Forest Grove Indian Training School Roster
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#Student Name as spelled on rosterBiographical Note from Pacific University Archives ResearchAlternate NameTribe on RosterAgency on RosterSexDate AdmittedDate WithdrawnNotes on RosterDate GraduatedModern Tribal Name 1 (Res./Nation)Modern Tribal Name 2 (Tribe / Alt Name)Birth DateDeath DateSourcesNotes
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1Ashue, CharlesCharles Ashue was born around 1864 at or near the Puyallup Agency.(1,2) His father, a Yakama man, had been taken as a prisoner by the U.S. Government to Puget Sound during the Yakima War in 1855-56. When his father died, Charles and his brother Samuel were taken by their uncle, Chief Aeneas, to live on Yakama land.(3) One source noted: "Charley Ashue was Yakama and Puyallup. He was born in the Lower Puyallup area where his mother lived and was identifed for that group. He was named for a Snohomish chief on his mother's side."(4) The Ashue brothers were among the first students to attend the Forest Grove Indian Training School, and they assisted in constructing its buildings. According to the 1880 Census, he was 15 when he started. After leaving the school, Charles returned to Puyallup lands. He married Mary Lyal, a fellow student from the Indian School, and they had several children together (see Mary's entry in this roster). He died some time after 1930. PuyallupPuyallupM2/25/1880YakamaPuyallup1864After 19301. U.S. Census (1880). -- 2. Indian Census Rolls (1888). Ancestry.com -- 3. La Clair et al v. United States. Vol. 184, The Federal Reporter, p. 132-133. Circuit Court, E.D. Washington, Southern Division. 18 June 1910. Web. Google Books. http://tiny.cc/p6dxyx -- 4. Fitzpatrick, Darlene Ann. We are Cowlitz: A Native American Ethnicity. University Press of America: 2004. p. 75. Google Books.
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2Ashue, SamuelSamuel Ashue was born between 1867-1871, probably at the Puyallup Agency.(1) His father, a Yakima man, had been taken as a prisoner by the U.S. Government to Puget Sound during the Yakima War in 1855-56. When his father died, Samuel and his brother Charles were taken by their uncle, Chief Aeneas, to live on Yakima land.(3) The Ashue brothers were among the first students to attend the Forest Grove Indian Training School, and they assisted in constructing its buildings. According to the 1880 Census, Samuel was 13 when he began. After leaving school, Samuel returned to the Yakima area. He died there in 1936. PuyallupPuyallupM2/25/1880YakamaPuyallup1867-187119361. U.S. Census (1880). -- 2. 3. La Clair et al v. United States. Vol. 184, The Federal Reporter, p. 132-133. Circuit Court, E.D. Washington, Southern Division. 18 June 1910. Web. Google Books. http://tiny.cc/p6dxyx
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3Brewer, DavidDavid Brewer of Puyallup was one of the first students to attend the Forest Grove Indian School, arriving in February 1880. He might have been, like his brother James Brewer, the son of a white settler named James and a native woman.(1) However, other sources state that both of David's parents were native; an obituary called him a "full-blood member of the Puyallup tribe" who was born on the Puyallup reservation and attended school there before going to Forest Grove.(2) According to the Census of 1880, he was 18 when he arrived in Forest Grove.(3) As one of the first students, he helped to construct the campus. In 1883, he married a fellow student, an Alaskan Native named Katie Loulin. They eventually had at least seven children together. The family worked at the school after it moved to Salem, staying employed there for most of the rest of their lives, though they also spent some time living in the Puget Sound area. David did several jobs at the Indian School, including working as a wagoner, cabinet-maker and carpenter in 1885.(4) He became the "Disciplinarian" of Chemawa School from 1885-1902 and 1905-1908, while his wife Katie worked in other roles.(5) David passed away on January 14, 1908. His obituary in the Chemawa School newspaper stated that in his role as disciplinarian, he had "ruled with love and kindness rather than by cruelty and harshness."(1)PuyallupPuyallupM2/25/1880Died Feb. 14, 1908Before 1885Puyallup18611/14/19081. See U.S. Census (1900) record for James Brewer. Ancestry.com -- 2. "David E. Brewer." Weekly Chemawa American. Jan 24, 1908. p. 4-5. oregonnews.uoregon.edu -- 3. U.S. Census (1880). -- 4. Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior. Washington: GPO, 1885. p. CLXXXVI. Google Books. -- 5. See annual reports of Forest Grove and Chemawa Schools to the Secretary of the Interior, 1885-1908, in Google Books; and his obituary, cited above.
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4James, KatieKatie James was from the Puyallup Agency. Few details of her life could be found. The 1880 Census does not record anyone by her name living in the school dormitory, but does record a "Kate Bottomish" from Washington Territory -- a name which does not appear on the school roster. Assuming that the two Kates are the same woman, she would have been 15 when she arrived at the school in 1880. Her father might have been Jim Bottomish, a Puyallup man of the correct age who was recorded in an 1888 Indian Census.Bottomish, Kate?PuyallupPuyallupF2/25/1880Puyallup?18651. U.S. Census (1880). -- 2. Indian Census Rolls (1888). Ancestry.com
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5Kautz, NugenNugen Kautz was first son of August Valentine Kautz, a Civil War general who also served in the Rogue River War. His mother was a Nisqually woman named Tenas Puss (Little Kitten), who was called Etta or Kitty in English. His parents married in the 1850s, and Nugen was born on March 17, 1857. His father named him after a friend from the military, John Nugen, but also nicknamed him "Lugie." Before coming to Forest Grove, Nugen lived at the Puyallup Agency and with Wesley and Catherine Gosnell of Lewis County, Washington. When he entered the Forest Grove Indian School with his brother, Augustus, he was about 23 years old. Neither he nor his brother are listed in the 1880 Census as living in the Indian School dormitory, perhaps suggesting that they had alternate lodgings. While still enrolled in the Indian School, he was also admitted to Tualatin Academy, which was a college preparatory high school that was attached to Pacific University. He attended the Academy in 1883. He married Lizzie Olnie, a fellow student. By the late 1890s he was an industrial teacher and gardener at the Warm Springs Agency School. He died in Alameda County on April 6, 1938.Kautz, NugentPuyallupPuyallupM2/25/1880NisquallyPuyallup3/17/18574/6/19381. Kautz, Lawrence G. August Valentine Kautz, USA: Biography of a Civil War General. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co., 2008.
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6Kautz, AugustusAugustus Kautz was the son of August Valentine Kautz, a Civil War general who also served in the Rogue River War. Augustus was born on February 9, 1859 to a Nisqually woman named Tenas Puss (Little Kitten), who was called Etta or Kitty in English. His parents married in the 1850s. His father named him Doctin at birth, but he changed it to Augustus later. By the 1860s, Augustus was living at the Puyallup Agency. He attended the Forest Grove Indian School alongside his older brother, Nugen Kautz. Neither he nor his brother are listed in the 1880 Census as living in the Indian School dormitory, perhaps suggesting that they had alternate lodgings. Augustus died in 1935. PuyallupPuyallupM2/25/1880NisquallyPuyallup2/9/185919351. Kautz, Lawrence G. August Valentine Kautz, USA: Biography of a Civil War General. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co., 2008.
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7Kalama, PeterPeter Kalama was born between 1858 and 1860 to Mary and John Kalama. His father, John Kalama, was a Native Hawaiian from Kula, Maui. John worked for the Hudson Bay Company at Fort Nisqually and settled near present-day Kalama, Washington, around 1830. Peter's mother Mary Martin was the daughter of "Indian Martin," a chief of the Nisqually tribe. According to the Census of 1880, Peter was 19 when he entered the Forest Grove Indian Training School. While still enrolled there, he was also admitted to Tualatin Academy, which was a college preparatory high school that was attached to Pacific University. He attended Tualatin Academy in 1884. U.S. Census Indian Rolls indicate that a Peter Kalama from Puyallup was living on Warm Springs lands by 1902, married to a woman named Lillie (maiden name Pitt), who was of the Pitt River Tribe. Peter and Lillie had been fellow students at the Forest Grove Indian School. Sometime in the 1900s or 1910s, Peter apparently remarried a Nisqually woman named Alice. Peter's name was listed in the Warm Springs Census until 1937, but he appears to have lived at the Nisqually Agency from around the 1910s until his death in 1947, aged nearly 90 years old.NesquallyPuyallupM2/25/1880Band, 181885NisquallyHawaiian1857-18601. U.S. Census (1880). 2. -- 3. Ho, James G.Y. "Forgotten Hawaiians: The Pacific Northwest." (2005). Web. www.northwesthawaiitimes.com/forgothaw.htm -- 4. Indian Census Rolls (1902-1937). Ancestry.com
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8Meeker, JerryJerry Meeker of the Puyallup Tribe was in the first group of students to register at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880. He was one of three Meeker children to attend. Jerry was born to two Puyallup parents around 1862 at the farm of a white man where his father worked.(2) According to the Points Northeast Historical Society, Jerry's father's native name was Sky-uch, but he adopted the name Meeker after his employer, Ezra Meeker.The same source notes that Jerry attended three schools in his lifetime: St. George’s Indian School at Spring Valley, the Forest Grove Indian School, and Cushman Indian school on the Puyallup Reservation. He married a fellow student from Forest Grove named Eliza O'Dell of Chehalis.(3) She died around the year 1890, but he remarried. Jerry eventually settled in the Browns Point area of Pierce County, Washington, where he worked as a farmer and a real estate broker. He also served, at various times, as sub-chief and police captain of the Puyallup Reservation. Jerry died in 1955 aged around 93 years old.(4)PuyallupPuyallupM2/25/1880PuyallupPuyallup1862after 19301. U.S. Census (1880, 1920-1930). -- 2. Harmon, Alexandra. Indians in the making: ethnic relations and Indian identities around Puget Sound. Vol. 3. Univ of California Press, 1998. p. 121. -- 3. "1800s on Browns Point: Jerry Meeker." Points Northeast Historical Society. http://www.pnehs.dreamhosters.com/lighthouse/?page_id=272 -- 4. Jerry Meeker Death Certificate index record, 4 Apr 1955. Ancestry.com
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9Porter, AnnieAnnie Porter of the Puyallup Agency was among the first students to attend the Forest Grove Indian School. According to the 1880 Census, she was 12 when she entered.(1) Her father may have been Nathaniel E. Porter, a white settler on Whidbey Island who had several children with a native woman called Sally.(2) If so, Annie may have recently lost her mother before being sent to Forest Grove, as Nathaniel married a new wife in June, 1880.(3) Annie worked for the school as a "cadet sergeant" in 1885-1886.(4) PuyallupPuyallupF2/25/1880Puyallup18681. U.S. Census, 1880. Ancestry.com -- 2. U.S. Census, 1870. Ancestry.com -- 3. Washington Marriages, 1802-1902. Ancestry.com -- 4. Official register of the United States containing a list of the officers and employes in the civil, military and naval service... Washington: GPO, 1885. p. 541. Google Books.
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10Richard, EdwardEdward Richards of the Puyallup Agency was born around 1856.(1) His father might have been Tyee Dick (also known as Dick Richards), who was a leader among the Puyallup, Nisqually and Cowlitz.(2) Andrew probably attended the missionary school in Puyallup as a boy. He entered the Forest Grove Indian Training School at age 24 in the very first group of students. A younger relative (possibly his brother) named Andrew Richards arrived at the same time. No information about Edward could be found after his enrollment at the school. Richards, EdwardPuyallupPuyallupM2/25/1880Puyallup18561. U.S. Census, 1880. Ancestry.com -- 2. Fitzpatrick, Darleen Ann. We are Cowlitz: A Native American Ethnicity. University Press of America, 2004. p. 118. Tyee Dick was also known as Dick Richards, Richard Scanewa or E-la-kah-ka.
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11Richard, AndrewAndrew Richards of the Puyallup Agency was born around 1869.(1) His father, Richard Scanewa (Tyee Dick), was a leader among the Puyallup, Nisqually and Cowlitz, and was descended from Chief Scanewa. Andrew's mother was a Nisqually woman named Lucy.(2,3) Andrew probably attended the missionary school in Puyallup as a young boy. He entered the Forest Grove Indian Training School at age 11 in the very first group of students. An older relative named Edward Richards arrived at the same time. By 1885, he held the post of "cadet sergeant" at the school.(4) In the late 1880s after leaving the school, he returned to the Puget Sound area and worked for the Nisqually and Skokomish Agency as a police private.(5)Richards, AndrewPuyallupPuyallupM2/25/1880PuyallupNisqually18691. U.S. Census, 1880. Ancestry.com -- 2. Fitzpatrick, Darleen Ann. We are Cowlitz: A Native American Ethnicity. University Press of America, 2004. p. 118. Tyee Dick was also known as Dick Richards, Richard Scanewa or E-la-kah-ka.-- 3. Washington State Census, 1887. Ancestry.com -- 4. Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs... Washington, DC: GPO, 1885. p. CLXXXIV-CLXXXVII. Google Books. His age is also drawm from this source. -- 5. Official register of the United States containing a list of the officers and employes in the civil, military and naval service... Washington: GPO, 1887. p. 557. Google Books.
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12Stanup, PeterPeter Stanup was a Puyallup man who was born around 1858. His father, (also named Peter Stanup?), was a prominent man in his tribe. The younger Peter attended a local missionary school and worked as a typesetter for newspapers while a young man. According to the Census of 1880, Peter was 21 when he entered the Forest Grove Indian Training School, making him one of the oldest students present at the time. He was married to a fellow student named Annie (or Anna) Kahim. The two had a daughter named Lottie. The census-taker treated Peter Stanup as the head-of-household for the dormitory of Native children at the school. Peter and his family probably went back to the Puyallup Agency sometime in 1881. By April 1882 he was writing letters from Tacoma to Professor Joseph W. Marsh of Pacific University stating his wish to enter Tualatin Academy as a regular high school student that fall. The Academy agreed to admit him (probably at no or lower tuition, though this is not recorded clearly), but he was not able to come at that time because health problems he was having with his eyes, according to other letters. Peter nonetheless was able to study enough theology to be licensed by the Presbyterian Church to preach the gospel by the summer of 1883. PuyallupPuyallupM2/25/1880Puyallup18581. U.S. Census (1880). -- 2. Stanup, Peter. Letters to Professor Joseph W. Marsh of Pacific University. Apr-Dec, 1882. Joseph W. Marsh Papers, Pacific University Archives. 3."Puyallup Indian Reservation." Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior (1883), p. 150.
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13Sicade, HenryAccording to the Census of 1880, Henry Sicade was 15 when he entered the Forest Grove Indian Training School.(1) While still enrolled there, he was also admitted to Tualatin Academy, which was a college preparatory high school attached to Pacific University. He entered the Academy in 1884 and became its first ever Native American graduate in 1886. Henry wrote several letters about his experience at the Forest Grove Indian School, transcripts of which exist in the Pacific University Archives.(2)PuyallupPuyallupM2/25/1880Puyallup18651. U.S. Census (1880). -- 2. Sicade, Henry. Letters to a former teacher. Jan 1917. Pacific University Archives. http://exhibits.lib.pacificu.edu/items/show/317
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14McCaw, SamuelSamuel R. McCaw of the Yakama and Puyallup tribes was born between 1868-1870, to a Scottish-American father with the same name and a mother called Mary, who was most likely Yakama. He was in the first cohort of students to attend the Forest Grove Indian Training School. When he arrived there at age 10, his name was recorded as Samuel Spott, after his stepfather, "General" Spot of the Puyallup (c.f. Chalcraft, Assimilation's Agent, 2004). Another former student, Henry Sicade, later wrote about him: "Sammy Spot #14 was none other than Sammy McCaw. Spot, his stepfather raised him and we use[d] to call him Spot. McCaw was his real name."(2) A history written in 1919 provides these details: "Mr. McCaw was brought up among wild Indians on the Ahtanum [a river on Yakima lands], but when a boy of ten attracted the favorable attention of some one who knew of the Government Indian School at Forest Grove. Oregon [possibly Elisha or Lucy Tanner, Congregationalist settlers who had come to Ahtanum from Forest Grove]. There he secured an elementary education. Then the ambitious young boy went east where he completed an academic and then a college course at Whittier College, Indiana [note: another source says he went to Earlham College; both were Quaker schools]. Following that he was in a banking house in Chicago for five years, after which he returned to his old home and was for twenty-three years the cashier of the Yakima National Bank at Yakima. In 1917 he entered upon the enterprise of banking at Wapato. The results thus far have been such as to amply justify the venture." Spott, SamuelPuyallupPuyallupM2/25/1880YakimaPuyallup1868-18701. William Denison Lyman, History of the Yakima Valley, Washington; Comprising Yakima, Kittitas, and Benton Counties .. (Chicago: S.J. Clarke, 1919), http://archive.org/details/historyofyakimav01lyma. -- 2. Sicade, Henry. Letters to a former teacher. Jan 1917. Pacific University Archives. http://exhibits.lib.pacificu.edu/items/show/317
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15Taylor, JuliaJulia Taylor was from the Puyallup Indian Agency.(1) She was around 14 when she entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880, according to the Census of that year. She attended alongside another Taylor child, Harry, who was likely a relative -- possibly her younger brother. No definite records of Julia's whereabouts after leaving the school could be found, but she may have married and returned to the Puyallup Agency. In 1886, a Julia Dean of approximately the correct age was listed on Indian Census rolls, along with her husband Joe Dean and daughter Cara. They were living with Harry Taylor and his parents, James and Louisa.(2) Assuming that Julia was also their daughter, she would have been of mixed Hawaiian ("Kanaka") and Northwest Native American ancestry.(3) Julia Dean last appears in the Indian Census rolls and other census records in 1887, which suggests she may have died or remarried about that time. Dean, JuliaPuyallupPuyallupF2/25/1880Puyallup1866after 18871. U.S. Census, 1880. Ancestry.com -- 2. Indian Census Rolls, 1886. Ancestry.com -- 3. See the entry for Harry Taylor on the Indian Training School roster.
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16Taylor, HarryHarry Taylor was from the Puyallup Indian Agency. His father, James Taylor, was a "Kanaka" of native Hawaiian ancestry -- possibly himself half Hawaiian and half Pacific Northwest native. Harry's mother, Louisa, was a native from the Puyallup consolidated tribes.(1) They were speakers of the "Klickitat-Yakima" language, however, which was usually spoken east of the Cascades.(2) Perhaps the family migrated to Puyallup from the Hudson Bay Company's Fort Vancouver, where many Kanakas had lived with native wives. Harry Taylor was about 10 when he entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880, according to the Census of that year.(3) He attended alongside a relative named Julia. In July 1881, he signed an autograph book of one of the Indian School teachers, Mrs. Walker, with this note: "I want you to pray for me so that I [will] be a good boy and to be a Christian boy also. And remember me when I will stop from the school."(4) He returned to the Puyallup Agency after leaving the school, where he appeared on tribal census rolls as continuing to live with his parents between 1889-1898. The Territorial census list his occupation as farmer or workman. Harry may have died around 1898, as no further records of his life could be found.PuyallupPuyallupM2/25/1880Puyallup1870after 18981. James Taylor is listed as a Kanaka of the Sandwich Islands in the Washington Territorial Census of 1889, but in other census rolls he is listed as an Indian. Ancestry.com -- 2. [x] -- 3. U.S. Census, 1880. Ancestry.com. -- 4. Forest Grove Indian Training School autograph book. Pacific University Archives. http://exhibits.lib.pacificu.edu/items/show/3308 -- 5. U.S. Indian Census Rolls, 1889-1898.
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17Kahama, EmmaEmma Kahama was student from Puyallup. According to the 1880 Census, she was 9 years old when she entered the school, making her one of the youngest students present at the time.(1) By 1884 at age 14, she was the lead student in one of the sewing rooms at the school. Her words were recorded in a school report to the Bureau of Indian Affairs: "We do all the patching and mending in our room. The girls in our room are all small. There are 14 girls in our room."(2)PuyallupPuyallupF2/25/18801885Puyallup18721. U.S. Census (1880). -- 2. "Report of Forest Grove School." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior (GPO: 1884), p. 205

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18Wilton, Willie H.William ("Willie") H. Wilton was a member of the Puyallup tribe born around 1862. According to the 1880 Census, he was 18 when he entered the Forest Grove Indian Training School.(1) Later Census records noted that he was half white.(2) [Was he the son of William B. Wilton, a white settler who had claimed land in present-day Tacoma?] After leaving, he became an industrial teacher at the Puyallup Agency School. He was later employed there as a farmer. He became a leader among the Puyallups, serving as vice-chairman of his tribal council, alongside several other alumni from Forest Grove including Henry Sicade and Jerry Meeker. In 1910, William sued Pierce County, Washington, attempting to prevent the annexation of his land to the city of Tacoma. He argued that a vote held on the annexation did not provide polling places for the annexed lands' residents -- effectively disenfranchising them. The court agreed with him and prevented the annexation.(3)Wilton, William H.PuyallupPuyallupM2/25/1880Puyallup18621. U.S. Census (1880). -- 2. U.S. Census (1900). -- 3. Wilton v. Pierce County, Cases Determined in the Supreme Court of Washington, vol. 61, p. 386 (1910). -- 2. U.S. Census (1880).
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19Lyal, MaryMary Lyal (or Lyell, or Lyle) was about 12 years old when she entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880, according to the Census taken that year in Forest Grove.(1) She was in the second group of students to arrive at the school. Mary returned to the Puyallup lands in 1885, where she lived with her widowed mother Catherine Lyle and several sisters.(2) She married a fellow student from the Indian School, Charles Ashue, around 1888, and lived together with him, their children, her sister and mother on Puyallup lands.(3) The Ashues were farmers.(4) By 1910, the family had moved to Yakama lands, where Charles had relatives.(5) Mary last appears in tribal census rolls in 1911, so she may have died about that time.Ashue, MaryPuyallupPuyallupF5/28/1880Puyallup18681. U.S. Census, 1880. Ancestry.com -- 2. Indian Census Rolls, 1885. Ancestry.com -- 3. Indian Census Rolls, 1896. Ancestry.com. -- 4. Washington Territorial Census, 1892; see also later U.S. Census records for Charles Ashue. Ancestry.com. -- 5. Indian Census Rolls, 1910-1911. Ancestry.com
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20Thompson, MinnieMinnie Thompson of the Puyallup tribe arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880, as one of the second group of students to enter. According to the 1880 Census (where her name is recorded as "Mamie"), Minnie Thompson was 8 years old when she began, which would make her one of the youngest students present at the time.(1) However, she stated in an teacher's autograph book that she was 12 years old as of Dec. 2 1881, so she may well have been a bit older than the Census indicates.(2) An 1888 Indian Census records her as living back on Puyallup lands by that date with her father, Thomas, and several siblings. PuyallupPuyallupF5/28/1880Home July 21, 18861886Puyallup18721. U.S. Census (1880). -- 2. Walker, Belle Putnam, “Forest Grove Indian Training School autograph book,” 1881. Pacific University Archives Exhibits. http://exhibits.lib.pacificu.edu/items/show/3308.
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21Lane, EllaElla Lane of the Puyallup tribe arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880, as one of the second group of students to enter. Her sister, Celia Lane, arrived at the same time. Ella graduated in 1885. The Indian Census of 1888 showed her living back on Puyallup lands, just a short distance away from other families who had sent children to the school including the Lyals. She married a fellow student, Henry Steeve (or Steve) of the Snohomish in Tulalip.Steeve, EllaPuyallupPuyallupF5/28/18801885Puyallup18711. Indian Census Rolls (1888). Ancestry.com -- 2. "First pupils." Weekly Chemawa American. Feb. 25, 1910. p.4. Historic Oregon Newspapers, http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/.
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22Lane, CeliaCelia Lane of the Puyallup tribe arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880, as one of the second group of students to enter. Her sister, Ella Lane, arrived at the same time. The school's roster records that Celia died on January 2, 1887. However, the Indian Census of 1888 shows a Celia Lane, sister to Ella Lane, still alive back on Puyallup lands a year after that note was written. Perhaps the family reported that she had died to avoid sending her back?PuyallupPuyallupF5/28/1880Died Jan. 2, 1887Puyallup1874?1/2/1887?1. Indian Census Rolls (1888). Ancestry.com
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23Stanup, AnnieAnnie (or Anna) Kahim Stanup was from the Puyallup Agency. According to the 1880 Census, she was 18 when she arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School as one of its second group of students. She was married to a fellow student, Peter Stanup. As of that year, they had one child together, an infant daughter named Lottie. The census-taker recorded her husband as the "head of household" for the native students' dormitory, perhaps indicating that they functioned as house parents to the other children. By July 1887, the couple along with several more children were recorded by an Indian Census as living back at the Puyallup Agency. Stanup, Anna KahimPuyallupPuyallupF5/28/1880Puyallup18621. U.S. Census (1880). -- 2. Indian Census Rolls (1887). Ancestry.com
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24Leslie, LucyLucy Leshi entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880, coming from the Puyallup Agency. Her name appears to have been misspelled "Leslie" on the class roster, but a 1910 newsletter from Chemawa listed her name correctly as "Lucy Leshi."(1) She was born around 1873, meaning that she was only about 7 when she entered the school. Her father was probably George Leshi.(2) Her mother, who was half Nisqually and half Tenino, was named Mary.(4) Lucy was probably the grand-niece of the Nisqually-Yakima war chief Leschi, who was executed by the United States in 1858. Lucy did not appear on the 1880 Census of inhabitants of Forest Grove, although all the others from her cohort of students were recorded.(3) This suggests that she may have been away or sick when the census-takers were present. By 1892, Lucy was listed as an Assistant Cook at the Puyallup Indian Boarding School.(5) She married David Dan in 1894.(6) A Lucy Dan appears in the Yakima Indian Census rolls in the years immediately following this, but without her husband; perhaps suggesting that he died soon after marriage.Leshi, LucyPuyallupPuyallupF5/28/1880Nisqually1874?After 19081. "First pupils." Weekly Chemawa American. Feb. 25, 1910. p.4. Historic Oregon Newspapers, http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/. -- 2. U.S. Indian Census Rolls (1892-1908). Ancestry.com. -- 3. U.S. Census (1880). -- 4. U.S. Secretary of the Interior. Official register of the United States, containing a list of officers and employes... Washington: GPO, 1893. p. 769. Google Books. -- 5. Ontario. Minister of Education. Annual Archeological Report 1901, being part of Appendix... Toronto, Cameron, 1901. p. 6. Google Books. -- 6. Washington Marriage Records, 1865-2004. Ancestry.com.
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25Whitely, RosaRosa Whitley (or Whitely) was a Wasco native from Warm Springs. She may have been related to Stock Whitely. He was described as "one of [Warm Springs'] most influential and most friendly chiefs to the whites," who died supporting U.S. forces in a fight against Snake River natives in 1864.(1) At the Warm Springs Agency, Rosa attended the missionary day school.(2) She arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880. She continued attending when it moved to its new location in Salem and graduated in 1888.(3) Rosa Whitely's name could not be found in records after this date, suggesting she married around that time. A Rosa aged 17, wife of "Enea's son", does appear in the Indian Census roll of Tenino natives from Warm Springs in 1890.(4) Alternatively, she might be the 19-year-old Rosa who married Moses Minthorn (a fellow graduate of the Forest Grove Indian School), and is recorded as living on Umatilla lands from 1888-1893.(5)Whitley, RosaWascoWarmspringF7/13/18801888Warm SpringsWascoAfter 18881. Logan, William. Report from Warm Spring Reservation, July 28, 1864. Printed in: Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs for the Year 1865. Washington D.C.: GPO, 1865. p. 97. Google Books. -- 2. "Reports of Agents in Oregon." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior. GPO: 1880. p. 148. Google Books. -- 3. "Commencement at Chemawa." Evening Capitol Journal. Salem: June 29, 1888. p. 3. oregonnews.uoregon.edu -- 4. Indian Census Rolls. Warm Springs. 1890. Ancestry.com -- 5. Indian Census Rolls. Umatilla. 1888-1893. Ancestry.com
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26Temple, LauraLaura Temple, a Wasco from Warm Springs, was born around 1866. Her mother was probably Lottie Temple. Having previously been enrolled in the Warm Springs Day School,(1) she arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880. A 1910 Chemawa School newsletter noted that she married Willie Miller(2), a Warm Springs native who had also attended the Forest Grove Indian School. Laura and Willie are recorded as living on Warm Springs lands as farmers for decades. Laura lived there from at least 1889-1940.(3) Miller, LauraWarmspringF7/13/1880Warm SpringsWasco1866after 19401. "Reports of Agents in Oregon." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior 1880, p. 148. -- 2. "First pupils." Weekly Chemawa American. Feb. 25, 1910. p.4. Historic Oregon Newspapers, http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/. -- 3. U.S. Indian Census rolls, 1889-1914 and U.S. Census, 1910-1940. Ancestry.com
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27Pitt, LillieLillie Pitt was born around 1864. She came to the Forest Grove Indian School from the Warm Springs Agency with her sister, Sallie. They had previously been enrolled in the Warm Springs Day School.(1) Their father was likely Charles Pitt, one of the Pit River men who had come to Warm Springs from California, who married a Wasco woman according to the 1900 U.S. Census.(2,3) Charles Pitt is known to have had two daughters. He told Pacific's Secretary of the Board of Trustees, George Atkinson, that he was born in Pitt River but had been taken in war and made a slave by the Wascos, and afterwards was bought by a white man, and then kept in a white family at Warm Springs.(4) By 1884, Lillie was in charge of one of the sewing rooms at the school and was teaching younger students sewing skills. She graduated in 1885. Sometime in the 1880s, she married fellow Forest Grove Indian School student Peter Kalama, who was half Nisqually and half Native Hawaiian. They lived at Warm Springs and had at least five children together. [needs more citations.]Kalama, LilliePitt RiverWarmspringF7/13/18801885Warm SpringsPit River1864?1. "Report of Forest Grove School." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior (GPO: 1884), p. 205. -- 2. "Reports of Agents in Oregon." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs the Secretary of the Interior 1880, p. 148. -- 3. U.S. Census (1910) -- 4. Atkinson, George. Letter to the Oregonian, 4/17/1880, reprinted in: A Public Spirit: George H. Atkinson's written legacy. Forest Grove: Bee Tree Press, 2015. p. 242.
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28Pitt, SallieSallie Pitt came to the Forest Grove Indian School from the Warm Springs Agency with her sister, Lillie. They had previously been enrolled in the Warm Springs Day School.(1) Their father was likely one of the Pit River men who had come to Warm Springs from California -- likely Charles Pitt, who married a Wasco woman according to the 1900 U.S. Census.(2,3) Charles Pitt is known to have had two daughters. He told Pacific's Secretary of the Board of Trustees, George Atkinson, that he was born in Pitt River but had been taken in war and made a slave by the Wascos, and afterwards was bought by a white man, and then kept in a white family at Warm Springs.(4) By 1884, Sallie was in charge of the girls' laundry at the school, with 14 other native girls under her charge. Sallie graduated in 1885 from Chemawa. The Washington State Census of 1892 recorded Sallie as working as a laundress in Pierce County, apparently using the skills she had learned at the school.(5) She later married a man named Barr, according to a Chemawa School newsletter of 1910.(6)Barr, SalliePitt RiverWarmspringF7/13/18801885Warm SpringsPit River18681. "Report of Forest Grove School." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior (GPO: 1884), p. 205. -- 2. "Reports of Agents in Oregon." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs the Secretary of the Interior 1880, p. 148. -- 3. U.S. Census (1900). -- 4. Atkinson, George. Letter to the Oregonian, 4/17/1880, reprinted in: A Public Spirit: George H. Atkinson's written legacy. Forest Grove: Bee Tree Press, 2015. p. 242. -- 5. Washington State Census (1892). Ancestry.com -- 6. "First pupils." Weekly Chemawa American. Feb. 25, 1910. p.4. Historic Oregon Newspapers, http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/.
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29Olney, LizzieLizzie Olney came to the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880 as one of a group of 15 students who had previously been enrolled in the Warm Springs Day School. According to census records, her father was a white man from New York -- probably Nathan Olney, an Indian Agent who had emigrated in 1843. Her mother was from Warm Springs. (She may also have been the adopted daughter or niece of Tullux Hollaquilla, the father of fellow Indian School student Etta; Lizzie is listed as Tullux's daughter in the 1895 Warm Springs Indian Census rolls.) In March 1882, she signed one of the autograph book of one of the Indian School teachers, Mrs. Walker, with this note: "Wherever you may be, will you ever think of me as your dear friend and scholar."(5) By 1883, she was being paid as the Assistant Cook for the Indian School.(6) Lizzie graduated from the Indian School in 1885. She married fellow student Nugen Kautz, whose mother was Nisqually and father had been a Civil War general. They returned together to Warm Springs lands in the 1890s, where her husband worked as a school instructor. By 1900, they and their children had settled on Puyallup lands in Pierce County, Washington, where they had a fruit orchard. Kautz, LizzieWarmspringF7/13/18801885Warm Springs1868?1. "Reports of Agents in Oregon." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs 1880, p. 148. -- 2. Splawn, Andrew Jackson. Ka-mi-akin: The Last Hero of the Yakimas. AH Clark Company, 1917. p. 256. Google Books. -- 3. U.S. Census (1900). -- 4. Indian Census Rolls (1895-1909). Ancestry.com -- 5. Forest Grove Indian Training School autograph book. Pacific University Archives. http://exhibits.lib.pacificu.edu/items/show/3308 -- 6. Official register of the United States, containing a list of officers and employes ... Washington: GPO, 1883. p. 587. Google Books.
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30Hollaquilla, Etta M.Etta M. Hollaquilla came to the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880 as one of a group of 15 students who had previously been enrolled in the Warm Springs Day School. She was the brother of Jerry Hollaquilla, another student who was admitted at same time. Her father was Tullux Holliquilla, who knew and liked the man who served as the Warm Springs Agency schoolmaster, Cyrus Walker. This is of note because Cyrus Walker's siblings lived in Forest Grove and were involved with the Indian Training School there. Tullux had worked for the US Government in the Modoc War. In 1885, Etta M. Hollaquilla graduated from the Forest Grove Indian School (perhaps in its new location in Salem) in 1885. She eventually married a man named Frank Bennett and they lived together on Warm Springs lands at least until 1910 along with several children.Bennett, EttaWarmspringF7/13/18801885Warm SpringsWasco1871after 19101. "Reports of Agents in Oregon." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs 1880, p. 148. -- 2. Holliquilla, Tullux. Letter to Cyrus Walker. 10 March 1907. http://exhibits.lib.pacificu.edu/ -- 3. US Census 1910
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31Parker, Emma V.Emma V. Parker, born about 1872, was a member of the Wasco Tribe who lived at the Warm Springs Agency. Her father was Billy Chinook, also known as William Parker, a Wasco who had joined with U.S. forces led by General Fremont. He travelled with Fremont through many states, and lived for a time with Quakers in Philadelphia, where he learned to read and write.(1) Billy Chinook became a celebrated advocate for the interests of the Wasco and Warm Springs tribes. Emma's mother was probably a Wasco woman named Annie Holliquilla,(2) though her father also had a Californian-Hispanic wife according to another source (see 1). Emma came to the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880 as one of a group of 15 students who had previously been enrolled in the Warm Springs Day School.(3) She graduated in 1885. Emma married a Warm Springs man named Cain (or Ku-kwal-li) Brunoe and they owned a farm and had many children together.(2,4) She died at Warm Springs in 1917. Brunoe, EmmaWascoWarmspringF7/13/18801885Warm SpringsWasco187219171. Jette, Melinda. Description of Medal given to Billy Chinook. The Oregon History Project. Oregon Historical Society: 2004. http://www.ohs.org/education/oregonhistory -- 2. Genealogy of one line descended from Emma Parker is provided in: "Adoption Election." Spilyay tymoo. Warm Springs: 27 Dec 2001. p. 9. oregonnews.uoregon.edu -- 3. "Reports of Agents in Oregon." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs the Secretary of the Interior 1880, p. 148. -- 4. Indian Census Rolls 1895-1917, and U.S. Census 1910. Ancestry.com
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32Miller, BenjaminBenjamin Miller was a Wasco from Warm Springs. He came to the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880 as one of a group of 15 students who had previously been enrolled in the Warm Springs Day School. He was possibly a brother or a close relative of William Miller, who was another student admitted at the same time. WascoWarmspringM7/13/1880Warm SpringsWasco1. "Reports of Agents in Oregon." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs the Secretary of the Interior 1880, p. 148.
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33Miller, WilliamWilliam ("Willie") Miller was Wasco from Warm Springs. He came to the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880 as one of a group of 15 students who had previously been enrolled in the Warm Springs Day School.(1) Another Miller boy named Benjamin, possibly his brother, arrived at the same time. A 1910 Chemawa School newsletter noted that William married Laura Temple(2), a Warm Springs native who had also attended the Forest Grove Indian School. Laura and Willie are recorded as living on Warm Springs lands as farmers from at least 1889-1935.(3)WascoWarmspringM7/13/1880Warm SpringsWasco1. "Reports of Agents in Oregon." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs the Secretary of the Interior 1880, p. 148. 2. "First pupils." Weekly Chemawa American. Feb. 25, 1910. p.4. Historic Oregon Newspapers, http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/. -- 3. U.S. Indian Census rolls, 1889-1914 and U.S. Census, 1910-1940. Ancestry.com
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34Hollaquilla, JerryJerry Hollaquilla, born in 1867, was a member of the Wasco Tribe of Warm Springs Agency. He came to the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880 as one of a group of 15 students who had previously been enrolled in the Warm Springs Day School. He was the sister of Etta M. Hollaquilla, who enrolled at the same time. Their father was Tullux Holliquilla, who had worked for the US Government in the Modoc War.(4) After leaving the Indian School (there is no record of whether he graduated), Jerry eventually returned to Warm Springs and married a woman named Eva, with whom he had children. He was working as an interpreter employed by the Warm Springs Agency as of 1905. Jerry and his wife lived there until at least 1920.WascoWarmspringM7/13/1880Warm SpringsWasco1867after 19201. "Reports of Agents in Oregon." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs the Secretary of the Interior 1880, p. 148. -- 2. US Census 1910, 1920. -- 3. "Employees in Indian Service." Annual Report of the Department of the Interior, Indian Affairs, Part 1, 1906. p. 537. -- 4.
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35Piute, George J.George J. Piute came to the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880 as one of a group of 15 students who had previously been enrolled in the Warm Springs Day School. He was in the school band according to its roster.PiuteWarmspringM7/13/1880Band; BuglerWarm SpringsPaiute1. "Reports of Agents in Oregon." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs the Secretary of the Interior 1880, p. 148.
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36Pinouse, GeorgeGeorge Pinouse (or Pianoose) was a member of the Wasco Tribe from the Warm Springs Agency. He was probably the son or nephew of a man named Pinouse who served as a scout for the U.S. Government in the Modoc War in the early 1870s.(1) The Indian Agent at Warm Springs noted that "Head Chief" Philip Pianoose (again, possibly George's father), was employed by the Indian Agency.(2) George Pinouse came to the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880 as one of a group of 15 students who had previously been enrolled in the Warm Springs Day School. No information about George after he left the school could be found. Pianoose, GeorgeWascoWarmspringM7/13/1880Warm SpringsWasco1. Citation needed. 2. "Report of Warm Springs Agency." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs of the Department of the Interior (1890), p. 212. Google Books. -- 3. "Reports of Agents in Oregon." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs the Secretary of the Interior (1880), p. 148. Google Books.
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37Skitus, WilliamWilliam Skitus was a member of the Wasco tribe located at the Warm Springs Agency in Oregon. He came to the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880 as one of a group of 15 students who had previously been enrolled in the Warm Springs Day School.(1) His mother might have been Harriet Skitus, a Wasco woman. Mary Richardson Walker, who was the mother of one of the Indian School teachers, noted in a diary that Billy Skitus died in March, 1883: "The Indian boy was buried, Billy Skitus. He used to help me wash last fall."(2) A Chemawa School newsletter of 1910 noted that he had died by that time, but did not note the year.(3)WascoWarmspringM7/13/1880Warm SpringsWasco3/18831. "Reports of Agents in Oregon." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs the Secretary of the Interior 1880, p. 148. -- 2. Walker, Mary Richardson. Diary. 16 Mar 1883. Walker Family Papers, Pacific University Archives. -- 3. "First pupils." Weekly Chemawa American. Feb. 25, 1910. p.4. Historic Oregon Newspapers, http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/.
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38Meacham, FrankFrank Meacham was a member of the Wasco-Wishram tribe located at the Warm Springs Agency in Oregon. He came to the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880 as one of a group of 15 students who had previously been enrolled in the Warm Springs Day School. His father might have been Samuel Meacham, a native man who was employed at the Warm Springs Indian Agency. Frank appears to have moved to the Yakima Agency after leaving the Forest Grove Indian School. A Frank Meacham was employed as an assistant teacher at the Yakima Agency Indian Boarding School in 1892.(3) The 1900 Census listed Frank Meacham, born circa 1868, of the Wishram tribe as living at the Yakima Reservation in 1900. At that time, he was working as a hops and berry picker, and was divorced. He was living with his mother, aunt and nephew, all of them also Wishram tribal members.(6) It is unknown why they all might have moved from Warm Springs to Yakima. Another source refers to this Frank Meacham as a "Carlisle [Indian School] Yakima" who visited Warm Springs in 1912.(4) Finally, there is also formerly classified file in the Bureau of Indian Affairs which lists a "tribal enrollment case" of one Frank Meacham at Warm Springs in 1913.(5)WascoWarmspringM7/13/1880Warm SpringsWasco-Wishram18681. "Reports of Agents in Oregon." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs the Secretary of the Interior 1880, p. 148. Google Books. -- 2. U.S. Secretary of the Interior. Official register of the United States, containing a list of officers and employes... Washington: GPO, 1879. p. 350. Google Books. -- 3.
Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs the Secretary of the Interior 1892, p. 873. Google Books. -- 4. McWhorter, Lucullus. The crime against the Yakimas. Republic Print, 1913. p. 54. Google Books. -- 5. Lester, Robert. "A guide to the microfilm edition of Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs Central Classified Files, 1907-1939..." Bethesda: University Publications of America, 1997. http://ucblibraries.colorado.edu/govpubs/nara/2131_RecsBIASerB.pdf -- 6. Entry for Frank Meacham. U.S. Census (1900). Ancestry.com
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39Rex, MelvilleMelville Rex (Rex Melville?) came to the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880 as one of a group of 15 students who had previously been enrolled in the Warm Springs Day School.WarmspringM7/13/1880Home July 21, 18861886Warm Springs1. "Reports of Agents in Oregon." Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs the Secretary of the Interior 1880, p. 148.
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40Lear, William H.William H. Lear came to the Forest Grove Indian School via Sitka, Alaska, in 1880. He is likely the same person as "Billy Lear", the son of a white man named William King Lear and a Samish woman named Xwelas (also called Mary). Billy Lear was born near present-day Bellingham, Washington, probably between 1865-1868. His father, William King Lear, had abandoned Xwelas by 1869 and had gone to Alaska, where he became a trader at Fort Wrangell. The elder Lear may have taken Billy with him to Alaska and sent him to Forest Grove from there, but this is unrecorded. In January, 1881, William wrote in the Indian School teacher Mrs. Walker's autograph book, "Please remember [me] as long as you live as a friend" and noted that he was 13 years old.(1) By 1900 Billy Lear was living on the Lummi Reservation alongside other Samish, where he was married with children. He died in 1947. SitkaAlaskaM8/1880Lummi?[need to record sources here -- Census, Google Books, etc.] -- 1. Forest Grove Indian Training School autograph book. Pacific University Archives. http://exhibits.lib.pacificu.edu/items/show/3308
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41Abraham, CharlesCharles Abraham entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880 with a sister or cousin named Ellen Abraham. He was probably one of seven boys wearing the school's military uniform who were featured in a portrait by Davidson titled "Group of Spokane Boys." According to a letter written by teacher Mary Lyman, in 1882, George was convinced by another student, Obed Littlewilliams, to run away from Forest Grove with some money that Obed had stolen. They walked all the way to Beaverton before getting caught by other students on a freight train. They were brought back to Forest Grove. Though Charles was recorded as being from the Spokane Tribe in the school register, he was probably really from the nearby confederated tribes of Colville. The 1900-1920 U.S. Census recorded Charles Abraham, a farmer, as living on the Colville Reservation with his wife, Mary.(2) He may have served as an interpreter for the government after leaving the school, as his name was noted in a letter regarding government agents crossing the Columbia in 1885.(3)SpokaneSpokaneM11/22/1880SpokaneColville18641920-1930?1. Lyman, Mary F. Letter to her parents. 28 Nov. 1882. Pacific University Archives. http://exhibits.lib.pacificu.edu/items/show/551 -- 2. US Census (1900, 1910, 1920). Ancestry.com -- 3.
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42Secup, GeorgeGeorge Secup entered the Forest Grove Indian Training School in 1880, one of several children from the Secup family to attend. George Secup was recorded in the school's roster as coming from the Spokane tribe. He was probably one of seven boys wearing the school's military uniform who were featured in a portrait by Davidson titled "Group of Spokane Boys." Later documents show that he lived on the Yakama reservation in the 1890s, so he may have had ties to both tribes. George Secup signed a petition in 1893 that objected to the sale of the Yakamas' Wenatchee Fishery.(1) He also got into trouble several times for cattle-stealing, however. In 1891, he was accused of stealing cattle in Yakima County but was acquitted.(2) A newspaper article about another incident in 1892 noted that he was around 18 years old at that time, and alleged that he and a partner "had gone into the horse stealing business of a wholesale scale, having driven off fifteen or twenty head from the neighborhood of the Satis and taken them to the Warm Springs Agency, in Oregon."(3) In 1895, he was in trouble again, with the newspaper alleging that he had pocketed money that did not belong to him from the sale of a cow and calf, which he spent on a hat and a blanket.(4) SpokaneSpokaneM11/22/1880SpokaneYakimaaround 1874after 18951. Petition from the Yakima Nation of Indians, printed in: United States. Senate. Letter from the Secretary of the Interior. 53rd Congress, 2nd session. Ex. Doc. 67. 1894. -- 2. Washington. Attorney General. Biennial report, 1891-1892. Olympia, WA: White, 1893. p. 173. -- 3. "The Local News Market." Yakima Herald. North Yakima, WA: 28 Apr 1892. p. 1. ChroniclingAmerica.loc.gov -- 4. "Weddle Waxes Wroth." Yakima Herald. North Yakima, WA: 1 Aug 1895. ChroniclingAmerica.loc.gov
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43Dorn, GeorgeGeorge Pas-cot Dorn entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880. He was probably one of seven boys wearing the school's military uniform who were featured in a portrait by Davidson titled "Group of Spokane Boys." His birth and death dates and other details of his life are unknown. Though George was recorded in the school register as coming from the Spokane tribe, several others in his group actually came from the nearby Colville Confederated Tribes, and he may have as well. Pas-cotSpokaneSpokaneM11/22/1880SpokaneColville?Checked all the usual sources, no confirmed matches. There was a George Dorn living as a janitor in Portland in the early 1900s per Ancestry.
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44Williams, JohnJohn Williams entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880. He was probably one of seven boys wearing the school's military uniform who were featured in a portrait by Davidson titled "Group of Spokane Boys." He signed a teacher's autograph book stating that he was 16 years old on July 14, 1881.(1) Because his name is relatively common on Indian Census rolls, it is difficult to determine what happened to him after leaving the school. There was a John Williams of about the right age living in the Fidalgo Precinct of Washington with his mother, named Mary, and a younger brother, Thomas, in 1880 according to the U.S. Census. Another John Williams (probably the same man) was married to a woman named Katie and living on Tulalip lands between 1900-1920, according to other census records.(2) This same John Williams is recorded in U.S. Indian Agency records as having worked for the Indian Police department as a private in the 1890s.(3)SpokaneSpokaneM11/22/1880SpokaneTulalip?1860-18651. Walker, Belle Putnam, “Forest Grove Indian Training School autograph book,” 1881. Pacific University Archives Exhibits. http://exhibits.lib.pacificu.edu/items/show/3308. -- 2. US Census (1880, 1900-1920). Ancestry.com -- 3. Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. U.S. GPO, 1893. p. 560. Google Books.
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45Lot, OliverOliver Lot entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880. He was probably one of seven boys wearing the school's military uniform who were featured in a portrait by Davidson titled "Group of Spokane Boys." Though Oliver was recorded as being from the Spokane Tribe in the school register, he appears to have really been from the nearby confederated tribes of Colville, where he lived according to the U.S. Indian Census rolls of the 1890s-1900s. Census-takers recorded his native name as Cee-Tel-co-Coa (or Cee-Til-co-Coo). Beginning around 1905, they recorded his Indian name as "Chief Big Star." He was married to a woman named Adelia and had a foster daughter, Catherine. SpokaneSpokaneM11/22/1880SpokaneColville1858 or 1859after 19071. Census of the Upper Spokane Colville Agency, 1895-1907. Found within: Indian Census Rolls, 1885-1940. Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Record Group 75; National Archives, Washington, D.C. Ancestry.com
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46Pratt, FredFred Pratt entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880. He was probably one of seven boys wearing the school's military uniform who were featured in a portrait by Davidson titled "Group of Spokane Boys." Though recorded as being Spokane in the school register, he may actually have been from the Colville Confederated Tribes, as were several of the other boys who arrived in his cohort. His birth and death dates and other details of his life are unknown. SpokaneSpokaneM11/22/1880Spokane
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47Littlewilliams, ObedObed Littlewilliams (also recorded as Obid Williams) was one of eight students from the Spokane region to arrive at the Forest Grove Indian School in November, 1880. He was probably one of seven boys wearing the school's military uniform who were featured in a portrait by Davidson titled "Group of Spokane Boys." Obed was noted by teacher Mary F. Lyman as being the "black sheep" of the school. According to one of her letters, in 1882, he stole over a hundred dollars from the general store in Forest Grove. He convinced another boy, Charles Abraham, to leave Forest Grove with him. They ran away from school and walked all the way to Beaverton before getting caught by other students (including Charles Varner) as they were preparing to take a train home. They were brought back to Forest Grove; it is unknown whether he was arrested. U.S. Census records from 1910-1930 show that he later moved to the Spokane Reservation and became a farmer. At age 22, he married a woman from the Kalispel tribe named Christine. She apparently died young, and he later married another woman, also native, named Agnes. Williams, ObidSpokaneSpokaneM11/22/1880Spokane1869after 19301. Lyman, Mary F. Letter to her parents. 28 Nov. 1882. Pacific University Archives. http://exhibits.lib.pacificu.edu/items/show/551 -- 2. 1. U.S. Census (1910-1930). Ancestry.com
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48Abraham, EllenEllen Abraham entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1880 with a brother or cousin named Charles. She died on January 2, 1887, apparently while still enrolled at school. She, like her brother, was probably really from the Colville Confederated tribes although she was recorded as Spokane on the school register.SpokaneSpokaneF11/22/1880Died Jan. 2, 1887SpokaneColville1/2/1887
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49Varner, LizzieLizzie Varner from Chehalis entered the Indian School in 1881 with a brother or cousin named Charles. Assuming that he was her full brother, then U.S. Census records show that their mother was a native of the Puyallup tribe, but their father was a white man born in Illinois or Ohio. Oyster BayChehalisF3/8/1881ChehalisPuyallup1. U.S. Census (1900-1920). Ancestry.com
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50Varner, CharlesCharles Varner from Chehalis entered the Indian School in 1881 with a sister or cousin named Lizzie. According to U.S. Census records, his mother was a native of the Puyallup tribe, but his father was white and had been born in Illinois or Ohio. Charles was the 1st Sergeant of the Indian Training School, meaning that he assisted with school discipline. In an incident in late 1882, two students ran away and Charles led a group of students who intercepted them on a freight train and returned them to Forest Grove. Later Census records show that Charles became a carpenter, which is likely a trade that he learned at the Indian School. He settled in Pierce County, Washington. The Census showed that he could read and write, and that he had a wife named Laura who was half Native, half French. When they were around 70, they moved in with their daughter (Florence) and son-in-law (a white man named Leslie Hinthorn) in Olalla. Oyster BayChehalisM3/8/1881ChehalisPuyallup1865after 19401. U.S. Census (1900-1940). Ancestry.com -- 2. Lyman, Mary F. Letter to her parents. 28 Nov. 1882. Pacific University Archives. http://exhibits.lib.pacificu.edu/items/show/551
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51Davis, MarionMarion Davis from Chehalis entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. According to anthropologists' notes from the early 20th century, Davis "was born at Centralia. His grandfather and father were Cowlitz. His mother, Liza, related among the Cowlitz, Puyallup and Nisqually, moved to the Upper Chehalis from the White River when she was five and she taught him some Lushootseed Puget Sound tales[...]."(1) Before coming to Forest Grove, Davis had been a member of the Chehalis Presbyterian Church, whose minister "set his eye with a view to use him as a native helper."(2) He appears to have returned in that capacity after attending the Indian School, as Edwin Chalcraft, a government adminstrator, recorded in his memoirs. Chalcraft noted that Davis was the first Indian to vote in his region after the passage of the Dawes Act in 1888.(3) Davis assisted several ethnographic efforts to record native languages, including Upper Chehalis (Tenino) and Chinook Wawa. As early as 1885, he worked with Myron Eells, a Pacific University graduate, on notes about Upper Chehalis. Eells described him as "an educated young man."(4) Later in life, probably in his late 60s or 70s, he made recordings of traditional stories and music, speaking and interpretating from languages that he knew.(1)ChehalisChehalisM3/8/1881ChehalisNisqually1885?19321. Northwest Anthropological Research Notes. Vol. 2:1. Moscow, Idaho: University of Idaho, 1999. p. 8. Google Books. -- 2. Welsh, Robert L. The Presbytery of Seattle 1858-2005: The ''Dream'' of A Presbyterian Colony in the West. Xlibris Corporation, 2006. p. 414. Google Books. -- 3. Chalcraft, Edwin L, and Cary C. Collins. Assimilation's Agent: My Life As a Superintendent in the Indian Boarding School System. Lincoln, Neb.: 2004. p. 22, 52. Google Books. 4. Pilling, James Constantine. Bibliography of the Salishan Languages. (Smithsonian, Bureau of Ethnology, Bulletin 16). U.S. G.P.O.: 1893. p. 20. Google Books.
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52Hughes, JohnJohn Hughes of Chehalis entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. A John Hughes born between 1855-1865 lived at the Yakama Agency in the 1920s.(1,2) An article published in the Chehalis Bee-Nugget in 1929 identified this John Hughes as originally being from the Cowlitz tribe, which is one of the confederated tribes of Chehalis.(3) Assuming that this is the same John Hughes who attended the Forest Grove Indian School, he died in ChehalisChehalisM3/8/1881ChehalisCowlitz1865?1. Marion County, Oregon Census (1895); and U.S. Census (1900). Ancestry.com 2. John Hughes records, Yakima Agency, U.S. Indian Census Rolls (1910-1929). Ancestry.com -- 3. John Hughes record, U.S. Census (1920). Ancestry.com -- 4. John Hughes death certificate, Washington Death Certificates (13 Oct 1929). His father's name is spelled "Kimbus" here, but in most other places it is spelled "Kimpus." -- 5. Irwin, Judith W. "The Dispossessed: The Cowlitz Indians in Cowlitz Corridor." Reprinted from The Columbian, 1994 Summer. Web. http://www.cowlitz.org/index.php/38-history1.
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53Jack, RobertRobert Jack entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881, with a brother or cousin named Bruce Jack. According to the Grays Harbor County Census of 1889, Robert was born in 1870, making him 11 years old when he arrived. The school register shows that he went home (with no reason recorded) in 1886. The 1910 U.S. Census recorded him as living as a single boarder in Oakville, Chehalis at that time, working as a laborer in the timber industry. The same census record states that both of his parents were of the Chehalis tribe, and that he had also attended Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania. ChehalisChehalisM3/8/1881Home July 21, 18861886Chehalis1870After 19101. Grays Harbor County Census (1889). Washington State Archives Southwest Regional Branch. SOS – Chehalis County Territorial Census. http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov/ -- 2. U.S. Census (1910). Ancestry.com
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54Jack, BruceBruce Jack entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881, with a brother or cousin named Robert Jack. According to the Grays Harbor County Census of 1889, Bruce was born in 1875, making him just 6 years old when he arrived.ChehalisChehalisM3/8/1881Chehalis18751. Grays Harbor County Census (1889). Washington State Archives Southwest Regional Branch. SOS – Chehalis County Territorial Census. http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov/
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55Brown, GeorgeGeorge Brown of Chilkat, Alaska entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. He was born around 1872 based on the school roster, which says that he was 13 when he entered. The roster also noted that he was a bugler for the school. By the 1884-1885 school year, he had attained the position of "cadet sergeant" at the school.(1) George Brown was identified as Tlingit by relatives in 2013.(2) A man named George O. Brown, of mixed Tlingit (maternal) and Swedish (paternal) ancestry was recorded as living in Fort Wrangell, Alaska, in 1900. He was a ship's pilot. His wife, Annie B. Brown, was a dressmaker of mixed Native Washington (maternal) and English (paternal) ancestry.(3) Perhaps they met at the Forest Grove school? Several women named Anna or Annie attended at about the same time, including Annie Porter, who was of mixed Puyallup/European descent. ChilcatAlaskaM4/25/1881Band; Bugler1885, age 13 (18?)TlingitChilkat1872?After 19001. Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs... Washington, DC: GPO, 1885. p. CLXXXIV-CLXXXVII. Google Books. This source also confirms his age and his mixed white/native heritage. -- 2. Hotch, Shawna. "Meeting an Archivist, Sparking Interest." Blog post. Oct 2 2013. http://pacificu-cis.weebly.com/1/previous/2.html -- 3. U.S. Census (1900-1910). Ancestry.com.
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56Shattuck, BenjaminBenjamin Frank Shattuck (usually known as Frank Shattuck) arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. The school's roster noted that he was a "genius with tools." Though he was recorded as an Alaskan native, a 1901 Chemawa School newsletter gave an update on his whereabouts, describing him as being from Orcas Island. It continued: "We notice Mr. B.F. Shattuck, who was a native of this place, his father being Charles W. Shattuck, one of the first white settlers at this place. Mr. Shattuck is engaged in the blacksmith business, which he has followed for the past seven years."(1) Another source notes that Benjamin's mother was Jeannie Shattuck, a Coast Salish woman.(2) He apparently hid his native heritage in later years. A 2004 article noted: "Frank, who wrote a history of the family that was published in the Orcas Islander newspaper in 1944, mentioned everyone in his family except his mother. It wasn'’t the only fact that Frank Shattuck chose to keep quiet in his written story. As a young boy, he was sent to the Chemawa Indian School in Salem, Ore. which was set up to assimilate Indian children into American ways and values. Frank kept this hidden in the newspaper article."(3)Shattuck, FrankFt. Wrangel StikineAlaskaM4/25/1881Genius with toolsCoast Salish1. "An old Chemawa boy." Weekly Chemawa American. Nov. 22, 1901. p.12. Historic Oregon Newspapers, http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/. -- 2. Orcas Island Historical Museum. Orcas Island. Arcadia Publishing, 2006. p. 11. -- 3. "Marriage of cultures: 19th century families." The Islands' Sounder. May 18, 2004. www.islandssounder.com
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57Goldstein, SamuelSamuel Goldstein, an Alaskan Native, arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. He was most likely Tlingit on his mother's side. He was probably related to an American man of German-Jewish ancestry with the same name. The elder Samuel Goldstein lived in Sitka in the 1870s and had stores there and in Fort Wrangell, where he sold liquor illegally.(1) He had been dismissed from the U.S. Army at Sitka in 1874 for violating Section 21 of the "Act to regulate trade and intercourse with the Indian tribes", which prohibited "any distillery for manufacturing ardent spirits" from being set up to sell liquor to natives.(2) The younger Samuel Goldstein was probably born around 1873 and would have entered the Indian School at about the age of 8, along with several other Alaskans. He returned to southeast Alaska later in life. The 1910 and 1920 U.S. Census record a Samuel Goldstein, a Tlingit from Sitka, living near Juneau in those years.(3) He died in 1927; his gravestone, accidentally buried, was found in Douglas, Alaska in 2012.(4)SitkaAlaskaM4/25/18816/30/1887Tlingit187319271. U.S. Senate. 44th Congress, 1st Session. Message from the President of the United States ... in relation to military arrests in the Territory of Alaska ... 1876. Ex. Doc. 33. Part 1: p. 3; Part 3, p. 5. Google Docs. -- 2. Samuel Goldstein dismissal record. U.S. Returns from Military Posts records. Aug 1874. Ancestry.com -- 3. U.S. Census, 1910-1920. Ancestry.com. -- 4. "Update: Native gravesite unearthed during Gastineau school construction." http://juneauempire.com/local/2012-06-22/native-gravesite-unearthed-during-gastineau-elementary-school-construction. Accessed 2/2015.
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58Burwell, WalterWalter Burwell was an Alaskan Native, most likely Tlingit on his mother's side, who came from Sitka. His father may have been white man with the same name who lived in Sitka and Wrangell in the 1870s-1880s. The elder Burwell was the deputy director of customs for Alaska in the early 1880s. The younger Walter Burwell enrolled at the Forest Grove Indian Training School with a group of other Alaskans in 1881. He graduated from Chemawa School in 1886, and stayed on there as head baker. A studio portrait of Walter Burwell wearing a suit with a "B" lapel pin survives in the Pacific University Archives. He apparently had sent the portrait to a former teacher, likely Samuel A.T. Walker, who was the shoemaking instructor. The photograph was printed in May 1887, just four months before his death. In the last year of his life, Burwell worked as the head baker for the school.SitkaAlaskaM4/25/1881Band; Died Sept. 2, 18871886Tlingit?9/2/1887[need to add sources]
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59Jackson, ArthurArthur Jackson is recorded in the Forest Grove Indian School's register as having been a member of the Ft. Wrangell Stikine, which was a band of the Tlingits. Few details are known of his life. Twentieth century U.S. Census records show several other Chilkat Tlingit natives named Jackson who were living near Ft. Wrangell in the early 20th century -- possibly relatives. Arthur enrolled at the Forest Grove Indian Training School with a group of other Alaskans in 1881. Ft. Wrangel StikineAlaskaM4/25/1881TlingitStikine [need to add sources]
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60Kadeshan, Harry G.Harry Kadeshan (also spelled Kadashan, Kadachan or Katishan) was probably a son of John Kadechan, a Stikine Tlingit man who lived from 1834-1914. John was a local Tlingit chief who was an early convert to Christianity. Harry's mother might have been John's wife, Lena Quonkah.(1) The Kadeshans were prosperous, keeping totem poles that still exist on Shakes Island. One member of the family, whose name was recorded as John Katishan, spoke extensively to a Smithsonian ethnologist in the early 1900s about Tlingit customs (cf. Russell). A John Kadeshan served as a guide to John Muir when he explored Southeast Alaska and Glacier Bay, and figures in his "Travels in Alaska." Chief John Kadeshan sent his children, probably including Harry, to missionary schools. Harry enrolled at the Forest Grove Indian Training School at the same time as a group of other Alaskan Native childen in 1881. On the roster it is noted that he was short and heavy, and possibly a little deaf.Kadashan, Harry G.Ft. Wrangel StikineAlaskaM4/25/1881Short heavy????; little deafTlingitStikine or Chilkat?1. Jackson, Sheldon. Alaska, and Missions on the North Pacific Coast, p. 235-236. -- 2. See references to 'Katishan': Russell, Frank. The Pima Indians. Smithsonian Instution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Vol. 26:1. 1908. Google Books. -- 3. See references to 'Kadachan': Muir, John. Travels in Alaska. Houghton Mifflin: 1915. Google Books.
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61Lott, CharlesCharles Lott, an Alaskan native, arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School from Fort Wrangell in 1881. He was likely Tlingit. Another Lott boy from Alaska, Daniel, entered the school in December 1883. Charles graduated from the Indian School after it had moved to Salem in 1888.(1) Few records of Charles or Daniel could be found outside of these mentions. Other Tlingits with the last name Lott were recorded in U.S. Census records of 1920-1940 as living near Wrangell. A photographer, Arthur Pillsbury, photographed the interior of a large traditional house near Wrangell in 1898 that probably belonged to Chief John Lott (b. 1860). A street in Petersburg, Alaska, is named after this same Chief John Lott, who seems to likely be a relative. No details of Charles Lott's life after arriving at the Indian School could be found.Ft. Wrangel StikineAlaskaM4/25/1881TlingitStikine or Chilkat?1. "Commencement at Chemawa." Evening Capital Journal. June 29, 1888. p. 3. ChronclingAmerica.loc.gov -- 2. U.S. Census, 1920-1940. -- 3. Pillsbury, Arthur C. "Tlingit known as Chief Lot's big house (interior)." Photograph. Wrangell, Alaska (1898). University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections Division. Web. http://digitalcollections.lib.washington.edu/cdm/ref/collection/loc/id/1719
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62Jones, PhilipPhilip Jones was an Alaskan native who arrived at the Forest Grove Indian Training School in 1881. He was probably around 20 years old at the time. It is noted on the roster that he was in band, where he played the bugle. He went home in July of 1887 after six years of attendance. A man with a Tlingit mother and a Russian father named Philip Jones -- probably the same man -- was recorded in the 1910-1930 U.S. Census as living in Sitka with a wife and children. The Census noted that he was able to read and write and worked as a fisherman.AlaskaM4/25/1881Band; Home July 7, 1887; BuglerTlingit18611. U.S. Census, 1910-1930.
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63Blake, GeorgeGeorge Blake was an Alaskan native who arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. He was probably about 14 at the time. By 1885, he had attained the post of "cadet sergeant" at the school.(1) The class roster noted that he played the bugle in the school band and went home on July 7, 1887. The 1900 U.S. Census recorded a George Blake, with a Tlingit mother and a white father, living in Wrangell with a wife and children. His father's place of birth was listed as "unknown," perhaps suggesting that his father died or abandoned the family while he was young. The Census noted that he could read and write and worked as a hunter.(2)Ft. Wrangel StikineAlaskaM4/25/1881Band; Home July 7, 1887; Bugler1885Tlingit18671. Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs... Washington, DC: GPO, 1885. p. CLXXXIV-CLXXXVII. Google Books. His age is also noted in this source. -- 2. U.S. Census, 1900.
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64Dickinson, SarahSarah Dickinson was a Tlingit-speaking woman from Tongas who had married a white man. Before coming to Forest Grove, she had worked as a teacher in Alaska. An Alaskan missionary recorded that in 1880, she "was sent to open a school at the store of the Northwest Trading Company, among the Chilcats at the head of Lynn Channel" (see Jackson). She also served as the interpreter at the Presbyterian Mission School at Fort Wrangel (see Wright). She enrolled at the Forest Grove Indian Training School in 1881. Sarah also stayed with Superintendent Wilkinson's family in 1882. No details could be found of her life after leaving the Indian School.Ft. Wrangel TongasAlaskaF4/25/18811.Jackson, Sheldon. "Report ... upon the condition of education in Alaska." Printed in: Proceedings of the Alaskan Boundary Tribunal. Washington: GPO, 1903. Appendix, p. 488. -- 2. Wright, Among the Alaskans, Philadelphia: 1883, p. 122
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65Williams, Alice L.Alice L. Williams of Spokane entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. A note on the school roster stated that she "Went home June 4, 1885; had scrofula." Scrofula is a form of tuberculosis that causes swelling of the lymph glands in the neck. No definite records of Alice could be found after 1885. PUApic_008608.jpgSpokaneSpokaneF7/9/1881Went home June 4, 1885; Had scrofulaSpokane
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66Hayes, FlorenceFlorence Hayes of Spokane entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. She arrived at the same time as a male relative, Garfield Hayes. Few records of the pair outside of the school roster have been located, though Garfield may have later changed his English name to "James." PUApic_008608.jpgSpokaneSpokaneF7/9/1881Spokane
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67Secup, Susette Susette Secup of the Spokane Tribe arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. She was one of several Secup children to attend. A "child's dress of red delaine" that she sewed while in school was featured in the Women's Silk Culture Organization's exhibit at the World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition in New Orleans, 1885.(1) She was still enrolled in the school when it moved to Salem. In 1885-1887, was recorded as holding a paid position as a "cadet sergeant" in the school.(2) PUApic_008608.jpgSecup, SusanSpokaneSpokaneF7/9/1881sick; Home July 4, 1887---Spokane1. Fairall, Herbert. The World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition, New Orleans, 1884-1885. Republican Publishing Company: 1885. p. 373. -- 2. "Report of the Indian School Superintendent," in Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs the Secretary of the Interior, 1886 and 1887.
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68Jopps, JuliaJulia Jopps of the Spokane Tribe arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. According to the school roster, she died in 1886; the cause was unrecorded. PUApic_008608.jpgSpokaneSpokaneF7/9/1881Died Feb. 5, 1886Spokane2/5/1886
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69Isaacs, LouiseLouise Isaacs of the Spokane Tribe arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. According to a newspaper article, she graduated from the school after it had moved to Salem in 1888.(1) No definite records of Louise could be found in typical sources after that date. PUApic_008608.jpgIsaac, LouiseSpokaneSpokaneF7/9/18811888SpokaneAfter 18881. "Commencement at Chemawa." Evening Capitol Journal. Salem: June 29, 1888.
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70Lot, MarthaMartha Lot (or Lott) of the Spokane tribe arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in July of 1881, joining her brother Oliver who had joined the school about a year earlier. Their father was Chief Lot of the Spokane from the Colville Agency.(1) Martha died just a few months later. The shoemaking teacher, Samuel A.T. Walker, recorded her death in his diary: "The Indian girl died that was sick at Captain Wilkinson’s house, Martha Lott."(2) She was buried at Naylor Cemetery, which has since been renamed Forest View Cemetery, in grave 10, lot 215.(3) Regarding her father's reaction to her death, see: Ruby, Robert H. Half-Sun on the Columbia: a biography of Chief Moses. University of Oklahoma Press, 1995. p. 293. SpokaneSpokaneF7/9/1881Died Oct. 16, 1881SpokaneColville8/16/18811. Collins, Cary C. "The broken crucible of assimilation." Oregon Historical Quarterly, 101:4 (Winter 2000), p. 483-484. -- 2. Walker, Samuel A. T., “Samuel A. T. Walker Diary, 1881,” Pacific University Archives. Web. http://exhibits.lib.pacificu.edu/items/show/3305 -- 3. Collins. p. 484. -- 4. Ruby, Robert H. Half-Sun on the Columbia: a biography of Chief Moses. University of Oklahoma Press, 1995. p. 293.
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71James, Eunice MadgeEunice Madge James of Spokane entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. According the school's roster, she passed away on June 23, 1884. The cause of death was not recorded on the roster. Superintendent Minthorn's annual report dated August 1884, however, notes that two children had died during the previous year, both of tuberculosis; Eunice was most likely one of these two cases.(1) PUApic_008608.jpgSpokaneSpokaneF7/9/1881Died June 23, 1884Spokane6/23/18841.Minthorn, H.J. "Report of Forest Grove." Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior. GPO: 1884. p. 207. Google Books.
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72George, JamesJames George of Spokane entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. According the school's roster, he passed away in July, 1886, after the school had moved to Salem. The cause of death was not recorded. PUApic_008608.jpgSpokaneSpokaneM7/9/1881Died June 5, 1886Spokane6/5/1886
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73Secup, BenBen Secup of the Spokane Tribe arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. He was one of several Secup children to attend. Other than records related to Secup children at the Forest Grove Indian School, records of the Secup family are scarce. Two other Secup men signed a petition objecting to the sale of land belonging to the Yakama Nation in the 1890s, suggested that perhaps they had ties to that tribe.(1) PUApic_008608.jpg SpokaneSpokaneM7/9/1881SpokaneYakama1. United States Senate. 53rd Congress 2nd Session. "Letter from the Secretary of the Interior transmitting a copy of an agreement with the Yakima Nation of Indians ..." Washington, DC: GPO, 1894. Google Books.
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74Rice, FrankFrank Rice of Spokane entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. According to the school roster, he passed away in 1888, after the school had moved to Salem. PUApic_008608.jpgSpokaneSpokaneM7/9/1881Died Feb. 28, 1888Spokane2/28/1888
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75Hayes, GarfieldGarfield Hayes of the Spokane Tribe entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. He arrived at the same time as a female relative, Florence Hayes. He was apparently named after President Garfield, who was serving at the time of his admittance, and the previous President Hayes. Because President Garfield was in office only for a few months in 1881, it's likely that this student received his English name at or near the time when he registered at the Indian School. No record of a "Garfield Hayes" can be found outside of the school roster. This suggests the possibility that he may have changed his name later. A "James Hayes" of the correct age and background appears in census records as living at the Colville Reservation between 1910-1940.(1,2) Assuming that this is the identical person, his native name was Ki-a-Me. This Kiame/James Hayes was the full-blooded son of Elizabeth (or S-Am-in-I-MA) Hayes, and lived from about 1873-1967. He made his living as a farmer. PUApic_008608.jpgHayes, James?SpokaneSpokaneM7/9/1881SpokaneColville?1873?1. U.S. Census (1910-1940). Ancestry.com -- 2. U.S. Indian Census Rolls. Spokane Tribe, Colville Agency. (1900-1929). Ancestr.com.
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76Jack, LilaLila Jack, of the Wasco tribe from Warm Springs, entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. The school's roster recorded that she died in 1883; the cause was not recorded.Jack, LillianWascoWarmspringF7/12/1881Died May 18, 1883----WascoWarm Springs5/18/1883
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77Sewokia, AmyAmy Sewokia, of the Wasco tribe from Warm Springs, entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. The school's roster recorded that went home sick in 1884.WascoWarmspringF7/12/1881sick; Home June 6, 1884WascoWarm Springs
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78Pipps, NellieNellie Pipps, of the Wasco tribe from Warm Springs, entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. She was probably related to Wallo Da Wish and Ollie Pipps, who were the only two elders of that name living in Warm Springs when Indian census rolls were drawn up in the early 1900s. WascoWarmspringF7/12/1881WascoWarm Springs1. Indian Census Rolls (1902-1904). Ancestry.com
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79Meeker, FredFred Meeker of Puyallup entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. He arrived at the same time as Joseph Meeker, who was probably a brother or cousin. Another Meeker boy named Jerry had already been at the school for about a year. The name "Meeker" came from their father or uncle, whose native name had been Sky-uch; he adopted the name Meeker after this employer, Ezra Meeker.(1)PuyallupPuyallupM9/10/1881Puyallup1. "1800s on Browns Point: Jerry Meeker." Points Northeast Historical Society. http://www.pnehs.dreamhosters.com/lighthouse/?page_id=272
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80Meeker, JosephJoseph Meeker of Puyallup entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. He arrived at the same time as Fred Meeker, who was probably a brother or cousin. Another Meeker boy named Jerry had already been at the school for about a year. The name "Meeker" came from their father or uncle, whose native name had been Sky-uch; he adopted the name Meeker after this employer, Ezra Meeker.(1)PuyallupPuyallupM9/10/18811. "1800s on Browns Point: Jerry Meeker." Points Northeast Historical Society. http://www.pnehs.dreamhosters.com/lighthouse/?page_id=272
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81Lewis, WilliamWilliam Henry Lewis was a native Alaskan from Fort Wrangell who was born around 1864. According to family records stored on Ancestry.com, he was the son of a white man named Joseph Henry Lewis and a native woman from Haines (probably Tlingit) named Martha Tutasley. He went to the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881, where he was in the school's band. Three years later, in 1884, he enrolled as a student at Tualatin Academy, which was a college preparatory high school attached to Pacific University. He was probably the first Alaskan Native ever to enroll there. After graduating from the Indian School in 1885, William married a fellow student, Jennie May Fletcher. They moved first to her home at Bainbridge Island, and then later to Wrangell. They had numerous children. Along with fellow student James Hadley, William was one of ten native "leading men of Wrangell" who wrote a letter to the governor of Alaska in 1899 asking him to defend their fishing grounds from white encroachment. U.S. Census records from the 1900s indicate that he made a living as a fisherman. William died in 1928 at the age of about 64.Lewis, William HenryStickeenAlaskaM9/24/1881Band1885Tlingit186419281. "Report of the Governor of Alaska." Annual Reports of the Department of the Interior. GPO: 1899. p. 8. Google Books. -- 2. Family trees related to Martha Tutasley, Ancestry.com. -- 3. U.S. Census (1900-1920). -- 4. Jennie May Fletcher obituary, Wrangell Sentinel, 12 Sep 1952; partially transcribed at http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=klea&id=I36537
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82George, HalexHalex (or Hallax) George was one of ten Umatilla children who arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. Though several other Umatillas with the last name George appear in Census records, no definite information about his life could be found, outside of what appears on the Indian School roster. George, HallaxUmatillaUmatillaF10/17/1881Umatilla
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83Winnum, EmmaEmma Winnum (or Winum) entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. According to an account published by the Forest Grove Indian School Superintendent Wilkinson, Emma was "the only daughter of Chief Winum, an Umatilla Oregon Indian." He wrote that "she was about fifteen when her father gave her to me to take ot the Indian School at Forest Grove. [...] Of steady Christian purpose, he ardently desired for his only daughter that she might have the benefit of an education, and he willingly gave her up to our care for that purpose." He continued his account with a story of how Emma helped to lead a group of ten Umatilla children from their lands to Forest Grove, encountering difficulties along the way. Wilkinson described her as a convinced Christian who witnessed her faith to her tribe, and who was neat, orderly, cheerful and a good student. Emma died of an illness at the school in December, 1883.(1)Winum, EmmaUmatillaUmatillaF10/17/1881Umatilla186612/18831. Wilkinson, Melville C. "The Story of an Indian Girl." Sunday School Times, Vol. 26:15 (12 Apr 1884), p. 228-229. Google Books.
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84Lowry, TemaTema Lowry (or Peo) was one of ten children from Umatilla lands who arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. Two of her relatives, Jennie and Emma, entered the school later. Census records show that Tema was born between 1867-1870 and was recorded as living at the Umatilla Agency in 1888-1893.(1) Her father was Elijah Lowrey, also known as Peo, or Chief Peo-peo-mox-mox. Tema was photographed with her brother, Walter, by the Indian Agent Lee Moorhouse wearing traditional clothing in 1888.(2)Peo, TemaUmatillaUmatillaF10/17/1881Umatilla1867-1870?1. Umatilla Agency, U.S. Indian Census Rolls (1888, 1893). Ancestry.com -- 2. Moorhouse, Lee. "Tema & Walter Peo . Umatilla Tribe." Photograph. 1888. University of Oregon Archives. PH036_6528. https://oregondigital.org
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85Abrahams, WinnieWinnie Abrahams of Umatilla arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881, and died two years later on June 28, 1883. The cause of her death was not recorded.UmatillaUmatillaF10/17/1881Died June 28, 1883Umatilla6/28/1883
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86John, AlbertAlbert John (also known as Albert Minthorn) of Umatilla arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881 and graduated in 1886. In 1886, he wrote a letter to the shoemaking instructor, Samuel A. T. Walker, "describing the death of the schoolmaster, illness among the students, and personal difficulties with his studies." (This letter is now held at the Oregon Historical Society.) After leaving the school, he found employment as a teacher at the Umatilla Agency's Indian boarding school. In 1912, the Forest Grove News-Times ran an article noting that Albert had returned to visit the former site of the school: "Albert John, a Umatilla Indian, better known by his adopted name of Albert Minthorn, visited S.A. [Samuel A.T.] Walker in this city, Saturday. Mr. Minthorn is a wealthy farmer ... When [the] Indian School was located here, he was a student in the school, and went from here to Salem when the institution was moved ... where he completed the course and then returned to his allotment of land on the reservation."Minthorn, AlbertUmatillaUmatillaM10/17/1881Home July 21, 18861886Umatilla1. John, Albert. Letter to Samuel A.T. Walker. 1886. Oregon Historical Society. -- 2. Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. U.S. GPO, 1887. p. 345. Google Books. -- 3. "Former Indian Student Revists Forest Grove." Forest Grove News-Times, Jun 6 1912. Pacific University Archives. exhibits.lib.pacificu.edu
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87Wilhelm, CharleyCharley Wilhelm of Umatilla arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. No other specific details of his life could be found. There was a Francis Wilhelm (or Mis-quot) living on Umatilla lands in 1900 who was possibly a brother. Francis' widowed father went by the name of Charley Bellman (or Pa-why-a-ma) -- perhaps this was Charley Wilhelm's father?UmatillaUmatillaM10/17/1881Umatilla1. Indian Census Rolls (1900). Ancestry.com
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88Barnhart, WilliamWilliam Barnhart of Umatilla arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881 and left on June 30, 1887. According to U.S. Census records, he was born around 1868 to two Umatilla parents. The Census also records that after attended the school, he returned to Umatilla lands, married a woman named Ka-Wva-Sha-Furn (also recorded as "Agnes"), and worked as a farm laborer. He lived until at least 1930 near several of his children and grandchildren.UmatillaUmatillaM10/17/18816/30/1887Umatilla1868after 19301. U.S. Census (1900-1930). Ancestry.com
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89Minthorn, Moses PriceMoses Price Minthorn was a Umatilla man that enrolled at the Indian Training School in 1881. He graduated from Chemawa Indian School in 1886 after five years of school. UmatillaUmatillaM10/17/1881Home July 21, 18861886Umatilla
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90HughHugh of Umatilla was recorded in the Forest Grove Indian School roster without a last name. He might have been Hugh Minthorn, since Moses Price Minthorn who arrived on the same day appears immediately before him in the list. Hugh arrived at the school in 1881. Minthorn, Hugh?UmatillaUmatillaM10/17/1881Umatilla
92
91Cook, RoyRoy Cook of Umatilla arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881 and left the school in 1887. No records of his activities after leaving the school could be found. Another native with the last name Cook was recorded in the 1892 Indian Census of the Umatilla as being from the Cayuse tribe. UmatillaUmatillaM10/17/18819/30/1887Umatilla
93
92Atkinson, SicenaAtkinson Secena of Chehalis entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. He was misidentified on the school roster as "Sicena Atkinson." He identified himself, however, in a note in the autograph book of one of the teachers, Mrs. Walker: "Most sincerely, your new scholar and friend, Atkinson Secena, From Independence, Thurston Co., W.T."(1) He was part of the family of Chehalis Secenas who figure in several stories collected by ethnologists. One story referred to an elder Secena as an "Oakville man" who was a very good gambler, and whose wife was half Skokomish.(2) After attending the Forest Grove Indian School, Atkinson Secena become one of several native students to enroll as a regular student at Tualatin Academy, which was the college preparatory high school attached to Pacific University.(3) No clear records of him could be found after the mid-1880s, but a record of an "Athen Secena" -- possibly the same person -- was written by the Indian Agent Edwin Chalcraft. He wrote, remembering a time perhaps in the late 1880s or early 1890s, "Athen Secena, a very fine educated young man had been sick a long time with consumption and the Agency doctor had done all he could for him. One night his father, Old Se-ce-na, call me from bed and said his son was dying." He goes on to describe how the father paid his medical care with some treasured sets of Wak-shk gambling disks. Chalcraft later gave one of the disks back to Athen's brother, Dan.(4) Assuming that "Athen" is the same man as he recorded as "Atkinson" on the school roster, then he would have been born about 1861, according to Indian Census Rolls; and his native name would have been Swal-Lup Pum Secena.(5) Athen probably died about 1887.Secena, Athen?ChehalisChehalisM12/1881ChehalisSkokomish1861?1887?1. Forest Grove Indian Training School autograph book. Pacific University Archives. http://exhibits.lib.pacificu.edu/items/show/3308 -- 2. Elmendorf, William Welcome. Twana Narratives: Native Historical Accounts of a Coast Salish Culture. Seattle: U. Washington Press, 1993. p. 22-23. -- 3. Pacific University Catalog. Forest Grove: 1884. -- 4. Chalcraft, Edwin L, and Cary C. Collins. Assimilation's Agent: My Life As a Superintendent in the Indian Boarding School System. Lincoln, Neb.: 2004. p. 72. Google Books. -- 5. Chehalis Tribe Indian Census Rolls, 1885-1886.
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93Odell, ElizaEliza Odell (or O'dell) of Chehalis entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. She was born about 1866, so she would have been about 15 when she arrived. She married a fellow student, Jerry Meeker, who was from Puyallup, and had several children with him. Jerry became prominent man in his tribe, serving at various times as sub-chief and police captain of the Puyallup Reservation. Eliza died sometime around 1890, which is the last year when she appears in Indian Census records.Meeker, ElizaChehalisChehalisF12/1881Chehalis186618901. U.S. Indian Census Rolls, 1887-1890. Ancestry.com. -- 2. "1800s on Browns Point: Jerry Meeker." Points Northeast Historical Society. http://www.pnehs.dreamhosters.com/lighthouse/?page_id=272
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94Fletcher, JennieJennie (or Jane, or Jennie May) Fletcher was born around 1869. Her father, William C. Fletcher, was a white man from Louisiana, and her mother, Sarah Fletcher, was probably Snohomish from the Bainbridge Island area.(1) Her obituary states that she was descended from the second wife of Chief Seattle.(2) Jennie arrived at the Forest Grove Indian Training School in 1881 and graduated in 1885. She was one of three Fletcher children at the school: David and William Fletcher arrived about a year after she did. By late 1884, Jennie was listed as one of the lead students in the sewing department of the school, earning a small salary.(3) After leaving school, she married a fellow student, William Lewis, who was an Alaskan native from Fort Wrangell. They moved first to Bainbridge Island, and then to Fort Wrangell, and had numerous children together. Her husband made a living as a fisherman while she kept house. Jennie died in 1952 aged about 83 years old.(2,4)Lewis, JennieSnohomishPuyallupF4/7/18821885186919521. U.S. Census (1880-1940). Ancestry.com -- 2. Most other details from her obituary, Wrangell Sentinel, 12 Sep 1952; partially transcribed at http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=klea&id=I36537 -- 3. Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs... Washington, DC: GPO, 1885. p. CLXXXIV-CLXXXVII. Google Books. 4. U.S. Census (1900-1940). Ancestry.com
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95Winyer, SusieSusie Winyer was a Nisqually native who arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1881. According to the 1880 Washington Territorial Census, she was born around 1866 and had lived in Thurston, Washington, before coming to the school. Her parents were named Shedott and Mary Winyer.(1) While enrolled as a student, Susie became an assistant cook at the school for $300 per year.(2) She graduated in 1885. NesquallyPuyallupF4/7/188218851. Washington Territorial Census (1880). Ancestry.com. -- 2. U.S. Secretary of the Interior. Official register of the United States, containing a list of officers and employes... Washington: GPO, 1883. p. 587. Google Books. She was listed in later registers as "Susie Winger."
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96Santiago, SophiaSophia Santiago arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1882. According to the school roster, she was a Nisqually native from the Puyallup Agency. Her mother might have been Nancy Santiago, a Puyallup woman of about the right age.(1) The roster notes that Sophia died on April 14, 1888, after the school had moved to Chemawa.NesquallyPuyallupF4/7/1882Died April 14, 1888NisquallyPuyallup4/14/18881. Indian Census Rolls, Puyallup Agency (1890). Ancestry.com.
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97Simon, CeciliaCecilia (or Celia?) Simon of Puyallup entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1882. She arrived at the same time as Alice Simon, who was probably a sister or cousin. The two Simon girls might have been nieces of John Simon, an upper Puyallup man.(1) The 1886 Indian Census rolls from the Puyallup Agency recorded a 12-year-old "Celia Simon" living with an uncle, John Simon. If this is the same person as Cecilia Simon, then she would have been about 8 years old when she was sent to Forest Grove. PuyallupPuyallupF4/7/1882Puyallup1874?1. Fitzpatrick, Darlene Ann. We are Cowlitz: A Native American Ethnicity. University Press of America: 2004. p. 74. Google Books. 2. Indian Census Rolls, Puyallup, 1886. Ancestry.com
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98Simon, AliceAlice Simon of Puyallup entered the Forest Grove Indian School in 1882. She arrived at the same time as Cecilia Simon, who was probably a sister or cousin. The two Simon girls might have been nieces of John Simon, an upper Puyallup man.(1) An Alice Simon who lived from 1868-1883 is buried in the Firewood Indian Cemetery at Puyallup. Assuming this is the same person, this means she died within a year of enrolling in the school.PuyallupPuyallupF4/7/1882Puyallup1868?1883?1. Fitzpatrick, Darlene Ann. We are Cowlitz: A Native American Ethnicity. University Press of America: 2004. p. 74. -- 2. Alice Simon grave record. Findagrave.com.
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99Meachem, FredFred Meachem (or Meacham) of Puyallup arrived at the Forest Grove Indian School in 1882. Other than the school's roster, no definite records relating to him could be found. A "Freddie Meacham" born in 1862 was recorded living at the Yakama Agency in 1880 and 1885 with his widowed mother, but this may not be the same person.(1) Several members of the Makah tribe named Meachem or Meacham lived at Clallam in the early 1900s and may have been relatives.(2) Another pair of Meacham boys, George and Frank Meacham of the Wasco-Wishram tribes, also attended the Forest Grove Indian School and later lived at Yakama, but there is no evidence that they were related.Meacham, FreddiePuyallupPuyallupM4/7/1882Puyallup1. Freddie Meacham, Yakama Agency, U.S. Indian Census records (1880 and 1885). Ancestry.com. -- 2. Abraham and Bell Meacham family records, U.S. Census (1900). Ancestry.com
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