Survey of EiCs of Ecological and Evolutionary Journals Regarding Preprint Policies
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTU
1
TimestampWhat is your name?What is your email address?At what journal are you the Editor in Charge?Does your journal current accept submissions that have been posted to a public preprint server (e.g., arXiv, Nature Precedings, ViXra)?Why is this your journal's preprint policy?Please provide a link to the page with this text, if available.Why is this your journal's preprint policy?As EiC of your journal, do you feel that submissions that have been posted publicly should be evaluated differently than those that have not?Please explain your answer to the above.What is the text of your journal's preprint policy?Why is this your journal's preprint policy?
2
1/21/2013 20:03:33david schimeldschimel@jpl.nasa.govEcological ApplicationsYesself-explanatory-see abovehttp://www.esajournals.org/toc/ebul/94/1NoWe view preprint submission as an acceptable activity for authors to use to distribute their work and gathering feedback, not so different from giving talks at meetings or in other venues, just using more current technology. Should prebublication discussion and review be a mandatory part of evaluation by the journal? In general, we think not. While prepublication feedback is aimed at and integrated by the author, journal peer review uses an arbitrator (the subject matter editor) independent of the author. Editors and reviewers are free to take cognizance of pre-publication discussions but neither required to, nor prohibited from doing so.Our purpose is to sponsor communication among scholars and establish a stable record of scientific results—not to make large profits. ESA has policies currently in place that are intended to increase access while maintaining the value of subscriptions for libraries. For example, all authors are encouraged to post their work (the final published pdf) in a publicly accessible form on a personal or employer web site or in an institutional repository. Authors are also permitted to republish all or portions of their work elsewhere without further permission from ESA, and may submit papers for publication in ESA journals that have previously been posted to the preprint server arXiv.
3
1/22/2013 6:34:28Aaron Ellisoneicem@fas.harvard.eduEcological MonographsYesIs there a reason you ask this twice?http://esapubs.org/esapubs/AuthorInstructions.htmNoJournal peer review is independent of comments (if there are any) on a publicly posted working paper.A posting of a manuscript or thesis on an author’s personal or home institution’s website or ftp site generally will not be considered previous publication. Similarly posting of a “working paper” in an institutional repository is allowed so long as at least one of the authors is affiliated with that institution. Submitted manuscripts may have been posted to a preprint archive if the papers in the archive are not peer-reviewed, and provided that a link to the published article will be added if the manuscript is accepted by an ESA journal. Authors should disclose whether such a posting has been made at the time of submission. If a manuscript is available as part of a digital publication such as a journal, technical series, or some other entity to which a library can subscribe (especially if that publication has an ISSN or ISBN), we will consider that the manuscript has been published and is thus not eligible for consideration by our journals. Finally, a necessary test for prior publication is whether the author can legally transfer copyright to ESA.
4
1/22/2013 11:41:45Dries Bontedries.bonte@ugent.beoikosWe do not have a policy at this time.nanaNoAll papers need to be subjected to peer review. Papers that have been passed some review process, might receive a fast decision policy by Subject editors only in case referee reports and rebuttal letter are postedi would not see a problem in handling such papers, preprint is no official peer reviewed publication
5
1/22/2013 13:03:03Lonnie Aarssenaarssenl@queensu.caIdeas in Ecology and EvolutionYesN/ANoThere is no published policy, but inquiries would receive an accepting response.
6
1/22/2013 17:19:18Louis Bernatchezlouis.bernatchez@bio.ulaval.caEvolutionary ApplicationsWe do not have a policy at this time.NANoI would not allow until we have an established policy for it.
7
1/23/2013 11:16:37Marcel Holyoakmaholyoak@ucdavis.eduEcology LettersNo 1. AIMS AND SCOPES
Ecology Letters is a forum for the very rapid publication of the most novel research in ecology, research that is not yet in the public domain.
Aims and scope at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/%28ISSN%291461-0248/homepage/ForAuthors.htmlThe decision is made by the onwers of the journal not EiCI'm not answering a question that potentially puts me in a position of conflict with the journal's publisherAuthors may not post preprints on public servers such as Arxiv. This is decided on by the publisher not the editors.
8
1/23/2013 18:39:29John A. EndlerJohn.Endler@deakin.edu.auEvolutionary EcologyNoNo formal policy. It only came up once, and I said no.NoAll papers should go through a thorough and objective review process regardless of their history.No formal text on this. It only came up once!
9
1/23/2013 18:57:12Chris Lortielortie@yorku.caOikosWe do not have a policy at this time.don't have oneYesshould be fast-tracked!we do not
10
1/24/2013 6:07:58Michael Ritchiemgr@st-andrews.ac.ukJournal of Evolutionary BiologyWe do not have a policy at this time.We have discussed the 'Peerage of Science' approach extensively, and I suspect that our approach to what you call 'preprints' would be similar. We have our own editing board and deciding editors are expected to facilitate peer review of all articles submitted to JEB. We would not discriminate against original papers that had been through a system of peer review prior to submission, but we retain a right to do a full in-house peer review of any article submitted. How much attention a deciding editor pays to reviews submitted with a paper is a personal decision. In practise, most ignore them.http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1420-9101/homepage/ForAuthors.htmlNoAs EiC I am responsible for ensuring that all articles published in the journal come up to our standards, which requires that our deciding editors are happy with the quality. I do not exclude a deciding editor from reading reviews submitted alongside a paper (and have looked at such myself), but some additional 'in house' reviewing is also expected.We do not have a specific text published, except for a typical statement saying that the covering letter needs to confirm that the work is original and is not under consideration for publication in another journal or book.
11
1/24/2013 12:11:07Theodora Bloomtbloom@plos.orgPLOS BiologyYesas abovehttp://www.plosbiology.org/static/policiesNoI can't explain why you ask the question, so can't explain why I disagree...Authors may present and discuss their findings ahead of publication: at medical or scientific conferences, on preprint servers, in public databases, and in blogs, wikis, tweets, and other informal communication channels. We recommend, however, that authors not contact the media or respond to such contact unless an article has been accepted for publication and an embargo date has been established....
12
1/25/2013 9:16:38Brian Charlesworthbiologyletters@royalsociety.orgBiology LettersYesWe recognise the value to scientists of posting preprints as part of scholarly communication.http://royalsocietypublishing.org/site/authors/licence.xhtmlNoIn relation to the Preprint version only, You are free to post it on web sites, including electronic preprint servers.
13
1/25/2013 10:20:57Scott L Collinsscollins@sevilleta.unm.eduI represent ESA Gov BoardYesTo meet the needs of the research community.NoAll submissions to the journals should follow the same peer review process for quality control. Not sure. The Governing Board agreed and the EiC's also agreed that use of preprint services prior to submission was not a problem.
14
1/25/2013 15:49:19Judith Bronsteinjudieb@email.arizona.eduAmerican NaturalistYesIt was a collective decision, after extensive discussion, by the editors and the University of Chicago Press.http://press.uchicago.edu/journals/jrnl_rights.html#faq6 NoThis is the authors' prerogative and is not related to the quality of the science - which should be the focus of the review process.f you choose to submit a prepublication version of your accepted paper to a noncommercial, discipline-specific preprint or working paper archive, we require that appropriate credit be given to the journal as described above and ask you to remove the working paper from the archive after your article is published or replace it with the published version. If you deposit the published version of your article, it may be made publicly available after the appropriate embargo period* has been observed. You are responsible for informing the manager of the archive of the embargo period that must be observed.
15
1/28/2013 5:37:49Professor Michael Hassell FRSproceedingsb@royalsociety.orgProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological SciencesYesWe recognise the value to scientists of posting preprints as part of scholarly communication.http://royalsocietypublishing.org/site/authors/licence.xhtmlNoWe recognise the value to scientists of posting preprints as part of scholarly communication.In relation to the Preprint version only, You are free to post it on web sites, including electronic preprint servers.
16
1/29/2013 15:10:35Rachel Shekargcb@life.illinois.eduGlobal Change BiologyNoGCB will not consider submissions that have been make public previously, especially if it received a DOINoIt seems that you are assuming that authors of submissions that have been previously posted would have received and incorporated feedback into their submissions. This feedback cannot be considered unbiased and/or a given quality (such as by experts in the field).We do not have any on "instructions to authors" but during submission authors are asked to " Confirm that the manuscript has been submitted solely to this journal and is not published, in press, or submitted elsewhere. "
17
4/10/2013 17:30:59Noah Rosenbergnoahr@stanford.eduTheoretical Population BiologyYesI expect that this openness fosters interest in the work published by the journal both before and after it appears in its final form.http://www.elsevier.com/journals/theoretical-population-biology/0040-5809/guide-for-authors#13510NoAt Elsevier, we believe authors should be able to distribute their manuscripts for their personal needs and interests, e.g. posting to their websites or their institution's repository, or e-mailing to colleagues. An author may use the preprint for personal use, internal institutional use and for permitted scholarly posting. Also, authors retain the right to use the accepted author manuscript for personal use, internal institutional use and for permitted scholarly posting provided that these are not for purposes of commercial use or systematic distribution. For example, authors retain the right to post their own version of their accepted manuscript in the arXiv subject repository.

For more information on our article posting policies, please see http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/authorsview.authors/postingpolicy
18
4/10/2013 19:36:16Sandra Shumwaysandra.shumway@Uconn.eduJournal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, Journal of Shellfish Research, Harmful Algae, Reviews in Fisheries ScienceWe do not have a policy at this time.we don't have oneNoposting on a web site does not constitute peer-review, anybody can post anything they want somewhere. I do not believe we have any at the 4 journals listed above
19
4/10/2013 19:43:55Daphne Fairbairndaphne.fairbairn@ucr.eduEvolutionNoThe motivation for this is financial: the journal depends upon income from subscriptions and libraries will not pay for content that is freely available elsewhere. Preprint publications also make citations confusing, as two articles (the preprint and the final publication) contain the same material. YesI do not think they should be published in Evolution.There is no official text for this, but we only accept original articles that have not previously been made publicly available in print or electronically. This is the policy set by our publisher, Wiley-Blackwell.

Evolution does publish articles in manuscript form as soon as they have been finally accepted. So once we accept an article it is available in preprint form.
20
4/11/2013 1:12:21Mikemgraham@mlml.calstate.eduJournal of PhycologyWe do not have a policy at this time.Number of requests are below threshold to trigger formation of policyYesScientific publishing is competitive and space in journals is limited. Preprinting and dissemination of ideas dilutes novelty of findings and attractions to Journal for publication. As and Editor, preprints are problematic. As a scientist, however, dissemination of information is critical and thus preprints may be a useful mechanism. The scientific publishing field, however, will likely need to make substantial changes in funding structure in order to be able to accommodate preprints effectively.We currently do not have a policy regarding deposition of papers on preprint servers
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
Loading...
 
 
 
Sheet1