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LINK TO PRESENTATION TEMPLATE: CLICK HERE
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TeacherDateELD Standards: Bridging
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Standard 1: Elaborating on Critical Principles for Developing Language and Cognition in Academic Contexts: Part 1: Interacting in Meaningful Ways
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Crispin Gonzalez9/10/181. Exchanging information/ideas: Contribute to class, group, and partner discussions, sustaining conversations on a variety of age and grade-appropriate academic topics by following turn-taking rules, asking and answering relevant, on-topic questions, well-articulated comments and additional information
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Kendall Irey 10/1/182. Interacting via written English: Collaborate with peers to engage in a variety of extended written exchanges and complex grade-appropriate writing projects, using technology as appropriate.
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Michael Davis10/29/183. Supporting opinions and persuading others: Negotiate with or persuade others in discussions and conversations in appropriate registers (e.g., to acknowledge new information and politely offer a counterpoint) using a variety of learned phrases (e.g, You postulate that X. However, I've reached a different conclusion on the issue) and open responses to express and defend nuanced opinions.
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Covey11/26/184. Adapting language choices: Adjust language choices according to task (e.g, group presentation of research project), context (e.g, to persuade to and provide arguments or counterarguments), and audience (e.g., peers, teachers, college recruiter).
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Huiras12/17/185. Listening actively: Demonstrate comprehension of oral presentations and discussions on a variety of social and academic topics by asking and answering detailed and complex questions that show thoughtful consideration of the ideas or arguments with light support.
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Villeda1/7/196. Reading/viewing closely: a. explain ideas, phenomena, processes and relationships within and across texts (e.g., compare/contrast, cause/effect, themes, evidence-based argument) based on close reading of a variety of grade-level texts, presented in various print and multimedia formats, using a variety of detailed sentences and precise general academic and domain-specific words.
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Zaragoza2/4/196b. Explain inferences and conclusions drawn from close reading of grade-level texts and viewing of multimedia using a variety of verbs and adverbials (e.g., creates the impression that consequently).
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Bowen3/11/196c. Use knowledge of morphology (e.g, derivational suffixes), content reference materials, and visual cues to determine the meaning, including figurative and connotative meanings, of unknown and multiple-meaning words on a variety of new topics.
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Brandon Smith3/25/197. Evaluating language choices: Explain how successfully writer and speakers structure texts and use language (e.g., specific word or phrasing choices) to persuade the reader (e.g., by providing well-worded evidence to support claims or connecting points in an argument in specific ways) or create other specific effects, with light support.
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4/22/198. Analyzing language choices: Explain how a writer or speaker's choice of a variety of different types of phrases or words (e.g., hyperbole, varying connotations, the cumulative impact of word choices)produces nuances and different effects on the audience.
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Matt THomas5/13/199. Plan and deliver a variety of oral presentations and reports on grade-appropriate topics that express complex and abstract ideas, well supported by evidence and reasoning, and are delivered by using an appropriate level of formality and understanding of register.
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5/20/1910. Writing: a. Write longer and more detailed literacy and informational texts (e.g., an argument about free speech)collaboratively (e.g., with peers) and independently by using appropriate text organization and register.
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10b. Write clear and coherent summaries of texts and experiences by using complete and concise sentences and key words (e.g., from notes or graphic organizers).
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11. Justifying/arguing: a. Justify opinions or persuade others by making connections and distinctions between ideas and texts and articulating sufficient, detailed, and relevant textual evidence or background knowledge by using appropriate register.
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11b. Express attitude and opinions or temper statements with nuanced model expressions (e.g., possibly/potentially/certainly/absolutely, should/might).
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12. Selecting language resources: a. Use a variety of grade-appropriate general (e.g., alleviate, salutary) and domain-specific (e.g., soliloquy, micro-organism)academic words and phrases, including persuasive language, accurately and appropriately when producing complex written and spoken texts.
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12b. Use knowledge of morphology to appropriately select affixes in a variety of ways to manipulate language (e.g., changing inaugurate to inauguration).
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Section 2: Elaboration on Critical Principles for Developing Language and Cognition In Academic Contexts: Part II: Learning About How English Works
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1. Understanding text structure: Apply analysis of the organizational structure of different text types (e.g., how arguments are organized by establishing clear relationships among claims, counterclaims, reasons, and evidence) to comprehending texts and to writing clear and cohesive arguments, informative/explanatory texts, and narratives.
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2. Understanding cohesion: a. Apply knowledge of a variety of resources for referring to make texts more cohesive (e.g., using nominalization, paraphrases, or summaries to reference or recap an idea or explanation provided earlier) to comprehending grade-level texts and to writing clear and cohesive texts for specific purposes and audiences.
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b. Apply knowledge of familiar languages resources for linking ideas, events, or reasons throughout a text (e.gl, using connecting/transition words and phrases, such as on the contrary, in addition, moreover)to comprehending grade-level texts and writing cohesive texts for specific purposes and audiences.
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3. Using verbs and verb phrases: Use a variety of verbs in different tenses (e.g., past, present, future, simple, progressive, perfect), and mood (e.g., subjunctive appropriate to the text type and discipline to create a variety of texts that describe concrete and abstract ideas, explain procedures and sequences, summarize texts and ideas, and present and critique points of view.
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4. Using nouns and noun phrases: Expand noun phrases in a variety of ways (e.g., complex clause embedding) to create detailed sentences that accurately describe concrete and abstract ideas, explain procedures and sequences, summarize texts and ideas, and present and critique points of view on a variety of academic topics.
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5. Modifying to add details: Expand sentences with a variety of adverbials (e.g., adverbs, adverb phrases and clauses, prepositional phrases) to provide details (e.g., time manner, place, cause about a variety of familiar and new activities and processes.
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6. Connecting ideas: Combine clauses in a variety of ways to create compound and complex sentences that make connections between and link concrete and abstract ideas, for example, to make a concession (e.g., while both characters strive for success, they each take different approaches to reach their goals), or to establish cause (e.g., Women's lives were changed forever after World War II as a result of joining the workforce).
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7. Condensing ideas: Condense ideas in a variety of ways (e.g., through a variety of embedded clauses, or by compounding verb or prepositional phrases, nominalization) to create precise simple, compound, and complex sentences that condenses concrete and abstract ideas (e.g., The epidemic, which ultimately affected hundreds of thousands of people, did not subside for another year).
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