We made a large cut on the top, from east to west, and after the turf was taken off, we came to the layer of chalk, then to fine garden mould. About three feet below the surface was a layer of flints, humouring the convexity of the barrow. These flints are gathered from the surface of the downs in some places, especially where it has been ploughed. This being about a foot thick, rested on a layer of soft mould another foot, in which was enclosed an urn full of bones. The urn was of unbaked clay, of a dark reddish colour, and crumbled into pieces. It had been rudely wrought with small mouldings round the verge, and other circular channels on the outside, with several indentures between, made with a pointed tool, (see Plate XXXII. where I have drawn all things found in this barrow.). The bones had been burned, and crowded all together in a little heap, not so much as a hat crown would contain. The collar-bone, and one side of the under jaw, are graved in their true magnitude. It appears to have been a girl of about 14 years old, by their bulk, and the great quantity of female ornaments mixed with the bones, all which we gathered. Beads of all sorts, and in great number, of glass of divers colours, most yellow, one black; many single, many in long pieces notched between, so as to resemble a string of beads, and these were generally of a blue colour. There were many of amber, of all shapes and sizes; flat squares, long squares, round, oblong, little and great. Likewise many of earth, of different shapes, magnitude, and colour; some little and white, many large and flattish like a button, others like a pully; but all had holes to run a string through, either through their diameter, or sides. Many of the button sort seem to have been covered 'with metal, there being a rim worked in them, wherein to turn the edge of the covering. One of these was covered with a thin film of pure gold. These were the young lady's ornaments ; and all had undergone the fire, so that what would easily consume, fell to pieces as soon as handled ; much of the amber was burned half through. This person was a heroine, for we found the head of her javelin in brass. At bottom are two holes for the pins that fastened it to the staff. Besides, there was a sharp bodkin, round at one end, square at the other, where it went into a handle. I still preserve whatever is permanent of these trinkets; but we recomposed the ashes of the illustrious defunct, and covered them with earth, leaving visible marks at top, of the barrow having been opened, to dissuade any other from again disturbing them; and this was our practice in all the rest. Then we opened the next barrow to it, enclosed in the same ditch, which we supposed the husband or father of this lady. At fourteen inches deep, the mould being mixed with chalk, we came to the entire skeleton of a man; the skull and all the bones exceedingly rotten, and perished through length of time ; though this was a barrow of the latest sort, as we conjecture. The body lay north and south, the head to the north." Not dissuaded by the external appearances, and convinced by experience that all interments found near the surface were subsequent deposits, Mr. CUNNINGTON, in 1803, explored the second tumulus, by making a section rather to the south of the centre, when at the depth of six feet, he came to the floor of the barrow, which was covered with ashes ; and on digging still further to the south, he found a fine oblong cist, about eighteen inches deep, fifteen-inches wide, and two feet long; and in it a complete interment of burned bones, and with them six beads apparently of horn, four of which were perforated ; the other two were circular, and rather flat, but all appeared as though they had been burned. Dr. STUKELEY made the same observation respecting the articles found in the other barrow ; but he must have been mistaken as to the amber, for we know that fire would entirely consume it.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942696'>942696</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 426</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW745'>MWI12908 - SU14SW745</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012586'>1012586 (old #10452)</a></p><p><strong>Additional Notes: </strong>Excavated by Stukeley in 1723 and the objects found are drawn in Plate XXXII of his book "Stonehenge - A Temple Restor'd to the British Druids". <p><img src="img/pl32.jpg"></p></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.184161°N 1.830092°W</p>
redAmesbury 29160Amesbury G4444942696http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942696SU 14 SW 426MWI12908SU14SW745
Excavated by Stukeley in 1723 and the objects found are drawn in Plate XXXII of his book "Stonehenge - A Temple Restor'd to the British Druids". <p><img src="img/pl32.jpg"></p>
http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW745104521012586https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101258651.184161°N 1.830092°W
86
51.18412344-1.831683831Amesbury G45Amesbury 30
AM: Bell barrow (15ft high) with primary cremation on surface (location of pyre) close to a small circular cist which contained ashes & small bones. PS: A large Bronze Age bell barrow, known as Amesbury 45, survives as earthworks and forms part of the Cursus barrow group (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow has an overall diameter of 56m and comprises a central mound which stands 3.5m high and sits on a roughly concentric but sub-circular plinth completely surrounded by a ring ditch. Berms separate the bottom of the mound and the edge of the plinth and the bottom of the plinth and the ditch. The mound was excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century (Barrow 30), who found a simple unaccompanied cremation close to a cist of black ashes with a few bits of burnt bone. The barrow was listed as Amesbury 45 by Goddard (as a very large bell barrow 15ft high) and by Grinsell (as a bell barrow). In 1913 Maud Cunnington noted it was in good condition having never been ploughed. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 30. A beautiful bell-shaped barrow, and the largest of this group. It measures in diameter from ditch to ditch one hundred and thirty-one feet, and fifteen feet in elevation. The superior size and beauty of this tumulus particularly excited our curiosity, and raised our expectations of success ; but alas ! after immense labour in throwing out the earth, to the depth of fifteen feet, we found only a simple interment of burned bones, unaccompanied by any urn, arms, or trinkets ; the relicts were piled up in a little heap upon the floor where the body had been burned, and close to a small circular cist or cinerarium, which contained black ashes, intermixed with some small fragments of bone.
Amesbury G45
<p><strong>Amesbury G45</strong></p><p>AM: Bell barrow (15ft high) with primary cremation on surface (location of pyre) close to a small circular cist which contained ashes & small bones. PS: A large Bronze Age bell barrow, known as Amesbury 45, survives as earthworks and forms part of the Cursus barrow group (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow has an overall diameter of 56m and comprises a central mound which stands 3.5m high and sits on a roughly concentric but sub-circular plinth completely surrounded by a ring ditch. Berms separate the bottom of the mound and the edge of the plinth and the bottom of the plinth and the ditch. The mound was excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century (Barrow 30), who found a simple unaccompanied cremation close to a cist of black ashes with a few bits of burnt bone. The barrow was listed as Amesbury 45 by Goddard (as a very large bell barrow 15ft high) and by Grinsell (as a bell barrow). In 1913 Maud Cunnington noted it was in good condition having never been ploughed. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 30 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 162)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 30. A beautiful bell-shaped barrow, and the largest of this group. It measures in diameter from ditch to ditch one hundred and thirty-one feet, and fifteen feet in elevation. The superior size and beauty of this tumulus particularly excited our curiosity, and raised our expectations of success ; but alas ! after immense labour in throwing out the earth, to the depth of fifteen feet, we found only a simple interment of burned bones, unaccompanied by any urn, arms, or trinkets ; the relicts were piled up in a little heap upon the floor where the body had been burned, and close to a small circular cist or cinerarium, which contained black ashes, intermixed with some small fragments of bone. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942703'>942703</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 427</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW746'>MWI12909 - SU14SW746</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012401'>1012401 (old #10342)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.184123°N 1.831683°W</p>
redAmesbury 30162Amesbury G4545942703http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942703SU 14 SW 427MWI12909SU14SW746http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW746103421012401https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101240151.184123°N 1.831683°W
87
51.18413475-1.832501Amesbury G46Amesbury 31
AM: Bowl/Bell barrow with primary cremation on ground surface with flat bronze dagger. PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow, known as Amesbury 46, survives as earthworks and forms part of the Cursus barrow group (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow has an overall diameter of 40m and comprises a roughly circular central mound, 1.7m high, which sits on a plinth surrounded by a ring ditch that is conjoined with that around Amesbury 47 to the west (Monument Number 942709). The plinth suggests more than one structural phase. The barrow mound was excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century (Barrow 31) who described it as bowl-shaped and recovered burned bones with a small spear head, now in Devizes Museum. A collared urn sherd was found nearby in 1957. The barrow was listed as Amesbury 46 by Goddard and by Grinsell (as a bell barrow). In 1913 Maud Cunnington noted it was in good condition having never been ploughed. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 31, a bowl shaped barrow one hundred and four feet in base diameter, and seventy-one and a half in elevation, produced on its floor an interment of burnt bones, with a small spear head.
Amesbury G46
<p><strong>Amesbury G46</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl/Bell barrow with primary cremation on ground surface with flat bronze dagger. PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow, known as Amesbury 46, survives as earthworks and forms part of the Cursus barrow group (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow has an overall diameter of 40m and comprises a roughly circular central mound, 1.7m high, which sits on a plinth surrounded by a ring ditch that is conjoined with that around Amesbury 47 to the west (Monument Number 942709). The plinth suggests more than one structural phase. The barrow mound was excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century (Barrow 31) who described it as bowl-shaped and recovered burned bones with a small spear head, now in Devizes Museum. A collared urn sherd was found nearby in 1957. The barrow was listed as Amesbury 46 by Goddard and by Grinsell (as a bell barrow). In 1913 Maud Cunnington noted it was in good condition having never been ploughed. The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 31 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 162)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 31, a bowl shaped barrow one hundred and four feet in base diameter, and seventy-one and a half in elevation, produced on its floor an interment of burnt bones, with a small spear head.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942705'>942705</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 428</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW747'>MWI12910 - SU14SW747</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012401'>1012401 (old #10342)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.129}'><img src='img/STHEAD.129.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.129' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.184134°N 1.832501°W</p>
redAmesbury 31162Amesbury G4646942705http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942705SU 14 SW 428MWI12910SU14SW747http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW747103421012401https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012401STHEAD.129
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.129}'><img src='img/STHEAD.129.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.129' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.129}'><img src='img/STHEAD.129.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.129' height='150'></a> </p>
51.184134°N 1.832501°W
88
51.18413537-1.832971844Amesbury G47Amesbury 32
AM: Bell barrow with primary cremation. PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow, known as Amesbury 47, survives as earthworks and forms part of the Cursus barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow has an overall diameter of circa 36m and comprises a central oval mound, 1.6m high, surrounded by a concentric berm and outer ring ditch. The ring ditch joins that surrounding the next barrow to the east, Amesbury 46 (Monument Number 942705). Excavations for Colt Hoare in the early 19th century located a simple interment of burned bones (Barrow 32). In 1913 Maud Cunnington noted the barrow was in good condition having never been ploughed. It was listed as Amesbury 47 by Goddard (as a large bell barrow) and by Grinsell (as a bell barrow). The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: No. 32, a fine bell-shaped barrow, contained only a simple interment of burned bones.
Amesbury G47
<p><strong>Amesbury G47</strong></p><p>AM: Bell barrow with primary cremation. PS: A Bronze Age bell barrow, known as Amesbury 47, survives as earthworks and forms part of the Cursus barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow has an overall diameter of circa 36m and comprises a central oval mound, 1.6m high, surrounded by a concentric berm and outer ring ditch. The ring ditch joins that surrounding the next barrow to the east, Amesbury 46 (Monument Number 942705). Excavations for Colt Hoare in the early 19th century located a simple interment of burned bones (Barrow 32). In 1913 Maud Cunnington noted the barrow was in good condition having never been ploughed. It was listed as Amesbury 47 by Goddard (as a large bell barrow) and by Grinsell (as a bell barrow). The barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 32 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 162)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 32, a fine bell-shaped barrow, contained only a simple interment of burned bones.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942709'>942709</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 429</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW748'>MWI12911 - SU14SW748</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012401'>1012401 (old #10342)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.184135°N 1.832971°W</p>
redAmesbury 32162Amesbury G4747942709http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942709SU 14 SW 429MWI12911SU14SW748http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW748103421012401https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101240151.184135°N 1.832971°W
89
51.18420655-1.833972406Amesbury G48Amesbury 33
AM: Bowl barrow with outer bank with primary cremation in circular cist (2ft deep) with beads of amber, stone, faience and a 'transparent hornlike substance'. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow, known as Amesbury 48, survives as earthworks and forms part of the Cursus barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow has an overall diameter of 38m and comprises a roughly circular mound, only 0.3m high, surrounded by a concentric ring ditch, with a very slight outer bank. A slight causeway crosses the ditch to the north of the mound. Excavations by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century (Barrow 33) recovered a primary cremation with beads of stone, amber and faience, some of which are in Devizes Museum. In 1913 Maud Cunnington noted the barrow was in good condition having never been ploughed but the barrow was subsequently ploughed for much of the 20th century. The barrow was listed as Amesbury 48 by Goddard (as a disc-shaped barrow) and by Grinsell (as a bowl barrow with outer bank). The barrow was surveyed at 1:1000 by English Heritage in April 2009 as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. The surviving earthworks suggest the central mound was relatively broad with no berm between the barrow mound and the surrounding ring ditch: perhaps a saucer barrow.
RCH: No. 33 is a kind of druid barrow, presenting an area of 78ft diameter surrounded by a fine vallum without a ditch but having no elevation as usual in the centre. Deprived of this index to the place of interment we expected much trouble in finding it, but our workmen luckily hit on the very spot and at a depth of 2 feet found a circular cist containing a deposit of burned bones together with a great many beads. Some of them were pully beads of glass, two of stone, another of a transparent hornlike substance; but the most were of amber and much decayed.
Amesbury G48
<p><strong>Amesbury G48</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with outer bank with primary cremation in circular cist (2ft deep) with beads of amber, stone, faience and a 'transparent hornlike substance'. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow, known as Amesbury 48, survives as earthworks and forms part of the Cursus barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow has an overall diameter of 38m and comprises a roughly circular mound, only 0.3m high, surrounded by a concentric ring ditch, with a very slight outer bank. A slight causeway crosses the ditch to the north of the mound. Excavations by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century (Barrow 33) recovered a primary cremation with beads of stone, amber and faience, some of which are in Devizes Museum. In 1913 Maud Cunnington noted the barrow was in good condition having never been ploughed but the barrow was subsequently ploughed for much of the 20th century. The barrow was listed as Amesbury 48 by Goddard (as a disc-shaped barrow) and by Grinsell (as a bowl barrow with outer bank). The barrow was surveyed at 1:1000 by English Heritage in April 2009 as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. The surviving earthworks suggest the central mound was relatively broad with no berm between the barrow mound and the surrounding ring ditch: perhaps a saucer barrow. </p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 33 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 162)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 33 is a kind of druid barrow, presenting an area of 78ft diameter surrounded by a fine vallum without a ditch but having no elevation as usual in the centre. Deprived of this index to the place of interment we expected much trouble in finding it, but our workmen luckily hit on the very spot and at a depth of 2 feet found a circular cist containing a deposit of burned bones together with a great many beads. Some of them were pully beads of glass, two of stone, another of a transparent hornlike substance; but the most were of amber and much decayed. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942712'>942712</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 430</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW749'>MWI12912 - SU14SW749</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012401'>1012401 (old #10342)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160b' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160c}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160c.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160c' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160h}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160h.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160h' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.184206°N 1.833972°W</p>
redAmesbury 33162Amesbury G4848942712http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942712SU 14 SW 430MWI12912SU14SW749http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW749103421012401https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012401STHEAD.160aSTHEAD.160bSTHEAD.160cSTHEAD.160h
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160a' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160b' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160c}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160c.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160c' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160h}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160h.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160h' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160b' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160c}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160c.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160c' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.160h}'><img src='img/STHEAD.160h.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.160h' height='150'></a> </p>
51.184206°N 1.833972°W
90
51.18413032-1.836548429Amesbury G49Amesbury 34
PS: A Bronze Age round barrow, known as Amesbury 49, survives as slight earthworks and forms part of the Cursus Barrow Group (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow measures approximately 26m in diameter: it comprises a sub-circular mound with slight traces of a ditch visible to its south-west. It was listed as a bowl barrow by both Goddard and Grinsell (Amesbury 49). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century without result (Barrow 34). A rough flint pick found on the surface of the barrow is in Devizes Museum. The barrow was considered in good condition in 1913 but was severely damaged by ploughing in the mid-20th century, when it is also visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs. The round barrow was surveyed by English Heritage in April 2009 at a scale of 1:1000 as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 34 has had a prior opening.
Amesbury G49
<p><strong>Amesbury G49</strong></p><p>PS: A Bronze Age round barrow, known as Amesbury 49, survives as slight earthworks and forms part of the Cursus Barrow Group (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow measures approximately 26m in diameter: it comprises a sub-circular mound with slight traces of a ditch visible to its south-west. It was listed as a bowl barrow by both Goddard and Grinsell (Amesbury 49). The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century without result (Barrow 34). A rough flint pick found on the surface of the barrow is in Devizes Museum. The barrow was considered in good condition in 1913 but was severely damaged by ploughing in the mid-20th century, when it is also visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs. The round barrow was surveyed by English Heritage in April 2009 at a scale of 1:1000 as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 34 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 163)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 34 has had a prior opening.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942659'>942659</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 420</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW733'>MWI12896 - SU14SW733</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012400'>1012400 (old #10341)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.184130°N 1.836548°W</p>
redAmesbury 34163Amesbury G4949942659http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942659SU 14 SW 420MWI12896SU14SW733http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW733103411012400https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101240051.184130°N 1.836548°W
91
51.183211-1.837267289Amesbury G50Amesbury 35
AM: Bowl barrow opened without result. PS: A Neolithic / Bronze Age round barrow, known as Amesbury 50, survives as slight earthworks and forms part of the Cursus Barrow Group (Monument Number 219681). The barrow comprises a central oval mound flanked by two asymmetric side ditches which have opposing entrances to the south-west and north-east, orientated along the 105m contour on which the barrow sits. The barrow mound stands circa 0.5m high and measures between 19m and 21 in diameter. The flanking ditches measure circa 0.1m deep and a maximum of 12m wide. Small causeways inside the ditches indicate that the ditches were dug in segments. Geophysical survey in July 2010 shows the two side ditches were dug as a series of large pits within which was one, possibly two oval rings of smaller pits. The combined surveys suggest the site was a perhaps a hengiform monument containing an oval structure, perhaps of timber, with a later round mound inserted (see <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/1461957112Y.0000000025">European Journal of Archaeology Volume 16, Issue 1, 2013</a>). The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare without result (Barrow 35), although it is possible that a small plain food vessel was recovered from the barrow by Cunnington senior. It was listed as Amesbury 50 by Goddard and by Grinsell (as a bowl barrow) and was considered in good condition by Maud Cunnington in 1913 but was damaged by ploughing in the mid-20th century, when it is also visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs. The round barrow was surveyed at 1:1000 scale by English Heritage in April 2009 as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: In No. 35 we could not find the interment.
Amesbury G50
<p><strong>Amesbury G50</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow opened without result. PS: A Neolithic / Bronze Age round barrow, known as Amesbury 50, survives as slight earthworks and forms part of the Cursus Barrow Group (Monument Number 219681). The barrow comprises a central oval mound flanked by two asymmetric side ditches which have opposing entrances to the south-west and north-east, orientated along the 105m contour on which the barrow sits. The barrow mound stands circa 0.5m high and measures between 19m and 21 in diameter. The flanking ditches measure circa 0.1m deep and a maximum of 12m wide. Small causeways inside the ditches indicate that the ditches were dug in segments. Geophysical survey in July 2010 shows the two side ditches were dug as a series of large pits within which was one, possibly two oval rings of smaller pits. The combined surveys suggest the site was a perhaps a hengiform monument containing an oval structure, perhaps of timber, with a later round mound inserted (see <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/1461957112Y.0000000025">European Journal of Archaeology Volume 16, Issue 1, 2013</a>). The barrow was excavated in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare without result (Barrow 35), although it is possible that a small plain food vessel was recovered from the barrow by Cunnington senior. It was listed as Amesbury 50 by Goddard and by Grinsell (as a bowl barrow) and was considered in good condition by Maud Cunnington in 1913 but was damaged by ploughing in the mid-20th century, when it is also visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs. The round barrow was surveyed at 1:1000 scale by English Heritage in April 2009 as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 35 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 163)</strong></p><p>RCH: In No. 35 we could not find the interment.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942661'>942661</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 421</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW734'>MWI12897 - SU14SW734</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012399'>1012399 (old #10340)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.183211°N 1.837267°W</p>
redAmesbury 35163Amesbury G5050942661http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942661SU 14 SW 421MWI12897SU14SW734http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW734103401012399https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101239951.183211°N 1.837267°W
92
51.1836825-1.837837696Amesbury G51Amesbury 36
AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (N./S.) in deep cist (6ft) with trepanned skull and 5in. skull disc with Type A Beaker. A large coffin or mortuary house with four posts stood in the grave. A secondary inhumation (N./S.) was placed on the ground surface with a `drinking cup' and decayed leather (?) to the right of its head. Another secondary (or intrusive) inhumation (N./S.) was placed above this. Two barbed and tanged arrowheads were found in the gravefill from one of these burials. The moundfill consisted of a loam core capped by chalk and surrounded by a causewayed ditch separated by a berm from the mound. In the moundfill, a secondary crouched inhumation was placed in the mound covered by a tapering board with a wooden knife-like implement by its face, a long-necked Beaker, a handled awl, a flint scraper and antler points. Intrusive into the ditch silt was another secondary crouched inhumation with a Bell Beaker. Blue stone fragments were also in the ditch silt. PS: A reconstructed Bronze Age round barrow, known as Amesbury 51, which forms part of the Cursus barrow group (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow has an overall diameter of approximately 36m. It comprises a roughly circular mound, 1m high, surrounded by a ring ditch, with slight traces of an outer bank visible to the north-west. The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century (Barrow 36) and completely re-excavated by Ashbee in 1960, after which it was reconstructed from the spoil to show the outward appearance. Ashbee's excavations showed the mound to be surrounded by a berm and causewayed ring ditch. The mound contained several inhumations, with finds including Beakers, some antler points, fragments of bluestone, and barbed and tanged arrowheads. The barrow was listed as Amesbury 51 by Goddard and by Grinsell (as a bowl barrow). Maud Cunnington considered it in good condition in 1913 but the barrow was severely damaged by ploughing in the mid-20th century, when it is also visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs. The round barrow was surveyed at 1:1000 scale by English Heritage in April 2009 as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 36. The contents of this barrow, in some degree, recompensed us for our disappointment in the two last. It produced three human skeletons, laid from north to south, and immediately one over the other; the first about two feet deep; the second on a level with the adjoining soil. Close to the right side of the head of this last skeleton was a drinking cup, and with it a considerable quantity of something that appeared like decayed leather. Six feet lower lay the third, with which was found the drinking cup, engraved in TUMULI PLATE XVI. When throwing out the bones of this skeleton, we had a strong proof how well they are preserved when deposited deep in the chalk, as they would bear being thrown for a considerable distance without breaking: the teeth were perfectly white, and not one of them unsound; but the most remarkable circumstance was, finding a piece of the skull, about five inches broad, that had been apparently sawn off, for I do not think that any knife could have cut it off in the manner in which this was done.
Amesbury G51
<p><strong>Amesbury G51</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (N./S.) in deep cist (6ft) with trepanned skull and 5in. skull disc with Type A Beaker. A large coffin or mortuary house with four posts stood in the grave. A secondary inhumation (N./S.) was placed on the ground surface with a `drinking cup' and decayed leather (?) to the right of its head. Another secondary (or intrusive) inhumation (N./S.) was placed above this. Two barbed and tanged arrowheads were found in the gravefill from one of these burials. The moundfill consisted of a loam core capped by chalk and surrounded by a causewayed ditch separated by a berm from the mound. In the moundfill, a secondary crouched inhumation was placed in the mound covered by a tapering board with a wooden knife-like implement by its face, a long-necked Beaker, a handled awl, a flint scraper and antler points. Intrusive into the ditch silt was another secondary crouched inhumation with a Bell Beaker. Blue stone fragments were also in the ditch silt. PS: A reconstructed Bronze Age round barrow, known as Amesbury 51, which forms part of the Cursus barrow group (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow has an overall diameter of approximately 36m. It comprises a roughly circular mound, 1m high, surrounded by a ring ditch, with slight traces of an outer bank visible to the north-west. The barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century (Barrow 36) and completely re-excavated by Ashbee in 1960, after which it was reconstructed from the spoil to show the outward appearance. Ashbee's excavations showed the mound to be surrounded by a berm and causewayed ring ditch. The mound contained several inhumations, with finds including Beakers, some antler points, fragments of bluestone, and barbed and tanged arrowheads. The barrow was listed as Amesbury 51 by Goddard and by Grinsell (as a bowl barrow). Maud Cunnington considered it in good condition in 1913 but the barrow was severely damaged by ploughing in the mid-20th century, when it is also visible as a cropmark on aerial photographs. The round barrow was surveyed at 1:1000 scale by English Heritage in April 2009 as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 36 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 163)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 36. The contents of this barrow, in some degree, recompensed us for our disappointment in the two last. It produced three human skeletons, laid from north to south, and immediately one over the other; the first about two feet deep; the second on a level with the adjoining soil. Close to the right side of the head of this last skeleton was a drinking cup, and with it a considerable quantity of something that appeared like decayed leather. Six feet lower lay the third, with which was found the drinking cup, engraved in TUMULI PLATE XVI. When throwing out the bones of this skeleton, we had a strong proof how well they are preserved when deposited deep in the chalk, as they would bear being thrown for a considerable distance without breaking: the teeth were perfectly white, and not one of them unsound; but the most remarkable circumstance was, finding a piece of the skull, about five inches broad, that had been apparently sawn off, for I do not think that any knife could have cut it off in the manner in which this was done. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942662'>942662</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 422</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW735'>MWI12898 - SU14SW735</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012398'>1012398 (old #10339)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.180}'><img src='img/STHEAD.180.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.180' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.183682°N 1.837837°W</p>
redAmesbury 36163Amesbury G5151942662http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942662SU 14 SW 422MWI12898SU14SW735http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW735103391012398https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012398STHEAD.180
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.180}'><img src='img/STHEAD.180.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.180' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.180}'><img src='img/STHEAD.180.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.180' height='150'></a> </p>
51.183682°N 1.837837°W
93
51.1838649-1.839697056Amesbury G52Amesbury 37
AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation in oblong cist. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow, known as Amesbury 52, survives as an earthwork and forms part of the Cursus barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow has an overall diameter of approximately 25m: it comprises an oval topped mound with very slight traces of a surrounding ditch visible to the north-east of the barrow mound. Any surrounding ditch to the west is probably overlain by the 19th-century wood bank of Fargo Plantation (Monument Number 1518869). A slight rectangular hollow in the top of the mound may relate to Colt Hoare's excavation, which located a cist containing ashes and burnt bones (Barrow 37). Maud Cunnington considered it in good condition in 1913 and the barrow appears to have escaped ploughing during the 20th century. It was listed as Amesbury 52 by Goddard and by Grinsell (as a bowl barrow). The round barrow was surveyed at 1:1000 scale by English Heritage in April 2009 as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 37. In this barrow we found only a large oblong cist, full of black ashes, and a few burned human bones;
Amesbury G52
<p><strong>Amesbury G52</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation in oblong cist. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow, known as Amesbury 52, survives as an earthwork and forms part of the Cursus barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow has an overall diameter of approximately 25m: it comprises an oval topped mound with very slight traces of a surrounding ditch visible to the north-east of the barrow mound. Any surrounding ditch to the west is probably overlain by the 19th-century wood bank of Fargo Plantation (Monument Number 1518869). A slight rectangular hollow in the top of the mound may relate to Colt Hoare's excavation, which located a cist containing ashes and burnt bones (Barrow 37). Maud Cunnington considered it in good condition in 1913 and the barrow appears to have escaped ploughing during the 20th century. It was listed as Amesbury 52 by Goddard and by Grinsell (as a bowl barrow). The round barrow was surveyed at 1:1000 scale by English Heritage in April 2009 as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 37 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 163)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 37. In this barrow we found only a large oblong cist, full of black ashes, and a few burned human bones;</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942672'>942672</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 423</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW736'>MWI12899 - SU14SW736</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012397'>1012397 (old #10338)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.183864°N 1.839697°W</p>
redAmesbury 37163Amesbury G5252942672http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942672SU 14 SW 423MWI12899SU14SW736http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW736103381012397https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101239751.183864°N 1.839697°W
94
51.18377615-1.840555816Amesbury G53Amesbury 38
AM: Bowl barrow opened without result. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as earthworks within Fargo Plantation and forms part of the Cursus Barrow Group (Monument Number 219681). It measures an overall diameter of 26.6m and comprises a circular mound surrounded by a ring ditch. A break in slope almost half way up the mound, which is 1.5m high, implies two phases of construction. A slight berm separates the mound from the ring ditch and possible causeways are evident in the south-western quadrant of the ditch. The site was listed as Amesbury 53 by Goddard and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell, but the earthworks suggest its original form was more complex. Ploughing in the early 19th century and subsequent vegetation as part of the plantation have probably caused damage to the monument. The earthworks were observed by English Heritage in November 2010 during a rapid field investigation of Fargo South as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: In No. 38, after much labour, we missed the interment.
Amesbury G53
<p><strong>Amesbury G53</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow opened without result. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as earthworks within Fargo Plantation and forms part of the Cursus Barrow Group (Monument Number 219681). It measures an overall diameter of 26.6m and comprises a circular mound surrounded by a ring ditch. A break in slope almost half way up the mound, which is 1.5m high, implies two phases of construction. A slight berm separates the mound from the ring ditch and possible causeways are evident in the south-western quadrant of the ditch. The site was listed as Amesbury 53 by Goddard and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell, but the earthworks suggest its original form was more complex. Ploughing in the early 19th century and subsequent vegetation as part of the plantation have probably caused damage to the monument. The earthworks were observed by English Heritage in November 2010 during a rapid field investigation of Fargo South as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 38 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 163)</strong></p><p>RCH: In No. 38, after much labour, we missed the interment.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942674'>942674</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 424</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW737'>MWI12900 - SU14SW737</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012396'>1012396 (old #10337)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.183776°N 1.840555°W</p>
redAmesbury 38163Amesbury G5353942674http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=942674SU 14 SW 424MWI12900SU14SW737http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW737103371012396https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101239651.183776°N 1.840555°W
95
51.18476644-1.841410885Amesbury G54Amesbury 39
AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (head to S.) in oblong cist (2ft deep) with flint dagger, beaker and polished stone object. A subsequent primary female (?) inhumation (head to N.) was placed on the ground surface with beads of faience and amber and a 'basin ornamented round the verge'. Another secondary inhumation with a 'drinking cup' was also in the moundfill. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as earthworks within Fargo Plantation and forms part of the Cursus Barrow Group (Monument Number 219681). It is not symmetrical but measures an overall diameter of circa 38m. It comprises a mound of two phases of construction which sits on a plinth and is surrounded by a shallow ring ditch. The barrow was excavated by Cunnington for Hoare in the early 19th century (Barrow 39) who discovered a primary inhumation with a Beaker, flint spear head and polished stone object (later identified as a hammer) and two secondary inhumations, one with another Beaker. Finds from the primary burial are in Devizes Museum. The barrow was listed as a bowl barrow (Amesbury 54) by Goddard and by Grinsell. The earthworks were observed by English Heritage in November 2010 during a rapid field investigation of Fargo South as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project.
RCH: No. 39 is a bowl shaped tumulus adjoining the south side of the cursus; it is 78 ft diameter and at this time nearly 7 ft in elevation, although it has been some years under tillage. This interesting barrow had experienced a prior, but partial opening and one skeleton with a drinking cup had been disturbed. On reaching the floor we discovered another skeleton, lying with its head due north which from the size of the bones and the great quantity of beads attending the interment we conceived to have been that of a female; and several of these being found near the neck confirmed in some degree this opinion. Close to the head stood a kind of basin neatly ornamented round the verge, but unfortunately broken into several pieces. On removing the head we were much surprised to find that it rested upon a drinking cup that had been placed at the feet of another skeleton and which was interred in an oblong cist two feet deep, and lying also from north to south. With the drinking cup was a spear of flint and a singular stone.
Amesbury G54
<p><strong>Amesbury G54</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary inhumation (head to S.) in oblong cist (2ft deep) with flint dagger, beaker and polished stone object. A subsequent primary female (?) inhumation (head to N.) was placed on the ground surface with beads of faience and amber and a 'basin ornamented round the verge'. Another secondary inhumation with a 'drinking cup' was also in the moundfill. PS: A Bronze Age round barrow survives as earthworks within Fargo Plantation and forms part of the Cursus Barrow Group (Monument Number 219681). It is not symmetrical but measures an overall diameter of circa 38m. It comprises a mound of two phases of construction which sits on a plinth and is surrounded by a shallow ring ditch. The barrow was excavated by Cunnington for Hoare in the early 19th century (Barrow 39) who discovered a primary inhumation with a Beaker, flint spear head and polished stone object (later identified as a hammer) and two secondary inhumations, one with another Beaker. Finds from the primary burial are in Devizes Museum. The barrow was listed as a bowl barrow (Amesbury 54) by Goddard and by Grinsell. The earthworks were observed by English Heritage in November 2010 during a rapid field investigation of Fargo South as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. </p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 39 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 163)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 39 is a bowl shaped tumulus adjoining the south side of the cursus; it is 78 ft diameter and at this time nearly 7 ft in elevation, although it has been some years under tillage. This interesting barrow had experienced a prior, but partial opening and one skeleton with a drinking cup had been disturbed. On reaching the floor we discovered another skeleton, lying with its head due north which from the size of the bones and the great quantity of beads attending the interment we conceived to have been that of a female; and several of these being found near the neck confirmed in some degree this opinion. Close to the head stood a kind of basin neatly ornamented round the verge, but unfortunately broken into several pieces. On removing the head we were much surprised to find that it rested upon a drinking cup that had been placed at the feet of another skeleton and which was interred in an oblong cist two feet deep, and lying also from north to south. With the drinking cup was a spear of flint and a singular stone. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219678'>219678</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 86</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW726'>MWI12889 - SU14SW726</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012377'>1012377 (old #10335)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.84}'><img src='img/STHEAD.84.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.84' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.85}'><img src='img/STHEAD.85.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.85' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.85a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.85a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.85a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.88}'><img src='img/STHEAD.88.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.88' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.88a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.88a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.88a' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.184766°N 1.841410°W</p>
redAmesbury 39163Amesbury G5454219678http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219678SU 14 SW 86MWI12889SU14SW726http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW726103351012377https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012377STHEAD.84STHEAD.85STHEAD.85aSTHEAD.88STHEAD.88a
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.84}'><img src='img/STHEAD.84.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.84' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.85}'><img src='img/STHEAD.85.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.85' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.85a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.85a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.85a' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.88}'><img src='img/STHEAD.88.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.88' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.88a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.88a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.88a' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.84}'><img src='img/STHEAD.84.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.84' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.85}'><img src='img/STHEAD.85.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.85' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.85a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.85a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.85a' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.88}'><img src='img/STHEAD.88.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.88' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.88a}'><img src='img/STHEAD.88a.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.88a' height='150'></a> </p>
51.184766°N 1.841410°W
96
51.18395889-1.842701346Amesbury G55
Monarch of the Plain
Amesbury 40
AM: Bell barrow (largest on the plain) with charred wood, but no cremation. The berm was slightly raised. PS: The Monarch of the Plain (Amesbury 55) is a very large Bronze Age bell barrow which survives as an earthwork. It comprises a circular mound which sits on a sloping berm, surrounded by a ring ditch. The monument stands 2.8m above the surrounding ground level and measures a maximum of 58m in diameter. Excavation by Colt Hoare (Barrow 40) in the early 19th century found only charred wood. The barrow was listed by Goddard and Grinsell as Amesbury 55. The round barrow was surveyed at 1:1,000 scale by English Heritage in March 2010 as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. It has been damaged by burrowing rabbits and early 20th century vehicular activity.
RCH: No. 40, in point of size, may be called the monarch of the plain, being evidently the largest barrow upon it; and its history still remains veiled in obscurity. The first time we opened it by a very large section, and examined well the floor; but though we perceived symptoms of cremation, in charred wood, etc. we could not discover the primary interment. Nor were our subsequent researches more favourable, and we still remain in ignorance. Perhaps some future antiquary may be more fortunate; and such is the caprice of ancient sepulture, that the deposit may be found near the top, as in the instance of our flint barrow at Kingston Deverill.
Amesbury G55 (Monarch of the Plain)
<p><strong>Amesbury G55 (Monarch of the Plain)</strong></p><p>AM: Bell barrow (largest on the plain) with charred wood, but no cremation. The berm was slightly raised. PS: The Monarch of the Plain (Amesbury 55) is a very large Bronze Age bell barrow which survives as an earthwork. It comprises a circular mound which sits on a sloping berm, surrounded by a ring ditch. The monument stands 2.8m above the surrounding ground level and measures a maximum of 58m in diameter. Excavation by Colt Hoare (Barrow 40) in the early 19th century found only charred wood. The barrow was listed by Goddard and Grinsell as Amesbury 55. The round barrow was surveyed at 1:1,000 scale by English Heritage in March 2010 as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape Project. It has been damaged by burrowing rabbits and early 20th century vehicular activity.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 40 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 164)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 40, in point of size, may be called the monarch of the plain, being evidently the largest barrow upon it; and its history still remains veiled in obscurity. The first time we opened it by a very large section, and examined well the floor; but though we perceived symptoms of cremation, in charred wood, etc. we could not discover the primary interment. Nor were our subsequent researches more favourable, and we still remain in ignorance. Perhaps some future antiquary may be more fortunate; and such is the caprice of ancient sepulture, that the deposit may be found near the top, as in the instance of our flint barrow at Kingston Deverill.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219593'>219593</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 57</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW741'>MWI12904 - SU14SW741</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1012395'>1012395 (old #10336)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.183958°N 1.842701°W</p>
redAmesbury 40164Amesbury G5555219593http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219593SU 14 SW 57MWI12904SU14SW741http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW741103361012395https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101239551.183958°N 1.842701°W
97
51.18423264-1.845705048
Winterbourne Stoke G29
Cursus 41
AM: Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation. PS: The site of a Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Goddard and Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 29. It was excavated in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare (Barrow 41), who found a possible primary cremation. The barrow was probably destroyed during the First World War by construction of the Night Camp (Monument Number 1362709) and was later ploughed. The location of the barrow appears to have been confused on Crawford's 6inch map (see Monument Number 219929). The location of this barrow falls within the area mapped from aerial photographs by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project, but the barrow was not recorded by either survey.
RCH: No. 41 produced an interment of burned bones.
Winterbourne Stoke G29
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G29</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary (?) cremation. PS: The site of a Bronze Age bowl barrow, listed by Goddard and Grinsell as Winterbourne Stoke 29. It was excavated in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare (Barrow 41), who found a possible primary cremation. The barrow was probably destroyed during the First World War by construction of the Night Camp (Monument Number 1362709) and was later ploughed. The location of the barrow appears to have been confused on Crawford's 6inch map (see Monument Number 219929). The location of this barrow falls within the area mapped from aerial photographs by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project, but the barrow was not recorded by either survey.</p><p><strong>RCH: Cursus 41 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 164)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 41 produced an interment of burned bones.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219519'>219519</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 33</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW713'>MWI12876 - SU14SW713</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1010896'>1010896 (old #10468)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.184232°N 1.845705°W</p>
pinkCursus 41164
Winterbourne Stoke G
2929219519http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219519SU 14 SW 33MWI12876SU14SW713http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW713104681010896https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/101089651.184232°N 1.845705°W
98
51.18342147-1.84427699
Winterbourne Stoke G28
Winterbourne Stoke 42
AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation in upright collared urn (MBA) in circular cist with a handled bronze awl. A secondary cremation (?) with a human skull fragment, a splinter of Stonehenge diabase and urn fragments were found later. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as slight but damaged earthworks. It had been assumed completely destroyed during the First World War when a large aircraft hangar was erected over the site (Monument Number 1362705). Slight earthworks of the ditch, south of the mound, were surveyed at a scale of 1:1,000 by English Heritage as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape project in 2010. The round barrow was listed by Goddard and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (both as Winterbourne Stoke 28). It was excavated in the early 19th century by Hoare (Barrow 42). Finds included a primary cremation with a handled bronze awl and a collared urn (previously described as an enlarged food vessel). Hoare described the barrow as being 66 feet wide and 6 feet high. Part of a human skull, some potsherds and rock fragments were found in 1870-71 by W H Cunnington. An inspection in 1969 recorded no visible remains, which were probably obscured while the area used by Wiltshire County Council as a dump for road-making material. Earthworks relating to the southern half of the ditch around the round barrow referred to above were recorded in March 2010, when the area was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 by English Heritage as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape project. They comprise a shallow hollow, up to 4m wide, that extends in an arc between SU 1096 4270 and SU 1097 4269 around the south-western quadrant of the flattened barrow mound to the north. A row of concrete blocks, representing the footings of a First World War hangar (Monument Number 1362705), extend east / west over the site of the mound and its northern half is obscured by vegetation.
RCH: No. 42. Nearly opposite the last mentioned barrow [41], but on the south side of the turnpike road, is a neat circular tumulus, sixty-six feet in diameter, and six feet in elevation, which was opened in 1803, and produced within a circular cist, an interment of burned bones, and a brass pin with part of its handle, deposited in a neat and perfect urn; the latter of which is engraved in TUMULI PLATE XVI.
Winterbourne Stoke G28
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G28</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary cremation in upright collared urn (MBA) in circular cist with a handled bronze awl. A secondary cremation (?) with a human skull fragment, a splinter of Stonehenge diabase and urn fragments were found later. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow survives as slight but damaged earthworks. It had been assumed completely destroyed during the First World War when a large aircraft hangar was erected over the site (Monument Number 1362705). Slight earthworks of the ditch, south of the mound, were surveyed at a scale of 1:1,000 by English Heritage as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape project in 2010. The round barrow was listed by Goddard and as a bowl barrow by Grinsell (both as Winterbourne Stoke 28). It was excavated in the early 19th century by Hoare (Barrow 42). Finds included a primary cremation with a handled bronze awl and a collared urn (previously described as an enlarged food vessel). Hoare described the barrow as being 66 feet wide and 6 feet high. Part of a human skull, some potsherds and rock fragments were found in 1870-71 by W H Cunnington. An inspection in 1969 recorded no visible remains, which were probably obscured while the area used by Wiltshire County Council as a dump for road-making material. Earthworks relating to the southern half of the ditch around the round barrow referred to above were recorded in March 2010, when the area was surveyed at a scale of 1:1000 by English Heritage as part of the Stonehenge WHS Landscape project. They comprise a shallow hollow, up to 4m wide, that extends in an arc between SU 1096 4270 and SU 1097 4269 around the south-western quadrant of the flattened barrow mound to the north. A row of concrete blocks, representing the footings of a First World War hangar (Monument Number 1362705), extend east / west over the site of the mound and its northern half is obscured by vegetation.</p><p><strong>RCH: Winterbourne Stoke 42 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 164)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 42. Nearly opposite the last mentioned barrow [41], but on the south side of the turnpike road, is a neat circular tumulus, sixty-six feet in diameter, and six feet in elevation, which was opened in 1803, and produced within a circular cist, an interment of burned bones, and a brass pin with part of its handle, deposited in a neat and perfect urn; the latter of which is engraved in TUMULI PLATE XVI.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219516'>219516</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 32</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW719'>MWI12882 - SU14SW719</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011042'>1011042 (old #10473)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.228}'><img src='img/STHEAD.228.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.228' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264b' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264c}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264c.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264c' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264d}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264d.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264d' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264e}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264e.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264e' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264f}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264f.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264f' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264g}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264g.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264g' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264h}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264h.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264h' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.183421°N 1.844276°W</p>
yellowWinterbourne Stoke 42164
Winterbourne Stoke G
2828219516http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219516SU 14 SW 32MWI12882SU14SW719http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW719104731011042https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1011042STHEAD.228STHEAD.264STHEAD.264bSTHEAD.264cSTHEAD.264dSTHEAD.264eSTHEAD.264fSTHEAD.264gSTHEAD.264h
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.228}'><img src='img/STHEAD.228.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.228' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264b' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264c}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264c.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264c' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264d}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264d.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264d' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264e}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264e.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264e' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264f}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264f.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264f' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264g}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264g.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264g' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264h}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264h.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264h' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.228}'><img src='img/STHEAD.228.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.228' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264b}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264b.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264b' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264c}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264c.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264c' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264d}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264d.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264d' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264e}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264e.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264e' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264f}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264f.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264f' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264g}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264g.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264g' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.264h}'><img src='img/STHEAD.264h.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.264h' height='150'></a> </p>
51.183421°N 1.844276°W
99
51.18530847-1.843269083Amesbury G56Amesbury 43
AM: Bowl barrow with primary male inhumation (head to N.) in shallow cist with a polished banded pebble by his head and a bronze dagger under his left hand. A secondary child inhumation lay above on the ground surface and a secondary adult inhumation was placed in the moundfill with a 'drinking cup'. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, or possibly a bell barrow. It was listed by Goddard and Grinsell as Amesbury 56, located within the western end of the Stonehenge Cursus (Monument Number 219546) and forming part of the Cursus barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century (Barrow 43). He found a primary inhumation accompanied by a bronze dagger and a polished pebble. In addition there were two secondary burials, one of a child, and the other an adult with a 'drinking cup' (Beaker). The mound survives 1.5m high and about 25m in diameter. Surveyed at 1:1000 in 2010; the barrow mound survives 1.5m high and about 25m in diameter; there is no surface trace of a ditch; there is a slight mound on the summit but whether this is a secondary construction or the result of later disturbance is unclear.
RCH: No. 43 and 44. These two barrows are included within the boundaries of the cursus and very near the western end of it. In opening the first of these [43] our labourers discovered at the depth of 3 ft, the skeleton of an adult, with a drinking cup, and on the floor of the barrow another of a child. We afterwards, in a shallow cist, found the 3rd skeleton of a man, lying with his head to the north, and close to it, on the right side, was a curious pebble, and under his left hand was a dagger of brass. The pebble is kidney formed of the sardonyx kind, striated traversely with alternate spaces that give it the appearance of belts; besides these striae it is spotted all over with very small white specks and after dipping it in water it assumes a sea-green colour.
Amesbury G56
<p><strong>Amesbury G56</strong></p><p>AM: Bowl barrow with primary male inhumation (head to N.) in shallow cist with a polished banded pebble by his head and a bronze dagger under his left hand. A secondary child inhumation lay above on the ground surface and a secondary adult inhumation was placed in the moundfill with a 'drinking cup'. PS: A Bronze Age bowl barrow, or possibly a bell barrow. It was listed by Goddard and Grinsell as Amesbury 56, located within the western end of the Stonehenge Cursus (Monument Number 219546) and forming part of the Cursus barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219681). The round barrow was excavated by Colt Hoare in the early 19th century (Barrow 43). He found a primary inhumation accompanied by a bronze dagger and a polished pebble. In addition there were two secondary burials, one of a child, and the other an adult with a 'drinking cup' (Beaker). The mound survives 1.5m high and about 25m in diameter. Surveyed at 1:1000 in 2010; the barrow mound survives 1.5m high and about 25m in diameter; there is no surface trace of a ditch; there is a slight mound on the summit but whether this is a secondary construction or the result of later disturbance is unclear.</p><p><strong>RCH: Amesbury 43 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 164)</strong></p><p>RCH: No. 43 and 44. These two barrows are included within the boundaries of the cursus and very near the western end of it. In opening the first of these [43] our labourers discovered at the depth of 3 ft, the skeleton of an adult, with a drinking cup, and on the floor of the barrow another of a child. We afterwards, in a shallow cist, found the 3rd skeleton of a man, lying with his head to the north, and close to it, on the right side, was a curious pebble, and under his left hand was a dagger of brass. The pebble is kidney formed of the sardonyx kind, striated traversely with alternate spaces that give it the appearance of belts; besides these striae it is spotted all over with very small white specks and after dipping it in water it assumes a sea-green colour. </p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219513'>219513</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 31</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW739'>MWI12902 - SU14SW739</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1009132'>1009132 (old #10324)</a></p><p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.89}'><img src='img/STHEAD.89.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.89' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.90}'><img src='img/STHEAD.90.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.90' height='150'></a> </p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.185308°N 1.843269°W</p>
redAmesbury 43164Amesbury G5656219513http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=219513SU 14 SW 31MWI12902SU14SW739http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW739103241009132https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1009132STHEAD.89STHEAD.90
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.89}'><img src='img/STHEAD.89.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.89' height='150'></a>
<a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.90}'><img src='img/STHEAD.90.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.90' height='150'></a>
<p><strong>Wiltshire Museum Accessions:</strong></p><p><a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.89}'><img src='img/STHEAD.89.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.89' height='150'></a> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshireheritagecollections.org.uk/index.asp?page=item&mwsquery={Identity%20number}={DZSWS:STHEAD.90}'><img src='img/STHEAD.90.jpg' title='DZSWS:STHEAD.90' height='150'></a> </p>
51.185308°N 1.843269°W
100
51.18539915-1.843841106
Winterbourne Stoke G30
Cursus 44
AM: Bell barrow with primary cremation in circular cist (1.9x1.4ft deep) (discoloured by fire) with ash. Colt Hoare may have found another cremation on the surface. To the west were 4 stake holes set out in a (3x1ft) rectangle. To the NW on the berm was an oval hollow containing ash and charcoal (antedating the ditch). A subsequent primary (?) crouched child inhumation (7yrs old) with long narrow skull was found in the southwest sector of the ditch (in primary silt) covered with flints with a phallic-shaped flint near skull. Nearby was a newly born infant. Unassociated, but nearby, were a fine barbed and tanged arrowhead and urn fragments. PS: The site of a Bronze Age round barrow located within the western end of the Stonehenge Cursus (Monument Number 219546) and forming part of the Cursus barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219681). Excavations in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare located a possible primary cremation (Barrow 44). The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 30 by Goddard and then Grinsell (as a bowl barrow). Excavations in 1958 by Christie suggested a bell barrow form and found a central cremation pit with a small quantity of bone and ash. A crouched child inhumation was found in the primary ditch silts. Nearby were the remains an infant. The ditch also appeared to cut a pit or hollow containing pine charcoal, burnt flints and flint debitage. Other finds from the excavation included a barbed and tanged arrowhead, and pottery of Late Bronze Age and Roman date. There are no intelligible earthwork remains of the barrow, which was damaged in the early 20th century by military activity and subsequent levelling for agricultural use. The barrow is visible as an earthwork and a cropmark on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.
RCH: In the adjoining barrow, No. 44, we found only a simple interment of burned bones.
Winterbourne Stoke G30
<p><strong>Winterbourne Stoke G30</strong></p><p>AM: Bell barrow with primary cremation in circular cist (1.9x1.4ft deep) (discoloured by fire) with ash. Colt Hoare may have found another cremation on the surface. To the west were 4 stake holes set out in a (3x1ft) rectangle. To the NW on the berm was an oval hollow containing ash and charcoal (antedating the ditch). A subsequent primary (?) crouched child inhumation (7yrs old) with long narrow skull was found in the southwest sector of the ditch (in primary silt) covered with flints with a phallic-shaped flint near skull. Nearby was a newly born infant. Unassociated, but nearby, were a fine barbed and tanged arrowhead and urn fragments. PS: The site of a Bronze Age round barrow located within the western end of the Stonehenge Cursus (Monument Number 219546) and forming part of the Cursus barrow cemetery (Monument Number 219681). Excavations in the early 19th century by Colt Hoare located a possible primary cremation (Barrow 44). The barrow was listed as Winterbourne Stoke 30 by Goddard and then Grinsell (as a bowl barrow). Excavations in 1958 by Christie suggested a bell barrow form and found a central cremation pit with a small quantity of bone and ash. A crouched child inhumation was found in the primary ditch silts. Nearby were the remains an infant. The ditch also appeared to cut a pit or hollow containing pine charcoal, burnt flints and flint debitage. Other finds from the excavation included a barbed and tanged arrowhead, and pottery of Late Bronze Age and Roman date. There are no intelligible earthwork remains of the barrow, which was damaged in the early 20th century by military activity and subsequent levelling for agricultural use. The barrow is visible as an earthwork and a cropmark on aerial photographs, and has been mapped by both RCHME's Salisbury Plain Training Area NMP and EH's Stonehenge WHS Mapping Project.</p><p><strong>RCH: Cursus 44 (Colt Hoare's Ancient Wiltshire Vol. 1 page 165)</strong></p><p>RCH: In the adjoining barrow, No. 44, we found only a simple interment of burned bones.</p><p><strong>Historic England Monument Number:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870325'>870325</a></p><p><strong>NMR Number:</strong> SU 14 SW 317</p><p><strong>Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW738'>MWI12901 - SU14SW738</a></p><p><strong>Scheduled Monument Listing:</strong> <a target='_blank' href='https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1009132'>1009132 (old #10324)</a></p><p><strong>Marker Position: </strong>51.185399°N 1.843841°W</p>
pinkCursus 44165
Winterbourne Stoke G
3030870325http://pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=870325SU 14 SW 317MWI12901SU14SW738http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/artsheritageandlibraries/museumhistoryheritage/wiltshireandswindonhistoricenvironmentrecord/wshermap.htm?sr=100&a=v&h=SU14SW738103241009132https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/100913251.185399°N 1.843841°W
Loading...
 
 
 
Sheet1