NNSTOY COVID-19 Resource List
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Online resourcesStrategiesArticlesConsiderationsWhat are the conversations like right now in your schools and districts?
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Curated by members of the National Network for State Teachers of the Year (NNSTOY) www.NNSTOY.org @nnstoy
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The National Network of State Teachers of the Year (NNSTOY) is an organization of State Teachers of the Year, National Teachers of the Year, and Finalists for State Teacher of the Year who are deeply committed to ensuring that every child in America gets the high quality education they deserve. NNSTOY connects, supports, and mobilizes our members and other expert educators to take on leadership roles in order to advocate for this nation’s most at-risk students. And at this crucial moment in public education, with many schools and districts closing due to COVID-19, our members mobilized to create this list of resources to assist teachers and students.
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This guide, which walks educators through how to engage students and apply pedagogy using Zoom videoconferencingMaking leaning meaningful while at home-not just busyworkNPR's Coronavirus Comic for KidsSend the survey to parents and care givers so you can figure out what works for them! And what a time for independent research projects, getting kids outside, service projects, etc.We received a phone call from the high school that they are sending home any students who have any cold symptoms. All large gatherings cancelled.
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Nearpod is a great tool for online teaching and can be used synchronously or asynchronously Perhaps, ways that teachers can connect to share ideas for how they're managing online learning at scale.School and the Coronavirus: What You Should Know by NEAIt will be important to think about how teachers can provide at-home learning activities to students who may not have the same access to devices/internet.We have received a letter from the Superintendent about how to stay healthy. (Washing hands, not touch face...)
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I'm also looking at resources in Actively Learn and ways to create discussion boards (Padlet, FlipGrid, etc.)Online forums that are easily accessible for students.How to Prepare for the CoronovirusI'm an English teacher, so most of my goals are to help foster active reading, critical thinking, and discussion opportunities while away.Other than the press release from the state one week ago, no conversation is taking place. I am discussing information with my students in the context of my class.
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Online platforms for hosting live classes (Zoom, for example). Teaching online in a way that makes kids WANT to engage in their learning. I want to ensure I am avoiding "busy work". I love the idea of using this time as an opportunity to connect with classrooms around the nation!Resources for Teaching Online Due to School Closures by Kathleen Morris Ideas for populations with limited internet connectivity.Potential closing and online instruction using Google Classroom
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Wonderopolis, TedED, NASA site & APOD (Astonomy Picture of the Day), Smithsonian, Flocabulary, Writing prompts at -- https://writingprompts.tumblr.com/, https://www.loc.gov/ (Library of Congress), National History Day activities, Khan Academy
https://www.khanacademy.org/, ITUNES University
https://apps.apple.com/us/app/itunes-u/id490217893, Google Books, soapbox, Google hangouts, padlet,
Teaching students how to access online tools, upload assignments, collaborate online.The Best Advice for Teaching Online if We Have To (Because of the Coronavirus) by Larry FerlazzoHow to get technology to those who don't have it , internet access The district has a policy of "Spread Facts, Not Germs", and have resources to videos and best practices for COVID-19. There is no discussion of closing schools.
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https://wistia.com/soapboxE-learning is easy for an English teacher since I could post an article, poem, etc online and have students complete an online discussion. A friend of mine is teaching math in Asia and is on week 5 of virtual math instruction. He uses screencasts but reports that students are becoming restless.Resources for Households from CDCThinking of students that don't have internet access and checking with local libraries, nd internet providers about how to get them access to free hotspots. Also a discussion about parking lot hot spots where people can use them from their cars.I work at a university, so far, the university system has canceled international trips for students. Newsletters have been sent out to parents from the school districts to parents to ensure that the district is on top of the situation and keeping in contact with necessary health organizations.
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Links to video chat platforms that are user friendly; Google Drive or Office 365 resourcesscreencasts. Zoom meetings. Written reflections and discussions. I have used a strategy for make-up work that I call photobooth seminar where students use their computer or phone camera and post a video of them talking about their thoughts on a book as if they are talking to their classmates.Wuhan Kids Disable App That Allows Them to Do Schoolwork While Quarantined by Scary MommyRight now, we are conducting school as normal. We have no nearby confirmed cases of Coronavirus. Our district has emailed that should school be closed, K-5 will be mailed packets to work on, and 6-12 will have online assignments.We haven't closed, but there is a lot of conversation around it, especially since we are in close proximity (adjacent county) to the outbreaks in NC.
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I just heard today that XM Satellite Radio has a free channel in conjunction with New York University and doctors from New York to give real time updates an the latest facts about the virus... here's a link: https://blog.siriusxm.com/doctor-radio-nyu-langone-health-launch-24-7-public-service-channel-hotline-for-coronavirus/Outside service projects. Picking up trash on school grounds and parks. Preparing seed beds for planting community gardens.What's at Stake When Schools Close For Coronavirus: A Bioethesist Weighs In from Education WeekThoughts about levels of accountability to which students can be held.We sent out a letter to parents. It said we're disinfecting. I literally never smell disinfectant anywhere in our school.
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Mystery Science- Elementary- has online platform. There is also platform that they can download resources if they don't have internet.Lessons or activities that can be done by students independently, with and without the internet. AFT Resources on the CoronavirusWe are making plans for how we will have a potential 2 weeks of lessons to be delivered at home, with the added challenge that not all students have internet access. I have one student who is now being kept at home as a precautionary measure for his own health, so I will be figuring out how to teach him.Providing accurate information on infection protection and the spread of COVID19; 3 schools closed
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https://newsela.com/I’m now a technologist at the district level and I just left a meeting on this same issue. We identified potential online-based systems that we would build from and use for implementation, and settled on Nearpod as the best solution for us. With distance learning, one of the neatest things that you can do is host virtual visits with other educators or professionals. I think Facebook would be a great way to reach out and cast a wide net to find folks to make some virtual “classroom visits” during times like these.TESOL Coronavirus Resources by the TESOL International AssociationHow to reach the students who don't have support from parents to access and understand lessons at home. We are a small rural district in a small rural state. We also currently have distance from any of the areas that have been impacted thus far. However, forward thinking teachers and administrators are beginning to think about what things might look like if the coronavirus outbreak continues to grow.
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@WeVideo
@DiscoveryEd
@brainpop
@GetKahoot
@try_pronto
@BookCreatorApp
@GoogleForEdu Hangout Meet
@gotynker
@Buncee
@PearDeck
@Nearpod
We’ve been doing a lot of videos of ourselves teaching and then putting up videos on YouTube or using tools like EdPuzzle to build in formative assessments that we can use to see what kids thought while they were viewingRemote Learning from ReadWorksOne big thing we (Italy/DoDEA, currently doing virtual schooling due to coronavirus) have been dealing with is the fact that if families have multiple kids at home, they may have to share a computer with siblings.Conversations are mostly happening at upper administrative levels. Lots of anxiety among teachers as we face an uncertain teaching landscape.
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Quizziz is great because you can assign a quiz and it’s graded for you but it comes off as a game like experience.One really cool thing I’ve seen on Facebook that I think has made a difference for our community is live streaming of events. Our base has had virtual Sunday services and our base librarian live streams herself reading books. If you miss them, you can still watch later but it allows people to connect with others in their community even if they can’t be in the same room together. Our admin also still does our daily bulletin every day. As a parent and a teacher, I’ve really appreciated some of these small things for keeping both my own kids’ and my students’ routines somewhat normal.This Twitter thread on tips for parents working at homeWhile this situation is obviously super unfortunate, everyone keeps commenting on how this has actually been really great PD. It’s been amazing to watch colleagues learn new things, select technology with intention, and help one another use new tools in response to specific instructional needs. Lots of people who are less comfortable with technology have found an unofficial buddy to help them with the tech part, so even just addressing the need to have a culture of mutual support would probably be helpful.We have plans in place for working from home as well as evaluating the necessity of all upcoming field trips. People are remaining calm.
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Zoom (we have a district account), Google Hangouts, Facebook Live Streaming, Closed Facebook Classroom Pages, Google Classroom, SeeSaw and FlipGrid. Logistically speaking we meet twice weekly with our classes on Google Meet and everything else is remote at the MS level, though I spend all day troubleshooting via email, grading, and available to check in with kids on Meet as needed. My daughter has about 45 minutes daily with her kindergarten teacher. I was amazed but it’s possible to do most of their morning routine virtually. The kids just press ‘X’ if they want to raise their hand and then unmute when called on. The first week was super stressful and the technology was a mess but we’re starting week three and the kids are doing remarkably well.Curated docs from the US DOE and federal government from the CCSSOI have seen some districts offering hotspots to deal with lack of internet accessOur district is focusing on thoroughly cleaning the building every day. No talk of canceling school.
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We are considering a survey to find out who does not have internet access at home as we will mail home packets perhaps of information.Making the Transition to a Virtual Classroom by EDCI’m super curious about what it looks like for young children, and for children who don’t have access to technology.Qashing hands, planning for two weeks off just in case
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I am putting together a "go to" list of applications and resources for teachers as we plan for this in my HS. Here are the major sources we are hoping to lean on to promote asynchronous instruction... Flipgrid, Edpuzzle, YouTube, CK-12 Foundation, Pear Deck, Quizizz, Learn360, All via Google Classroom integration. (And I echo the idea that this is a really great example of intentional technology integration professional learning!)I teach art in Italy and we are on week 3 of virtual school. As for shutdowns, this has gone surprisingly well all things considered. Being tech savvy is key. We have been very dependent on Google Apps, Schoology, and now Google Classroom. Those that aren't familiar with these platforms are hurting and need a lot of support. Google Forms has been my friend - it allows me to collect student work in an organized fashion- which is important because I could have as many as 600 responses to a single assignment. So, while you're still in session, get people trained on Google Docs, forms, meet, slides, and sheets. Also decide on the structure so that it's easy for parents to access. Also, make sure everyone knows how to hyperlink and how to adjust sharing settings on google Apps. That has been a major sticking point- people will think they've shared something, but the permissions aren't set correctly.Transitioning to Online Learning: Pro Tips on What You Need to Know from ASCDI know the American Academy of Pediatrics had said an hour of high quality screen time for 2-5 year oldsMonitoring, canceled a trip to a theater.
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https://blog.kamiapp.com/remote-learning-with-kami-during-school-shutdowns/?fbclid=IwAR1J4gy0B_uTmiWnKP-7E3VcFBQ_PkpZPNJfcpXMzDMWUNso5EPhLFh7xfgCheck out our school's web pages. If you go to EU South Digital Learning it will give you links to all the school's pages.Tips for Talking to Kids about Coronavirus from Harvard GSEWe’re having a lot of conversations about equity/access. Even if kids have devices at home, that doesn’t mean they have Internet access. Even if they have a smart phone, it doesn’t mean they have a data plan that would allow them to fully participate in some sort of online or distance-learning. We are also having serious conversations about how to feed kids that get free breakfast and lunch every day in our schools. Also, it is unclear with current state law as to whether or not online learning days would count towards the state required number of days (180 in CT) and if not, we have to make them all up anyway... and if that’s the case, then it violates our contracts to work from home AND then have to make up the time. It’s quite complicated.Currently, we are wondering about the existence of an action plan.
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https://www.allsides.com/unbiased-balanced-newsI teach art in Italy and we are on week 3 of virtual school. As for shutdowns, this has gone surprisingly well all things considered. Being tech savvy is key. We have been very dependent on Google Apps, Schoology, and now Google Classroom. Those that aren't familiar with these platforms are hurting and need a lot of support. Google Forms has been my friend - it allows me to collect student work in an organized fashion- which is important because I could have as many as 600 responses to a single assignment. So, while you're still in session, get people trained on Google Docs, forms, meet, slides, and sheets. Also decide on the structure so that it's easy for parents to access. Also, make sure everyone knows how to hyperlink and how to adjust sharing settings on google Apps. That has been a major sticking point- people will think they've shared something, but the permissions aren't set correctly.
Check out our school's web pages. If you go to EU South Digital Learning it will give you links to all the school's pages.
We have been working from school without students, but I anticipate that's going to change soon.
I have been making videos for my students. You can find them in the lesson plans in Vicenza Elementary school, specials, art.
For the next few weeks I plan to set up a web page with links to YouTube tutorials for drawing, origami, paper weaving, and basic sewing. Children can choose a tutorial video link, try it out, then post a response and photo of their work via Google Forms. There's no way of knowing what materials they have at home, so I want to make simple drawing one option, but I want to present more complex options too so that they're not just drawing for 2 months...
https://www.dodea.edu/VicenzaES/
Caring for Preschoolers at Home from Harvard GSEToday I met with our cafeteria person and we talked about the possibility of putting together food boxes for qualifying families, using my NHS kids to pack/deliver/do whatever they need. We sent out a survey today to families asking about internet service to get a better idea of what our students have for availability. I talked with Angelica Jordan in Italy yesterday and compiled all of her amazing hints/tips and sent it to my tech integrator who handed it out at the admin team yesterday. Inequity is a huge issue in our rural state, but we also live in an area that is riddled with drug addiction and a lot of our students are being raised by their grandparents. I'm not worried about my kids getting sick. I'm worried about them bringing it home to their grandparents, their parents in chemo, and their immunocompromised family members.Well, as we were just declared in a state of emergency yesterday, I'm a bit perplexed that we have had no conversations within my school (or district) about COVID19, beyond our school nurse sending out updates and reminding everyone to wash their hands frequently, and our health teacher emailing staff to remind students to cough and/or sneeze into their elbow. However, I was told my principal is attending a meeting today where that is to be discussed, so perhaps we'll get some information from administration in the next day or two.
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https://educators.brainpop.com/2020/02/19/free-brainpop-access-for-schools-affected-by-the-corona-virus/We have been working from school without students, but I anticipate that's going to change soon.Coronavirus is not related to race. The superintendent actually had to send that email to students and families because of calls he was getting about "you need to quarantine certain people." We haven't started talking about e-learning days yet, but all teachers in my district have gone through e-learning training to prepare for snow days.
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This sheet has a list of companies offering free educational resources/platforms due to Coronavirus: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1NUKLZN7hGSu1Hzm70kfzBKs-lsSELaEMggS60Bi2O2I/htmlview?usp=sharing&fbclid=IwAR2ZRtH1HtJNUrUZV19HLCpNJ6V_Jwpz7PyiUsSG2jfSqudZWE1sk6J3SnU&sle=trueWe’ve been doing a lot of thinking about this. One thing to keep in mind is that while not all students have tech at home, most have a cell phone. Set up conference call numbers for each teacher. Send home an emergency kit now with lists of online resources for older kids to access via phone and these plus paper packets and books for youngers. Include a schedule of times when each teacher will be available by phone. For younger, Ms. Jones will read a story with discussion each day at 2; she will do a one-hour math lesson each day at 11, etc.
The issue of feeding students is an important one too. What can districts do with funding from in-school programs to provide weekly boxes of non-perishable food to students?
Facebook can set up closed group pages for each class where teachers can leave assignments, hold group chats, etc.
Supporting One Another in a Time of Crisis from Harvard GSEDiscounted WIFI for low-income families through ComcastGood information. Steps for prevention.
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Coding activities
1. Make sure teachers know how to use digital resources. Have them practice face-to-face with kids and make sure any digital textbooks, etc. have working passwords ahead of time. For us, that would mean making sure everyone knows how to use Google Classroom (that is what they are using as well). I can tell you right now that not everybody in our building does.

2. Management of time. On the first day of learning, Angelica's teachers all held Google Meets at the same time and they couldn't attend to everything. Then things got moved. Her boys ended up being on their computers for 12 straight hours. Her school has instituted a "you-have-your-regularly-scheduled-time" approach. Teachers can run sessions only during their regularly scheduled bell time. Most teachers run two synchronous sessions a week and three collaborative work times.

3. IEPs/504s. Make sure you know them and have access to them from home and that you continue to find ways to modify and differentiate from home.

4. The DOD created a one-stop-shop in less than 3 days. One website that takes parents and students to all teacher classrooms and resources so that they aren't juggling it. She says this has been amazing for parents.

5. Daily lesson templates for all teachers have been implemented. On them, they put: 1. Their I Can Statement, their Lesson Tasks, their Assignments to Be Submitted (and how), their Due Date. Nothing more, nothing less, and the consistency from teacher to teacher plan books helps parents see what their child needs to do.
To be ready, plan of action, keeping schools germ free.
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Craft activities: Buggy and BuddySkype-A-Scientist sign-upRestrained, yet apprehensive
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The JFK Moonshot At home learning checklists from member Melody AraboSo far, we are simply reminding staff and students to cover their mouth with the back of their arms when they cough or sneeze, to wash their hands with soap and water, to use hand sanitizer, and to use disinfectants on their tables and other hard surfaces as necessary. Additionally, we're imploring folks to keep their hands/fingers out of their mouths, eyes, and nose.
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STEM Kits for PTO Nights (That could easily be adapted to activities for families to do at home)VIrtual Field Trips!Talking about how to prepare 2 weeks worth of at home lessons / technology concerns
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Interactive Simulations in Math and ScienceFamous Authors Doing Real Time Interactive Read Alouds!Preparing for possible closure of school and how to service students with special needs should this occur
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Mystey Science Planning for School ClosuresHomemade InstrumentsHow to prepare for closures, how to provide electronic education to not have to make up lost days
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Building Big (Engineering through PBS)Prevention- washing hands, updates of number of confirmed cases
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Library of Congess: History of American BuildingsRight now our school is not close to any active cases. So we are being proactive. Disinfecting and washing even more than before. Teachers are concerned that schools will close if the virus spreads close to us and are wondering what that would look like for elementary students.
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AFT's Share My Lesson Coronavirus ResourcesJust waiting for WHEN we are off - no one knows if we will be able to do cyber classes.
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Scholastic Learn at Home Right now, we are conducting school as normal. We have no nearby confirmed cases of Coronavirus. Our district has emailed that should school be closed, K-5 will be mailed packets to work on, and 6-12 will have online assignments.
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Facebook for Educator's One Pager on Learning at HomeMuted. Some concerns over school closing in other parts of the state - 200 miles away.
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E-Learning Resources from Kappa Delta PiWe are making plans for how we will have a potential 2 weeks of lessons to be delivered at home, with the added challenge that not all students have internet access. I have one student who is now being kept at home as a precautionary measure for his own health, so I will be figuring out how to teach him.
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Lunch Doodles with Mo Willems from the Kennedy CenterOur district and building are planning on the state shutting us down for two weeks. Our school board will not make the call, but will wait for the state to make the call. The district is planning on both student and teacher expectations for online learning during that period.
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Free student leadership resources at Lead4ChangePreparations for elearning
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Understanding Covid-19 Resources from NNSTOY member/librarian/teacher leader Angie MillerSuperintendents around state talking but not quickly enough. Field trips cancelled. What to do about lunches and breakfast. Will hourly workers be paid? Not equity with technology.
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Free Educational Resources from TERC
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18 Best Resources for Kids in Elementary, Middle, and High School from We are Teachers
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Caregiver Math Resources from Lesley University
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100 Activities to Do at Home During School Closures
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Play at Home Guide from Playworks
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Education Reimagined's Distance Learning Resource Center
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Fordham Institute's Resource Guide
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