1_Questionnaire_MountainObservatories_Responses
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TimestampYour nameName of ObservatoryInstitution and OrganizationDescription of ObservatoryEstablishment of ObservationsCoordinates of your ObservatoryAltitudeCountryData accessData access: Webpage and ContactData resolution (temporal)Affilated NetworkDomain of ObservationsCategory of ObservationsFacilities of ObservatoryCollaborations with other observatories or institutions
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6/5/2014 8:44:36Richard HooperCUAHSICUAHSICUAHSI HIS is designed to publish time series data collected at a fixed point and hence is applicable for sensors and repeated grab samples. Most data is physical and chemical, but biological time series can also be published.N/A
42°25.1058′ N, 71°6.3696′ W
N/AAllFree data accesshiscentral.cuahsi.orgmultipleN/AAnthroposphere, Atmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeospherePollution, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Geology, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, FloodsCUAHSI provides data publication services to universities and hence can be the basis for collaboration and cooperation among observatories.
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6/5/2014 8:53:12Netra ChhetriGandaki River Basin, NepalArizona State UniversityNepali farmers face a range of socio-economic stresses, including population growth, a low level of technology usage, and an exodus of able-bodied labor forces (mainly males) to other economic sectors, that compound the impacts of climatic changes. To cope with these constraints, farmers must increase their adaptive capacity and become more resilient. The goal of this observatory is to examine spatial and temporal dimensions of the adaptive capacity of farmers and livestock keepers vulnerable to exposure driven by climate and other livelihoods stressors, and link this understanding to locally relevant climate adaptation portfolio in the Gandaki River Basin (GRB) of the Western development region of Nepal. Our vision is to build the capacity of these communities to sustain their livelihoods in the face of climatic change by generating locally relevant knowledge, enhancing coping capacities, and improving the resilience of the crop-livestock systems to climate change. Capacity building, in this sense, should strengthen the society’s (individuals, households, communities, and supporting institutions) existing capacity to cope with, adapt to, and plan interventions for climate change while acknowledging and addressing the compounding effects of other livelihood stressors as well. Generating locally relevant knowledge will foster a better understanding of the underlying systemic factors, which are responsible of shaping the vulnerability and adaptive capacity of these societies. Leveraging and building upon local knowledge and expertise in climate adaptation as well as engaging a number of other regional stakeholders-- government agencies, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and universities--will enhance the coping capacity. These will also ensure the development and adoption of a locally relevant climate adaptation portfolio. Furthermore, acknowledging and addressing other livelihood stressors will not only improve adaptive capacities, it will also improve the resilience of the crop-livestock systems.since 2012NA152-4560NepalRestricted data access (purchase)NAyearly, HouseholdAAG, SRMBiosphere/EcosphereLand use, Natural resources, Economy, Tourism, Urbanization, Policy, Agency and governance, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Forests, Animals, Invasive species, Landscapes, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Snow and Ice, Floods, livelihoodsNALocal Initiatives for Biodiversity Conservation (LI-BIRD), Integrated Center for Mountain Development (ICIMOD), Agriculture and Forest University (AFU) Nepal.
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6/5/2014 9:52:59Douglas LowenthalStorm Peak LaboratoryDesert Research Institutehttp://stormpeak.dri.edu/since 198140.455 N, -106.744 W3210 m ASLUSARestricted data access (registration)gannet.hallar@dri.eduvaries depending on measurementGAW, NOAA ESRLAtmosphere, Biosphere/EcospherePollution, Weather and Climate, Water cycle, Snow and Iceyear round accessibility, permanent electrical power, accommodations for 9, clean lab, cold lab, aerosol and gas sampling manifolds and measurement equipment, cloud particle measurement instruments, see: http://stormpeak.dri.edu/

Harvard, U. Washington, Colorado State University
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6/5/2014 11:27:32Danny MarksReynolds Creek Experimental WatershedUSDA/ARS Northwest Watershed Research CenterThe Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) was authorized by congress in 1959 to address five essential resource management issues for the western US: water supply, seasonal snow, soil freezing, water quality, and rangeland hydrology. RCEW has been operated continuously since, and is now part of both the National Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) network, and USDA's Long Term Agro-ecosystem Research (LTAR) network. Though RCEW was originally snow dominated, it is currently located within the rain/snow transition zone. It has provided detailed information on mountain climate and hydrology across more than 1000 m of elevation for more than 50 years, and is therefore the ideal location to study the impact of climate warming on mountain systems.

RCEW is a 238 km2 drainage with an elevation range of 1145 m (1099–2244 m AMSL) located in the Owyhee Mountains near Boise, Idaho (Figure 1). The ecology and hydro-climatology of RCEW are representative of much of the interior mountain west and Great Basin, including areas of Idaho, eastern Oregon, Utah, and Nevada. While there are several hundred snow and precipitation measurement sites across the western United States, Bales et al. [2006] point out that there are only 6 comprehensive energy balance sites and that the RCEW is the most detailed and longest studied of those. Basic instrumentation includes thirty-two precipitation sites, twenty-eight full energy balance meteorological stations, including precipitation, temperature, humidity, radiation, wind speed and direction, snow depth, surface and soil temperature and moisture content, and fourteen gauged sub-basins, all measuring streamflow, stream temperature and sediment, ranging in size from a few hectares to the entire watershed. This is augmented with five 10 m towers measuring atmospheric profiles of temperature, humidity, wind and radiation, a 15 m tower measuring the same through an Aspen canopy, and a 20 m platform tower over the same Aspen canopy. Eddy covariance (EC) is operated at six locations over the full range of elevation and all major plant canopy types, providing estimates of heat, carbon and water flux. Because snow is a critical source of water, eight snow courses ranging from 1500-2300 m were established in the upper part RCEW, and have been operated on a bi-weekly basis since 1960. Specific instrument suites focus on snow studies (Reynolds Mtn. East), snow redistribution (Upper Sheep Creek), and snow deposition, melt, soil moisture and temperature within the rain/snow transition zone (Johnston Draw). All instrumentation (including EC systems) is operated continuously year-round, with sub-hourly measurements that are aggregated to hourly averages. Basic data are available via anonymous ftp from ftp.nwrc.ars.usda.gov, and additional experimental data are available by contacting Dr. Danny Marks (ars.danny@gmail.com).
1960116.5 W, 43.2 N1100 - 2300USA, IdahoFree data accessBasic data are available via anonymous ftp from ftp.nwrc.ars.usda.gov, and additional experimental data are available by contacting Dr. Danny Marks (ars.danny@gmail.com).hourlyCZO, LTAR, CCRNAtmosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereNatural resources, Weather and Climate, Geology, Soils, Water cycle, Snow and Ice, Floodsyear-round, with cabin and dorm facilities, laboratory, shop, computer access, vehicles, technical support and assistance available. For detail on instruments, data, etc. see above. For information contact Dr. Mark Seyfried (mark.seyfried@ars.usda.gov)Walnut Gulch, Arizona (LTAR)
Marmot Creek, Alberta, Canada (CCRN)
Southern Sierra Nevada CZO, California
Senator Beck Basin, Colorado
Tuolumne, Sierra Nevada, California


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6/5/2014 11:42:46David HerbstSierra Nevada Sentinel Stream NetworkSierra Nevada Aquatic Research LaboratoryA network of headwater streams (first to third order size) were selected using GIS to identify least-disturbed reference watersheds. These were ranked according to predicted risk of change in flow using downscaled models and ranked also with respect to natural resistance features (aspect, groundwater sources) so that a matrix of risk and resistance features could be assessed across these sites. The network consists then of 24 streams across the Sierra in 7 national forests and 3 national parks. Each stream is instrumented with flow level and temperature recorders and each summer the streams are surveyed for the biological community of stream macroinvertebrates, the algae and organic matter they consume, water chemistry, and physical habitat. This year is the fifth year of data collection.since 2010mixed but all in Sierra Nevada3000 to 12000 ftUSA-CaliforniaFree data accessHerbstlab.msi.ucsb.eduyearly, hourlynoneHydrosphereResilience, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, Floods, aquatic invertebrate indicatorsField sites require no maintenance but laboratory work carried out at the University of California Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Laboratory in Mammoth Lakes CaliforniaUS Geological Survey climate modeling lab (Dan Cayan)
US Forest Service Region 5 (Joseph Furnish)
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6/5/2014 12:42:11Christopher LandrySenator Beck BasinCenter for Snow and Avalanche StudiesSenator Beck Basin Study Area (SBBSA) is located at 37°54'24.8"N x 107°43'34.6"W in the Ouray Ranger District of the Uncompahgre National Forest in the western San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado. A Special Use Permit was granted to the Center for Snow and Avalanche Studies in October 2003. Under that permit, CSAS received permission to develop and use two study plots and develop a stream gauging station within the 719 acre (290 ha) Senator Beck Basin. More maps of the site are available on our maps page.

The Swamp Angel Study Plot (SASP) is located in a sheltered 'hollow' below treeline at 11,060' (3,371m), near US Hwy 550 at Red Mountain Pass. The Senator Beck Basin Stream Gauge (SBSG) station sits near SASP, in a narrow bedrock gorge at the hyrdrologic "pour-point" of the Basin. The Senator Beck Basin Study Plot (SBSP) is located above treeline, at 12,186' (3,714m), near the center of the Basin. A fourth instrument array, the Putney Study Plot (PTSP), is located on private property on a ridgeline at 12,323' (3,756m) 2km southeast of the Senator Beck Basin,
Winter 2003/200437°54'24.8"N, 107°43'34.6"W3362-4118 amslUSAFree data accessavailable on: http://www.snowstudies.org/data1.html, contact clandry@snowstudies.orgyearly, seasonal, monthly, daily, hourly, 3-hourNoneAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereWeather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Soils, Water cycle, Snow and IceSenator Beck Basin is operated year-round, is readily accessible in all seasons.

Instrumentation is extensive - see http://www.snowstudies.org/sbbsa1.html

Solar power only - no line power available.
CSAS worked closely with Mark Raleigh and Martyn Clark of the NCAR Hydrometeorological Applications Group to publish a data paper about Senator Beck Basin this year. CSAS has hosted numerous research groups from a variety of universities, CRREL, and others.
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6/5/2014 15:29:01Lynn FenstermakerNevCANDRI, UNR and UNLVThe Universities of Nevada (Reno and Las Vegas) and the Desert Research Institute have collaborated with land owner agencies in Nevada to establish two elevational transects of monitoring stations collectively named the Nevada Climate-ecohydrological Assessment Network (NevCAN). These basin-to-mountain top transects are located in the Sheep Range (located approx 35 km NNW of Las Vegas) and in the Snake Range (east central NV along the UT border; approx 335 km NNE of Las Vegas). The primary purpose of NevCAN is to collect data for long-term assessment of climate variability and change and its impact on ecological and hydrological processes and function.

The Snake Range transect has eight monitoring stations beginning at an elevation of 1757 m on the west side of the range, peaking at 3358 m at the western subalpine site and ending at 1566 m on the eastern side of the range. The Snake Range transect encompasses several collaborating land holder agencies including: the Long Now Foundation, Bureau of Land Management, Great Basin National Park and the Nevada Land Trust.

The Sheep Range transect has four monitoring stations beginning at an elevation of 894 m and ending at 2274 m. All of the monitoring stations are located on land managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Some stations are co-located with Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) sites.

One of the primary NevCAN goals is to make climate change science and data accessible to all and thus enhance understanding of climate variability and its impacts.
2010-2013Snake = ~38.96, -114.31; Sheep = ~36.52, -115.17Snake = 1566 to 3357m, Sheep = 900 to 2320 mUnited StatesFree data accesshttp://sensor.nevada.edu/NCCP/Climate%20Monitoring/Network.aspx1 min and 10 min (raw data)None at this timeAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereNatural resources, Adaptation, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Plants, Forests, Invasive species, Water cycle, Snow and Ice, Paleo recordsNevCAN is a set of monitoring stations that was funded by a National Science Foundation EPSCoR climate change grant. The stations operate 24 hours a day, year round, on solar power and batteries. All monitoring stations are accessible via paved or dirt roads except the Sheep Montane station, which requires a 1.5 hr hike. No other facilities are associated with the towers, but sufficient power and expansion capabilities are provided so that additional sensors can be added.

A consistent set of sensors are installed at each station to monitor precipitation, air temperature, wind speed and direction, incoming solar radiation, net radiation, relative humidity, barometric pressure, soil moisture and temperature at several depths. A webcam is mounted on each tower to provide real time assessment of site conditions as well as archival photographs to help assess plant phenology, snow depth and snow melt timing.

Networking capabilities provide real time transmission of data and webcam images to the Nevada Climate Change Data Portal where any interested person may download data free-of-charge. A subset of the data also are available from the Western Regional Climate Center.
Collaborations with NRCS SCAN and SNOTEL stations, discussions with NEON and LTER. Stakeholder organizations include: BLM, Great Basin National Park, Longnow Foundation, Great Basin Landscape Conservation Cooperative, NV Division of Wildlife, NV Div of Water Resources, Western Regional Climate Center.
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6/5/2014 17:28:33Susanna VennAU-KNPREsearch School of Biology, Australian National UniversityThe AU-KNP Australian GLORIA summits are nestled in the heart of the Snowy Mountains, Kosciuszko National Park in New South Wales, south-eastern Australia. Vegetation monitoring on the five summits of Mt Clarke (1813 m to 2114 m) began in 2004 and a second survey was conducted in 2011. In general, the lower altitude summits support taller, shrubbier vegetation, whilst the highest summit is dominated by grasses and forbs.since 200436.24'55.00'' S, 148.17'05.00" E2114 maslAustraliaRestricted data access (registration)http://www.gloria.ac.at/?a=9&l=1&m=KNPevery 5-7 yearsGLORIABiosphere/EcosphereBiodiversity, Plants, Invasive species, Landscapes1 hour walk from Charlottes Pass car park in summer season. Ski access only in winter. No power. Aboriginal sacred site. University of Otago (New Zealand), GLORIA team, Swiss GLORIA team
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6/5/2014 19:19:00Kenichi UENOJALPS networkNational university collaboration in central Japanhttp://jalps.suiri.tsukuba.ac.jp/english/
http://www.geoenv.tsukuba.ac.jp/~jalps-atm/index.html
since 201035-37N, 137-139E500-3000 amslJapanRestricted data access (registration)ueno.kenichi.fw@u.tsukuba.ac.jphourlyJALPS, MEXTAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereWeather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Forests, Landscapes, Water cycle, Snow and IceSee details in
http://www.geoenv.tsukuba.ac.jp/~jalps-atm/index.html
University of Tsukuba, Shinsyu university, Gifu university, Asia Flux
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6/6/2014 0:18:47Bindhy Wasini PandeyDepartment of Geography, Delhi School of EconomicsUniversity of DelhiMonitoring through Data Collected on Common Property Resources, Livelihood Security, disaster management. Ecological Restoration, Conservation of Biodiversity through the protection of the Biosphere Reserves.
Interactions with experts, Research Scholars.
Uses of Internet connection for assessment and information.
Open Lecture series and Geo-forum of the Department.
199432.2700° N, 77.1700° E2186 meterIndiaRestricted data access (registration)E-Mail : whmi_manali@yahoo.comseasonalICIMODE, IHDP, GLOBE, GLP,MRI,, Anthroposphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, GeosphereLand use, Natural resources, Pollution, Tourism, Urbanization, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Forests, Animals, Landscapes, Soils, Snow and Ice, Floods, Hazards and Risk asessment.Accommodation, Library, Internet, food, Research, Guidance. Trekking, Training. Atal Bihari Bajpai Mountaineering Research Institute, Manali, India.
SHROT NGO, Uttarakhand, India.
UDGAM NGO, Uttarakhand India
VARDAN NGO, Uttarakhand India.
HNB Garhwal University, Uttarakhand, India.
Environmental Monitoring Society, (EMS) New Delhi, India
Natural Resorces Institute, University of Manitoba, Canada.
Department of Geography, Kashmir University, Srinagar, India
G. B. Pant Institute of Himalayan Studies.

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6/6/2014 2:30:11Rolf WeingartnerHydrological Atlas of SwitzerlandGeography, Univ. BernMapping "all" features of Swiss hydrrology (including Alps)since 1992Switzerland200 - 4000 m aslSwitzrlandFree data accesswww.hades.unibe.chyearly, seasonal, monthly, dailyBAFU, MeteoSwissAtmosphere, Hydrosphere, GeospherePollution, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Geology, Landscapes, Soils, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, Floods, Paleo recordsSwiss Federal office of environment (BAFU), MeteoSwiss
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6/6/2014 4:08:32Nicky AllsoppJonkershoekSAEONThe Jonkershoek small catchment experiments were initially established in 1938 to measure the impact of afforestation on streamflow. This provided irrefutable evidence that plantations used more water than the natural vegetation and has informed South Africa's policies on invasive alien plant management. Further research added considerably to knowledge of fynbos ecology and to understanding the role of fire in this vegetation type. SAEON took over the streamflow and weather monitoring in 2010 and is currently expanding the weather monitoring network.1938-33.98S, 18.95E280-1213 maslSouth AfricaRestricted data access (registration)http://data.saeon.ac.za/ contact: wim@saeon.ac.zahourlyILTERAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Policy, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Invasive species, Water cycle, Freshwater systemsInstrumented gauging weirs, automatic weather station, raingauges, fog precipitation gauges
year-round, accessible by vehicle or on foot, no power, no accommodation or office space on site
CapeNature, CSIR, University of the Western Cape, Department of Environment Affairs-Natural Resource management
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6/6/2014 4:16:12Francisco BonetSierra Nevada (Spain)University of GranadaUnder the name of the “Sierra Nevada Global Change Observatory”, ideas and methodologies proposed by the GLOCHAMORE project were implemented in this mountain region in 2008. This first phase of the observatory lasts two years and is being financed by the [www.juntadeandalucia.es/medioambiente Andalusian environmental administration] (Department of the Environment. Regional Government of Andalusia). Sierra Nevada’s active participation in the GLOCHAMORE project has greatly helped the inclusion of this project’s guidelines in the Sierra Nevada Observatory. The selection of environmental variables used for monitoring is based on this initiative’s proposed research strategy.
The basic objectives of the Sierra Nevada Global Change Observatory are to:
Define, quantify and characterise natural processes and resources for identifying and differentiating between natural situations and other situations resulting from global change in any of its multiple factors. Whenever possible, it will be determined to what extent a certain situation can be attributed to specific factors.
Characterise acceptable change limits so that it is possible to differentiate between a) recurring fluctuations and b) long-term changes, as well as detect and interpret anomalies in the shortest time possible. This will enable a quick and proportionate reaction to changes detected, if necessary.
Supply information for correct planning of management activities aimed at reversing malfunctions detected in ecological processes.
Assess effectiveness and efficiency of management activities carried out in view of any changes detected in order to propose appropriate adjustments for adaptive management.
Provide reliable information to complement the monitoring efforts of other institutions that are responsible for ensuring the conservation of Sierra Nevada Biosphere Reserve, by virtue of international awards received.
Determine research requirements, relative to any changes detected, that transcend the scope and objectives of a Natural Processes and Resources Monitoring Programme.
Provide useful information to managers and researchers on global change in Sierra Nevada.
Help to disseminate information of general interest that enhances knowledge of the values and importance of Sierra Nevada Biosphere Reserve.
To achieve the above objectives, a range of tasks is being carried out, grouped into four basic areas:
Monitoring of environmental processes to diagnose the state of natural systems in the face of global change. The guidelines of the GLOCHAMORE Strategy have been followed to implement this monitoring system. The aim is to carry out a prolonged evaluation of several environmental variables using scientifically acceptable methodologies.
Adaptive management: The goal of the whole project is to implement an adaptive environmental management model. This means management results are continuously assessed, with this assessment determining management objectives. A feedback mechanism is therefore established which improves the state and resilience of natural resources.
Dissemination of results: we believe it is vital to implement dissemination mechanisms for both the results of the work and the methodologies and experience acquired during the project.
Management of the information generated: a significant amount of varied information will be generated throughout the project. We believe it is very important to implement mechanisms for storing this information in an organised way. This greatly aids its interrelation for generating useful knowledge in the management process.
since 2007, but we have gathered older time series (since 1950)37.05046 N, -3.3670 WFrom 700 to 3482 m.a.s.lSpainRestricted data access (registration)http://linaria.obsnev.es, contact: info@iecolab.esyearly, seasonal, monthly, daily, hourlyGLORIA, LTER, ICOS (partially), GLOCHAMOREAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Natural resources, Pollution, Adaptation, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Landscapes, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, Paleo recordsMeteo stations, wireless sensor network, vehicles, permanent electrical power, etc.Some FP7 projects: MS.MONINA, EU BON
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6/6/2014 12:17:50Jeff HolmquistWhite Mountain Research CenterUniversity of California Los Angeles, Institute of the Environment and SustainabilityWhite Mountain Research Center (formerly White Mountain Research Station) is a unit of the University of California Natural Reserve System, and the UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability.

WMRC operates three full-service field stations to support college-level instruction and research throughout the entire eastern Sierra Nevada region. The stations, forming an elevation gradient from Owens Valley high into the White Mountains, provide lodging, meals, labs, and work space to scientists and students from all over the country and world. See our facilities pages for more information. WMRC also maintains a small research hut on the summit of White Mountain Peak at 4342 m (14,242’). The geologic exposure, steep topography, high elevation, arid climate, and potential for winter access make the center uniquely valuable for scientific study and education.

WMRC has been supporting scientific achievement for over 60 years (see WMRC history pages). It has played an important role in research pertaining to many scientific disciplines including, but not limited to, physiology, astrophysics, archaeology, anthropology, ecology, biology, geology, geography, and medicine. Research in these and many other subjects continues today (see WMRC video and brochures). The center is also known internationally as an unsurpassed site for education in Earth science. Every year geology field camps are based at WMRC and thousands of students have been trained here.
195037.63 N, 118.26 W4316USAFree data accesshttp://www.wmrc.edu/projects/GLORIA/data-and-specimen.htmlyearlyGLORIAAnthroposphere, Atmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereLand use, Natural resources, Pollution, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Invasive species, Geology, Landscapes, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Snow and Ice, Paleo recordsOwens Valley Station (OVS) (WMRC headquarters) – Open year round, located 6 km (4 miles) east of Bishop in Owens Valley at 1250 m elevation (4108’). The Owens Valley station is under-utilized in the early spring, late fall and winter seasons. Spring, summer and early fall are generally booked early, although some openings in August are usually available. OVS can sleep up to 50 people and offers groups year-round housing in air conditioned/heated dorms with separate rooms for faculty. There is an industrial kitchen with dining-room seating for 48 people. WMRC cooks provide excellent meals during the late spring, summer, and early fall seasons. The Owens Valley Station has two classrooms, a small laboratory, full-size greenhouse, wireless internet and computer lab, and a small library. In addition there is a volleyball court, basketball hoop, outdoor campfire pit and large grassy area for outdoor recreation.

Open from about June 1 – October 31 (weather and snow permitting). Crooked Creek Station is a beautiful log cabin style building, which now operates off grid by utilizing solar power. This station is located in the Bristlecone/Limber Pine Forest at 3090 m (10,150’) in the White Mountains. Crooked Creek is an ideal facility in which to teach field classes, conduct research, and to hold workshops and retreats. Housing is seasonal. CCR can sleep up to 50 people in dorms and cabins. It has an industrial kitchen and the WMRC cooks at Crooked Creek provide excel- lent meals. CCR has wireless internet, a small computer room, four dry labs and an outdoor campfire pit.

Open from about June 1 - October 31 (weather and snow permitting), Barcroft Station was constructed in 1951 at an elevation of 3800 m (12,470') in the White Mountains. Barcroft can house up to 25 people in comfortable dorms. It has a full kitchen with excellent meals provided. Three labs are available for visiting research scientists and their students, and the station has wireless internet access. Upstairs in the main building is a classroom/living room area and recreational facilities. The station has been the site of much research in the physiological effects of high elevation, and was also used for a decade by Noble laureate, George Smoot, for research in cosmic background radiation. The Barcroft Station is off-grid and most power is generated from rooftop solar photovoltaic panels.

Open by special arrangement only from about mid-June to mid-October (weather and snow permitting). The summit hut, 8 km (5 miles) north of Barcroft Station, was constructed in 1955 on White Mountain Peak at 4342 m (14,242’). This two-room stone building provides living quarters for up to 4 people and laboratory space for the study of high-altitude physiology, astronomy, and cosmic radiation. The summit hut is supplied from Barcroft station, about a 30-45 minute drive away. Vehicular access is by permission only and 4x4 with high clearance is essential. A snowfield usually blocks the final switchbacks just below the summit lab.
Yosemite National Park
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
Sierra Nevada Inventory and Monitoring Program
Death Valley National Park
Devils Postpile National Monument
US Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station
Inyo National Forest
Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Lab
Sierra Nevada Research Institute
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6/8/2014 11:33:42Courtney FlintiUTAHUtah State UniversityiUTAH is a research infrastructure capacity building project on water sustainability in the Wasatch Range Metropolitan Area - a mountain urban region in Utah. The project is highly interdisciplinary and involves social, engineering, ecological, climate, hydrological and other sciences as well as interactions with professional and civic stakeholders.since 2012not knownnot knownUSAFree data accessavailable at http://iutahepscor.org/data_modeling.htmlvariable across projectsnoneAnthroposphere, HydrosphereLand use, Natural resources, Urbanization, Agency and governance, Adaptation, Weather and Climate, Landscapes, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, FloodsMultiple facilities and instrumentation efforts involved in ecohydrological and social observatory efforts. I am affiliated with the NSF funded MtnSEON - research coordination network led by Jim Gosz. iUTAH is a NSF EPSeCOR project.
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6/9/2014 13:29:59Róbert KankaThe Tatry MtsInstitute of Landscape Ecology Slovak Academy of SciencesComplying with Gloria methodology four summits were chosen
1. Summit – Krížna peak (1918.6 m a.s.l.) is situated in Liptovské kopy Mts (eastern part of the Západné Tatry Mts). It is occurred on the westward crest, about 900 m from main Krížna peak (2038 m a.s.l.). This summit represents higher subalpine level. The summit is sharply divided into the warmer SW, S, SE and E expositions and colder and moister W, NW, N, NE expositions. Particularly broken relief conditions cause variability of vegetation here. In the SW, S, SE and E direction the communities of the alliances Juncion trifidi K r a j. 1933 and Nardion B r.-B l. 1926, L u q u e t 1926 are dominant here; in the N and W directions communities of alliance Loiseleurio-Vaccinion B r.-B l. in B r.-B l. et J e n ny ex K r a j. 1933, which alternate with communities of Salicetea herbaceae B r.-B l. 1948 class.
2. Summit – Veľká kopa peak (2052.4 m a.s.l.) is situated in Liptovské kopy Mts (eastern part of the Západné Tatry Mts). It is occurred 4 m (altitudinal) from the top of Veľká kopa peak itself. This summit was classified as lower alpine level. The communities of alliance Juncion trifidi K r a j. 1933 are widespread in W, S and E expositions. Some transitional communities sporadically dislocate the homogeneity of vegetation. However, typical herb species of alpine zone are missing. Northern exposition is characteristic by evenly backdown of grass species. They are substituted by herb species here, in consequence of this vegetation is getting a character of the class Salicetea herbaceae B r.-B l. 1948 communities – alliances Salicion herbaceae B r.-B l. in B r.-B l. et J e n n y 1926 and Festucion pictae K r a j. 1933 or the class Thlaspietea rotundifolii B r.-B l. 1948 – alliance Androsacion alpinae
B r.-B l. in B r.-B l. et J e n n y 1926.
3. Summit – Sedielková kopa peak (2061.3 m a.s.l.) is situated in Vysoké Tatry Mts. This summit represents higher alpine level. The altitudinal divergence between previous and this summit is certainly small (Veľká kopa peak 2052.4 m a.s.l.), but we can see here some
differences according to species composition. Mosses and lichens typical for a higher alpine zone often occur here. On the southern slope, communities of alliances Juncion trifidi K r a j. 1933 and Festucion pictae K r a j. 1933 dominate; communities of alliance
Loiseleurio-Vaccinion B r.-B l. in B r.-B l. et J e n n y ex K r a j. 1933 characterize the eastern one. The northern slope is covered by mosaic of Juncion trifidi K r a j. 1933 and Salicion herbaceae B r.-B l. 1948 alliances. Western slope is mostly covered by vegetation
of alliance Loiseleurio-Vaccinion B r.-B l. in B r.-B l. et J e n n y ex K r a j. 1933 with a higher abundance of mosses and lichens.
4. Summit – Krátka peak (2374.5 m a.s.l.) is situated in the Vysoké Tatry Mts. This summit was classified as subnival level and is the highest one within the target region Tatry. It occurs eastwards from the main summit. Particular expositions are characterized by the
habituated temperature differences (SW, S, SE, E compare to NW, N, NE). Grassy communities of alliance Juncion trifidi K r a j. 1933 mostly cover S slopes. Vegetation of terraces and stone holes was classified to order Androsacetalia vandellii B r.-B l. in M e i e r et B r.- B l. 1934. Northwards is obvious by the occurrence of the communities of Salicion herbaceae B r.-B l. in B r.-B l. et J e n n y 1926 and Hypno-Polypodion M u c i n a ms. alliances, which are typical by low abundance of grasses and domination of mosses (even with lichens).
since 200149.17°N, 19,98°E2100SlovakiaRestricted data access (registration)http://www.gloria.ac.at/hourly, Hourly temperature of soil, vegetation data in periods of 7 yearsGLORIA, LTERGeosphereBiodiversity, PlantsWi-fi dataloggers buried in soil, every 2 years download of data
Accessibility of observatory - approx. 3-4 hours of walk from mountain village (700 m a.s.l.) to peaks (2000 - 2400 m a.s.l.)
Historical origin - all summits established in 2001 in the Tatry national park, the oldest national park in Slovakia
Instruments - the main instrument is 1x1 m grid frame with 100 cells 10x10 cm, nails for fixation of grid frame; thin string 300 m long
Austrian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Interdisciplinary Mountain Research & University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Center for Global Change and Sustainability
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6/9/2014 14:57:46Alejandra Arce IndacocheaChirapaq Ñan InitiativeInter-institutional PlatformThe Chirapaq Ñan Initiative was launched in 2012 with the objective of systematically monitoring high native potato diversity and the conservation status of native potato landraces over time and in their natural environment (in situ). Chirapaq Ñan means “Rainbow Route” in the quechua language of the Peruvian Central Andes. Like a rainbow, it spatially connects diverse sites, forming a network of custodian farming communities, public, private and international institutions that are the stakeholders and function across the different microcenters. The microcenters are geographical areas characterized by present-day high and unique diversity of native varieties. The different microcenters complement each other due to their distinct diversity. They were selected and included in the Chirapaq Ñan Initiative according to the following criteria: (i) distribution range of cultivated species, (ii) varieties’ degree of endemism, (iii) geographical distance between microcenters, (iv) linguistic and cultural diversity within and between microcenters, (v) local interest and presence of national partners able to take the lead in the initiative, (vi) presence of factors that threaten conservation.

In addition to farming communities, municipalities, regional governments and smallholder farming families, the initiative is currently made up of more than 12 partners that hold the same rights and institutional responsibilities. They include: Instituto Nacional de Innovación Agraria (INIA), Perú; Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias (INIA), Chile; el Instituto Nacional de Innovación Agropecuaria y Forestal (INIAF), Bolivia; Fundación PROINPA, Bolivia; Universidad Nacional de Huancavelica (UNH), Perú; Universidad Austral de Chile (UACh), Chile; Programa de Desarrollo Local (PRODESAL), Chile; Grupo Yanapai, Perú; Centro Andino de Educación y Promoción JMA (CADEP), Perú; Instituto de Investigación para el Desarrollo (IRD), Bolivia; and the International Potato Center (CIP).

Locally, each microcenter is integrated by a consortium of municipalities, universities, NGOs, and national research programs, among others. The local consortia are led at the local level by a national institution. The International Potato Center assumes and facilitates regional coordination, thus seeking the standardization of methods and monitoring indicators, in addition to enabling the exchange of experiences between the different countries’ microcenters. The participation of youth and the education of future generations relating to the use of agrobiodiversity are considered important components in order to achieve sustainable adaptation to climate change and social drivers of change.
since 2012between -12.6 dd and -14.357 dd (latitude) and -74.87 dd and -72.14 dd (longitude)between 3400 and 4400 maslPeruFree data accesss.dehaan@cgiar.orgseasonalARCGIS, WORLDCLIMAnthroposphere, Biosphere/EcosphereLand use, Natural resources, Biodiversity, Plants, LandscapesApplied Biotechnology Lab, International Potato Center (year-round)
Geographic Information Systems Lab, International Potato Center (year-round)
Our collaborations since the Chirapaq Ñan monitoring initiative was launched in 2012 include: Instituto Nacional de Innovación Agraria (INIA), Perú; Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias (INIA),Chile; Instituto Nacional de Innovación Agropecuaria y Forestal (INIAF), Bolivia; Fundación PROINPA, Bolivia; Universidad Nacional de Huancavelica (UNH), Perú; Universidad Austral de Chile (UACh), Chile; Programa de Desarrollo Local (PRODESAL), Chile; Grupo Yanapai, Perú; Centro Andino de Educación y Promoción JMA (CADEP), Perú; Instituto de Investigación para el Desarrollo (IRD), Bolivia; Universidad Publica del Alto (Bolivia);CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) and the International Potato Center (CIP).
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6/11/2014 8:13:37Houet & Le Roux & GalopOHM VicdessosCNRS INEE & Université de ToulouseIn the Pyrenees, the OHM Haut Vicdessos focus its efforts in a mountain area subject to a strong human abandonment since the second half of the twentieth century. The study area covers seven municipalities located in the upper valley of Vicdessos Ariège, from the heart of the valley until 3000m asl. Impacted by an intense mining, metallurgical and agropastoral pressure for more than a millennium, this valley is now the place of a process of abandonment, marked by the final stop of any industrial activity, and with the development of tourism and new activities.200942°45'22''N 1°28'48''E1000 m aslFranceRestricted data access (registration)didier.galop@univ-tlse2.frit depends on the variablesRéseau des OHMAnthroposphere, Atmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Natural resources, Pollution, Economy, Tourism, Urbanization, Policy, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Invasive species, Landscapes, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, Floods, Paleo recordsmultisite observatories.
continuous monitoring of snow cover on a high mountain valley
continuous monitoring a small watershed

by road, by foot and by helicopter..
French universities
Georgia university
BRGM
CNES
...
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6/11/2014 9:44:00Harald PauliGLORIA network coordination; Schankogel Mastersite; Hochschwab SiteAustrian Academy of Sciences (IGF), BOKU University Vienna (ZgWN)A series of summit sites arranged along the elevation gradient from the treeline to the uppermost occurings of vascular plants respresent a GLORIA target region (i.e. a mountain area with consistent climatic conditions). Different nested sampling designs and methods are applied in order to monitor plant diversity and vegetation pattern changes. Further, soil temperature is measured continuously at hourly intervals.
GLORIA had started in the year 2000.

For details see the GLORIA field manual at: www.gloria.ac.at

The fully revised edition of the manual should be available in 2014.
GLORIA international since 2000; Schrankogel Mastersite since 1994Schrankogel: 47° 2'N, 11° 6'E; Hochschwab: 47°37'N, 15° 9'ESchrankogel: 2600-3500m asl; Hochschwab: 1900-2255m aslAustriaRestricted data access (registration)contact: office@gloria.ac.at; harald.pauli@oeaw.ac.at; www.gloria.ac.athourly, hourly for soil T, vascular plant data: every 5-10 yearsGLORIABiosphere/EcosphereLand use, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Animals, Soils, Snow and Iceno permanent facilities in form of buildingsCollaboration with over 100 institutions who are responsible for currently 120 GLORIA long-term observation sites (target regions) on six continents
See: www.gloria.ac.at
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6/15/2014 3:00:29Eric KelseyMount Washington ObservatoryMount Washington ObservatoryMount Washington Observatory is a private, non-profit scientific and educational institution organized under the laws of the state of New Hampshire. Its mission is to advance understanding of the natural systems that create the Earth's weather and climate, by maintaining its mountaintop weather station, conducting research and educational programs and interpreting the heritage of the Mount Washington region.
Mount Washington Observatory is one of only a handful of permanently-staffed mountaintop weather stations in the world and the only one of its kind in the Western Hemisphere. The mountain's elevation, combined with its unique topography and extraordinary weather extremes make it a natural laboratory. The Observatory, with its technological infrastructure, skilled staff, off-mountain logistical support and year-round mountaintop facility at Mount Washington State Park, is a truly remarkable scientific destination.
Since its founding in 1932, Mount Washington Observatory has contributed to important research efforts in short-wave radio propagation, ice physics, the constitution of clouds, and the composition of the atmosphere. The Observatory has also been an integral partner in the deployment, testing and monitoring of scientific equipment, as well as the testing of consumer and industrial products in one of the planet's most extreme places.
since 193244.27N, 71.30W1917 m aslUSARestricted data access (purchase)http://www.mountwashington.org, contact: research@mountwashington.orghourly, some recent data available at 1 minn/aAtmosphereWeather and Climate, Snow and Icestaffed 24/7 year-round
permanent electrical power
Internet access
full sleeping quarters
full kitchen/dining area
accessible by automobile and cog train during warm season (May-October) and snow tractor during cold season (November-April)
Observatory leases space in building owned by state of New Hampshire
origin partly motivated by International Polar Year 1931-32
Appalachian Mountain Club, Plymouth State University, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, University of New Hampshire, University of Massachusetts-Lowell, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, NOAA-National Weather Service
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6/24/2014 18:30:45Thomas SpiegelbergerAlps LTER Irstea GrenobleMountain areas have a wide variety of ecological systems and human activities (agro-sylvo-pastoralism, tourism, hunting, etc.). The climate, economic and societal changes raise questions about the response of biological diversities, the adaptation of production systems, and more generally the various uses of mountain areas including agriculture, tourism and the natural components of the landscape.
The primary research topic of this LTER is mountain ecosystems. The study area is located near the cities of Grenoble and Chambéry. It covers two national parks (Ecrins and Vanoise), two regional nature parks (Vercors and Massif des Bauges) and several natural reserves.

This LTER carries out research on diversity and Alpine ecosystem functioning and services in the context of climate change and changes in mountain territories. The research relies on a network of long-term observation sites and on the experimental ecological platform in the "Joseph Fourie"’ Alpine Station located at the Lautaret pass. Research is conducted in close consultation with land managers.

Key Research Topics
↘ Dynamics of biological diversity in the Alps: the contribution of paleosciences to the reconstitution of Alpine paleoenvironments, the modeling of diversity distribution and dynamics, the study of landscape changes and their impacts on diversity
↘ Alpine ecosystem functioning and services: the role of environmental factors (climate, snowfall) and of human activities on the carbon, nitrogen and water cycles, on the functioning and services of mountain soils, and on the correlation between land use, diversity and ecological services
↘ Interrelations between ecological systems and activity systems: tourism activity in mountains, role of protected areas, relations between human activities and the wildlife, relations between valleys and mountains
2008gravitiy centre: 044° 06' 00" N, 005° 03' 00" Eaverage 1600,FranceRestricted data access (registration)thomas.spiegelberger@irstea.fryearly, monthly, dailyLTERAnthroposphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, GeosphereLand use, Natural resources, Tourism, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Landscapes, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Paleo recordsLTER Tyrolian Alps, LTER Niwot Ridge,
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6/25/2014 12:51:32Martin PriceCentre for Mountain StudiesPerth College, University of the Highlands and Islands, UKSee http://www.perth.uhi.ac.uk/specialistcentres/cms/Pages/default.aspx200856° 24' 0" North, 3° 26' 0" West20 amslUKFree data accessmartin.price@perth.uhi.ac.ukusually decadalEEAAnthroposphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Natural resources, Tourism, Policy, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Landscapes, Water cycle, Snow and IceSnice 2008, we have been working with the European Environment Agency and its associated European Topic Centre (ETC: currently the European Topic Centre for Spatial Informational and Analysis ETC-SIA, based at the University of Malaga, Spain) on data for European mountain ranges. This resulted in a state-of-knowledge report published in 2010: see http://www.eea.europa.eu/publications/europes-ecological-backbone
Current work is in support of the Alpine and Carpathian Conventions, respectively with regard to demography (for the next Report on the State of the Alps) and forests.
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6/30/2014 14:53:34Erika HiltbrunnerFurkaALPFOR (Alpine Research Station Furka) and Institute of Botany, University of BaselAlpine Research and Education Station Furka, ALPFOR, Switzerland The ALPFOR station is unique in Europe by being located at 2440 m a.s.l. directly in the centre of the alpine belt (Swiss central Alps), convenient access by public transport or car. ALPFOR was founded by members of the Institute of Botany of the University of Basel in cooperation with the regional 'Korporation Ursern' (Andermatt) and the Swiss Army in 2009. Three major buildings of the former military camp ‘Furkablick’ have been adapted and renovated in 2009-2011 to serve the new science- and education-oriented needs. Funds were provided by private and public donations. The station is run by the independent, non-profit organisation ALPFOR (affiliated to the University of Basel) that aims at supporting long-term activities in research and education in alpine ecology, fostering sustainable management and use of high mountain ecosystems. The three ALPFOR houses offer space for projects, courses and conferences: dining/lecture room for 80-100 persons, 45 beds in 2- to 7-person rooms, 2 large kitchen facilities, several working rooms and modern sanitary facilities in all 3 houses. The station is open from 1st June to 30th September, please notify there is no access during wintertime. Year-round weather station, total N deposition, multi-site soil temperatures, 300 flowering plant species (biodiversity hotspot), high geo- and topographic diversity. Inventory of flora and fauna on 22 permanent plots (c. 400-600 m2). Research topics (since 1991): - Microclimatology - Influence of elevated CO2 on growth and water regime - Impact of N deposition, warming, sheep trampling on alpine grassland - Population biology, reproductive ecology, molecular genetics of plant populations - Hydrological consequences of land use change - Ecological consequences of N-fixing shrub encroachment - Biodiversity monitoring200846.57749°N, 8.42033°E2240 m aslSwitzerlandRestricted data access (registration)erika.hiltbrunner@unibas.chyearly, seasonalGMBA Mountain LTER networkBiosphere/EcosphereWeather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Snow and IceAccess only in summer possible
History: The ALPFOR station consists of three buildings of a former military camp (built in 1917). Close to the station, the Furkapass road reaches its highest point at 2436 m a.s.l. The pass road connects the canton Uri (Ursern valley) with the canton Valais (Rhone valley).
Permanent electrical power, 45 beds, Three houses with lab and working rooms (former military camp), field container.
exchange of data collection methods with other LTER sites of the GMBA mLTER network
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6/30/2014 17:00:31Georg WohlfahrtNeustiftUniversity of InnsbruckEddy covariance flux tower above managed mountain grassland. Focus is on trace gas exchange with past/ongoing measurements of exchange of CO2, H2O, CH4, N2O, CO, various volatile organic compounds, gaseous elemental mercury. since 200147°07´N, 11° 19´E970 m aslAustriaFree data accesshttp://www.europe-fluxdata.eu/yearly, seasonal, daily, hourlyLTER, FLUXNETAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Pollution, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Plants, Nutrient cycle, Water cyclepermanent electrical power
climatized instrument hut
eddy covariance
general meteorological measurements

ARPA Valle d'Aosta (Italy)
FEM San Michele all'Adige (Italy)
EURAC Bolzano (Italy)
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6/30/2014 17:19:52Francisco BonetSierra Nevada LTER siteUniversity of GranadaUnder the name of the “Sierra Nevada Global Change Observatory”, ideas and methodologies proposed by the GLOCHAMORE project were implemented in this mountain region in 2008. This first phase of the observatory lasts two years and is being financed by the [www.juntadeandalucia.es/medioambiente Andalusian environmental administration] (Department of the Environment. Regional Government of Andalusia). Sierra Nevada’s active participation in the GLOCHAMORE project has greatly helped the inclusion of this project’s guidelines in the Sierra Nevada Observatory. The selection of environmental variables used for monitoring is based on this initiative’s proposed research strategy.
The basic objectives of the Sierra Nevada Global Change Observatory are to:
Define, quantify and characterise natural processes and resources for identifying and differentiating between natural situations and other situations resulting from global change in any of its multiple factors. Whenever possible, it will be determined to what extent a certain situation can be attributed to specific factors.
Characterise acceptable change limits so that it is possible to differentiate between a) recurring fluctuations and b) long-term changes, as well as detect and interpret anomalies in the shortest time possible. This will enable a quick and proportionate reaction to changes detected, if necessary.
Supply information for correct planning of management activities aimed at reversing malfunctions detected in ecological processes.
Assess effectiveness and efficiency of management activities carried out in view of any changes detected in order to propose appropriate adjustments for adaptive management.
Provide reliable information to complement the monitoring efforts of other institutions that are responsible for ensuring the conservation of Sierra Nevada Biosphere Reserve, by virtue of international awards received.
Determine research requirements, relative to any changes detected, that transcend the scope and objectives of a Natural Processes and Resources Monitoring Programme.
Provide useful information to managers and researchers on global change in Sierra Nevada.
Help to disseminate information of general interest that enhances knowledge of the values and importance of Sierra Nevada Biosphere Reserve.
To achieve the above objectives, a range of tasks is being carried out, grouped into four basic areas:
Monitoring of environmental processes to diagnose the state of natural systems in the face of global change. The guidelines of the GLOCHAMORE Strategy have been followed to implement this monitoring system. The aim is to carry out a prolonged evaluation of several environmental variables using scientifically acceptable methodologies.
Adaptive management: The goal of the whole project is to implement an adaptive environmental management model. This means management results are continuously assessed, with this assessment determining management objectives. A feedback mechanism is therefore established which improves the state and resilience of natural resources.
Dissemination of results: we believe it is vital to implement dissemination mechanisms for both the results of the work and the methodologies and experience acquired during the project.
Management of the information generated: a significant amount of varied information will be generated throughout the project. We believe it is very important to implement mechanisms for storing this information in an organised way. This greatly aids its interrelation for generating useful knowledge in the management process.
200737.081N, -3.21W3482SpainRestricted data access (registration)http://linaria.obsnev.esyearly, seasonal, monthly, daily, hourlyGLORIA, LTER, GLOCHAMOREAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Natural resources, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Landscapes, Soils, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, Paleo recordsWe have collaborated mainly with LTER Europe and US LTER regarding data management. We have also several collaborations with Spanish mountain sites. We are also collaborating with GLORIA sites.
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6/30/2014 20:23:21Mark WilliamsNiwot Ridge LTERUniversity of Colorado-BoulderNiwot Ridge is located approximately 35 km west of Boulder, Colorado, with the entire study site lying above 3000 m elevation. There is a cirque glacier (Arikaree Glacier), extensive alpine tundra, a variety of glacial landforms, glacial lakes and moraines, cirques and talus slopes, patterned ground, and permafrost. The research area is bounded on the west by the Continental Divide, with runoff on the two sides being destined for the Colorado and Mississippi Rivers.

Interactions between climate and ecosystems with complex topographic gradients generate unique source and sink habitats for water and nutrients as a result of precipitation, energy, and chemical redistribution. At Niwot Ridge, current changes in climate and atmospheric deposition of nitrogen to these systems are causing rapid changes in some portions of this system but not in others. A conceptual model is presented that links terrestrial ecosystems to each other and to aquatic ecosystems. We report how atmospheric inputs as well as endogenous resources can be amplified or attenuated by transport processes. High elevation lakes and the alpine tundra-forest ecotone are locations expected to receive the brunt of anthropogenic inputs obtained from the redistribution of exogenous materials from the regional environment, and from endogenous sources originating from other montane areas.
198040º 3' N; 105º 36 ' W3500 mUSAFree data accesshttp://culter.colorado.edu/NWT/yearly, seasonal, monthly, daily, hourly, depends on variables being measuredGloria, LTER, NEONAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereNatural resources, Pollution, Policy, Agency and governance, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Invasive species, Geology, Landscapes, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, Floods, Paleo recordsyear-round, power, eddy covariance measurements, lots of other measurementsItalian LTER, GMBA
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7/2/2014 17:01:56Nikolaus SchallhartAlpine Research Centre ObergurglUniversity of InnsbruckThe Alpine Research Centre Obergurgl connects interdisciplinary research tradition with current dynamic research activity. The focus concentrates on environmental and climatologic sciences, cultural, economical and historical research as well as studies about sociological aspects in the high mountain regions for scenario modeling.

It is an important field station of the Innsbruck University (research focus: Alpine Space - Man and Environment) and furthermore an important site within the national and international platform LTER/LTSER (Long-term Ecosystem Research, Long-term Socio-economic and Ecosystem Research), as part of the LTER region Tyrolean Alps.

Aims and offers of the Alpine Research Centre Obergurgl:

1. Research

Support for researchers
Cooperation buildup and funding of interdisciplinary research initiatives
Research activities and monitoring at different long-term research sites


2. Infrastructure for researchers, courses and conferences

The Alpine Research Centre offers perfect basic conditions for scientific courses, excursions and conferences. Guest researchers and students are invited to use the opportunity to combine research and education with fieldwork in the Central Alps. We support researchers and students with accomodation and additional facilities such as a laboratory, lecture rooms, and a library). For reservation of guestrooms or other facilities please contact the University Center Obergurgl.


3. Service: lectures and excursions

As far as personally and temporally possible the team of the Alpine Research Centre provides know-how and expertise.

The following services are currently offered:

Lectures
Excursion guides
Advanced trainings

In case of interest please contact Nikolaus Schallhart!


4. Information infrastructure

Collections of:

Relevant literature about the region „Inner Oetz valley“
Climatologic data (since 1951)
Species lists and field mapping of vegetation and soil
The Alpine Research Centre exist since 1951, the LTER site Obergurgl since ~2000, first Monitoring programmes in the region since ~1938 (rock glacier monitoring)46.8671° N, 11.0248° E1930 m aslAustriaRestricted data access (registration)http://www.uibk.ac.at/afo/ variing depending on type of dataLTSER (part of LTSER platform Tyrolean AlpsBiosphere/Ecosphere, GeosphereLand use, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Animals, Geology, Soils, Snow and IceThe Alpine Research Centre is located in a congress centre (University Center Obergurgl), which is open almost year-round, there are seminar rooms, libraries, a small laboratory and a lecture hall.
The field-monitoring sites are not accessible in winter (most of them)
different institutes and research groups of the University of Innsbruck and other universities
Nature Park Ötztal
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7/3/2014 2:34:58Alice Chung-MacCoubreySierra Nevada NetworkNational Park Service, Inventory & Monitoring ProgramThe Sierra Nevada Network (SIEN) includes four National Park Service units on the west slope of the Sierra Nevada in California: Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks (SEKI), which are two units managed together by one Superintendent, Yosemite National Park (YOSE), and Devils Postpile National Monument (DEPO). The network spans a wide elevational range from 400 to 4,417 meters, encompasses both Mediterranean and Boreal
climates, and thus supports diverse assemblages of plants and animals. More than 90 percent of network park lands are designated wilderness. The SIEN is designing and implementing a long-term monitoring program to measure key indicators of ecological integrity, or “vital signs”. Six monitoring projects are being implemented, encompassing ten vital signs; these projects include: 1) lakes water chemistry, 2) high-elevation forests, 3) birds, 4) wetlands, 5) river hydrology, and 6) climate reporting.
since 200736.6N, 118.8W700-13000 ft mslUnited StatesFree data accesshttp://science.nature.nps.gov/im/units/sien/, contact les_chow@nps.govyearlyNational Park Service Inventory & Monitoring Program (NPS I&M)Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereNatural resources, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Invasive species, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and IceWe have 2 permanent field station/office at two national parks, but our monitoring work occurs elsewhere in the national parks. To support our operations, we have 2 year-round vehicles, 2 seasonal vehicles, and access to pack stock or helicopters for equipment transportation. Climate and river hydrology data are from existing stations, most of which are operated by other agencies. Most of our monitoring equipment is carried by foot into the field and monitoring occurs at randomly located, spatially distributed plots/sites.The Institute for Bird Populations- bird monitoring
U.S. Geological Survey- forest research & streamgage monitoring
NPS- Klamath I&M Network and Upper Columbia Basin I&M Network

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7/3/2014 15:55:40Lluís CamareroLOOP - Limnological Observatory of the PyreneesCSIC - Uni. Barcelona - CREAFBiological chemical and physical temporal variation in remote, high altitude lakes mostly depend on the ecosystem responses ro atmospheric forcings conditioned by ontogenic development at teh ecosystems through time. At LOOP we use diferent approaches (ecological monitoring, regional surveys, paleolimnology) to decipher the information provided by the Pyrenean lakes on current and past environmental changes.198442.62ºN, 0.76ºE1600-3000 maslSpainRestricted data access (registration)webpage: www.loopweb.org, contact: camarero@ceab.csic.esseasonal, monthly, daily, hourlyLTERAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereNatural resources, Pollution, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, Paleo recordsAccesible all-year round. The LOOP is an observational facility in teh vicinities of teh Aigüestortes National Park. It comprises a field station and several monitored catchments. The field station is accesible by car and has permanent electrical power supply. There is a fully equiped lab for chemical analysis of water. Monitored catchments are equiped with several automatic weather stations, discharge gauges and water temperature loggers. A network of sampling stations are visited to collect chemical and biological samples at different time intervals, from biweekly to seasonal. The sampling network consists of eight streams, fourteen lakes and two atmospheric deposition collectors. -
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7/7/2014 4:29:04Dan LambertMount Mansfield Science and Stewardship Center (proposed)University of Vermont, Vermont Center for Ecostudies, Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, Mount Mansfield CompanyMount Mansfield is a northern Appalachian mountain located at 44.5° N latitude, 72.8° W longitude in Vermont (USA). With a summit elevation of 1,339 m, it is the state’s highest peak, capped by approximately 81 ha or alpine vegetation and flanked by extensive montane fir-spruce, northern hardwoods, and a system of alpine ski trails. A 161-km2 state forest surrounds a University of Vermont Natural Area (161 ha), and a four-season recreational resort. Since 1955, researchers at this site have amassed a voluminous scientific record spanning the earth, atmospheric, and ecological sciences. Continuous, decades-old records exist in the areas of meteorology, wet deposition chemistry, forest health, plant and animal ecology, streamflow, and water chemistry. Long-term soil and alpine zone monitoring began 12 and 10 years ago, respectively. With coordination by the Vermont Monitoring Cooperative, these datasets have been used to model various dimensions of the mountain’s ecosystem, often in combination with records collected from other high-elevation sites in the northeastern US and southeastern Canada. A number of collaborators have recently proposed to establish the Mount Mansfield Science and Stewardship Center within a vacant building at the top of a toll road that reaches the ridgeline.

The Mansfield Center’s mission is to promote the health of northeastern mountain ecosystems by catalyzing collaborative science and stewardship on Mount Mansfield. The foundation for this work consists of: a modern mountain field station; a long-term ecological and meteorological record; a tradition of information sharing and regional networking; and a commitment to science-based environmental policy and natural resource management.

Goals
• Advance interdisciplinary research and long-term monitoring of mountain ecosystems and changes affecting mountain flora and fauna
• Develop, implement, and demonstrate stewardship actions that will lead to improved conservation of mountain environments from a local to global scale.
• Provide place-based education and outreach on mountain ecology, conservation issues, and stewardship.

Approach
• Measure natural variability and effects of human activity on mountain ecosystems.
• Quantify and model vital ecosystem processes.
• Evaluate the vulnerability and resilience of populations and natural communities.
• Integrate scientific findings into policy and management tools and guidelines.
• Provide learning experiences that prepare students for future careers as environmental scientists and decision-makers.
meteorological data since 1955; ecological data since 199144.5° N latitude, 72.8° W longitude1,339 m amslUnited StatesFree data accessavailable on: http://www.uvm.edu/vmc/research/datalibrary.php, contact: yearly, hourly, project-dependentVermont Monitoring Cooperative (VMC)Anthroposphere, Atmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereLand use, Natural resources, Pollution, Tourism, Policy, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Iceseasonal, permanent electrical power, accessible by road, facility originated as a telecommunications buildingMonitoring effects of ski area development on stream flow (USGS and VMC)
Long-term monitoring of forest health (VT Dept of Forests, Parks and Recreation and US Forest Service)
Amphibian and forest bird monitoring at Mount Mansfield and Lye Brook Wilderness (Vermont Amphibian and Reptile Atlas Project and Vermont Center for Ecostudies)
Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (US Forest Service and VMC)
Atmospheric mercury deposition monitoring
Long-term monitoring of forest soil mercury (University of Vermont, US Geological Survey, US Forest Service, Natural Resources Conservation Service, US Department of Agriculture, Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation, Green Mountain National Forest, Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation
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7/7/2014 20:58:11Martha AppleGLORIA US-PIOMontana TechGLORIA stands for Global Observational Research Initiative in Alpine Environments. It is a global network for monitoring temperatures and the responses of alpine plants to climate change. The US-PIO GLORIA site is in southwestern Montana, USA and was established in 2008.200845.49° N, 112.48°W2865 amslUnited StatesRestricted data access (registration)http://www.gloria.ac.atFive year intervalsGLORIABiosphere/EcosphereWeather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Snow and IceThe US-PIO observatory is accessible by foot during the summer season, has no electrical power, and has data loggers that record temperature on an hourly basis. Trampling of the alpine plants is limited because there is no definite established trail to these US-PIO GLORIA summits.RAPT - Researching Alpine Plant Traits

Glacier National Park Snowfield Plant Research/Observatory
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7/14/2014 23:10:45Michele FreppazIstituto Scientifico Angelo MossoUniversità di Torino DISAFA and NatRiskThe scientific institute Angelo Mosso belonging to the University of Turin is localized near the Olen Pass at 2901 m asl on the Monte Rosa Massif and represents an unique location for research, formation and divulgations purposes in the fields of high elevation medicine, meteorology, glaciology, geology, soil and snow science, natural hazards and climate change. The Insitute was founded in 1907 from the willing of the Italian physiologist Angelo Mosso and promoted by the Queen Margherita and King Vittorio Emanuele III, with the help of many international Research Institutes, public and private Organizations and Administrations. Here the successful Italian mountain expedition to K2 was partly prepared, with specific tests on the alpinists that were training for the K2 climbing from here up to Capanna Regina Margherita at the Punta Gnifetti (4559 m asl). Beside high altitude medicine, the Institute was well known for the glaciologist and meteorologist studies conducted by Professor Umberto Monterin in years 1927-40. Nowadays the collection of snow and weather data continues thanks to the collaboration of the University of Turin with the Alpine Troops – Servizio Meteomont, who in 2004 installed an automatic weather station close to the Insitute, in order to continue automatically to collect the meteorological data that in the past were manually registered.
The Institute has a complex story: in June 2000, just before the beginning of a new possible revitalization, a fire took place and caused severe damages to the building. Only thanks to the EU-Interreg project “Messa in rete dei musei storico- scientifici nel territorio del Monte Rosa” the Institute was repaired and devoted partly to an exhibition area and partly to laboratories. In particular, the Research Center NatRisk-LNSA of the University of Turin has room for its studies on alpine environment, with a special focus on climate change and natural hazards. Moreover, the Insitute represents a unique location for the organization of specific training courses, such as for example the IPROMO School and the master on Mountain Medicine organized by the University of Turin in collaboration with other partners.
190745.52° N, 7.52° E2901ItalyRestricted data access (registration)michele.freppaz@unito.itseasonalLTERGeosphereWeather and Climate, Ecosystems, Geology, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Snow and Iceyear-round, permanent electric power, accessibility using a lift during the winter season, using a road during summer, inaugurated in 1907, automathic weather station, laboratoryCollaboration with ARPA Valle d'Aosta in the framework of the italian LTER parent sìte: High elevation sites in northwestern Alps
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7/18/2014 15:35:21Christopher AndrewsECN CairngormCentre for Ecology & HydrologyThe Cairngorms UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) site is situated in the Invereshie and Inshriach National Nature Reserve, within the Cairngorms National Park, and covers some 10 km2 of pine forest, dry heaths, mires and alpine vegetation including moss and lichen heaths on the highest ground. ECN is the UK’s long-term environmental monitoring and research programme and makes regular measurements of air, soil, water, and a range of animals and plants across a network of sites to determine how and why the natural environment is changing (see www.ecn.ac.uk for more information).
1999 in current form57°07’ N, 03°49’ W330-1111 maslUKFree data accesshttp://www.ecn.ac.ukyearly, seasonal, monthly, daily, hourlyGLORIA, ECN, INTERACT, LTSER, LTER- EuropeAnthroposphere, Atmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Natural resources, Pollution, Tourism, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Snow and IceAccess is available year round but there are no facilities on site. Access is on foot only from a trailhead accessible by car (it is not serviced by public transport).

Permanent instrumentation on site for recording environmental data, snow cover, phenology and fauna.

We have worked very successfully within the GLORIA and INTERACT communities, leading to some excellent science and research papers. INTERACT was very successful in bringing several international researchers to the the site through the transnational access scheme (www.eu-interact.org).
We have also recently been working closely with LTER-Europe participants leading to a joint publication on rapid ecosystem service assessment across the network.
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7/19/2014 0:58:24Jeremy LittellAlaska Climate Science CenterUnited States Geological SurveyWe don't have an observatory - we have the pieces of an observatory that have yet to be wired together in any meaningful way! They are scattered over a huge area of Alaska, and each one is different.Variable - early 1960s for some63.2, -148.50 to 3000m60Free data accessjlittell@usgs.govyearly, seasonal, monthly, daily, hourlyIndependentAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereNatural resources, Adaptation, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Plants, Forests, Landscapes, Soils, Water cycle, Snow and Ice, Paleo recordsWe have two partnerships that involve networks of researchers currently pursing scientific questions in mountain environments. The Alaska Science Center (USGS), which monitors glacier mass balance and hydrologic flux in Alaska mountains; International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, which does research on permafrost, ecosystem response, ecohydrology in high latitude and mountain systems of Alaska;
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7/19/2014 16:11:50Ricardo JanaGrey GlacierUniversidad de Magallanes (UMAG), Dirección de Programas AntárticosThe Torres del Paine National Park is considered one of the most visited tourist attractions in the region of Magallanes and one of the largest biosphere reserves in the world, is located between the mountain massif of the Andes and the Patagonian steppe, where his rugged geography shapes a landscape with abundant glaciers, lakes, rivers, waterfalls and lush vegetation. This place stores within their territories pristine beauty and abundant, which is characteristic of the region, which not only allows the development of educational activities in contact with nature but also a unique and invaluable source of scientific information that attracts the attention of a considerable number of people around the world interested in studying from this great natural laboratory. The availability of infrastructure will greatly facilitate the development of scientific and / or educational institutions of different conducting research programs. There is great interest in the scientific community to develop activities in the Southern Ice Field (CHS), so the Grey glacier could be used as a reference glacier (Benchmark) basis that this is part of the large nature reserve of water and their large size and similar behavior with other large glaciers CHS, allows its use as a representative of what happens in a larger context laboratory.200051º 00’ 15’’ S, 73º 10’ 48’’ O200 - 3050 maslChileRestricted data access (registration)http://www.umag.cl/investigacion/dpa/?page_id=933yearlyGEO-GNOMEAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, GeosphereNatural resources, Tourism, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Snow and IceChilean Antarctic Institute
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Brasil
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7/19/2014 17:42:13Viviana FerrarioOsservatorio del paesaggio (landscape observatory) del Canale di BrentaUniversità di Padova, Università Iuav di Venezia, Regione del VenetoThis is the first structured landscape observatory in Italy, settled according to the European Landscape Convention.
The core idea is that landscape can be considered as a “tool”, which may contribute to the expression, outline and mediation of different perceptions, values and viewpoints, both of expert knowledge and lay people about the local environment and territory. In this perspective landscape may stimulate the emerging of territorial questions and an open discussion on them.
The Landscape Observatory should:
1. monitor landscape tranformation
2. monitor people landscape perception
3. work as a “round table” for dialogue and for identifying common landscape objectives inside the local community.
201145.8572633°N, 11.6589719°E166 m amslItalyFree data accesshttp://www.osservatorio-canaledibrenta.itnot declaredRete degli osservatori locali del paesaggio del VenetoAnthroposphereLand use, Natural resources, Economy, Tourism, Urbanization, Policy, Agency and governanceLandscape Observatory of Catalunia (Spain)
Regione Toscana (Italy)
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7/19/2014 18:01:02Tom GiambellucaHaleNetUniversity of Hawaii at ManoaHaleNet: The Haleakalā Climate Network, Maui, Hawai‘i

In June 1988, the first stations in the HaleNet climate network were established on the leeward slopes of Haleakalā Volcano with the installation of three climate observing stations at elevations of 950 1650 and 2120 m. With two additional leeward stations, the network was extended to the Haleakalā summit in 1990. Two years later, stations were added on the windward slope. Eventually, 11 sites were established, eight of which are currently in operation. The longest running HaleNet stations have been recording microclimate data for more than 25 years. The data collected at these stations include measurements of net and solar radiation, air temperature, infrared surface temperature, wind speed, relative humidity, wind direction, soil temperature, soil heat flux, and soil moisture. Derived variables include potential evapotranspiration, and vapor pressure.

HaleNet has proved highly useful in support of conservation efforts on Haleakalā and for research on the influences of climate on high elevation tropical ecosystems. Numerous studies have utilized HaleNet data to better understand the climate of high mountain slopes in Hawai‘i, estimate rates of evapotranspiration, analyze climate variability and long-term trends in temperature, rainfall, solar radiation, and other variables, to help design programs to control invasive species, and to determine the underlying causes of decline in an important high elevation native plant.
HaleNet currently serves as a model for the development of a statewide climate monitoring system. But continuing financial support for the system is never certain. The biggest challenge now is to transition HaleNet and other climate monitoring networks in Hawai‘i from a project-based funding regime to more sustainable, institutional base support.

198820.71°N, 156.26 °W960-2990 m amslUSAFree data accessthomas@hawaii.eduhourlyN/AAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereWeather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Invasive species, Water cycle, Paleo recordsAll stations are powered by solar panels. Remote stations are connected by a radio telemetry networkCollaborating institutions:
Haleakala National Park
Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center, USGS
Pacific Islands Climate Change Cooperative, DOI
Department of Botany, University of Wisconsin
Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Colorado State University
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7/19/2014 21:25:19Tino JohanssonCHIESAInternational Center of Insect Physiology and EcologyThe Climate Change Impacts on Ecosystem Services and Food Security in Eastern Africa (CHIESA) is a four-year research and development project aimed at increasing knowledge on the impacts of climate change on ecosystem services in the Eastern Afromontane Biodiversity Hotspot (EABH).

CHIESA is funded by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland, and coordinated by the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe) in Nairobi, Kenya.

Through research and training, CHIESA will build the capacity of research communities, extension officers and decision makers in environmental research, as well as disseminate adaptation strategies in regard to climate change. The general areas for environmental research are in agriculture, hydrology, ecology and geoinformatics.

CHIESA's implementing agency is icipe, with coordination among four universities in Africa and Europe. Together, these institutions carry out activities within eight distinct work packages, and oversee participation of 22 stakeholder institutions.

CHIESA activities focus on three mountain ecosystems in Eastern Africa, namely Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, the Taita Hills in Kenya and Jimma Highlands in Ethiopia. The project consortium monitors weather, detects land use/land cover change, and studies biophysical and socio-economical factors affecting crop yields and food security.

The project also builds the climate change adaptation capacity of East African research institutions, stakeholder organizations and decision-makers through research collaboration and training. Together with local communities, the project will develop, test and disseminate climate change adaptation tools, options and strategies at the farm level.

Further, CHIESA provides researcher training for staff members of the stakeholder organizations, enhances monitoring and prediction facilities by installing Automatic Weather Stations, and disseminates scientific outputs to various actors from farmers to policy-makers.
2011will be provided laterlaterKenyaRestricted data access (registration)lateryearly, seasonal, monthly, dailyAfroMontAnthroposphere, Atmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Economy, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Invasive species, Landscapes, SoilslaterUniversity of Dar es Salaam (TZ), Sokoine University of Agriculture (TZ), University of York (UK), University of Helsinki (FI), Kenya Meteorological Department, Tanzania Meteorological Agency, National Meteorological Agency of Ethiopia, Jimma University (ET)
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7/19/2014 22:34:57Chris HergartenLearning LandscapesMSRI / UCAThe Learning Landscapes program is a new research and monitoring project initiative for the Naryn area in Kyrgyzstan developed by the Mountain Societies Research Institute (MSRI), University of Central Asia in Kyrgyzstan.
The idea is driven by the need to improve people's lives through gaining a better understand of how people make decisions. The question how research-generated knowledge is (or is not) used in (adaptive) decision-making processes at household, community and various government administrative levels takes thereby a center stage.
The two main goals of the Learning Landscapes program are:
- To conduct long-term, application-focused research and monitoring in and on these systems in collaboration with local organizations and other stakeholders; and
- To establish demonstration and experimentation sites that future UCA faculty may use for research and place-based experiential education and that community members and organizations may use for learning purposes.
201476.432°N, 41.5°E ~ 2500 maslKyrgyzstanFree data accessNo data available yetyearly, seasonal, monthly, dailyGLORIAAnthroposphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, GeosphereLand use, Economy, Policy, Agency and governance, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Landscapes, Snow and IceCollaboration with University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, Canada
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7/19/2014 23:06:13Willem FergusonMariepskopUniversity of PretoriaClimate monitoring (9 weather stations), water, Geomorphology, Biodiversity, ecosystem services, Human socio-economicssince 200824.55S, 30.85E700m - 2000 mSouth AfricaRestricted data access (registration)www.mariepskop.orgyearly, hourlyAfroMont, SAEONAnthroposphere, Atmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Natural resources, Economy, Agency and governance, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Animals, Water cycleRudimentary accommmodation and lab facilitiesSAEON, Mpumalanga Parks Board, Department of Agriculuture, Forestry and Fisheries, Japanese International Coopreation Agency (JICA), Agricultural Research Council
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7/19/2014 23:28:49Daniel Ruiz CarrascalLos NevadosEscuela de Ingenieria de AntioquiaMulti-tiered research project aimed at understanding the potential impacts of climate change on the integrity of high altitude environments in the Tropical Andes. The goal is to deepen the understanding of the function and importance of these habitats, and assess the best suite of adaptation strategies for their conservation. Activities are focused on a key protected area in Colombia, namely the Los Nevados Natural Park, on the El Ruiz-Tolima volcanic massif, in the Central Andean region (04°36’-04°57’ N; 75°12’-75°30’W). Seven main components of analysis have been proposed: (i) analysis of long-term changes in atmospheric (in)stability; (ii) diagnostics of water balance/supply and potential changes in hydrological regimes; (iii) assessments of biodiversity levels and vulnerabilities; (iv) role of anthropic disturbances; (v) carbon capture and storage in soils, peatlands and aquatic microhabitats; (vi) analysis of long-term changes in climatic conditions (past climate reconstructions, analysis of instrumental periods, hindcasts, and climate model projections); and (vii) socio-economic factors (e.g. ecosystem services valuation, communities perceptions, land-use practices). Diverse primary and secondary data are periodically gathered as part of the long-term monitoring effort. Data include weather station and data logger records, georreferenced information such as marks, tracks and perimeters of water bodies, georreferenced photographs, and biological parameters from vegetation experimental plots.Since 20064.75°N, 75.33°W3900 maslColombiaFree data accesspfcarlos@eia.edu.cohourlyNAAnthroposphere, Atmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Natural resources, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Plants, Soils, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, Paleo recordsQuaterly field campaigns; ground transportation available; 3900 m base camp; gear available: from high-tech outdoor camping tents to high-pressure oxygen cylinders; equipments and devices: portable video-cameras, digital cameras, tripods, personal laptops, new-generation GPSs, precision compasses, digital thermometers and hygrometers, altimeters, two-way radios, solar power packs and inverters, and optical USB stations.International Research Institute for Climate and Society - Columbia University in the City of New York (USA)
The Tree Ring Lab - Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University in the City of New York (USA)
University of Maine (USA)
World Bank
The MacArthur Foundation
Nature Conservancy
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7/19/2014 23:46:50Renee F. BrownValles Caldera Wireless NetworkUniversity of New Mexico Sevilleta Field StationDirectly affiliated with the Sevilleta Wireless Network in central NM, the Valles Caldera Wireless Network is a remote wireless network for the real-time acquisition of environmental sensor data. Today, this network encompasses hundreds of sensors located at eddy covariance flux towers distributed in the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) in northern New Mexico, USA.200735.8769444°, -106.5877778°2000 metersUnited States of AmericaRestricted data access (registration)Contact: rfbrown@sevilleta.unm.eduVaries by research site. Data from all sites on the network are collected on an hourly basis, but individual sites record data at frequencies as high as 10 Hz.Sevilleta LTER, Jemez River Basin CZOBiosphere/EcosphereLand use, Natural resources, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Plants, Forests, Landscapes, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Snow and IceYear-around operation. Powered by solar. Access is restricted to snowshoeing and skiing during the winter season. Our network can support all types of sensor instrumentation, including network-accessible cameras.Users of the Valles Caldera Wireless Network have included researchers at the University of New Mexico (UNM), University of Arizona (UA), and Desert Research Institute (DRI).
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7/19/2014 23:46:54Renee F. BrownSevilleta Wireless NetworkUniversity of New Mexico Sevilleta Field StationIn 2004, we established what has become one of the world’s largest remote wireless networks for the real-time acquisition of environmental sensor data. Today, this network encompasses thousands of sensors located at weather stations, global change experiments, and flux towers distributed across several thousand square kilometers in central New Mexico, USA.2004 34.3546944°, -106.8845833°1500 metersUnited States of AmericaRestricted data access (registration)Contact: rfbrown@sevilleta.unm.eduVaries by research site. Data from all sites on the network are collected on an hourly basis, but individual sites record data at frequencies as high as 10 Hz.Sevilleta LTERBiosphere/EcosphereLand use, Natural resources, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Plants, Forests, Geology, Landscapes, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycleYear-around operation. Powered by solar. Access varies depending on site location. Most sites are located on private property. Our network can support all types of sensor instrumentation, including network-accessible cameras.Users of the Sevilleta Wireless Network have included researchers at the University of New Mexico (UNM), University of Colorado at Boulder (CU), University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC), New Mexico Tech (NMT), University of Virginia (UVA), and University of Idaho (UI).
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7/20/2014 0:13:27Manuel PeralvoAndean Study LandscapesCONDESANThis observatory will implement a set of study landscapes in the Andean region based upon previous work of CONDESAN under the umbrella of regional monitoring networks (GLORIA, iMHEA, Red de Bosques Andinos). The goal is to develop and implement an integrative monitoring protocol to characterize links between biodiversity, carbon and other relevan ecosystem processes under the context of climate change and land use and land cover change.20050 deg N, '78.7 deg W1850EcuadorFree data accesshttp://geoi-bol.com/geovisores/geovisor_cima/Range of time scales (minutes to years)GLORIA, Andean Forests, et al.Anthroposphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereLand use, Economy, Resilience, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Forests, LandscapesA combination of on the ground sensors arranged along altitudinal and land use gradients, remote sensing data and data management infrastructure.INSTITUTO DE ECOLOGÍA REGIONAL - UNIVERSIDAD DE TUCUMÁN
HERBARIO NACIONAL DE BOLIVIA (LPB) – CONVENIO MUSEO NACIONAL DE HISTORIA NATURAL E INSTITUTO DE ECOLOGÍA
INSTITUTO ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT
CORPORACIÓN GRUPO RANDI RAND
UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL DE LOJA
MINISTERIO DEL AMBIENTE DEL ECUADOR
NATURALEZA Y CULTURA INTERNACIONAL
INSTITUTO DE CIENCIAS AMBIENTALES Y ECOLÓGICAS - ICAE, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES
AGENCIA SUIZA PARA EL DESARROLLO Y LA COOPERACIÓN - COSUDE
CONSERVACIÓN INTERNACIONAL
COOPERACIÓN TÉCNICA ALEMANA - GIZ
Fondo para la Protección del agua de Quito, Ecuador – FONAG
Instituto de Montaña, Perú – IM.
The Nature Conservancy, Colombia, Ecuador, Perú – TNC
Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Medellín – UNALMEED
Escuela Politécnica Nacional de Quito, Ecuador – EP
The Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Londres, Inglaterra – IMPERIAL

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7/20/2014 18:10:23Steven JayYellowstone Ecological Research CenterYellowstone Ecological Research CenterYERC brings together academic institutions, private companies, and governmental agencies from around the country to work in the group’s major research focus area: the 20 million acre, Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). YERC is an independent, private, non-profit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to increasing the role of science at the natural resources decision-making table. YERC
is a source of science-based information for the diverse stakeholders of the GYE and beyond.
since 198945.6778° N, 111.0472° W1461 maslUSARestricted data access (registration)www.coasterdata.netyearly, seasonal, monthly, dailyMtnSEONAtmosphere, Biosphere/EcosphereLand use, Natural resources, Ecosystems, Plants, Forests, Animals, LandscapesYear round office located in Bozeman, MT. Field site including a Cabin and Mobile Housing located in Cooke City, MT near the NE entrance to Yellowstone National Park. Mobile field station consisting of a 4-season camper trailer with satellite phone and internet connection, full kitchen and beds.University of Montana, University of Idaho, University of Victoria, Yellowstone National Park, Shoshone National Forest, Red Rocks National Wildlife Refuge.
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8/13/2014 14:20:19Nicky AllsoppTable MountainSAEON Fynbos Nodehttp://www.saeon-fynbos.org/
Microtopography and temperature
Long-term vegetation surveys
Soil moisture in relation to vegetation restoration
Cloud precipitation
Climate monitoring
Fire and vegetation recovery
Impact of invasive aliens plants
since 1966-33.98 S, 18.41 E10-1000 amslSouth AfricaRestricted data access (registration)http://data.saeon.ac.za/all of aboveILTERAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Soils, Water cycle, fireyear round, dispersed sites in national parkUniversity of California, Berkeley, University of Connecticut, SANParks, University of Cape Town
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8/14/2014 13:18:11Tacham Walter NdamNonUniversity of Bamenda and The Environment and Rural Development FoundationThe lebialem highlands is situated along the Mount Cameroon chain rich in endangered flora and fauna. It is a conservation hot spot to conserse the threatened and endangered cross river gorilla and several plant species.
Recent ethnobotanical studies show that anthropological and land use systems coupled with modern lifestyle is causing the gradual loss of indigenous knowledge and destruction of water catchment cites.


Since 20045˚ 11’N, 5˚ 45’E 2500mCameroonFree data accessNonyearly, monthlyTFTF, M&N, Ruthford Biosphere/EcosphereLand use, Natural resources, Economy, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Freshwater systemsNo facilities are available except at the University campus and the head office in Buea.- Successful implementation of agroforestry systems in the West and Northwest regions of Cameroon
- Coordination of the ABS project on Echinops giganteus, and its implementation in the Mount Bamboutos region of Cameroon.
- Conducted ethnobotanical surveys to document indigenous knowledge of the Banwa and Mundani people of the lebialem highlands.
- Conservation of the cross river gorilla and chimpanzes
- In progress to create a santuary in the lebialem highlands.
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10/31/2014 9:01:26Christoph KuefferMIRENMountain Invasion Research Network MIREN is a global network of 11 monitoring sites on all continents (except Antarctica) and in different climate zones focused on plant invasions and vegetation change as a result of global change.200547.22°N, 8.33°E 500-4200 mslSwitzerlandRestricted data access (registration)www.miren.ethz.chevery c. 5 yearsGMBABiosphere/EcosphereAdaptation, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Invasive species, Landscapesvegetation monitoring plotsMRI
GMBA
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11/4/2014 16:57:25Irene AlvarezMont Blanc AtlasResearch Center for Altitude EcosystemsThe Atlas is a pluridisciplinary project to measure and model the evolution of the Mont Blanc range under climate change and human pressure, with a focus on ecology. It gathers the work of many scientists. The CREA, based in Chamonix also carries out original research, including participatory monitoring. The goal is to establish a constant monitoring and integrate the Mont Blanc site in global networks such as LTER.200845°55,95 N, 6°52,48 E500-3000maslFrance, Switzerland, ItalyFree data accesswww.atlasmontblanc.orgyearlynot yetBiosphere/EcosphereAdaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, LandscapesBasecamp for scientists - temperature stations - study sitesThe CREA initiated the Mont Blanc Atlas with the support of the CNRS-LECA, WSL and ARPA
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1/21/2015 16:00:27Manuel PeralvoPichincha Learning SiteCONDESANBaseline in construction for a long term observatory in:
- Land use and land cover change dynamics
- Network of actors and environmental governance systems
- Carbon and biodiversity along environmental and land use gradients
20100.11N, -78.7W1800EcuadorFree data accesshttp://geovisor-monitoreo.condesan.org/Different temporal/spatial scalesGLORIA, Andean Forests, othersBiosphere/EcosphereLand use, Economy, Adaptation, Ecosystems, Forests, LandscapesDifferent facilities managed directly and with the collaboration of partner institutions.Multiple institutions including RIAB (http://www.bosquesmodelo.net/), Municipality of Quito, Private Reserve Network, among others.
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1/21/2015 18:22:27Ian BillickRMBLRMBLWe host approximately 200 students and scientists each summer that do a wide range of research. Founded in 1928, we have 1500+ scientific publications associated with the research and one of the largest collections of long-term studies.1928latitude = 38° 57' 19.60', longitude = -106° 59' 28.32'2900 metersUSAFree data accessrmbl.orgDependsGloria, alpine plant warming by species removal network (Sanders and Sundqvist)Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereWeather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Invasive species, Geology, Landscapes, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, Paleo recordsApproximately 70 buildings, including three laboratories. We are accessible year-round, though most research is done seasonally. We have permanent electrical power, weather stations, a GIS/GPS lab, and other shared research platforms.We interact with a wide range of organizations, including DRI, OBFs, and 50+ colleges and universities.
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1/22/2015 10:03:28Elena E. TimoshokMountain glacier basin AktruIMCES SB RAS (RUSSIA)This basin is privmary observatory of Institute of Monitoring of Climatic and Ecological Systems.
Glacier basin Aktreu provides a lot of opportunities for studies of monitoring because of its high ecosystem and ladscape diversity and relatively low human-related disturbance level.
Basin has cold and humid climate and contains
1)unique for Altay old siberian stone pine (Pinus sibirica) forests which have 500+ years old trees, priceless for dendroclimatological studies and suitable for monitoring of most stable type of plant communities which survived Little Ice Age.
2) Typical for Altay siberian Larch forests, which provide opportunity of monitoring of typical for Altay plant communities
3) Developing ecosystems on moraines and fluvioglacial deposits
4) Upper treeline amd forest line in the forest-tundra ecotone and bottom forest line several kms below basin on the edge of the forest and steppe.
Basin had meteorological stations which was functioning between 1960s and 1990s
SInce the 2014 basin has automatical meteorologica station, supported by IMCES SB RAS.

since 199950.07N,87.77E2100 to 2400 aslRussiaRestricted data access (purchase)contact: ten80@mail.ruMixed: weather data daily and free; climate data yearly; ecosystem data yearlyNoneAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, GeosphereAdaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, LandscapesObservatory highly accessible for the Russian mountains
Glaciological data since 1911; Weather data between 1952 and 1994, and since 2014; Esosystem monitoring since 1999
60 permanent sampling areas
Automatical metorological station
Electrical power may be provided by side organisation
Housing may be provided by side organisation
Tomsk State University
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1/22/2015 10:15:27Elena E. TimoshokMountain glacier basin KorumduIMCES SB RAS (RUSSIA)This observatory used by scientist of IMCES SB RAS for regular (once per 3 to 4 years) mounitoring of changes of ecosystem development (forelands), upper treeline and forest line, and high altitudinal forests (mainly consisting of siberian larch (Larix sibirica).200850.13N,87.70E2150-2400 m aslRussiaRestricted data access (purchase)contact: ten80@mail.ru3-4 yearsNoneBiosphere/EcosphereAdaptation, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forestshard to reach
No permanent facilities, except for 10 permanent sampling areas
No
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1/22/2015 10:39:35Elena E. TimoshokMountain glacier basin AkkolIMCES SB RAS (RUSSIA)Scientists of IMCES SB RAS study foreland ecosystems and development, forest fragments formed in cold and arid climate of the Yuzhno-Chuisky range.since 200249.81N;87.86E2300-2500 m aslRussiaRestricted data access (purchase)contact: ten80@mail.ru5+ yearsNoneBiosphere/EcosphereEcosystems, Plants, ForestsHard-to-reach
No permanent facilities except for 5 permanent sampling areas
None
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1/23/2015 17:41:45Maria B GarcíaOrdesa and Monte Perdido National ParkOAPN - CSICORDESA AND MONTE PERDIDO NATIONAL PARK

Protected area: 15.608 ha

General description:

The Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Park (OMPNP) lies in the Southern slopes of the Central Pyrenees (Huesca province, Aragón). It is in bounded to the north by the French border (Gavarnie and Estubé valleys) and includes different municipalities: Torla, Fanlo, Tella-Sin, Puértolas and Bielsa (besides Broto if the buffer area is considered).

The PNOM comprises 4 deep valleys occupying 15.608 ha: Ordesa (Arazas river), Añisclo (Bellós river), Escuaín (Yaga river) and the upper part of Pineta (Cinca river). The peripheral part spreads over 19.679 ha more, and extends along parts of other valleys: Bujaruelo (the Ara river), Vió, Puértolas (Airés canyon), the medium reaches of Pineta valley, and La Larri.

The ice and the water constitute the main eroding agents responsible for the landscape: glaciar valleys (U shape), river valleys (V shape), deep canyons, mountain lakes… Despite most of the park is dominated by the alpine belt and subalpine grasslands, the impressive orography creates a mosaic of small areas covered by contrasted ecological systems: deep valleys, different kind of forests, very large rocky walls, canyons, screes, sunny and shady areas. Such environmental heterogeneity promotes a high diversity (for example more than 1400 plant species) and singularity (many endemic plants, some restricted to the Park), as a consequence of specific adaptations.

Two particular geomorphological processes are noticeable in the park: glaciar and periglacial processes and karstic dynamics. In the northern slopes of the Marboré, Cilindro and Monte Perdido, several ice masses in different state of conservation and dynamics occur. The Monte Perdido ice masses are the only one that can be considered as glaciers and they are composed of two separate bodies that have been greatly reduced during the last decades. Periglacial processes (polygonal soils) are still active in the high altitudes. Because of the carbonate nature of the bedrock, karstic processes are very active in the Park and are the main control of its hydrogeology.

Conservation status

The OMPNP is one of the oldest in Spain. It was created in 1918 after the Covadonga Park, and named at that time “Ordesa National Park” because only included one valley. It was the first Spanish National Park declared as Biosphere Reserve (Ordesa-Viñamala) by the UNESCO, in 1977. Three additional valleys were included in 1982, when it changed the current name: “Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Park”. It is also included in other European protected spaces, like the Areas of Comunity importance, and those of special importance for birds.
1982 the oldestCoord: 42º38’ N 0º01’ W 700-3,355 maslSPAINRestricted data access (registration)evillagrasa@aragon.esIt depends on the variableGLORIA, LTERAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereLand use, Natural resources, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, AnimalsSierra Nevada (Spain)
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1/23/2015 19:14:53Malki SaenzJatunhuaycuFondo para la Proteccion del Agua (Quito, Ecuador)El sitio Antisana se encuentra por fuera del límite occidental de la Reserva Ecológica Antisana. La REA se ubica en la cordillera oriental, a 45 km al este de Quito. Junto al Parque Nacional Cayambe-Coca (PNCAY), constituyen la cuenca alta del río Napo. Uno de los atractivos de la REA es el volcán Antisana (5 758 msnm), uno de los más grandes y altos del país. Es un estrato-volcán activo, que ha reportado algunos eventos eruptivos, siendo el más reciente aquel que rellenó parcialmente el antiguo valle glaciar del río Papallacta, dando lugar a la formación de la laguna del mismo nombre. since 20060.46°S , 78,20°W> 4000 maslEcuadorRestricted data access (registration)http://www.condesan.org/gloria/content/antisanadailyGLORIA-AndesAnthroposphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereLand use, Natural resources, Policy, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Landscapes, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and IceHydro-meteorological monitoring network in the micro-catchment of Jatunhuaycu in the Reserva Ecologica de Antisana. Monitoring of the site is realized by FONAG-Fondo para la Proteccion de Agua; and has been supported by several public and private Ecuadorian companies. Research is done in cooperation with Escuela Politecnica Nacional (Quito), Universidad de San Francisco de Quito, amongst others.
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1/23/2015 19:37:32Veerle VanackerLlavircayUniversidad de CuencaSet of 5 paired micro-catchments in highly degraded region. Monitoring of hydrometeorological data (precipitation, discharge) and solid and solute riverine fluxes. Characterization of land use change (multi-temporal land use maps), and key soil parameters. Also analysis of land use and agricultural systems, and characterisation of main livelihood strategies from household interviews.

Implementation of soil and water conservation structures with local communities, and weekly monitoring of water and sediment fluxes.
since 20092.94°S, 79°W2600 maslEcuadorRestricted data access (registration)www.ucuenca.edu.ac/dailyNAAnthroposphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereLand use, Natural resources, Economy, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycleCollaboration with local public institutions: Empresa Publica Municipal de Aseo y Saneamiento; Empresa Publica de Telecomunicaciones, Agua potable, y Alcantarillado; the Secretario Nacional de Agua - SenAgua; and the University of Cuenca. International cooperation with the Universite de Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium) and University of Leuven (Belgium).
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1/23/2015 19:59:05Elise OsengaRoaring Fork Observation NetworkAspen Global Change InstituteThe Roaring Fork Observation Network currently consists of 4 soil moisture and weather monitoring stations located at multiple elevations within the Roaring Fork Valley (RFV of Colorado.

Stations are managed by the Aspen Global Change Institute (agci.org) a non-profit focused on furthering scientific understanding of global environmental change. Plans exist to expand the network to a total of 6 stations within coming years.
201239.13N, 106.53W2500mUSAFree data accesseliseo at agci.orgdailyN/AAtmosphere, GeosphereWeather and Climate, Ecosystems, Forests, Soils, Water cycle, Soil moistureThe RFV is a watershed located in central Colorado in North America. Elevations range from over 4,200m at the highest point to around 1,800m at the lowest point. Ecosystems likewise rage from scrub oak to mixed conifer forests. Key towns within the watershed include Aspen and Glenwood Springs.

Four monitoring towers currently exist in different ecosystems (mixed conifer; declining aspen; disturbed high altitude meadow; disturbed riparian). Each monitoring tower measures air temperature, rain (snow data not available), relative humidity, and soil moisture at 10cm, 20cm, and 52cm depths. Soil temperature at 20in is already available for three sites and will soon be added to the fourth. Stations were installed between 2012 and 2014. Two additional stations are scheduled to be installed in summer of 2015. Data is free for public use. Online data extends only through the previous month and is unprocessed. For historic data, please contact Elise at eliseo at agci.org.
Future Forest Roundtable (a local collaboration of management, policy, non-profit and public entities involved in the protection, understanding, and management of forest ecosystems within the Roaring Fork Watershed); Roaring Fork Watershed Collaborative (a watershed-based affiliation of public, private, and government stakeholders committed to promoting the health of local streams and rivers and the watershed as a whole)
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1/23/2015 21:59:06Wolfgang SchoenerSonnblickZentralanstalt für Meteorologie und GeodynamikIn the international context of high-mountain research the Sonnblick Observatory and its science stand out because of:
o the unique climate monitoring back to 1886 offering to investigate and understand climate change in the Alpine region at the background status from the pre-industrial level to the period of significant influence of men
o the unique position of the atmospheric monitoring platform at 3100m at the summit of Sonnblick without local pollution sources around and thus optimum background conditions combined with the direct access to the surrounding glaciers
o the highly linked monitoring and research programme covering the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, the lithosphere and partly the biosphere including the easy access to all environments – thus enabling to study not only temporal trends but also exchange and cycling processes in the environment.
o the high experimental potential offered by the onsite technical stuff thus enabling permanently supervised measurements or sampling campaigns
188647.054°N, 12.958°E3106AustriaRestricted data access (registration)www.sonnblick.netyearly, seasonal, monthly, daily, hourlyBSRN, GAW, GCW, WGMS, GTN-P, NDACC, LTERAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeospherePollution, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Geology, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, Paleo recordsyear-round access (by cable car), permanent electrical power, internet access, on-site technical staff, accomodation for about 100 persons in nearby hut of Österreichischer Alpenverein, platform for sensors and instruments, GAW-DACH (Zugspitze, Hohenpeißenberg, Jungfraujoch, Sonnblick)
VAO (Virtual Alpine Observatory)
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1/24/2015 17:30:01GunyaElbrusInstitute of GeographyThe station was organized in 1957 by Professor G.K.Tushinsky (1909-1979) who was its scientific supervisor till 1979. The choice of its location in the Terskol settlement (Kabardino-Balkaria) was predetermined by the tasks of the International Geophysical Year (1957-1959). The station was the base for geographical and glaciological investigations according to the IGY Program, which were carried out by the students, post-graduates and specialists of the Moscow State University. In 1969 a new complex of living and teaching facilities was constructed at the Azau site to support field training of geography students and the year-round studies of glaciers, snow cover, avalanches, mudflows and mountain landscapes. In 1969-1986 the Elbrus station was a part of the Research Laboratory of Snow Avalanches and Mudflows operating as the experimental glaciological center and methodological center of glacier, avalanche and mudflow studies.http://www.eng.geogr.msu.ru/practics/stations/elbrus/
Since the 1980s, the Elbrus station increases the research area within the National Park "Elbrus" established in 1986. In 1990s the Atlas of the National Park was prepared, which included maps of not only natural processes (glaciers, avalanches, mudflows, and others), but also of land use, grazing, degradation of landscapes. Since then regularly study of the dynamics of land use, tourism development, etc. have been carried out. Elbrus station can be considered as the Observatory of social-ecological systems.
since 1957 as a glacial station, sice 1990 as a complex socilal and ecological station43°15′N, 42°28′E2320RussiaFree data accessin constructionyearly, some data rarelyWGMS, North Caucasian scientific networkAnthroposphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereLand use, Natural resources, Tourism, Policy, Agency and governance, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Landscapes, Snow and IceMoscow State University (glaciological station)
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1/26/2015 2:57:19ruiying changGongga shanInstitute of Mountain Hazards and Environment,CASThe Chinese Ecosystem Research Network (CERN), one of the founding members of the International Long Term Ecosystem Research Network (ILTER), and Global Terrestrial Observation System (GTOS), was established in 1988 under the auspices of the Chinese government and the World Bank Loan. Through years of effort, it is now well placed to address important issues, serving as a functional network to meet the needs of both the national and international ecological research.since 198729.60N, 101.88E1600-3400 m aslChinaRestricted data access (registration)http://www.cerndata.ac.cn/yearly, seasonal, monthly, daily, hourlyGLORIA, ILTER(Chian)Atmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereNatural resources, Tourism, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Snow and IceCERN
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1/26/2015 12:16:22Giorgio MatteucciABR-1 Collelongo Selva Piana IT-ColNational Research Council of Italy - Institute of Agroenvironmental and Forest BiologyThe research site was established in 1991 by the Department of Forest Environment and Resources (DISAFRI) of Tuscia University (Viterbo, Italy) in the framework of the CNR-RAISA project (1991-1995). DISAFRI carries on research activities from 1991 until 2004. From July 2004, the research station is managed by the Institute of Agroenvironmental and Forest Biology of the National Research Council. Research activities have been performed in the framework of several national (CNR Strategic Project on Mountain Forests, 1995-1997; CONECOFOR, 1997-2011) and European Union funded project (EUROFLUX, CANIF and ECOCRAFT, 1996-1998; LTEEF-II, 1998-2000; FORCAST and CarboEuroflux, 2000-2002; MefyQue, 2001-2004; CarboEurope 2004-2008, FutMon 2009-2011). Currently, activities are carried on within a national project on monitoring of forest ecosystems (Conecofor) and some european project (FP7 GHG-Europe, LIFE+ EnvEurope and ManFor C.BD.)

Facilities
micrometeorological sensors (inside and outside the forest), data loggers, eddy covariance instrumentation and other sampling devices available. Walk-up tower (26 m). Mountain cabin available close to the site

Current research topics
Structure, dynamics and silviculture of beech forest, ecosystem level carbon and water vapour fluxes, soil chemistry, net primary productivity, leaf area index, soil respiration, nitrogen cycling, hydrological cycle, vegetation studies, crown conditions, leaves chemistry, stem growth, atmospheric wet deposition, ozone, climate, phenology, biodiversity indicators;

Collected data
Structure, dynamic, ecology and silviculture of beech forests since 1991-2; net primary productivity, stem growth and beech ecophysiology since 1992; net ecosystem exchanges in 1993 and continuously since 1996; soil respiration from 1994 to 1998, 2007-2008; litter production and leaf area index since 1992, litter decomposition 1996-2001; monitoring data (CONECOFOR) since 1995/7; soil carbon dynamics since 1997; databases: basic and by research topics.

Current data
physical data: climate (10 seconds, 30 min averages), pedological characterisation, energy balance.
chemical data: wet deposition and ozone (7 days), foliar chemistry (2 years), soil chemistry (5-10 years, solid phase; biweekly-monthly, liquid phase).
biotic data: crown and vegetation (annually), biodiversity indicators (test phase), phenology (weekly), leaf area index (season/annual).
data on processes: stem growth (seasonal-annual, 5 years), ecosystem fluxes of CO2 and H2O (30 min), leaf litter production and decomposition, net primary production (aboveground, 1-3 years; belowground, 3 years).
Databases on basic data and by research topics.
199141°50' 57.7" N, 13° 35' 17.3" E1560ItalyRestricted data access (registration)giorgio.matteucci@cnr.ityearly, seasonal, monthly, daily, half-hourlyLTERAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Natural resources, Pollution, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycleFacilities
micrometeorological sensors (inside and outside the forest), data loggers, eddy covariance instrumentation and other sampling devices available. Walk-up tower (26 m). Mountain cabin available close to the site
ICP-Forests, ICOS, FluxNet, ExpeER, GHG-Europe, Conecofor, ICP Integrated Monitoring, Plant-Water Isotope Network
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1/27/2015 10:35:10Prof. Dr. Georg Kaser, Dr. Ludwig Braun, Prof. Dr. Ulrich StrasserRofentalUniversity of Innsbruck, Bavarian Academy of SciencesIn the Rofental (Ötztal Alps) a consortium of the three institutions, and open to research partners worldwide, concentrates on studying and monitoring cryospheric, atmospheric and hydrological processes and changes with particular attention to the complex topography and climate settings of the Alpine terrain. First documents from glaciers in the Rofental, Ötztal Alps, date back as far as 1601 and regular observations and systematic studies had begun more than 150 years ago. First geodetic maps where generated in the late 19th century, first rain gauges were mounted in 1929 and glacier mass balance time series of Hintereis-, Vernagt- and Kesselwandferner are among the longest uninterrupted world-wide, building a basis for regional hydrological studies, for glacier-climate and ice dynamic research, and for estimating the world wide glacier’s contribution to sea level rise. By 2014, networks of stakes and pits for mass balance monitoring are maintained at Hochjoch-, Hintereis-, Kesselwand- and Vernagtferner by the consortium members. Runoff gauges at Vernagtferner and in Vent (operated by the Hydrological Office of Tyrol) and a network of rain gauges in the Rofental basin are the basis for high mountain hydrological studies. A varying number of automatic weather stations on and in the surroundings of the glaciers are operated by the Rofental consortium. The glaciers in the Rofental are frequently used as a test site for process studies, model development and evaluations and for new remote sensing or ground based methods in glaciological research. A series of airborne LIDAR derived high resolution DTMs of Hintereisferner and its surroundings are available since 2001. They are subject of ongoing evaluations and method comparison studies as well as for monitoring and studying periglacial morphodynamics. The generated data are available from the consortium partners, glaciological key results are annually reported to the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS). A research station on Hintereisferner (with observer status in the Horizon 2020 INTERACT network) and one at Vernagtbach serve as logistic bases for fieldwork. In recent studies, socio-ecological research aspects – e.g. in relation with the use of water for energy production and tourism – comprise the natural scientific investigations.195246.8336°N, 10.8314°2889 AMSLAustriaFree data accesshttp://data.lter-europe.net/deims/site/LTER_EU_AT_042variing depending on type of data from 10 Minutes to annualLTSER (part of LTSER platform Tyrolean Alps)Anthroposphere, Atmosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereTourism, Agency and governance, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, FloodsSevereal, from observatory hut to fully equipped mountain lodgemanyfold, worldwide
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1/27/2015 15:19:40Rosario G. GavilánSierra de GuadarramaUniversidad Complutense de MadridThe Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments (GLORIA; www.gloria.ac.at) is a globally active network of long-term in situ observation sites in alpine regions. The aim of this network is to assess the ecological consequences of climate warming for cold-adapted high mountain vegetation and its biological richness.
Sierra de Guadarrama - GLORIA Mountain observatory is working from 2006. Four summits are being monitoring: Dos Hermanas, Valdemartin, Las Guarramillas and Peñas de la Barranca.
The outlook for conservation of small alpine areas close to high population concentrations is poor in terms of sustainable development. We are currently developing research into alpine vegetation which includes interspecific associations, spatial patterns and processes, the study of rare flora and the monitoring of alpine vegetation to detect future changes. These surveys may assist decision-makers and people in charge of these areas to improve their conservation policies.
since 200640º47'N, 3º57'W2280SpainFree data accesswww.gloria.ac.atevery five yearsGLORIABiosphere/EcosphereNatural resources, Adaptation, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Invasive species, Landscapes, SoilsAccessibility of observatory, National Park, nearness Madrid, Mediterranean alpine communities monitored every five years. Instruments: dataloggers net at different altitudes in Sierra de Guadarrama from forest to alpine GLORIA sites.- GLORIA coordination
- University of Vienna
- University of Montana
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1/27/2015 15:26:44Rosario G. GavilánSierra de GredosUniversidad Complutense de MadridThe Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments (GLORIA; www.gloria.ac.at) is a globally active network of long-term in situ observation sites in alpine regions. The aim of this network is to assess the ecological consequences of climate warming for cold-adapted high mountain vegetation and its biological richness.

Sierra de Gredos- GLORIA Mountain Observatory is working from 2009. Four summits are being monitoring: El Morezón, Navasomera, El Calvitero and La Ceja.
The outlook for conservation of small alpine areas close to high population concentrations is poor in terms of sustainable development. We are currently developing research into alpine vegetation which includes interspecific associations, spatial patterns and processes, the study of rare flora and the monitoring of alpine vegetation to detect future changes. These surveys may assist decision-makers and people in charge of these areas to improve their conservation policies.
since 200940º15'N,5º16'W2389 maslSpainFree data accesswww.gloria.ac.atfive yearsGLORIABiosphere/EcosphereNatural resources, Adaptation, Resilience, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Landscapes, SoilsRegional Park, Mediterranean alpine communities monitored every five years. Instruments: dataloggers net at different altitudes in Sierra de Gredos from forest to alpine GLORIA sites.GLORIA Initiative Coordination
University of Vienna
University of Montana
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1/27/2015 20:28:03Jalil NorooziGLORIAUniversity of ViennaThis study is according to GLORIA network protocol. 200835.90°N, 51.39°E3700IranRestricted data access (registration)www.gloria.ac.atyearlyGLORIABiosphere/EcosphereEcosystems, Biodiversity, PlantsGMBA
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1/27/2015 20:32:20Jalil NorooziGLORIAUniversity of ViennaThe study is according to GLORIA network protocol201137.80°N, 46.50°E3650IranRestricted data access (registration)www.gloria.ac.atyearlyGLORIABiosphere/EcosphereEcosystems, Biodiversity, PlantsGMBA
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2/2/2015 18:57:47José-Luis BENITO ALONSOGLORIA ES-CPY (Parque Nacional de Ordesa y Monte Perdido)Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología, CSIC; Gobierno de Aragón (DGA) A series of summit sites arranged along the elevation gradient from the treeline to the uppermost occurings of vascular plants respresent a GLORIA target region (i.e. a mountain area with consistent climatic conditions). Different nested sampling designs and methods are applied in order to monitor plant diversity and vegetation pattern changes. Further, soil temperature is measured continuously at hourly intervals. GLORIA had started in the year 2000. For details see the GLORIA field manual at: www.gloria.ac.at. The fully revised 5 edition of the manual should be available in 2015.
Establishment of Observations: GLORIA international since 2000; Parque Nacional de Ordesa y Monte Perdido since 2001.
ES-CPY Gloria site is an pyrenaean limestone mountain at the Autonomous Community of Aragon.
since 200142° 39' 20'' N, 0° 0' 49'' W2242-3022 maslSpainRestricted data access (registration)office@gloria.ac.at; harald.pauli@oeaw.ac.at; www.gloria.ac.athourly for soil T, vascular plant data: every 5-10 yearsGLORIABiosphere/EcosphereLand use, Natural resources, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Snow and IceNo permanent facilities in form of buildings. The ES-CPY observatory is accessible by foot during the summer season, has no electrical power, and has data loggers that record temperature on an hourly basis. Dirección General de Calidad Ambiental y Cambio Climático del Gobierno de Aragón; Jolube Consultoría Ambiental
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2/2/2015 18:57:54José-Luis BENITO ALONSOGLORIA ES-SPY (Valle de Tena y Robiñera)Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología, CSIC; Gobierno de Aragón (DGA) A series of summit sites arranged along the elevation gradient from the treeline to the uppermost occurings of vascular plants respresent a GLORIA target region (i.e. a mountain area with consistent climatic conditions). Different nested sampling designs and methods are applied in order to monitor plant diversity and vegetation pattern changes. Further, soil temperature is measured continuously at hourly intervals. GLORIA had started in the year 2000. For details see the GLORIA field manual at: www.gloria.ac.at. The fully revised 5 edition of the manual should be available in 2015.
Establishment of Observations: 2011.
ES-SPY Gloria site is an pyrenaean siliceus mountain at the Autonomous Community of Aragon.
since 201142° 45' 10'' N, 0° 11' 46'' W2302-2995 maslSpainRestricted data access (registration)office@gloria.ac.at; harald.pauli@oeaw.ac.at; www.gloria.ac.athourly for soil T, vascular plant data: every 5-10 yearsGLORIABiosphere/EcosphereLand use, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Snow and IceNo permanent facilities in form of buildings. The ES-SPY observatory is accessible by foot during the summer season, has no electrical power, and has data loggers that record temperature on an hourly basis. Dirección General de Calidad Ambiental y Cambio Climático del Gobierno de Aragón; Jolube Consultoría Ambiental
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2/2/2015 18:58:00José-Luis BENITO ALONSOGLORIA ES-MON (Moncayo)Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología, CSIC; Gobierno de Aragón (DGA)A series of summit sites arranged along the elevation gradient from the treeline to the uppermost occurings of vascular plants respresent a GLORIA target region (i.e. a mountain area with consistent climatic conditions). Different nested sampling designs and methods are applied in order to monitor plant diversity and vegetation pattern changes. Further, soil temperature is measured continuously at hourly intervals. GLORIA had started in the year 2000. For details see the GLORIA field manual at: www.gloria.ac.at. The fully revised 5 edition of the manual should be available in 2015.
Establishment of Observations: 2012.
ES-MON Gloria site is an oromediterranean siliceous mountainat the Autonomous Community of Aragon.
since 201241° 47' 13,95'' N, 1° 50' 23,01'' W2116-2314 maslSpainRestricted data access (registration)office@gloria.ac.at; harald.pauli@oeaw.ac.at; www.gloria.ac.athourly for soil T, vascular plant data: every 5-10 yearsGLORIABiosphere/EcosphereLand use, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Snow and IceNo permanent facilities in form of buildings. The ES-MON observatory is accessible by foot during the summer season, has no electrical power, and has data loggers that record temperature on an hourly basis. Dirección General de Calidad Ambiental y Cambio Climático del Gobierno de Aragón; Jolube Consultoría Ambiental
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2/7/2015 13:35:03Prakash C TiwariDepartment of GeographyKumaun University, Nainital, Uttarakhand, Indiahttp://www.kunainital.ac.in197329°23'09"N and 79°27'35"E1950 mIndiaRestricted data access (registration)pctiwari@yahoo.comAs per requirementMRI; ICIMODAnthroposphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereLand use, Natural resources, Pollution, Economy, Tourism, Urbanization, Policy, Agency and governance, Adaptation, Resilience, Culture, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Invasive species, Geology, Landscapes, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, Floods, Paleo recordsRemote Sensing and GIS equipments ICIMOD; UGEC; ESG Project; MRI; GLP; University of Arizona, Tucson, USA; Trribhuwan University, Kathmandu, Nepal; Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Monsoon Asia Integrated Regional Study (MAIRS), Beijing, China
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2/9/2015 14:16:23Hiroyuki MuraokaTakayama siteGifu UniversityLong-term and multiple observations of carbon cycle in a deciduous broadleaf forest and in an evergreen coniferous forest. Measurements include CO2 flux, biomass increment, plant ecophysiology, in situ and satellite remote sensing. The interdisciplinary approach is called "Satellite Ecology". since 1993 36° 8'33.79"N1342-1400 m, a.s.lJapanRestricted data access (registration)http://www.green.gifu-u.ac.jp/takayama/index.htmlhourlyLTER, Fluxnet, BON, JalpsAtmosphere, Biosphere/EcosphereNatural resources, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Soils, Water cycleyear-round for mictometeorology and in situ remote sensing, permanent electrical power, cool summer but deep snow in winter (Dec - Apr), The CO2 flux data goes to AsiaFlux database, and some ecological data goes to JaLTER (Japan LTER), and in situ remote sensing (digital camera images and spectral reflectance of forest canopies) goes to "Phenological Eyes Network (PEN)"National Institute of Advanced Science and Technology
National Insitute for Environmental Studies
University of Tsukuba
JAXA
JAMSTEC
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2/9/2015 23:20:21Mark SchulzeH.J. Andrews Experimental ForestUSDA Forest Service, Oregon State UniversityThe Andrews Forest is situated in the western Cascade Range of Oregon, and covers the entire 15,800-acre (6400-ha) drainage basin of Lookout Creek. Elevation ranges from 1350 to 5340 feet (410 to 1630 m). Broadly representative of the rugged mountainous landscape of the Pacific Northwest, the Andrews Forest contains excellent examples of the region's conifer forests and associated wildlife and stream ecosystems. These forests are among the tallest and most productive in the world, with tree heights of often greater than 250 ft (75 m). Streams are steep, cold and clean, providing habitat for numerous aquatic organisms.
When established in 1948, the Andrews Forest was covered by a mix of old-growth conifer (~500 yrs old) and mature forest (100-150 yrs old). Beginning in the 1950's, a series of small watershed manipulations laid the foundation for basic and applied research involving ecosystem function, vegetation succession, nutrient dynamics and forest-stream interactions that continues to the present. The old-growth forests were the subject of intensive basic research beginning in the 1970s, including the original work on northern spotted owl. Studies of large wood and carbon cycling over the past three decades have revealed exceptional properties of these forests and streams. The Andrews Experimental Forest serves as a science benchmark for multiple themes and provides a foundation for regional studies.
The mission of the overall Andrews Forest Program is to support research and education on forests, streams, and watersheds, and to foster strong collaboration among ecosystem science, education, natural resource management, and the humanities. The history of the research program at the Andrews Forest has been diverse, with the dominant themes changing over time. Emphasis in the 1950s centered on systems for roading and for harvesting old-growth forests. Research in the 1960s focused on effects of logging on water, sediment, and nutrient losses from small watersheds. During the International Biological Program of the 1970s, basic studies centered on the workings of the forest and stream ecosystems, especially in old-growth forests. In the 1980s, these basic studies continued under LTER and were augmented with applied research in silviculture, wildlife, landscape ecology, carbon dynamics, and other topics. Conflict over federal forestry in the 1990s focused attention on old-growth, spotted owl, and landscape ecology. With growing concern about climate change in the 2000s, analysis of long-term records and effects of mountain topography on ecosystem response to climate variability took center stage.
Observatory established in 1948; initiation date varies by long-term dataset44.21N, 122.26W410-1630 mUSAFree data access http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/lter/data.cfm?frameURL=8yearly, seasonal, monthly, daily, hourlyLTER, USDA Experimental Forests, UNMAB, NADPAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereLand use, Natural resources, Pollution, Policy, Agency and governance, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Invasive species, Geology, Landscapes, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, FloodsYear-round, electrical power to station, permanent climate and hydrology measurement facilities, many other measurement programs LTER, USDA Experimental Forests
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2/10/2015 17:27:57Antoine GUISANRechAlp.vdUniversity of Lausanne, FGSEThe RechAlp.vd project

The RechAlp.vd project is a Web platform that collects data and research on the natural sciences of the Alpine region in the Vaud Canton. It is supported by the Faculty of Geosciences and Environment (FGSE) of the University of Lausanne’s (UNIL).

The primary aim of this project is to develop a support platform that encourages and maintains interdisciplinary research in the Alpine region of the Vaud Canton. The two initial goals of the project were first, the creation of a online database to store and retrieve what data and bibliographic resources exist for the area, and second, the collection of all documents and metadata on datasets, projects and activities in the study area to feed the online database. The first phase of the project was successfully achieved and a geo-data online database is now available for use on this site.

More at http://rechalpvd.unil.ch
200146.15.5°N 7.6.39°E1253 mSwitzerlandFree data accesshttp://rechalpvd.unil.ch/Various (different data)LTER, MIREN, GLORIA, CZO, GMBA, MRIAnthroposphere, Atmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereLand use, Natural resources, Pollution, Tourism, Urbanization, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Invasive species, Geology, Landscapes, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, Floods, Paleo recordsLarge study area for multidisciplinary research (various équipements and measures, metadata freely accessible)GMBA, MIREN
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2/11/2015 15:00:32Douglas HardyKilimanjaro Northern Ice FieldUniv. Massachusetts GeosciencesThis is a longterm study of climate on Kilimanjaro's Northern Ice Field. A comprehensive array of meteorological instruments operates on 2 towers (AWS) in conjunction with a network of accumulation/ablation stakes on several summit glaciers. The overall objective of the observations is to develop better understandings of the ice core record(s) from Kilimanjaro, and the history of glaciers on the mountain.Feb. 20003.06°S, 37.35°E5775 mTanzaniaRestricted data access (registration)by request: dhardy@geo.umass.edu, info website <http://kiboice.blogspot.com/>hourly-AtmosphereWeather and Climate, Snow and Ice, Paleo recordsMore info. at <http://kiboice.blogspot.com/>Univ. Innsbruck
Ohio State University
Paul Scherrer Institute
NOAA
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2/11/2015 15:12:16Douglas HardyQuelccaya Ice CapUniv. Massachusetts GeosciencesQuelccaya Ice Cap is the largest glacier in the Tropics, located at high elevation in the Cordillera Vilcanota of Perú. The UMass Climate System Research Center has been conducting climate research at Quelccaya's summit since 2003. We operate a comprehensive automated weather station (AWS) which includes instrumentation compatible with NOAA's Climate Reference Network (CRN), yielding the first high-accuracy air temperature measurements at a high-elevation site. At the summit site we conduct regular snow measurements and sampling, to better understand accumulation and ablation processes and thus the ice core record. We also conduct GPS margin surveys and have been studying avian biodiversity in the area.since August 200313.93°S, 70.82°W5680 mPeruRestricted data access (registration)available on request to dhardy@geo.umass.edu, more info. at <http://quelccaya.blogspot.com/>hourly-Atmosphere, Biosphere/EcosphereWeather and Climate, Biodiversity, Snow and Ice, Paleo recordsMore information: <http://quelccaya.blogspot.com/>Ohio State University
NOAA
University at Albany (SUNY)
Paul Scherrer Institute
Appalachian State University
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2/12/2015 16:40:29Edoardo CremoneseTorgnonARPA Valle d'AostaCO2 and H2O fluxes and phenological observations on alpine grassland, aboveground biomass estimation, analysis of carbon sequestration, and net primary production. Soil gaseous emission and main meterological parameters observation200945.844°N,7.57°E2160ItalyFree data accesswww.arpa.vda.it/climatechangedaily, hourlyFLUXNET, LTER, PhenoCamBiosphere/EcosphereWeather and Climate, Ecosystems, Plants, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycleTorino University (IT), Milano Bicocca University (IT), Innsbruck University (AU), MPG (GER), INRA (FR), Harvard University (USA)
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2/17/2015 13:19:14Ramiz MammadovPirgulu at Great CaucasusInstitute of GeographyClimatic parametrsn soil and hydrology197540 47 1448 35 32AzerbaijanFree data accesshtpp//igaz.azyearly, seasonalServer Institute GeographyAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Natural resources, Pollution, Economy, Tourism, Urbanization, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Forests, Landscapes, Soils, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, Floods, Paleo recordspermanentInstitute Geography in Moscow, Tbilisi, Almati. Kiuv,
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2/18/2015 10:48:03Bulent AcmaUnit of Southeastern Anatolia Project (GAP)Anadolu Universityno regular observation.since 199339°47′K 30°31′D788 m (2.585 ft)TurkeyFree data accessno any websiteyearlyUnit of Southeastern Anatolia Project (GAP)GeosphereEconomy, Ecosystems, Freshwater systemsUnit of Southeastern Anatolia Project (GAP)
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2/24/2015 10:27:00Elisa VargasPyrenees Climate Change Observatory (OPCC)Working Community of teh PyreneesThe purpose of the Pyrenees Climate Change Observatory is to follow and understand the climate evolution in the Pyrenees with the aim of limiting climate change impacts and adapting to its effects by defining appropriate adaptation strategies for socio-economic sectors and the most fragile natural areas.
The OPCC seeks to broaden the visibility of the Pyrenees on both a European and international levels in the fields of observation and adaptation to climate change.
201042.33ºN, 0.33ºO818 msnmSpainFree data accessavailable on www.opcc-ctp-org, contact: info_opcc@ctp.orgDepends on the action, but mainly yearlynoneAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Natural resources, Economy, Tourism, Policy, Agency and governance, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Invasive species, Landscapes, Water cycle, Snow and Ice, Floods- European Environment Agency
- Regional and national governments: govern d'Andorra, Region Aquitaine, Gobierno de Aragón, Generalitat de Catalunya, Gobierno Vasco, Région Languedoc-Rousillon, Région Midi-Pyrénées, Gobierno de Navarra.
- Universities (UNIZAR, INP-PURPAN...)
- BRGM
- Water agencies
- Environmental entities (IHOBE)
- NGOs


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3/1/2015 4:27:38Gvozdarev Alexeygeomagnetical station "Baygazan"Gorno-Altaysk State UniversityA geomagnetical variations of DHZ-components are registrated with measurement rate 5 Hz by means quartz magnetometer. Proton magnetometer is used to control stability of baselines of quartz variometers. since 03/12/200951.7599N, 87.4319E470 mRussiaRestricted data access (purchase)contact: gvozdarev@ngs.ruminIGAGeosphereGeologyINTERMAGNET observatory ARTI
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3/20/2015 11:45:50Aimee ClassenWarming by species removal (WSR)University of Copenhagen + othersGlobal warming, driven by greenhouse gas emissions, is predicted to increase average global surface temperatures 2-4 ºC by 2090. The amount of carbon (C) in the atmosphere regulates how much warming will occur globally; yet the amount of C taken up and released from terrestrial ecosystems under warming remains uncertain in the global land models that predict future climates. In terrestrial ecosystems, the majority of C available for atmospheric exchange resides in the soil and the atmosphere-soil C exchange is regulated by both climate and plant/soil communities. Shifts in plant community composition as well as warming often result in dramatic alterations of ecosystem function and the indirect effects of climate change on plant community composition and interactions can have a larger impact on C dynamics than the direct effects of climate. Thus, understanding and modeling the influences of both climate and interactions among species on biodiversity and ecosystem C dynamics across ecosystems is critical to predicting future climates and the impact of climate change on biodiversity. Using observations as well as experiments along globally-distributed elevational gradients our network aims to study ecosystem-level responses to the direct and indirect effects of warming. Such a coordinated cross-site research effort provides a strong test of the generality of these experimental results among different montane ecosystems.212 (started)Colorado: 38.8534, -106.9448; Abisko: 68.30377, 19.13093; Haibei: 37.6133, 101.305; Davos: 46.770845, 9.872932; Tasmania: -42.3431, 147.3413; Greenland: 61.1458, 45.4347; Patagonia: -40.927, -71.1732 at each site (low and high)USA, Sweden, Switzerland, China, Australia (mainland, Australia (Tasmania), Greenland (Blæsedalen), Greenland (Narsarsuaq), Argentina, New Zealand, Spain, Brazil Restricted data access (purchase)atclassen@gmail.comvaries WSRAnthroposphere, Atmosphere, Biosphere/EcosphereEcosystems, Plants, Soils, Nutrient cycleWarming x species removal project at low and high elevations. We are using the ITEX designed open top chambers. We are also using the gradients to monitor plant and microbial communities/ functions. Aimee Classen & Nate Sanders (University of Copenhagen), Maja Sundqvist (University of Copenhagen & Umeå University),
Jin-Sheng He (Peking University), Christian Rixen (Swiss Federal Institute), Mark Hovenden (University of Tasmania), Daan Blok (University of Copenhagen), Adrián Escudero & Fernando Maestre (Universidad Rey Juan Carlos), Toke Høye (Aarhus University), Noelia Barrios Garcia & Mariano Rodgriguez-Cabal (CONICET Argentina), Jennie McLaren (University fo Texas El Paso), Julie Deslippe (Victoria University of Wellington), Cristina Aponte (The University of Melbourne), Alessandra Fidelis & Lara Souza (Universidade Estadual Paulista, University of Oklahoma)
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3/24/2015 14:50:31Prof. Dr. Markus LeuenbergerHigh Altitude Research Station JungfraujochInternational Foundation High Altitude Research Stations Jungfraujoch and Gornergrat (HFSJG)http://www.hfsjg.ch/
The High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch is the highest in Europe. It is operated by the International Foundation HFSJG with its member organizations from Austria, Belgium, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Switzerland. The Foundation is dedicated to providing the infrastructure and support for scientific research of international significance that must be carried out at an altitude of 3000-3500 meters above sea level or for which a high alpine climate and environment are necessary. The Research Station (inaugurated in 1931) and the Sphinx Observatory (completed in 1937) are run for this purpose at Jungfraujoch.
The character of the scientific projects has changed appreciably over the years. Today, the Research Station Jungfraujoch is one of Europe’s leading centers for environmental science. It is involved as a prime site in more than thirty national and international networks for atmospheric research.
since 193146.55°N, 7.98°E3580 m aslSwitzerlandFree data accesshttp://www.hfsjg.ch/jungfraujoch/onlinedata.htmldifferent time resolutionsNDACC, WMO, GAW, GCOS, AGAGE, EUMETNET, ACTRIS, InGOS, NORS, EMEPAtmospherePollution, Weather and Climate, Geology, Water cycle, Snow and Ice, Meteorological monitoring, health studies, radiation monitoring, coscmic ray monitoring, aerosol radioactivity monitoringThe Jungfraujoch is accessible all year round by the Jungfrau railway.
The Research Station is the base of operations for all scientific work. The building includes four laboratories, a pavillon for cosmic ray research, a mechanical workshop, a library, a kitchen, a living room, ten bedrooms, a bathroom, and the living quarters of the custodians. Major equipment includes a machine to produce liquid air. Since the founding of the research station, its infrastructure has been continually adapted to the needs of the users (electricity, water, telephone, chemistry and medical laboratories, liquid nitrogen as coolant, fax, internet).
The Sphinx observatory includes two laboratories, a weather observation station, a workshop, two terraces for scientific experiments, an astronomical as well as a meteorological cupola. The astronomical cupola is equipped with a 76cm telescope with Cassegrain and Coudé focus (only partly in use).
Umweltforschungsstation Schneefernerhaus, Germany (http://www.schneefernerhaus.de)
Sonnblick Observatorium, Austria (http://www.sonnblick.net)
Virtual Alpine Observatory (http://www.schneefernerhaus.de/en/research-station/virtual-alpine-observatory/linking-alpine-research.html)
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3/24/2015 15:07:51Prof. Dr. Markus LeuenbergerHigh Altitude Research Station GornergratInternational Foundation High Altitude Research Stations Jungfraujoch and Gornergrat (HFSJG)http://www.hfsjg.ch/gornergrat
The astronomical observatories at Gornergrat were installed in the late 1960's in the two towers of the Kulm Hotel Gornergrat. The rooms are leased from the Burgergemeinde Zermatt which itself is a member of the Foundation HFSJG. The Observatory Gornergrat South includes a 7.5 m cupola, a computer room, a workshop, two bedrooms, a kitchen, and a bathroom. The Observatory Gornergrat South is made available to pupils, students, visitors at Gornergrat as well as to the general public through the project 'Stellarium Gornergrat'. It is designed to enable observations on site or via remote control over the internet. The station offers astronomical observations together with pedagogical programmes. The Observatory Gornergrat North includes a 7.5 m cupola, two computer rooms. Both observatories are open for guest researchers. In addition to the two observatories, the Physikalisches Institut of the University of Bern operates a laboratory container at the Belvedere terrace for measurements of solar neutrons. This apparatus has been installed in collaboration with the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory of the Nagoya University, Japan, and is the European cornerstone of a worldwide network of solar neutron detectors.
since 196645.98°N , 7.78°E3125 m aslSwitzerlandFree data access---currently no data available---GeosphereAstronomy, cosmic raysThe Gornergrat is accessible all year round by the Gornergrat railway. The observatories have permanent electrical power, telephone and internet available.
The astronomical observatories at Gornergrat were installed in the late 1960's in the two towers of the Kulm Hotel Gornergrat. In 1966/67 an astronomical observatory on the south tower of the Kulm Hotel was constructed by the ‘Centre National Français de la Recherche Scientifique’ (CNRS) and the ‘Observatoire de Genève’ (Proff. J. Lequeux and M. Golay). From 1984-2010 the Observatory Gornergrat South was rented to the University of Cologne, Germany. The instrument installed by the 'I. Physikalisches Institut der Universität zu Köln' was a high-tech 3 m radio telescope. Installation of a 1.5m telescope at Gornergrat North by the Italian ‘Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche’ in 1979. In 2005 the Telescopio InfraRosso del Gornergrat (TIRGO) project ended.
Center of Space and Habitability (CSH) of the University of Bern, the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB), the University of Geneva (UoG), and the International Foundation High Altitude Research Stations Jungfraujoch and Gornergrat (HFSJG)
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3/26/2015 17:09:45BirckSentinels lakes networkAsters : Conservatoire d'espaces naturels de Haute-SavoieStandardized Long term monitoring on 25 high altitude lakes in the Alps and Pyrenees.Various physical, chemical and biological parameters are followed: Water transparency, estimated from Secchi disk measurement.Vertical profiles along the water column using a multiparameter probe give measurements of water temperature, pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen concentration and conductivity.
Submersible data logger (Tinytag) monitor temperature at the top and the bottom of water column.
The goal is both to detect modifications in the ecological state of lakes (modifications which could be linked to changes in “lake-uses” (tourism, fishing etc)) and progress on the understanding of specific ecological process in order to, in fine, apply the adapted remediation.
201245.99° N, 6.79°E1700-2800 amslFranceRestricted data access (registration)in progressyearly, seasonal, monthly, daily, hourlySOERE OLABiosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereLand use, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Geology, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Paleo recordsHigh altitude lakes are difficult to reach in winter because of the snow. So, we use more and more datta loggers to record parameters (temperature...).
SOERE OLA - INRA Thonon les Bains
University of Savoie : Edytem, LCE
University of Aix-Marseille - IMBE
Ecrins, Mercantour, Vanoise and Pyrénées National Parks.
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3/27/2015 21:53:53Bryan MarkLlanganuco Valley Embedded Sensor NetworkOhio State UniversityConditions of glacier recession in the seasonally dry tropical Peruvian Andes motivate research to better constrain the hydrological balance in alpine valleys. There is an outstanding need to better understand the impact of the pronounced tropical hygric seasonality on energy and water budgets within pro-glacial valleys that channel glacier runoff to stream flow. In the summer of 2005, an embedded sensor network (ESN) comprising of a transect of air temperature and humidity microloggers ranging from 3470 to 4740 m amsl and two automatic weather stations (AWS) at 3850 and 4700 m amsl was installed in the glacierized Llanganuco Valley, Cordillera Blanca, Peru. The ESN and AWS units are maintained through a collaboration between The Ohio State and Bridgewater State Universities, with official collaboration from the Peruvian National Water Authority (ANA), Office of Glaciology and Water Resources (UGRH). Available datasets include half-hourly real-time observations and archives since July 2014 and diurnal, monthly, seasonal and multi-year aggregates since July 2005.20049.07943°S, 77.6512°W3850 m amslPeruFree data accessReal-time half-hourly data available through DataGarrison: https://datagarrison.com/users/300234061829950/300234061829950/plots.phphourly, half-hourlyn/aAtmosphere, HydrosphereWeather and Climate, Water cycleThe year-round, continuous measurements are from autonomous sensors, battery and solar powered, and located discretely to avoid disturbance. The ESN consists of Lascar temperature and humidity loggers hanging at 2 m above ground in trees and the AWS units are HOBO weather stations from Onset Computer Corp. augmented with DataGarrison Satellite Station (Iridium) through Upward Innovations Inc.. Instruments on the AWS include air temperature, humidity, precipitation, wind speed, and wind direction from Onset Computer and incoming solar radiation from the apogee pyranometer.Bridgewater State University, McGill University, Syracuse University, Autoridad Nacional del Agua (ANA) - Unidad de Glaciologia y Recursos Hidricos (UGRH)
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3/28/2015 6:26:31Jean-Emet NodemMountains in Cameroon /mount bamboutosAfroMont CameroonMount bamboutos,since 1980, is became a place of conflict between familal and modern agriculture, like agro-industry and large exploitation recovered by the elites. This peoples use new technology like irrigation , pesicide, chimical fertilizer and other natural fertilized.
The larger part of this productin is intended to external market notably Gabon.Espacialy family agriculture carried out by the peasans is totally delaying, but it was the one that was left soil uncropped and provide food security in this area.
This change has a serious consequence on the soil, vegetation, sources of fresh water and the disapparence of some animal, scare spcies that we can only meet in the mountanous milieu like touraco Doré.Before 1970s, once need a good dress when you go to that zone. Actually, the heat is becoming powerfully.
How have we reach at that level? The states pass throught it real law or legislations on the preservation of mounntains, on the international convention and also in serious dispositions added in Agenda21( chapter 13,14, 18…). Is in this confusion that urban elites rapidly implanted there , sending the paysan; thefore mountains , like mount bamboutos is live intensive ecological degradation.
since 20005°35N and 5°45 N of longititude eastmount bamboutos:2740mCameroonFree data accessjeanemet@yahoo.comseasonalstates universities in CameroonBiosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Natural resources, Pollution, Economy, Policy, Agency and governance, Adaptation, Resilience, Culture, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Landscapes, Soils, Water cycle, Freshwater systemsseasonal observatory( GPS,Camera)ONG in Cameroon: ADEID-Bafoussam; ERuDef -Buea
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5/18/2015 15:29:14Raffaella BalestriniVal Masino (code: LOM1)Regional Forestry Board and Water Research Institute - Italian National Research Council IRSA-CNRThe study area, Val Masino, at 1190 m a.s.l. and a mean slope of 10%, is situated in the upper basin of the river Masino (northern Italy), in a typical glacial valley on the north side of the main valley, Valtellina. Around 85% of the basin is above 1850 m and is delimited by mountains rising to 3500 m. The overall soil cover percentage is 66 and only 13% of the catchment is forested. The climate is continental, with the highest amount of precipitation in summer and the least in winter.
A throughfall plot (30 · 30 m) was established in the lower conifer forest component of the catchment. The vegetation belongs to the Veronico urticifoliae-Piceetum with Picea abies making up 52% of the trees. The secondary overstory species are Abies alba (22%), Larix decidua (11%), Betula alba L. (9%), Fagus silvatica (6%). The Norway spruces are between 50–80 years old.
The geological substratum is volcanic granodiorite and the soils are Humic Cambisol. The soil is very acid, with very low base saturation and exchangeable acidity occupying most of the cation exchange capacity (CEC).
Since 200546°14'16'' N, 9°33'16'' E1190 m aslItalyRestricted data access (registration)contact: balestrini@irsa.cnr.itweeklyLTER, ICP Integrated MonitoringBiosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereWeather and Climate, Deposition, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Geology, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and IceAccessible all year-round by car. Permanent electrical power. Restricted accessibility of observatory. Two weather stations, one inside a forested plot and the other in an open area; discharge gauge; throughfall atmospheric deposition collectors and bulk deposition samplers in the open-field area; lysimeters.Università degli Studi di Torino UNITO - NatRisk, Università degli Studi di Milano Bicocca (UNIMIB), University of Colorado INSTAAR, Institute of Ecosystem Study – CNR, Institute of Agroenvironmental and Forest Biology IBAF-CNR
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6/13/2015 19:30:39Derek KauneckisTruckee-Carson River System (TCRS)Academy for the Environment, University of Nevada Reno; Voinovich School, Ohio University; Desert Research Institute; USGSManagement of snow fed arid river systems has taken on critical importance in the last decades due to increasing and diverse demands for water use, urban population growth, and decreasing and more variable water supplies due to shifting hydroclimatic regimes. Despite these stresses, water policy has been slow to adapt and typically responds to crisis rather than anticipating new potential conditions. The project develops an integrated systems-based approach to predict the robustness of the Truckee-Carson River System’s (TCRS) water supply to future hydroclimatic conditions, the resilience of the system to extreme events (droughts/floods) and changes in land-use and economic growth, and to assess stakeholder acceptance of alternative water policy institutional arrangements designed to enhance sustainability. By creating a system-wide analytic framework designed to engage diverse stakeholder communities in all aspects of the project, the methodological approach has the potential to inform and transform water management for increase resilience to future hydroclimatic conditions. The behavior of both individual and organizational agents will be simulated through an agent-based model in a structure of iterated simulations. The project utilizes existing hydrology and water operations models (MODFLOW, PRMS, Riverware, MODSIM), generates links to climate/precipitation scenarios, and couples with existing and potential institutional arrangements generated from data collect from water managers and water users. The study develops stakeholder-engaged, coupled hydroclimatic-institutional models to address resource management questions and challenges common to snow-fed, arid-land river systems toward a generalizable approach to similar localities globally.201439.49573, -119.264491422 amslUnited States of AmericaRestricted data access (registration), contact: kaunecki@ohio.eduyearly, seasonal, monthlynoneAnthroposphere, HydrosphereLand use, Economy, Urbanization, Policy, Agency and governance, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, FloodsResearch project collects primary data on governance arrangements and policy, simulates possible climate-hydrological conditions; engages decision-makers in coupled policy-climate-hydrological scenarios. New project. Collaborations in process.
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6/13/2015 19:53:31Derek KauneckisLake Tahoe Governance ProjectVoinovich School, Ohio UniversityPeriodic research conducted on governance arrangements in the Lake Tahoe Basin. Research has examined the historic evolution of governance arrangements, the science/policy interface, and policy networks. 199939.10365, -120.03078 1895 amslUnited States of AmericaFree data accesshttps://tahoe.blogs.unr.edu/research/science-integration/, contact: kaunecki@ohio.eduDecadalnoneAnthroposphereLand use, Economy, Tourism, Urbanization, Policy, Agency and governanceInstitutional arrangements; Governancenone
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8/4/2015 10:02:16Jeff BrownSagehen Creek Field StationUniversity of California, Berkeley
Sagehen Creek Field Station
Located within the Sagehen Experimental Forest on the eastern slope of the northern Sierra Nevada approximately 20 miles north of Lake Tahoe, Sagehen Creek Field Station has been dedicated to research and teaching since 1951. The University of California operates the station under a long-term, special-use permit from the U.S. Forest Service. The surrounding watershed is also available to researchers and classes through an agreement with the Forest Service and includes extensive stands of yellow pine, mixed conifer, and red fir forests, as well as brush fields, scattered mountain meadows, and fens. Sagehen serves as the hub of a much broader network of research areas known as the Central Sierra Field Research Stations, which is comprised of: Sagehen Creek Field Station, Central Sierra Snow Laboratory, Onion Creek Experimental Watershed, Chickering American River Reserve, and North Fork Association Lands.
Graduate research at Sagehen has provided the basis for 80+ master's and doctoral theses. Current work includes: behavioral studies of dark-eyed juncos; stream runoff modeling; bees/butterflies in mountain montane meadows; GIS as a tool for reserve master planning.



Read more: http://nrs.ucop.edu/reserves/sagehen/sagehen_creek.htm#ixzz3hpanihJi
since 195139° 25' 55" N, 120° 14' 28" W1950 meters above sea levelUSAFree data accesshttp://sagehen.ucnrs.orghourlyUC NRSBiosphere/EcosphereLand use, Weather and Climate, Plants, Forests, Animals, Geology, Snow and IceHousing in 22 buildings for up to 59 people year-round. Library/computer lab; two classrooms; communal kitchen, eating area, and deck; office space; fish observation house. Electricity with backup generator, wireless network with satellite Internet service, VCR, slide and LCD projectors. Flush toilets, showers, sinks, washing machines. Heat is available in all buildings.

Read more: http://nrs.ucop.edu/reserves/sagehen/sagehen_creek.htm#ixzz3hpbIlvBv
USFS, USGS, CA Dept of Wildlife, Caltrans
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8/5/2015 0:52:48Maria ShahgedanovaTuyuksuKazakhstan Institute of GeographyThe observatory, established in 1957 and run by the Kazakhstan Institute of Geography, focuses on conducting glaciological, hydrological and meteorological measurements. It is located at the foot of the Tuyuksu glacier (one of the world bench-mark glaciers reporting data to WGMS). There is a standard meteorological station whereby temperature and precipitation measurements are taken every three hours and there are records of barometric pressure and sunshine hours. Both glacier mass balance and meteorological measurements have been conducted without interruption since the 1950s. The site is manned throughout the year. In 2015, an automatic weather station was installed recording barometric pressure, air temperature and wind speed at two levels, wind directions, four components of radiation, soil temperature, volumetric soil moisture and electric conductivity at five levels, soil heat flux and distance to the surface (as an indicator of snow accumulation and melt). An identical weather station is installed on the plain to enable comparisons and installation of additional equipment at higher altitudes and on the Tuyuksu glacier is planned for 2016. Prof. Igor Severskiy is in charge of the observatory (iseverskiy@gmail.com]). 195743.03oN; 77.07oE3500 amslKazakhstanRestricted data access (registration)Prof. Igor Severskiy (iseverskiy@gmail.com) yearly, seasonal, monthly, dailyNONEAtmosphere, HydrosphereWeather and Climate, Water cycle, Snow and IceThe observatory is run by the Kazakhstan Institute of Geography. Several staff, employed by the Institute, are on site throughout the year conducting meteorological, hydrological and glaciological measurements. The observatory is accessible by road (four-wheel drive) between June and September and on foot from the nearby Chimbulak ski resort in other months. There are several houses of which one is heated and used throughout the year by the Observatory staff. There is electrical power on demand. There is a standard and automatic meteorological stations on site. The observatory is a base for glaciological measurements. The observatory is run by the Kazakhstan Institute of Geography who recently established close collaboration with the University of Reading, UK. This collaboration has resulted in the updating and expansion of the instrumental base and new collaborative research projects funded by the Newton - al Farabi Fund.
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9/9/2015 17:14:42Collin BodeAngelo Coast Range ReserveUniversity of California, BerkeleyThe Heath and Marjorie Angelo Coast Range Reserve protects 7,660 acres of the upper watershed of South Fork of the Eel River in Mendocino County, California, United States. It is used for university-level teaching and research. The Angelo Coast Range Reserve was the first gift to The Nature Conservancy west of the Mississippi, and for many years, the largest. Today, it is one of 39 protected natural areas in the University of California Natural Reserve System, and is managed through the U.C. Berkeley campus.

Since Heath and Marjorie Angelo protected their land in the 1930s, the population of California has increased over six-fold. The Angelo gift, along with the 17 sq. km Elder Creek basin (designated as an area of critical ecological concern by the Bureau of Land Management) together constitute one of the largest continuous tracts of undeveloped coastal conifer forest remaining in California. The reserve protects 5 km of the upper South Fork Eel River, four undisturbed tributary watersheds, mixed conifer-broad-leaf forests (redwood and douglas fir), meadows on river terraces, and bands of chaparral at higher elevations.
1999 39°43'19"N, 123°38'46"W400United StatesFree data accesshttp://angelo.berkeley.edu, contact: collin@berkeley.edu or psteel@berkeley.edu5 minuteUniversity of California Natrual Reserve SystemAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereResilience, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Invasive species, Geology, Landscapes, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Freshwater systemsGrid and solar electricity. Wireless internet. Housing for researchers and overnight classes. Wet and dry lab. Three airborne LiDAR flights (2004,2009, 2014) and extensive GIS coverages for area.

Permanent instrumentation: 700 sensors in realtime wireless sensor observatory. 5 minute interval on sensor readings. 5 weather stations elevations 400 m to 1,410 m. 1 heavily instrumented hillslope with 7 wells, 5 rigged trees (30-54 m), soil moisture, sap flow, well water level, and basic met data. Stilling well on South Fork Eel river, river stage and water temperature.
Eel River Critical Zone Observatory (http://criticalzone.org/eel). Angelo is the primary research site and is part of the US Critical Zone Observatory network.
National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics (NCED, http://nced.umn.edu): One of the three research sites for the center.
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10/15/2015 14:18:31Dr Rob MarchantKITEhttps://www.york.ac.uk/environment/research/kite/Varied and across different locations on East African Mountains

Including long term vegetation monitoring plots
Data base of Leaf Area Index (for comparative studies with NDVI remote sensors
Climate stations along trisects in Jimma Highlands, Taita Hills and Kilimanjaro
Africa-wide climate forecast projects
East African social ecological scenarios
Since 2008numerous800-2800mEthiopia, Kenya, TanzaniaRestricted data access (registration)https://www.york.ac.uk/environment/research/kite/different for different dataCHIESABiosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Natural resources, Resilience, Culture, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Soils, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Paleo recordsLinks to research stations - e.g. TERRA in Taita HillsNumerous across East African University, NGO and Government sectors
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10/17/2015 22:51:23Zachary T. AanderudiUTAH Gradients Along Mountain to Urban Transitions (GAMUT)Utah State University, University of Utah, and Brigham Young University The Innovation Urban Transitions and Aridregion Hydro-sustainability project or iUTAH, http://iutahepscor.org, is a statewide effort to understand impacts of population increase, land usage, and climate change on Utah's water resources for the sustainability of natural and urban systems. Funded by NSF’s Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, the seminal infrastructure of iUTAH is a real-time observatory network of terrestrial climate and aquatic stations evaluating water resources along a gradient along mountain-to-urban transitions or GAMUT. GAMUT measures aspects of water inputs, outputs, and quality in three watersheds that share common water sources (winter-derived precipitation in montane systems) but differ in the human and biophysical nature. The watersheds include the: middle Provo in the Heber Valley that is experiencing a rapid landuse transition from agriculture to urban; the Red Butte Creek in Salt Lake City that is highly urbanized, and the Bear River in Logan that is slowly transitioning in landuse from agriculture to urban. The climate stations measure solar radiation, rainfall, snow depth, evapotranspiration, soil moisture other climate parameters. The aquatic monitoring stations measure dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, nitrate, chlorophyll content, and dissolved organic matter. since 2002 40˚45’38.63” N 111˚49’52.24” W1300-3000 amslUnited States of AmericaFree data accessavailable on: http://data.iutahepscor.org/tsa/minutenoneAnthroposphere, Atmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereLand use, Natural resources, Economy, Urbanization, Agency and governance, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, FloodsMultiple stations and instrumentation in three watersheds involved in ecohydrological, biophysical and social observatory research efforts. GAMUT has year-round access to power from solar arrays or permanent electrical power. Most sites are accessible throughout the year. Monitoring efforts include: fifteen aquatic monitoring stations, twelve terrestrial monitoring stations, seven storm drain stations, and four mobile sensor units. Utah local and state government and land-water management agencies
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10/19/2015 6:05:56Martha AppleGlacierPlantsMontana TechGlacier Plants is a set of geospatially referenced transects and plots at Glacier National Park, Montana for monitoring and research on rare arctic-alpine plants that grow near the edges of snowfields and glaciers that are retreating due to climate change.201248.43°N, 113.37°E2438 amslUSARestricted data access (registration)Available from Martha Apple, maple@mtech.eduseasonalGLORIA (yet this observatory is not a GLORIA target regionBiosphere/EcosphereEcosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Snow and IceThis observatory consists of transects and plots for monitoring of snowfield plants with access provided by roads and then trails. It is within Glacier National Park, which has camping facilities as well as the National Park Service Infrastructure.This observatory is in collaboration with a group of ice-patch archeologists and there is a GLORIA target region elsewhere in Glacier National Park.
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11/1/2015 17:01:35Rob MarchantCHIESAICIPEAn array of 3 transects on the Jimma Highlands. Mt Kilimanjaro and the Taita Hills that each comprise 4 total weather stations 2012http://chiesa.icipe.org/index.php/about-us/study-areas600-2200mEthiopia, Tanzania and KenyaRestricted data access (registration)http://chiesa.icipe.org/index.php/resource-centre/geospatial-data-and-mapshourlyCHIESAAtmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, HydrosphereLand use, Natural resources, Economy, Tourism, Urbanization, Policy, Adaptation, Resilience, Weather and Climate, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Geology, Landscapes, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, FloodsAll are free standing total climate stations - at the Taita Hills in the TERRA research station managed by the University of HelsinkiNumerous - details on the CHIESA website

http://chiesa.icipe.org
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11/3/2015 13:35:49Guisan AntoineRechAlpUniversity of Lausanne. Faculty of Geosciences and EnvironmentsThe RechAlp.vd project, which began in July 2013, is the outcome of the wish of the Faculty of Geosciences and the Environment at the University of Lausanne to create a priority study area in the Alps of Canton de Vaud. The project aims to develop a support platform that encourages and maintains interdisciplinary research in the Alps of Vaud. An online geo-database storing and retrieving what data and metadata exist on datasets, projects and activities in the study area is available since July 2014. A portal is homed on the UNIL’s website at URL: http://rechalpvd.unil.ch and to date contains ~ 4000 metadata in the fields of natural sciences and social sciences. The promotion and the introduction of the project are currently in progress. It is now possible using the RechAlp.vd portal to do the inventory of the data linked to the Alps of Vaud, to identify geographic or environmental gaps in the existing information and to design complementary data sampling strategies. In this regard, RechAlp.vd should open new scientific perspectives for research and teaching, especially in transdisciplinary fields of natural and social sciences.since 201346,21°N, 7,03°E /http://rechalpvd.unil.ch/data/)375 m to 3'210 mSwitzerlandFree data accessavailable on http://rechalpvd.unil.ch/, contact: info-rechalp@unil.chAllLTER, CZO, GNOMO, MRI, MIREN, GMBAAnthroposphere, Atmosphere, Biosphere/Ecosphere, Hydrosphere, GeosphereLand use, Natural resources, Pollution, Economy, Tourism, Urbanization, Policy, Agency and governance, Adaptation, Resilience, Culture, Weather and Climate, Deposition, Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Plants, Forests, Animals, Invasive species, Geology, Landscapes, Soils, Nutrient cycle, Water cycle, Freshwater systems, Snow and Ice, Floods, Paleo recordsCanton de Vaud, All Faculties of the University of Lausanne, All the townships of the Alps of Vaud
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12/10/2015 21:33:37John WenzelPowdermill Nature ReserveCarnegie Museum of Natural HistoryCarnegie Museum of Natural History maintains Powdermill Nature Reserve, an environmental research station in the Ligonier Valley, originally established in 1956. Powdermill’s location in the mid-Appalachian region makes it a place of significance for both human and natural interests. The Appalachian Mountains are among the most diverse temperate terrestrial environments in the world. They include both densely and sparsely inhabited areas, as well as industrial areas and remote natural areas. Because the mountains stretch from near the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Lakes, they form a critical link in migratory routes and natural pathways for myriad species.
The reserve, located on 2,200 acres in the Laurel Highlands (Rector, PA), is one of the region’s most important resources for environmental research and education. The property includes 83 acres of maintained old fields in several blocks, 13.5 miles of trails (about one mile of which is various net lanes at the bird banding station). With its mature second-growth forests, wetlands, ponds, old fields, and streams, Powdermill is a refuge for many plants and animals, including a number of species that are becoming increasingly rare in our region as a result of habitat destruction. The known vascular plants comprise 851 species in 456 genera from 129 families (Utech, 1999), compared to 179 families known for all of Pennsylvania. Powdermill Run, the mountain spring stream that traverses the mixed deciduous forest on the property, is considered one of the few unpolluted streams available for ongoing studies of aquatic life, and it is ranked Exceptional Value, the highest ranking possible: PA Fish and Boat calculated the Index of Biotic Integrity to be 97% in 2012. These natural resources, along with excellent facilities, enable Powdermill to serve broad communities, such as scientific researchers, educators and students from grades K-12 through post-graduate, professionals in various ecological fields, and the general public. Powdermill activities also maintain desired habitats for species of concern and study. Powdermill offers the advantage of long-term stability for multi-year projects and the ability to undertake controlled manipulations. Populations of plants or animals can be marked permanently and accessed as needed with little concern for external disturbance.
196140.16363313N -79.26748042420USARestricted data access (registration)Luke DeGroote at DeGrooteL@CarnegieMNH.org, http://www.powdermillarc.org/3 to 6 times per weekAvian Knowledge NetworkBiosphere/EcosphereWeather and Climate, AnimalsYear-round, permanent, bird banding station, with laboratory space, lodging for visitors. American Bird Conservancy, US National Aviary, US Geological Survey, plus more than 10 regional universities
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