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CourseSubject AreaState NumberCreditsHonors AvailableCredit AcquisitionCredit RecoveryDual Credit AvailableAdvanced PlacementCo- TaughtLaunch LiveNCAA EligibleDescriptionSyllabus
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A+ TutoringElectives0.5This course offers an opportunity for 11th & 12th graders to complete their A+ tutoring hours for the A+ Scholarship in a virtual setting. Students in this course are required to earn a minimum of 50 tutoring hours for the ½ credit. Students will earn their tutoring hours by working with other Launch students/classes and will tutor through Canvas/Zoom. All tutoring hours must be completed via the Springfield Public Schools Launch program with Springfield Public Schools/Launch teachers. Students need to check with their high school A+ Coordinator to see if they are currently meeting the A+ Requirements prior to enrolling: 95%+ attendance, 2.5+ non-weighted GPA, Proficient or Advance on the Algebra I EOC (there are other ways to meet this requirement) and good citizenship.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1OYJDusLjVeAOGjDCk62-kZnTu7lCwv8gxm1KteGMMkg/export?format=pdf
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ACT PrepElectives9940250.5CAACT Preparation is a course designed to give students an opportunity to prepare to take the ACT (American College Test). Students will spend half the course on the verbal (English, Reading, and Writing) sections and the other half on the Mathematics and Science Reasoning sections of the test. This class will focus on learning and practicing strategies as well as reviewing content to improve scores. Concepts reviewed include grammar and punctuation rules; algebra, geometry, and trigonometry principles; and reasoning skills for interpreting charts and graphs.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1lwHgUjth8AXyp6VwHmeoO_xgbU9ukV-qfU0xZbJ_H90/export?format=pdf
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Driver EducationElectives871000.5CAThis course provides classroom instruction with a focus on the skills, responsible attitudes, and behaviors needed to become a safe driver. This course is dedicated to the concept of helping young drivers save lives – their lives as well as the lives of others. While taking the course, students will also learn about the basic traffic laws and rules of the road that apply to common everyday driving situations.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1hRei0Ev0-npkilKKZWA-oIgn138DWCdUhayTmTJNFSU/export?format=pdf
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HiSet PrepElectives0.5
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Hunter and Boater SafetyElectives9999300.5CAThis course offers a unique educational experience which provides students with the opportunity to become a responsible hunter and boater. Students will learn the basic hunter techniques, outdoor safety and shooting skills, and obtain a Hunter’s certification card. Students MUST be 16 at the beginning of this course to enroll.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1TZ3onYKcLOipiAQeQv3XUrIZdYMAljrhoHf5SYisLGM/export?format=pdf
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VolunteerismElectives9910150.5This course offers a unique educational experience which provides students with the opportunity to understand how their community works by developing an awareness of “volunteerism.” Students must volunteer 90 hours of unpaid service outside the regular school day to an organization from a list of nonprofit community agencies and service organizations. Students may select a listed agency to meet individual needs or interests. This course may be repeated one time and is offered as a pass/fail.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1XEaZoG3BPltc_QlOZIMnTi9X0LmhgKOfEXn-JkFscwk/export?format=pdf
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AP English Lit. & Comp.English Language Arts549951.0DCAPNCAAThis course is intended to prepare you for the AP English Literature and Composition examination administered by the College Board each spring. All students will engage in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, you will deepen your understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As a survey of Western and English Literature, the course will include not only a study of major literary works of each historical period, but also a study of the economic, moral, and social environment that produced the literature. Critical analysis of the structure and genre of literature corresponds to an approach to writing about literary works, including writing to understand, to explain, and to evaluate. Writing genres include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1O7cYj8jMi539s-O0_SPcz--V_hG4WKonfGjzOimpvYo/export?format=pdf
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Contemporary LitEnglish Language Arts548221.0HDCNCAAThis course explores major themes in contemporary novels and non-fiction texts. Students will read, discuss, research, and analyze literary selections. They will examine authors' techniques and will gain awareness of how literature reflects society. Students will read and write about a variety of works including literature from different cultures, authors and societies; young adult literature; and contemporary literature. The course will help students become more culturally literate and globally aware while developing vocabulary, reading comprehension, and composition skills. This course may be conducted in both small group and whole-class format.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1PIFAQ2bWSEUqp35s9j35jR0Lapg6OOqQGLDi-msgP0Y/export?format=pdf
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Creative Writing IEnglish Language Arts548050.5CADCNCAACreative Writing is an in-depth writing course that gives students the opportunity to further develop their talent in the areas of personal essay, fiction, poetry, and drama. In a collaborative workshop structure, students will explore numerous types of genres as they work through the writing process and will be expected to identify their strengths and weaknesses as a writer. Students will analyze texts of published authors and use their speaking and listening skills to share their writing.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1RjHcLJ_MyROT1ZON9cqCJNxvfmb9d4QhD1MFHZ9sh1I/export?format=pdf
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Creative Writing IIEnglish Language Arts548050.5CANCAAThis is an elective course intended to be taken in addition to a core English course. Creative Writing is an in-depth writing course that gives students the opportunity to further develop their talent in the areas of personal essay, fiction, poetry, and drama. In a collaborative workshop structure, students will explore numerous types of genres as they work through the writing process and will be expected to identify their strengths and weaknesses as a writer. Students will analyze texts of published authors and use their speaking and listening skills to share their writing.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1dxgkLIWQ8UUbaVSTiCABbPBYhKpun9XTgZSGVFcAda8/export?format=pdf
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English IEnglish Language Arts548001.0HCACRCo-TaughtLiveNCAAEnglish I builds on reading, writing, listening and speaking, and information literacy skills begun in middle school. Literature includes thematic units consisting of novels, short stories, plays, poetry, and nonfiction. Writing includes varied composition experiences.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1DB9M-VztfilcNkCLjPwwpRlF5MaNu6hKuE53I7T8R5c/export?format=pdf
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English IIEnglish Language Arts548001.0HCACRCo-TaughtLiveNCAAIn this course students will engage in writing, reading, speaking and listening. This course builds on skills learned in earlier grades. Students will also learn to analyze literature, identifying ideas, themes, and literary elements; but they also are encouraged to respond personally to works. As students work through this course they will read and respond to a variety of nonfiction texts and produce personal and nonfiction writings, at times based on research.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Jx519z2pOFrprPhBtafvJb-3xT28wD1PBWg5emzajNo/export?format=pdf
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English IIIEnglish Language Arts548001.0HCACRCo-TaughtLiveNCAAThis course enlarges the students’ understanding of their heritage through an integrated study of American literature. Through responding to fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry, both formally and informally, students examine the literature of the American experience. Although students entering the class should have basic writing skills, further development of composition modes and media are integrated into an extensive reading and language study.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1uEtUgRXmNlwnFAME8o_NaEPF5NSxr2ayAmXwnBnA8ws/export?format=pdf
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English IVEnglish Language Arts548001.0CACRCo-TaughtLiveNCAAIn this course students compare and evaluate significant writers and their works by exploring recurring themes and ideas. Writing, inspired by the literature studied, personal experience, and source-based research, will be an important part of this course. Students are expected to undertake a research project, either in writing or in an exhibition.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1RcCommLK4u1fJl87ZkP-OjNTTl48Nm0c05ENbmTj3gQ/export?format=pdf
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Film as Literature IEnglish Language Arts548990.5CAThis course is an in-depth study of film production and film writing from a literary perspective. Students will engage with a variety of films through many thematic units, including but not limited to the history of film production, telling a story through visuals, a director’s study, adapting a book to film, film genre study, creating stop-motion animation, and telling their own story in film. Students will analyze the literary, dramatic, and cinematic devices of film through small group and whole class discussion, in formal and informational writing, and through collaborative projects with classmates. Through questioning and critical analysis, students will become more perceptive viewers of film.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/11b0yCT__VWLacSuMckyb2VzUBqF1ZRiIe7lzaHrUawE/export?format=pdf
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Film as Literature IIEnglish Language Arts548990.5This course is an in-depth study of film production and film writing from a literary perspective. Students will engage with a variety of films through many thematic units, including but not limited to the history of film production, telling a story through visuals, a director’s study, adapting a book to film, film genre study, creating stop-motion animation, and telling their own story in film. Students will analyze the literary, dramatic, and cinematic devices of film through small group and whole class discussion, in formal and informational writing, and through collaborative projects with classmates. All students will have their film reviews published online. Through questioning and critical analysis, students will become more perceptive viewers of film.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/17vcCnTV22o3RLlNgI_MJR7Hb5IvDGrw_yznFjCIHM0k/export?format=pdf
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Grammar & Comp IEnglish Language Arts0548040.5DCNCAAThis course has two parts: One half parallels the Writing I course at Missouri State University, with students developing proficiency in writing for academic and professional purposes and learning to produce, copy-edit, and publish quality research writing. The other half of the course provides an intensive and immersive research reading experience, both guided and self-directed, with students becoming conversant and current in the areas of academic and professional discourse most relevant to them, and enjoying opportunities to reflect on, share, and act upon that learning in ways that help them and their communities.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1V-aHpxzMnBj8dby-Y-DmbsCEjlBw9Xp3Cm2ysZGhDCA/export?format=pdf
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Grammar & Comp IIEnglish Language Arts0548040.5DCNCAAThis course has two parts: One half parallels the Writing I course at Missouri State University, with students developing proficiency in writing for academic and professional purposes and learning to produce, copy-edit, and publish quality research writing. The other half of the course provides an intensive and immersive research reading experience, both guided and self-directed, with students becoming conversant and current in the areas of academic and professional discourse most relevant to them, and enjoying opportunities to reflect on, share, and act upon that learning in ways that help them and their communities.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1l9KJtF1q8esRTG1Nu56_iLjErT9eTGMMT6tDcDvob7k/export?format=pdf
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Introductory SpeechEnglish Language Arts565001.0DCNCAAThis course is for students who want to learn to think clearly and express themselves effectively before an audience. Students are provided opportunities to develop and increase their self-confidence and fluency as speakers. The course covers multiple aspects of public speaking and gives the student practical experience through participation. Students are introduced to the study of poise, use of body and voice, oral interpretation of literature, beginning argumentation, and speaking in front of an audience.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1YY0UlaXFUMaiirWZR8rTmAZ3b8XTda0DGBVysxoF27s/export?format=pdf
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ReadingEnglish Language Arts548411.0CAThis course is designed for students that may be reading below, on, or above grade level. The purpose of this course is to provide a reading program with differentiated instruction for students based on each student’s individual reading ability. This is possible through the use of the Reading Plus program, where students will complete online activities based on need, and through specific Canvas assignments that will reinforce the work students complete on Reading Plus. Students will also interact with texts matched to their reading level along with project content that is appropriate for high school students and based on personal interest. This course can be counted as one English credit. All credits received after will be counted as elective credit.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1KcidGwWQQebUbQOBa5zEV8CU_BVVntOqPDeNKUgutKE/export?format=pdf
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AP Studio Art 2-D DesignFine Arts1.0APThis course provides a program of study which allows academically and artistically accelerated high school students the opportunity to pursue college level instruction. This course will provide the highly motivated art student with educational and artistic opportunities beyond the regular studio class for a thorough, rigorous, and challenging course of study. The course will develop students’ understanding of basic design concepts and principles and the use of these principles in their daily lives The class will require visual analysis, synthesis and evaluation skills, as well as regular outside of class assignments and projects. This course is designed to prepare the students for the Advanced Placement 2D design test. This course may be repeated for credit.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zFoV3pUK-_0qDn_HdWo0eoZleLkGW_N88hJ6G4HxDVo/export?format=pdf
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Fine Arts Appreciation I: MusicFine Arts1269200.5CACRStudents enrolled in this online course will be introduced to music of the 20th century and how it affected the culture of America. Units to be covered may include, but not be limited to Jazz, Rock n Roll, Motown, and Hip Hop.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1K9rn8ydm4mu3NSaiZjMw75uqVnv2tSLv22qEUC0tes4/export?format=pdf
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Fine Arts Appreciation II: ArtFine Arts241100.5CAStudents enrolled in this online course will be introduced to visual art ideas as they relate to the history and context in which art is made. Students will interact with art through the lens of a tourist, a critic and a curator through activities that include virtually visiting museums around the world, blogging, and curating a virtual exhibition.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1_o2nOjqOiOg9PhTPjfA3DVTYFwIQyQJlUlFqPOZZ7AM/export?format=pdf
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Music Theory IFine Arts1269950.5DCThe purpose of the Music Theory course is to provide a program of study which allows high school students the opportunity to deepen their understanding of Music Theory. This course will provide the highly motivated music student with educational and musical opportunities beyond the regular performance ensembles for a thorough, rigorous, and challenging course of study. The class will require musical analysis, synthesis and evaluation skills.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/12kFh-koOaO2uq3NttbNe0ZIlHnLn00J_vgb-Rw9tI5s/export?format=pdf
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Music Theory IIFine Arts0.5The purpose of the Music Theory course is to provide a program of study, which allows high school students the opportunity to deepen their understanding of Music Theory. This course will provide the highly motivated music student with educational and musical opportunities beyond the regular performance ensembles for a thorough, rigorous, and challenging course of study. The class will require musical analysis, synthesis and evaluation skills.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/183zFGbCeVavBMiZSc8BhcLZLdBU5VTLhNDEvDba8Q4U/export?format=pdf
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HealthHealth & Physical Education853000.5CACRThe purpose of this course is to help students gain the necessary knowledge to make sound health decisions regarding their personal health and wellness. Instruction may include units covering mental health, heart disease, CPR, cancer and carcinogenic agents, reproduction and sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse, personal health care, and chronic and infectious diseases.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/128YHmIefs42tSL7TbChB5S0b_Vdv6W5d--gkH_u_Ygs/export?format=pdf
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Lifetime FitnessHealth & Physical Education0.5Students in “Lifetime Fitness” will learn concepts and skills to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical activity and fitness. This course will help students recognize the benefits of physical activity and help set personal fitness goals. It is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and desire to pursue physical activity throughout life.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1yfwxHykb8byXCuEhCJWZhmNR23usORDHWaOhD16nOs4/export?format=pdf
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Physical Education IHealth & Physical Education860000.5Students in this course will deal primarily with the concepts and improvement of physical fitness. It is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and desire to pursue physical fitness throughout life. The course will include a variety of lab experiences, lectures, written tests and fitness tests. Of particular importance are the health related aspects of fitness – cardiovascular endurance, strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and body fat composition.
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Physical FitnessHealth & Physical Education860000.5CAStudents in this Physical Fitness will gain an understanding and appreciation of the lifetime need for fitness. Students will participate in group and individual activities to develop all aspects of health related fitness and the proper components of weight training principles. This course uses a combination of traditional assignments and logging exercise hours using wearable fitness trackers.
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Algebra 1AMathematics1.0Co-Taught
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Algebra 1BMathematics1.0Co-Taught
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Algebra IMathematics1158101.0CACRLiveNCAAAlgebra I is organized around the families of functions, with special emphasis on linear and quadratic functions. Students will learn to represent them in multiple ways as verbal descriptions, equations, tables, and graphs. These functions will be applied and used to model real-world situations in order to solve arising problems. Students will also learn data analysis and apply geometric properties in the algebraic realm.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1MhU1XkJxTD4N-oLSbLBnsEWF66FMDRT5A8q7Ikq3m6c/export?format=pdf
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Algebra IIMathematics1158101.0HCACRLiveNCAAAlgebra II continues the study of algebra, the representation of quantities using variables and mathematical operations to show relationships. Students will represent relationships and functions with linear equations and explore relationships of direct and indirect variation. Students will explore quadratic functions and perform operations with complex numbers. Polynomials and their properties will be explored and graphed. Students will explore exponential relationships, logarithmic functions, and probabilities. Students receiving credit for this course cannot also receive math credit for Algebra II Honors.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-jm4mTT9AY-M2NWA630kcQcSZrTtuv_-eoAuBdHf288/export?format=pdf
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AP Calculus ABMathematics1158951.0DCAPNCAAThe mathematics of Calculus is based on the idea of rates of change. Topics include analyzing functions, limits, differentiation, curve sketching, extreme value problems, anti-differentiation, definite integration, areas under curves, and volumes of solids. This course prepares students for the Calculus Advanced Placement Test for college credit.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1FT7AhuFROuhvlF6kyFY0l80NgtHfBa5oJdqe_VsiQuY/export?format=pdf
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AP Calculus BCMathematics1158951.0DCAPNCAAThe mathematics of Calculus BC (Calculus 2) is based on the idea of rates of change and includes the study of functions, differentiation, integration, applications in integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, sequences, series, conic sections, parameterization, and polar coordinates. This course prepares students for the Calculus Advanced Placement Test for college credit. Dual enrollment for college credit may be available. Inquire at your high school.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1cEwTYru1tjFtsYTx6-k14bl07nvF3ixDTI3phL0qZj4/export?format=pdf
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AP Computer Science AMathematics991195DCAPhttps://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1utkr3_HvNVi7Dxnp5r3d9deTTSQedplFslZQa0q7ulo/export?format=pdf
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AP Computer Science PrinciplesMathematics9911951.0APThis is a fast-paced course equivalent to a college introductory programming class. Students will learn about the exciting kinds of problems tackled by computer science while exploring the field’s most important tool—programming. The course will explore systematic problem-solving strategies that can be applied to real-world problems. The focus will be on writing full classes and the logic and structures around building them. Throughout the course, students will study common, reusable algorithms and learn to analyze them for correctness and speed.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1UJFIuDyspz-btHjh2Cu8ZoTsZalh3lXBqSg28c3qxBU/export?format=pdf
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AP StatisticsMathematics1158751.0DCAPNCAAThe AP Statistics course is an excellent option for any student who has successfully completed Algebra II, regardless of the student’s intended college major. This course is not a Calculus-based course. The purpose of AP Statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students may choose to take the AP Exam at the end of the course.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/19ezfKWVSE5gwDP7aOrtT4oS7-IoSNwk-rtuRkxaVdr0/export?format=pdf
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College AlgebraMathematics1158101.0DCNCAAThis course is a standard course in college-level algebra. Topics include (but are not limited to) properties of functions; polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic functions and their graphs; and conic sections. Dual enrollment for college credit may be available.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ExF947SrSZuhrIn_Kz3fRzCqsQ6wIjHUcr8GUN8w79w/export?format=pdf
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Foundations of AlgebraMathematics1158151.0CACRCo-TaughtLiveFoundations of Algebra provides students with the fundamental skills required to be successful in future algebra courses. Students will study concepts of number and operations, algebraic relationships, and probability. Students will learn algebraic concepts including (but not limited to) solving linear equations and graphing. It will prepare students to become critical thinkers. Through mathematics, students not only need to develop skills with numbers, but develop the ability to set up problems, approach problems with a variety of techniques, and understand the underlying mathematical features of such problems.
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GeometryMathematics1158301.0HCALiveNCAAGeometry will require students to explore complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Emphasis is placed on using deductive reasoning in the analysis of topics such as parallel lines, circles, polygon congruence, similarity, area, volume, and probability. Students receiving credit for this course cannot also receive math credit for Geometry Concepts or Geometry Honors.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1E2GJfRDqqqX34SID8PxUAQq3tlkEfLWQ9Lx-oBiWRHc/export?format=pdf
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Introduction to Computer ScienceMathematics9911050.5This course is an introduction to computer programming, intended for the student who is interested in learning to write and interpret JAVA computer programs to solve problems in a structured environment. This course is designed for students who have an interest and ability in mathematics, science, or business. It will cover basic terminology, history, input/output control, decision control, repetition, functions, arrays, and elementary strings.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1RWN5TGHluDOPzr8PKq4Gi4MkO1UxoxRrkXgxPZ4Y1Bo/export?format=pdf
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PrecalculusMathematics1158400.5DCNCAAPrecalculus is a course designed for students who are planning to take Calculus and are interested in a math- or science-related career. Students in this course will study functions, graphing, limits, and other advanced topics. https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1cplaMhNt3QYCkVWwo8Imn6bMAopecxRM_PH_LuyCwOI/export?format=pdf
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Professional MathMathematics1158001.0CACRProfessional math will introduce the applications of mathematics in areas such as cryptography, history, music, weather, architecture, baseball and crime scene analysis. Students in this course are not expected to have especially strong math skills or scientific backgrounds; most calculations will be elementary although advanced material is taught as needed. Students will be exposed to number theory, trigonometry and calculus, group theory, geometry, probability, and mathematical modeling. Concepts will be applied immediately to the problems that motivated them.
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StatisticsMathematics1158751.0NCAAThe Statistics course is an excellent option for any student who has successfully completed Algebra II, regardless of the student’s intended college major. This course is not a Calculus-based course. The purpose of Statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students receiving credit for this course cannot also receive math credit for AP Statistics. https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1keSbu3R4UaH4UdTsdBaCamyNoCZS_D-Zv6WBE8rY0F0/export?format=pdf
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TrigonometryMathematics1158400.5DCNCAATrigonometry is designed for the students who will continue on to Pre-calculus or for the college-bound student. Trigonometric topics include applying properties of the unit circle, utilizing trigonometric identities to solve problems, and graphing trigonometric functions.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1K9z-Rup5cQ05qxqHWEL1SrmcIY26v2bT6AmxhubKv_A/export?format=pdf
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Childhood Development IPractical Arts968211.0CAThis course addresses the concepts related to understanding the areas and stages of child growth and development, recognizing effects of heredity and environment on human growth and development, promoting optimum growth and development in the prenatal, and infancy stages. Careers in child development are explored. Leadership development will be provided through Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) student organization.
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Computer ApplicationsPractical Arts343520.5CAThrough hands on exploration and project-based approach, you will continue to stand out in digital productivity. Colleges and the workplace require skill in Microsoft Office. By using advanced techniques in Microsoft Office, you will create an electronic portfolio and complete the course with the opportunity to earn the Microsoft Office Specialist industry-recognized certification. https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1qnWUsg4dIu0KGHEjoE_wxT7RVMHjrAX_sfnb9fFdGDQ/export?format=pdf
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Digital CommunicationsPractical Arts343920.5CACRThis course is designed to teach students various digital input and manipulation methods. Emphasis is placed on typing personal and business letters and reports. The students will explore proper keyboarding technique, voice and handwriting recognition. Units on file management email and 10-key will also be covered. This class meets the requirements for the Intro to Computer Applications course.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fRh3OOTFYt3cDjuFEMKABI5DAwVKAKJsvqMR7th7wD4/export?format=pdf
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Employment InternshipPractical Arts9963000.5CAThis course will provide students with the opportunity to intern (work) in different job placements. The length of time spent at each job placement usually lasts three to four weeks for a minimum of 1½ to 2 hours per day. A minimum of 20-30 hours of employment exploration is required from each employer. Days are set aside for contact with the program coordinator to review and discuss career exploration experiences. Students must be 17 and provide their own transportation. Work experience in the internship program is generally on a non- paid basis. The student must maintain medical insurance at his/her parents’ expense during this class. Businesses/Organizations will not provide workers compensation, general liability, or professional liability insurance coverage for the student during the non-paid internship period.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/14D7BVIZst2mZBo0rC1j569XQtSi7ZESXR5WptESvNgM/export?format=pdf
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FACS InternshipPractical Arts968370.5Students will have the opportunity to explore a FACS related career through on-site learning experiences. This course is designed for students with an interest in one of the following areas: child development; fashion merchandising; clothing construction; family studies; foods and nutrition; culinary arts; house and interior design. Students will develop an awareness of career-related responsibilities and will have the opportunity to apply skills gained through high school education as they work on-site with an approved site supervisor. Students must provide their own transportation.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1SrdPPDboPXjP5gp00bCjJiSmh44tfnLOARhP8ru-kDI/export?format=pdf
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Financial AccountingPractical Arts343101.0Are you thinking of majoring in business or marketing in college? Do you plan to own your own business? If so, you will need to have an understanding of the accounting process, so why not get a step ahead while you are in high school? This course is designed to build a basic understanding of manual and automated accounting principles, concepts, and procedures which are necessary for businesses to make financial decisions. Students will develop business skills such as: creating and developing spreadsheets, 10-key operation, financial problem solving, professional accounting software, and basic business principles.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1DiOBc5ug8RVZ3F5h5bc5_toTiEjr5b9iVgdaaO57E4w/export?format=pdf
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Personal FinancePractical Arts9964000.5CACRDCPersonal Finance is designed to help students apply decision-making skills to earning and spending an income, establishing and enhancing savings and investments, insurance, using credit, and managing money. Three hours of free college credit is available through the OTC articulation agreement.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1VVe5uPzP1u0cL8MMo8xK3Ehwc0kGEpjm76pHHSIo8k0/export?format=pdf
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Web DesignPractical Arts343930.5This course will focus on website planning, basic design, layout, and construction. Other topics include evaluation of websites, image editing, and animation. Students will learn basic HTML structure and formatting and use the Adobe Web Design Premium software suite including Dreamweaver, Fireworks, Photoshop, and Flash.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/16L3CAoQGnMHwum3v7Ids4DetmsPwo-vYDZOj_jqA6wQ/export?format=pdf
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AP PhysicsSciences1350951.0DCAPNCAAAP Physics B is a national algebra/trigonometry based course in physics. The syllabus for this course is equivalent to introductory physics courses for university students. The emphasis is on understanding the concepts and skills using laboratory investigation and formulae to solve problems. Laboratory work is an integral part of this course. In this course students will investigate kinematics, Newton’s laws, torque, rotational motion and angular momentum, gravitation, circular motion, work, energy, power, linear momentum, mechanical waves and sound, and electric circuits. This course is designed for college bound students interested in pursuing a science related field. Dual credit may be available. Students will be qualified to sit for the AP Physics 1 examination.
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AstronomySciences1338101.0CANCAAThis course is a multidisciplinary, laboratory based course which examines the structure and composition of the planets, stars, galaxies, and the universe. The topics will include, but are not limited to, observing the night sky, planetary features, planetary motions, the sun, stars, galaxies, and the universe.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1D0nEXyiPl71m-B7cs70WQpiwJqtC0od5G-BTotM4gVg/export?format=pdf
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ChemistrySciences1346001.0HCRNCAAChemistry is a non-weighted course that involves the analysis of chemical concepts and the application of basic algebraic skills. This is an NCAA approved college preparatory course but is not eligible for Dual Credit. It is not as math intensive as Honors Chemistry but does include more mathematical problem solving and independent practice than Introductory Chemistry. Laboratory work is an important part of this course. Students receiving credit for this course cannot also receive credit for Introductory Chemistry or Honors Chemistry.
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Earth ScienceSciences1338001.0HCACRCo-TaughtLiveNCAAThis is a laboratory course that integrates the study of the earth and our physical world and builds upon those concepts introduced in middle school science courses. The study of the earth will include an introduction to the science of the earth; properties and processes of its surface and interior including plate tectonics, volcanism, earthquakes, glaciation, mountain building, formation of rocks, minerals, and the structural basis of landforms, its history and our place in the universe. A study of atmospheric processes and weather elements will also be a part of this course.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/11-kP2IpeNKNUICetm1jnwzhcI0eMbTiDY9o2k2JpVww/export?format=pdf
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General BiologySciences1342001.0HCRLiveNCAAThis course provides an overview of the processes of living things, from a cellular level to the biosphere. It is a valuable course for any student, especially those requiring a general knowledge of biology for postsecondary study or careers in the fields of health or environmental sciences. Laboratory activities integrating scientific investigation and process skills make up an important component of this course. Students receiving credit for this course cannot also receive credit for Introductory Biology or General Biology Honors.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-qMJgMm1mcOrmPlke4HAfybCieDzJOkxcegxqcVMsR8/export?format=pdf
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Introductory BiologySciences1342001.0CACRCo-TaughtLiveThis course provides an overview of the processes of living things, from a cellular level to the biosphere. It is a valuable course for any student, especially those requiring a general knowledge of biology for postsecondary study or careers in the fields of health or environmental sciences. Laboratory activities integrating scientific investigation and process skills make up an important component of this course. Students receiving credit for this course cannot also receive credit for General Biology or General Biology Honors.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-qMJgMm1mcOrmPlke4HAfybCieDzJOkxcegxqcVMsR8/export?format=pdf
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Introductory ChemistrySciences1346001.0CRThis course provides students an opportunity to discover what chemistry is about without moving into highly theoretical and mathematical studies. Laboratory investigations will be included. Many of the basic concepts of chemistry will be investigated, including the structure of matter and the application of chemistry to the environment and to society. This course has less independent preparation outside of class and is not accepted by NCAA as a science course.
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Physical ScienceSciences1350101.0HCACRCo-TaughtLiveNCAAPhysical science is the study of the physical world around you. Physical science can be broken up into two branches, chemistry and physics.

· Chemistry: the study of the structure and properties of matter.
· Physics: the study of the relationship between matter and energy.

The class provides an introduction to basic chemistry and basic physics. Topics covered are matter and its interactions, forces and interactions, energy, and waves and their applications. Students will participate in application of these concepts through virtual labs, projects, and writing assignments.
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American Baseball HistorySocial Studies1566900.5NCAAThis course surveys and interprets the history of baseball in the United States. Major topics studied are “Origins of Sport”, “Professionalism and the National Pastime”, “Troubles of Big Business”, “Baseball and America from the Progressive Era through the 1920s”, “Baseball, the Great Depression, and World War II”, “Baseball and the African American Experience,” “Baseball and Post War America: 1950s-1960s,” and “Baseball and America in the 1970s and 1980s.” The course deals with both the role and significance of baseball in American society over the past 150 years and with the history of the game itself.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Xz88Cx1bHEMq019ahQxaHLObkhuSGTj0cmrY5ahEMH4/export?format=pdf
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American Civil WarSocial Studies1566910.5NCAAThis course covers the American Civil War era from the earliest seeds of disunion at the Constitutional Convention to the end of Reconstruction. Particular attention will be given to events that unfolded in Missouri, the Ozarks, and the Trans-Mississippi Theater and their subsequent results. The strands of the K-12 Social Studies Curriculum, economics, government, geography, multicultural and current perspectives and citizenship will be utilized to understand this period of history. https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1H21275sKy5RW2CeqFJUi-_E6eebiUOlEKX3IRYOXE5E/export?format=pdf
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AP European HistorySocial Studies1566951.0APNCAAThe AP course in European History is intended for qualified students who wish to complete classes in secondary school equivalent to college introductory courses in European history and corresponds to the most recent developments in history curricula at the undergraduate level. In colleges and universities, European history is increasingly seen in a broad perspective, with teaching methods reflecting an awareness of other disciplines and diverse techniques of presentations, including visual and statistical materials. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals of AP European History are to develop (a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history, (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and (c) an ability to express historical understanding in writing https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1KzlNUIRE3Y6ehRpsi0OY1slZOQCx_gLK6at1GZ-PGW8/export?format=pdf
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AP PsychologySocial Studies1561951.0DCAPNCAAThe AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology and learn about the ethical considerations and methods psychologist use in the science and practice. Students will gain an understanding of the strength and limitations of various psychological approaches and research methods. This course is designed to mirror an entry-level college course and students are expected to read and write extensively as well as evaluate and perform psychological experiments when applicable.
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AP US Gov. & PoliticsSocial Studies1567951.0DCAPNCAAAP United States Government and Politics introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning assess causes and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence-based arguments.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1aC8VJoLQ6OHR4f4lOxcxX43K_RxsFL1oVYfm_eElpIU/export?format=pdf
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AP US HistorySocial Studies1562951.0DCAPNCAAThe AP U.S. History course is designed to provide you with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. History. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. You will learn to assess historical materials – their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance – and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/11jkBv0MpsFd-FhaTs0AyTm5aVPa9xjMK_bp03pRRCX8/export?format=pdf
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Black HistorySocial Studies
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EconomicsSocial Studies1566300.5NCAAThis course presents the philosophy and principles of economic concepts. It consists of a study of the nature and method of economics; opportunity cost; business organization, supply and demand; the market system and competitive enterprise; money, banking and monetary policy; resource allocation; and international economics. This course is designed to cross subject area lines when appropriate in order to give the student a broad view of concepts under investigation. This is a weighted course. Students will be expected to complete assignments outside of class time on a regular basis. Students will be expected to complete projects that must include the elements of research, exploration and evaluation. All students in this course are expected to read extensively, think critically and write lucidly. https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1IltJtiPZH5KNTZhaR1--EklzmUBh-jCzQ3hJisjAuuk/export?format=pdf
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Liberty & Law (Gov.)Social Studies1566510.5HCACRCo-TaughtLiveNCAAThis course is designed to be the culminating experience in the student’s required social studies program bringing together and expanding the knowledge from prior study of the following areas: citizenship, Current events, multicultural perspectives, history, geography, economics, and government. The students will be expected to demonstrate, through examination, understanding the basic provisions and principles of The Constitutions of the United States and of the State of Missouri as prescribed by state statute.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1AAUxlcKzoLuY49Z94ShLuwH9GqTBcOLU6T4WOe_7d7c/export?format=pdf
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Psych. of the HolocaustSocial Studies1561001.0NCAAThe unique historic events that have come to be known as the Holocaust will be used as a vehicle to analyze and explore psychological concepts such as attitude formation, personality development, discrimination, the bystander effect, learned behavior, motivation and multiple aspects of both individual and group behavior. This course will examine how diverse forms of individual and social behavior can exist in the midst of a dysfunctional social order like that of Germany prior to and during the Holocaust, as well as explore other acts of genocide.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1WxpTdoSn8gz_QIL28m_zQ512srS2D7nIF8HjukHc7P4/export?format=pdf
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PsychologySocial Studies1561000.5CACRNCAAThis psychology survey course is designed to help each student gain insight into human behavior. Through this course students will be introduced to the content, terminology, methodology, and application of the discipline. Students will also identify 0 Current events and issues in psychology on a regular basis.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/18E6PgQb635OifIveTW6GXW7X66aYVjSxF7aYcbCHnz8/export?format=pdf
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SociologySocial Studies1566700.5HNCAAThis sociology survey course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of how societies are formed and how they function. Sociology is a study of people in group relationships and integrates all the disciplines of social movement. This course addresses values, norms, culture, socialization, social stratification and social institutions. It may also include consideration of social problems such as crime, poverty, prejudice and discrimination, collective behavior and social movements.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1efM9SarD5vIQ3cfZUehiysxzJy-TDZa1_FT0gxSart8/export?format=pdf
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US HistorySocial Studies1566611.0HCACRCo-TaughtLiveNCAAThis United States History course, required of all students, is a survey of U.S. history since Reconstruction. The course will examine and evaluate matters relating to the student’s role as a citizen in an ever changing, multicultural world and focus on the social, political, economic, and military events which had a major impact on shaping the United States as it is today. https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1GV7bRrcAaffRLzj9bLfBAFx-joZooxXj1nJoKO_Dam8/export?format=pdf
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World GeographySocial Studies1566400.5CACRCo-TaughtLiveNCAAThis course is a study of people, places and environment from a physical and cultural perspective. Through a variety of classroom activities, students will gain an appreciation and understanding of the interdependent world in which they live. Students will analyze and evaluate the connection between their local and global communities. The course will emphasize the practical and responsible application of geography to life situations.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1lmvhU4Ts3xXiAfx4e-N1CvKMjaszUKQXNwa1gHFAynQ/export?format=pdf
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World HistorySocial Studies1566631.0HCACRNCAAThis course is a survey of world history and cultures with an emphasis on the Modern Era from Renaissance to the present. The focus of the course is the major ideas, people and events from the eastern and western hemispheres which have shaped our world today. Major themes include but are not limited to Global Exchange, Age of Discovery, Renaissance and Reformation, the Age of Revolution, and how they have impacted the Modern Era. Students will be given the opportunity to become involved in rigorous learning and writing requiring critical thinking activities, research, making inferences, generalizing and drawing conclusions.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1XTsQaOPM9FXBBaFhcNEYEdg7EsEaPclcFh4_QQA-LJc/export?format=pdf
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French IWorld Languages649001.0NCAAIn French I, the student begins to understand, speak, read and write French. Conversational skills using the present tense and practical vocabulary are emphasized. Students also begin to study the culture of French-speaking peoples. https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ryCPckvlz3b0HGP5LVwzFT6mjOrzhyTK4p2GoNv-kds/export?format=pdf
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French IIWorld Languages649001.0NCAAFrench II builds on the first-level course. Students increase their vocabulary, are introduced to the past tense, and improve conversational, reading, and writing skills. Students continue to study the culture of French-speaking peoples.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1pC6P6cB-krT6A87m7hipCaVEdsySqg0j4oUuJ9cDfLE/export?format=pdf
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French IIIWorld Languages649001.0DCNCAAIn French III, students continue to develop skills in speaking, listening and writing French. At this level there is increased emphasis on vocabulary development, oral proficiency, expression in past and various other tenses. Students continue to expand knowledge of the culture of language-speaking peoples.
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French IVWorld Languages649001.0DCNCAAIn French IV, students concentrate on more proficient communication in French. Students and teachers communicate more in French in order to refine the skills of speaking, auditory and reading comprehension, and composition. Students apply previously learned verb tenses and are introduced to the remaining tenses and moods in the verb system. Units of study include more authentic readings and discussion of culture and personal opinions.
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German IWorld Languages651001.0NCAAIn German I, students will acquire an elementary ability to listen, speak, read, and write the German language. This course emphasizes the skills needed for useful daily communication, e.g. making friends, expressing ones needs and preferences, seeking and giving directions, etc. Along with learning the language, students will also be introduced to German culture.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1JOgt_BmXll1p_8WEGN4ZTGiIUire5Vnn72wVFB9oIGg/export?format=pdf
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German IIWorld Languages651001.0NCAAIn German II, students will acquire an elementary ability to listen, speak, read, and write the German language. This course emphasizes the skills needed for useful daily communication, e.g. making friends, expressing ones needs and preferences, seeking and giving directions, etc. Along with learning the language, students will also be introduced to German culture.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1RI6RxnMe7p87HsRrbGF7CaZA9JeL9r28ukoW7hR8yxw/export?format=pdf
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Japanese IWorld Languages680001.0NCAAIn Japanese I, the student begins to understand, speak, read and write Japanese. Conversational skills using the present tense and practical vocabulary are emphasized. Students also begin to study the culture of Japanese-speaking peopleshttps://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1UA1G-dNeqcRh0IexDnKzjAaxbARL_td9VPfZPzKrUGU/export?format=pdf
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Japanese IIWorld Languages680001.0NCAAJapanese II builds on the first-level course. Students increase their vocabulary, are introduced to the past tense, and improve conversational, reading, and writing skills. Students continue to study the culture of Japanese-speaking peoples.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1t6M4teodty41-jUE2MUU2X1urwh3TL1jNnCpi1Avx7s/export?format=pdf
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Spanish IWorld Languages663001.0NCAAIn Spanish I the student begins to understand, speak, read, and write Spanish. Conversational skills using the present tense and practical vocabulary are emphasized. Students also begin to study the culture of Spanish-speaking peoples.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1BBdQ0u2CzN2X8Xo8GwAJFPxOJcWmvZZKoglGRzJ3eGA/export?format=pdf
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Spanish IIWorld Languages663001.0NCAASpanish II builds on the first-level course. Students increase their vocabulary, continue to use and develop the present tense and infinitive verb constructions, and improve conversational, reading, and writing skills. Students continue to study the culture of Spanish-speaking peoples.https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Eo5nqVDOuw3acxD4RxJcXuMr9fpTsg1yJ0VY8CLM_tI/export?format=pdf
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Spanish IIIWorld Languages663001.0DCNCAAStudents in Spanish III continue to develop skills in speaking, listening, and writing Spanish. At this level there is increased emphasis on vocabulary development, oral proficiency, expression in the past tenses and various other tenses. Students continue to expand knowledge of the culture of Spanish-speaking peoples.
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