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Your Username“Bloodchild” raises the question of what gives one group the right to decide the lives of another group. In your own words, describe the condition of the Terrans in the Tlic world. Does their situation resemble chattel slavery or perhaps the circumstances of Native American tribes as they relate to the United States? Why does Butler’s choose the word “Preserve” (5) for the land where the Terrans live? What insight does this word give us about the conditions of the Terrans?In your view, do the Tlic have the right to treat Terrans as they do? What do you think Butler means in her Afterword by saying this story is about “paying the rent”? Are Terrans “paying the rent” at present, here on Earth? If not, should we paying it, and if so, to whom/what would we pay it? Stories of humans going forth into space usually depict us as mastering and colonizing other species, or at least being equals to them. Why do you think it is important for us to imagine us so? What does Butler depiction of Terrans in “Bloodchild” tell you about what she thinks of this type of story?
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3/14/2016 14:08:25AprilGreeen
The conditions of the Terrans in the Tlic world closely resembles European settlement in Native American territory. The Europeans took over Native Americans territory, making them (as the Terrans) their hosts as commodity to keep their race alive. The Tlics want to control and maintain their planet in such a way where Terrans can survive to be their host in the interest of their survival. No, because what makes them a superior race?
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We think Butler means the Terrans pay their rent by giving up their male child to help to Tlics reproduce to keep their species alive.

We think that we're landlords and leeches.
Butlers depiction in Blood Child provides good insight on what it is to be a minority to a superior race.
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3/14/2016 14:19:30Barcode158376 Neither. Because the Terrans are the invading force and the Tlics neither forced them into the situation nor hunted them down for this. Butler views it as a form of paying rent for the ability to stay on the Tlic home planet. For the protection and "preservation" of the Terrans lifestyle. And also to keep them away from maundering bands of Tlics taking them to become hosts and therefore separating them from their families. Yes. Because it is their home planet. But also with the fact that Tlics now have to raise their N'Tlics they develop a bond and it's not as bad as being randomly taken (like in the early days) It's too complicated to answer. Butler was anti-colonialist. Her choice was probably informed from growing up Black in the US during the beginning and height of the civil rights and seeing how blacks were treated in the United States. Also she probably kept in mind what happened to the Native Americans as well and how they were wiped out by the invading European forces.
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9/10/2016 12:42:40Bentley0207I feel to an extent the situation in "Bloodchild" is similar to Slavery and the circumstances of Native American tribes due to the facts that:

1) The Terrans are in a strange new world with no protection and no reinforcements and a strict set of rules that aren't exactly in their favor. (ex: Guns are against the law so you are unable to protect yourself and your family)

2) The residents live on a 'Preserve' which can be interpreted the same as a plantation or a reservation.

3) The Terrans are chosen and picked by impatient fellow members of T'Gatoi's race for impregnation to further their race and some of them see the Terrans as nothing more than hosts for their young, not caring if they live or die.
I think Butler chose the word "preserve" for the land where the Terrans live to truly explain the conditions they live in.

When I read the word "Preserve", I interpret that as being similar to a zoo, or those open spaces where people go for safari. It's made to let the captives feel comfortable, but you're still captive for someone else's entertainment and disposal.
From the perspective of the Terrans, I think it's wrong to see them as nothing more than walking blood bags or hosts for your young. The fact they sacrifice their bodies and potentially their lives for the progression of the Tlic race while viewed as an honor and part of their civic duty by the Tlic, is totally opposite in the eyes of some Terran.

From the perspective of the Tlic, They allowed the newcomers to their land and they found a way to make use for them as well as room for them to live "comfortably" even included them into their society in turn creating a new inclusive community for everyone.

I think when Butler says this story is about "paying the rent" she means that the Terrans are paying the rent by sacrificing their bodies to the Tlic to be used as hosts for their offspring.

I don't think Terrans here on earth are paying the rent if the terrans are to be considered the humans on this planet. If that is the example we're using then in my opinion the Tlic would be mother earth and her creations.

Based on human actions throughout history we have most certainly not been paying the rent especially lately and we are due for a major lump sum back payment. By continuing to make more eco-friendly choices in all of our daily lives we can attempt to stop the irreparable damage we're doing this planet before we have to go find the planet the Tlic actually live on and become the Terrans in real life.
I think that's just an upgraded version of manifest destiny. Humans have always assumed we're the top of every chain yet we know next to nothing about life on other planets. I feel Butler's depiction of Terrans in "Bloodchild" can be taken two ways:

1) We can see ourselves as the Terrans, having to leave earth probably due to our own current activities and find new planets to inhabit, only to find a smarter race already living and thriving there ready to take us into captivity.

2) The manifest destiny ideal of becoming the Tlic. Coming to a new planet, taking over and "taming the savages" to be civilized. (Is it odd that I see America somewhat in the Tlic?)

Humans don't want to admit to themselves there might be the chance that we'll land on someone else's home and won't be able to beat, cheat and murder them into submission. So we create this ideal that we'll expand our empire anywhere we please.
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9/14/2016 19:33:18ynfantecarmenfrom what i understood the Terrans where in preserve for the Alians to be able to reproduce themselves, its a sort of oprression that the Aerrans were in. yes i think that their situation resembles both slavery and the circumstances of native american in a sense that the Terrans needed the Alians to survive with the sterile eggs and be safe, it resembles slavery because that's the position the Terrans were in by the Alians exploiting their body in order to reproduce.the insight that the word preserve give to me, is that the alians had the Terrans in captivity for their own benefit like preserving them in a order to reproduce.no they dont have that right because the Terrans should have the right to do what they want with their bodies and not feel like caged or compromise.i think she meant that the Terrans were paying a price for living in this place called the preserve, maybe the Terrans were safer in that planet than in another planet.i think it is important for us to imagine what is it like to be in that position because us as humans tend to exploit our planet. i really didn't get this question.
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9/16/2016 1:42:48Amartinez47I don't believe that the Terrans way of life is as bad as it may seem because as you can see in the story the Tlic possess emotions. Therefore they are capable of loving and living together with the Terrans in peace.The word preserve hints that the Tlic are using the Terrans for their own reasons.I believe that they do have the right because i"m sure that if we were in their shoes we would do the same."Paying the rent" is the price that the Terrans have to pay to keep their species alive. I don't believe that we are currently "paying the rent" and I don't think that we need to.I think it's important to think about colonization outside of Earth because we don't know if the planet will eventually become inhabitable for human life. I think Butler's depiction of Terrans tells us that she thinks that it the idea of colonization outside of Earth could backfire.
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9/16/2016 12:51:01DarkNotos There were some hints in the story which sparks up an idea that the Earth is a Terran's hometown and they're much closer to the nature (they're farmers, hunters) rather than Tlic. Tlic are subjugators and insatiable consumers that are traveling from a place to place (or planets). The planet is still belong to the Terrans, but laws and regulations were made by Tlics. I believe the term "Preserve", which Butler uses to describe Terran's land has a correlation between sci-fi world and facts from the history of America. Word "Preserve" could be interpreted as a reservations where Native Americans are living even today, As an outsiders. Terrans allowing Tlic to treat them in such way. And no, they don't have the right. I'm not sure how to respond.I'm not sure how to respond.
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