2016-2019 UNPS Utah Rare Plant Master List
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NumCronquist FamilyAPG/PPG FamilyUtah Flora FamilyTaxonFNA/otherAlternate Taxonomic NameNatureServeESA rank/dateBLM/FS sensitive?UT-DISTRangeHabitat Spec# Indiv# PopsIntrins RarityThreatTrendMin ScorePot ScorePriorityScored ByScoreDateConfidenceCommentsNew CommentsComments ByDateBEAVBOXECACHCARBDAGGDAVIDUCHEMERGARFGRANIRONJUABKANEMILLMORGPIUTRICHSALTSANJSANPSEVISUMMTOOEUINTUTAHWASAWASHWAYNWEBEDistribution elsewhere:bonap_search_dateConsotium_Intermountain_herbaria_datea_utah_flora_search_date
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AspleniaceaeAspleniaceaePolypodiaceaeAsplenium adiantum-nigrumAsplenium adiantum-nigrumDisj111100unk45MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008x
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59AspleniaceaeCystopteridaceaePolypodiaceaeCystopteris bulbifera Cystopteris bulbifera Disj11110unkunk46WatchUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008The Salt Lake County record is questionable and repeated searches of the few suitable habitats have failed to locate this species [Windham, Mar 2015]. A "?" has replaced the "x" for Salt Lake County. UT-Dist changed from "peripheral" to "disjunct" by Windham. These changes do not re-rank this taxon.Alexander & M. WindhamJul 2015?xx
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60AspleniaceaeCystopteridaceaePolypodiaceaeGymnocarpium dryopterisGymnocarpium dryopterisG. dryopteris is an allotetraploid hybrid between the Pacific NW diploid G. disjunctum and the eastern US diploid G. appalachianumDisj111101unk56WatchUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Only 1 specimen at BRY have been collected. It has been found in the Tushar Mountains in Piute County (Taye 4014, 23 July 1988, BRY). Threats to this taxon may be primarily from the grazing-related impacts of cattle and naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. This is the primary reason for the scoring of the threats to this species to a "1". It is not known if these threats are consistent in the remainder of its range in Utah. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah.AlexanderFeb 2015x
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109AsteraceaeAsteraceaeCompositaeCrepis bakeri ssp. cusickiiNot in Utah sensu A Utah FloraDisj10unkunkunkunkunk16Status UncertainAlexanderNov 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. This taxon was reported for Utah in FNA "Crepis bakeri is generally recognized by the low stature, dense rosettes of pinnately lobed leaves with coarsely dentate lobes, tomentose stems and leaves, stipitate-glandular hairs distally on stems, relatively large involucres, and densely flowered heads. It is considered closely related to C. occidentalis." No vouchers are cited in FNA for Utah nor is any information noted about the notable disjunction in ssp. cusickii. It may be that the author has mistaken a depauperate C. occidentalis specimen for C. bakeri. This taxon has not been included in revisions to A Utah Flora and there is no obvious taxon that Welsh recognizes within which it would fit nomenclaturally. This taxon is placed on the "Status Uncertain" list until specimens can be confirmed to a species based on the FNA treatment.AlexanderNov 2014
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174AsteraceaeAsteraceaeCompositaeHelianthus pumilusHelianthus pumilusDisj10110unkunk35MediumAlexanderNov 2014lowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 1 specimen at BRY has been collected. It has been found in Kane County (Seaman Wash loop road, 1.25 mi e of Petrified Hollow Wash, T43S, R4W, s12, 24 Jun 2003, W. Fertig 20563). This taxon's primary range is in Colorado and Wyoming. Habitat Specificity scored as "0" since the habitat does not seem unusual according to FNA ("Dry, rocky soil in open areas"). The one voucher from Utah was collected "sandy clay derived from Moenkopi Formation", but this species does not seem to be a edaphically restricted species. It is apparently not restricted to this habitat type in other parts of its range according to the description in FNA. Threats to this taxon may be primarily from grazing-related impacts and ATV disturbance, but it is scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys.AlexanderNov 2014x
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AsteraceaeAsteraceaeCompositaeLeucosyris carnosaArida carnosaMachaerantha carnosaPerhp1111unk1unk57HighOct 2018Tooele Co. 2015XAZ, CA, NV, CO, Mexico
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242AsteraceaeAsteraceaeCompositaeSolidago mollisSolidago mollisDisj10110unkunk35MediumAlexanderAug 2015lowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. No specimens at BRY have been collected of this taxon. It is reported for Utah in A Utah Flora from a specimen collected in the Monte Cristo Range near Birch Creek Reservoir in Rich County (Holmgren 15850, 01 Aug 2008, UTC, NY; data from SEINet). The data cited in A Utah Flora is incomplete and the date "13 Oct 2008" is incorrect. This taxon's primary range is in the Great Plains. Habitat Specificity scored as "0" since the habitat does not seem unusual according to FNA ("Dry or drying prairies, open woods, along fence rows"). Threats to this taxon may be primarily from grazing-related impacts, but it scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. These data rank this taxon to the "Medium" list.AlexanderAug 2015x
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243AsteraceaeAsteraceaeCompositaeSolidago simplex var. nanaSolidago simplex var. nanaDisj11unkunkunkunkunkExcludedAlexanderNov 2014lowA Utah Flora recognized var. nana from alpine populations in the Uinta and La Sal Mountains. However, this name is misapplied to Utah populations. FNA states that "variety nana is mainly confined to peaks of the Cascade Mountains in Oregon and Washington, and very rarely on central Vancouver Island, British Columbia." It does not occur in Utah and the dwarf alpine phase segregated by Welsh as var. nana is without taxonomic status at the varietal level. These data rank this taxon on the "Excluded" list.AlexanderNov 2014
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245AsteraceaeAsteraceaeCompositaeSphaeromeria capitata Sphaeromeria capitata Tanacetum capitatumDisj111100unk45MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008The majority of Utah specimens come from Claron Formation outcrops in Garfield County at an elevation greater than 2300 m. However, A Utah Flora reports a single site in the Snake River Valley in Millard County (T16S, R19W, NW1/4 Sec.35) of this plant growing in playa margins and spring mounds with Swertia gypsicola and Ivesia kingii. These two species are also found across the Nevada state line in White Pine and Nye Counties in similar habitats. Sphaeromeria capitata is not. Although there is a remote chance this is a highly unusual, low elevation Pleistocene remnant population of S. capitata, or Welsh has misidentified this specimen and it is one of the saline valley-spring mound species of Sphaerromeria found in Nevada, of which there are a couple that grow sympatric with Swertia gypsicola and Ivesia kingii, most notably Sphaeromeria potentilloides var. nitrophila. [don't place this in the published version of the list until I have had a chance to collect specimens and confirm the identification].xx
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AsteraceaeAsteraceaeCompositaeStephanomeria occultataLocEnd211111unk78ExHighCommitteeOct 2018X
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270AsteraceaeAsteraceaeCompositaeTownsendia condensata Townsendia condensata Disj111101unk56WatchUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Main pop in WY, edaphic endemic (volcanics), pops small, need info on threatsOnly 3 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found in the Tushar Mountains in Piute (Taye 3064, 7 Aug 1984 BRY,UTC) and Beaver (Taye & Frost 2586, 3 Jul 1984 BRY) Counties. This taxon's primary range is in Wyoming and Montana. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" due to its status as an igneous, alpine talus species according to FNA ("Rocky slopes and talus"), however the habitat in A Utah Flora is quite different ("Alpine grass-forb tundra") and may indicate it may be more variable. Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. This is the primary reason for the scoring of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah.AlexanderFeb 2015xx
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280AsteraceaeAsteraceaeCompositaeVernonia marginataVernonia marginataDisj11unk10unkunk36Need DataAlexanderNov 2014A taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants inclusion. Only 1 specimen at has been collected (Fleming 263 at the Capitol Reef Herbarium). This taxon's primary range is in the southern U.S. Welsh states "the plains ironweed is included on the basis of a single specimen from Capitol Reef National Park. The species is not cited for Utah in FNA 19: 211. 2006." There is a possibility that this record is a waif. Relocation of this plant at the collection locality is necessary for the determination if there is a self-sustaining population of this species in Utah. As a result, number of individuals is scored as "unknown" Threats are unknown but it is likely minimal since the collection site was within a national park. It can be assumed this is a native species since FNA does not state that the U.S. populations are non-native.AlexanderNov 2014x
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470CampanulaceaeCampanulaceaeCampanulaceaeNemacladus longiflorus var. breviflorusNemacladus longiflorus var. breviflorusDisj101101unk45MediumFertigFeb 2009HighCryptic species, easily overlooked, juniper sand dune habitat may be specialized, may be threatened by proliferation of roads in habitatx
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518CrassulaceaeCrassulaceaeCrassulaceaeDudleya arizonicaDudleya pulverulenta var. arizonicaDisj111101166HighAlexanderMay 2009Rare on limestone outcrops and cliffs in the Beaver Dam Mts and highly threatened by over-collection for horticulture, as well as impacts from recreation and urban growth. Trends probably down. Perhaps should be ranked as a regional endemic. x
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524CuscutaceaeConvolvulaceaeCuscutaceaeCuscuta warneri Cuscuta warneri C. indecora var. warneriDisj1unk1111167HighUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Now known from New Mexico (UT pop disjunct?). Last observed in UT in 1957, possibly extirpatedx
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534CyperaceaeCyperaceaeCyperaceaeCarex craweiCarex craweiDisj11110unkunk46WatchUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008x
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541CyperaceaeCyperaceaeCyperaceaeCarex idahoaCarex idahoaan ecotype of C. parrayana sensu IMFDisj11unk101unk46WatchAlexanderAug 2014mediumUnderstandable the plant hasn't been recognized in the past. One of the pieces of evidence Cronquist used for combining Carex idahoa and C. parryana is that some sites seem to have both forms. Turns out he's right that there are half a dozen sites where they co-occur BUT the plants remain morphologically distinct there, without intermediates, and they occupy different microhabitats. You know Carex are all about microhabitat specialization.) Additional Source: Reznicek, A. A., and D. F. Murray. 2013. A re-evaluation of Carex specuicola and the Carex parryana complex (Cyperaceae). J. Bot. Res. Inst. Texas 7:37-51.Barbara Wilson (Carex Working Group)Aug 2014x
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547CyperaceaeCyperaceaeCyperaceaeCarex livida Carex livida C. livida var. radicaulisDisj111101unk56WatchUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Only 7 specimen at BRY have been collected in Utah. It is known from Duchesne and Uintah Counties. This taxon's primary range is in the northern U.S.and Canada. Habitat Specificity scored a "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to A Utah Flora ("Subalpine, boggy meadows"). Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from cattle and naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah.AlexanderJan 2015xx
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549CyperaceaeCyperaceaeCyperaceaeCarex microglochin ssp. microglochinCarex microglochin Disj111101unk56WatchUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Only 7 specimen at BRY have been collected in Utah. It is known from Daggett, Duchesne and Emery Counties. This taxon's primary range is in the Rocky Mountains and western Canada. Habitat Specificity scored a "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to A Utah Flora ("Calcareous boggy meadows"). Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from cattle and naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah.AlexanderJan 2015xxx
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571CyperaceaeCyperaceaeCyperaceaeEleocharis ovataEleocharis ovataDisj11unkunk01unkExcludedUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Eleocharis ovata was not reported for Utah in FNA and neither were the similar taxa, E. obtusa or E. engelmannii. The status of the determination of this voucher at BRY sensu A Utah Flora is in doubt. This voucher is now determined as Eleocharis erythropoda at BRY according to SEINet, a species reported for Utah in FNA. Another record of E. ovata in Kane County (Fertig 22850, 26 July 2006, Colorado Plateau: Coral Pink Sand Dunes, Sand Springs, BRY UTC) is likely incorrectly identified also. It is not known if it is E. erythropoda also. The record for this taxon has been transferred to Eleocharis erythropoda. These changes re-rank this taxon to the "Excluded" list.AlexanderDec 2014?x
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572CyperaceaeCyperaceaeCyperaceaeFimbristylis castaneaFimbristylis spadiceaDisj11unkunk0unkunkStatus UncertainAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 9 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found in Kane, Millard, San Juan, Utah, and Washington Counties. Neither Fimbristylis spadicea nor Fimbristylis castanea are not reported for Utah in FNA. This species has been found only in the southeastern U.S. and the closest populations are in Texas. If the Utah populations are this species, it is an extremely long-distance disjunct from the main populations. Sensu FNA, "Fimbristylis castanea, commonly placed in synonymy of F. spadicea..., a widespread salt marsh perennial of tropical America, is distinguishable by its relatively shorter spikelets, usually lower habit, and by its proportionately shorter involucral bracts. Fimbristylis spadicea is hardy with us only as a greenhouse plant." Apparently, F. spadicea is a misapplied to plants in Utah. The name appears only to be applied to a weedy species, not native populations. All of the vouchers at BRY are another species, but not Fimbristylis castanea. This taxon is placed on the "Status Uncertain" list until these specimens can be confirmed to a species based on the FNA treatment. AlexanderDec 2014?????
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573CyperaceaeCyperaceaeCyperaceaeFimbristylis puberula var. interiorNot in Utah sensu A Utah FloraDisj11unkunk0unkunkStatus UncertainAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. This taxon was not reported for Utah in A Utah Flora but it is reported in FNA. Of the 9 specimens of Fimbristylis spadicea at BRY, it is doubtful any are this taxon. Apparently, F. spadicea is a misapplied to plants in Utah. The name appears only to be applied to a weedy species, not native populations. Var. interior has been found only in the Southeastern U.S. A specimen cited in FNA as being collected in Arizona (A. Fendler 876, from 1847) was collected along the Arkansas River in Kansas. As a result, the closest populations are in eastern New Mexico or Texas. If the Utah populations are this species, it is an extremely long-distance disjunct from the main populations. All of the vouchers at BRY are another species, but not Fimbristylis castanea or F. spadicea. This taxon is placed on the "Status Uncertain" list until these specimens can be confirmed to a species based on the FNA treatment. AlexanderDec 2014?????
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574CyperaceaeCyperaceaeCyperaceaeNot in Utah sensu A Utah FloraDisj11unkunk0unkunkStatus UncertainAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. This taxon was not reported for Utah in A Utah Flora but it is reported in FNA. Of the 9 specimens of Fimbristylis spadicea at BRY, it is doubtful any are this taxon. Apparently, F. spadicea is a misapplied to plants in Utah. The name appears only to be applied to a weedy species, not native populations. Var. puberula has been found only in the Eastern U.S. and the closest populations are in Texas. If the Utah populations are this species, it is an extremely long-distance disjunct from the main populations. All of the vouchers at BRY are another species, but not Fimbristylis castanea or F. spadicea. This taxon is placed on the "Status Uncertain" list until these specimens can be confirmed to a species based on the FNA treatment. AlexanderDec 2014?????
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627FabaceaeFabaceaeLeguminosaeAstragalus horniiAstragalus horniiDisj11unkunk01unk36Status UncertainAlexanderMay 2009Sandy playa-edge endemic from S CA and reported from disjunct pops in adjacent states. Arnold Tiehm in 2008 hypohtesized that this plant was transported by brids along flyways in the western U.S. up until the early 20th century. The diversion of water and the draining of wetlands in the Great Basin and changed the flyways and no longer do the large flocks of birds migrate over the Great Basin from Mexico and Southern California as they once did. The UT report needs to be confirmed and might be historical.
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FabaceaeFabaceaeLeguminosaeLupinus higginsiiNot treated elsewhere so farLocEnd (?)Nov 2019 - added but not rankedNamed in 2012 by Welsh, Atwood and L. Johnson. Only 3 records at BRY and none currently (Nov 2019) on-line - known apparently only from he the Beaver Dams Mtns in Utah and also in Mohave Co. in AZ. Plants from Beaver Dam Mtns. previouslly identified as L. sericeus var. jonesii. Grows in limestone/sand. UT elev range 6800-7700 ft.xMohave Co., AZ
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682FabaceaeFabaceaeLeguminosaeLupinus latifolius var. leucanthusLupinus latifolius var. leucanthusL. latifolius var. columbianusDisj10110unkunk35MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008x
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709FabaceaeFabaceaeLeguminosaeTrifolium beckwithii Trifolium beckwithii Disj101101155WatchUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008?x
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710FabaceaeFabaceaeLeguminosaeTrifolium cyathiferumTrifolium cyathiferumDisj10unkunk0unkunk15Status UncertainUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Historical?Welsh sites, without collector information, that a specimen from NY from Jack Creek, Kane County, Utah is the voucher for A Utah Flora. The Intermountain Flora reports T. cyathiferum for Utah with the same locality as Welsh. In SEINet and in the NY Virtual Herbarium, no T. cyathiferum specimens can be found for Utah. I found no Trifolium specimen at NY from the "Jack Creek" locality, other than the ones from Nevada. Apparently, the specimen Welsh observed at NY has either been re-identified as another taxon, annotated as being from another state, or a combination of both. His proposal that this specimen may be from Nevada has merit. T. cyathiferum is found in eastern NV only in the Independence Range of Elko County. It has been collected several times along Jack Creek. Therefore, it is likely that the specimen was collected in Elko Co., Nevada. The specimen as it stands is now effectively undocumented. As a result of these data, Number of Individuals and Number of Populations is changed from "1" to "unknown". Since the single voucher was without specific collector data in A Utah Flora and IMF (and the determination and locality is in dispute), this taxon is re-ranked to the "Status Uncertain" list.AlexanderFeb 2015?
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725GentianaceaeGentianaceaeGentianaceaeLomatogonium rotatumLomatogonium rotatumL. rotatum ssp. tenuifoliumDisj111101unk56WatchUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 20085 records are cited for Daggett County by A Utah Flora but only two are listed (Goodrich 22365, 23591 BRY). It was not documented why number of individuals for this taxon was scored as a "unknown" while other taxa that have only been known from a single specimen in Utah were scored as a "1". Further population-level research may show that this taxon is more locally common and should be scored a "0". However since it has only been collected 5 times in the same relative vicinity, it is reasonable to assume this plant is not common in Daggett County and rescoring this taxon as a "1" is warranted. Habitat Specificity rescored a "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to A Utah Flora ("Wet sedge meadow"). It was not documented by the original list why this species scored as "0" when all other riparian species were scored as "1". Threats to this taxon include disturbance from the grazing-related impacts of cattle and naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah.AlexanderDec 2014x
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728HydrangeaceaeHydrangeaceaeSaxifragaceaeJamesia americana var. roseaJamesia americana var. roseaDisj111unkunkunkunk37Need DataUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008general info neededx
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741HydrophyllaceaeBoraginaceaeHydrophyllaceaePhacelia austromontana Phacelia austromontana Disj101101155WatchUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Historicalx
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771IsoetaceaeIsoetaceaeIsoetaceaeIsoetes howellii Isoetes howellii Disj11110unkunk46WatchUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Only 5 specimen at BRY have been collected in Utah. It is known from Cache and Washington Counties. Habitat Specificity rescored a "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to A Utah Flora ("Ponds margin" and "ephemeral pool"). It is not known why the species of Isoetes were scored "0" for habitat specificity when most are riparian or ephemeral pools species. AlexanderJan 2015xx
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773JuncaceaeJuncaceaeJuncaceaeJuncus articulatusJuncus articulatusDisj11unk001unk35MediumAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Although only 5 specimens at BRY have been reported for A Utah Flora from Grand, San Juan, Tooele, and Utah Counties, SEINet has 33 specimens from these and 6 additional counties (and some are at BRY but were not included in A Utah Flora by Welsh): Box Elder, Carbon, Daggett, Rich, Summit, and Wasatch. It is a species that is mostly in the northeastern U.S. with scattered disjunct populations across the Midwest and Western U.S. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to FNA ("Wet ground in ditches, lake and stream margins, and a variety of other habitats, often a calciphile"). This species has more than 25 populations in Utah (assuming the determination of the SEINet records are mostly correct) and likely is common locally. Number of Individuals is scored as "unknown" since this species may have large local populations. Riparian habitat modification and disturbance from farming, residential development, and the grazing-related impacts of cattle are a threat to this species. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys.AlexanderDec 2014xxxxxxxxx
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774JuncaceaeJuncaceaeJuncaceaeJuncus brevicaudatusJuncus tweedyi Disj111101166WatchUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Waif? Usually in hot springs in Yellowstone NP! Historical.Sensu FNA, "Populations from about around hot springs in the west have been separated as Juncus tweedyi Rydberg, but no morphologic distinction appears to exist between J. tweedyi and J. brevicaudatus." This plant has a similar distribution to J. articulatus, it is a species that is mostly in the northeastern U.S. with scattered populations across the Midwest and Western U.S. Th only specimen from Utah was collected in Box Elder County in 1874 (Kuntze 3133, "bei Corrinne", NY) and is the holotype of J. canadensis var. kuntzei. This taxon is a historical collection and the population has likely been extirpated. It is another candidate for a list of potentially extinct species that have not been relocated in the past 50 years. Habitat Specificity rescored as a "1" due to its status as a acidic riparian or hot spring species according to A Utah Flora ("wet places about hot springs") and FNA ("Generally in acidic or peaty moist sites, including emergent shorelines and around hot springs"). It was not documented in the original list why this species scored as "0" when all other riparian species were scored as "1". These changes re-rank this species to the "Watch" list.AlexanderDec 2014x
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776JuncaceaeJuncaceaeJuncaceaeJuncus castaneusJuncus castaneusDisj11unk101unk46WatchAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 4 specimens at BRY have been reported for A Utah Flora. It has been found on the Wasatch Plateau (Sanpete County) and in the Uinta Mountains (Duchesne and Summit Counties). A recent record for Uintah County has been collected (Goodrich 28324, 22 August 2011, Uinta Mtns., Lake Shore Basin, Ashley Creek drainage, BRY, USUUB). It is a species that is mostly in Alaska and the Canadian Arctic with scattered disjunct populations across the Rocky Mountains. Number of Individuals are unknown, since it is difficult to estimate based on the distributions of specimens how large the local populations of Juncus species are. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" due to its status as a alpine riparian species according to A Utah Flora ("wet alpine communities") and FNA ("Tundra, subalpine and alpine bogs and meadows, and along streams in gravelly or clayey soils"). Threats to this taxon include riparian habitat modification and disturbance from the grazing-related impacts of cattle and naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. AlexanderDec 2014xxxx
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780JuncaceaeJuncaceaeJuncaceaeJuncus hemiendytus var. hemiendytusNot in Utah sensu A Utah FloraDisj11unkunk0unkunk26Status UncertainAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. This taxon was not reported for Utah in A Utah Flora but it is reported in FNA. This species has been found in California, Nevada and the Pacific Northwest with disjunct populations in Idaho and Utah. Habitat Specificity rescored a "1" due to its status as a vernal depression or meadow species according to FNA ("various damp open habitats including vernal depressions, streambeds, swales in sagebrush flats, forest clearing and alpine meadows"). This taxon is placed on the "Status Uncertain" list until specimens can be confirmed to a species based on the FNA treatment. AlexanderDec 2014
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781JuncaceaeJuncaceaeJuncaceaeJuncus interiorNot in Utah sensu A Utah FloraDisj10unkunk0unkunk16Status UncertainAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. This taxon was not reported for Utah in A Utah Flora but it is reported in FNA in the text. However, it is not in Utah according to the distribution map. Arizona is also in the distribution text but not on the map. This species has been found in Midwestern and Southeastern U.S. with disjunct populations in Ohio and Colorado (map distribution). Habitat Specificity scored as "0" since the habitat does not seem unusual according to FNA ("Dry, often upland sites in prairies, exposed disturbed sites, and ditches in sandy or clayey soils"). This taxon is placed on the "Status Uncertain" list until specimens can be confirmed to a species based on the FNA treatment. AlexanderDec 2014
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793LemnaceaeAraceaeLemnaceaeLemna gibbaLemna gibbaDisj11unk111unk47WatchAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Although 3 specimens at BRY have been determined as this species, this species was not reported for Utah in FNA. This taxon's primary range is in the extreme southwestern U.S. and Mexico. The closest populations of this taxon to Utah are in Clark County, Nevada. The report from Iron County, Utah may be correctly identified, but the Utah County report is much farther disjunct from the range of the species and should be re-examined. This taxon may also be present in Washington County. Habitat Specificity rescored a "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to FNA ("Eutrophic, quiet waters in temperate regions with mild winters"). Number of Individuals scored as "unknown" since population sizes are not known for this small plant in Utah. This plant has been found in still, eutrophic outflows of springs in the Mojave Desert region, habitats that are becoming significantly degraded by development, ATV-recreational disturbance, and grazing impacts. Species of small, water-dependent herbs are generally overlooked by botanists. Despite this, the habitat for this species is very limited. The situation is complicated by man-made water features. Many of the eutrophic water bodies in the range of this species are not natural, mostly stock ponds and residential reservoirs. It is possible that the populations of this taxon in Utah are not native. It is a high priority to check to see if these populations still exist. Until this has been attempted, it is just an educated guess to say that the trend of this species is downward.AlexanderDec 2014xx?
41
826LythraceaeLythraceaeLythraceaeDidiplis diandraDidiplis diandraPeplis diandraDisj11unkunk0unkunk35Status UncertainUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008ReportedHabitat Specificity rescored a "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to A Utah Flora ("pods and lakes"). It is not known why the Habitat was originally scored as a "0". Specific vouchers for this taxon are not reported in A Utah Flora. As a result of these data, Number of Individuals and Number of Populations is changed from "1" to "unknown". The populations in Fish Lake may be threatened by yet unknown source, possibly recreation and development disturbances and riparian modifications along the lake shores. Several riparian species have not been relocated in this area for over 40 years (see Potamogeton). These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys, but it is likely downward. Since the vouchers were without specific collector data in A Utah Flora and IMF (and the determination and locality is in dispute), this taxon is re-ranked to the "Status Uncertain" list.AlexanderDec 2014x
42
841NajadaceaeHydrocharitaceaeNajadaceaeNajas guadalupensis subsp. guadalupensisNajas guadalupensisDisj111101unk56WatchAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 2 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found in Cache, Duchesne, and Salt Lake Counties. This taxon's primary range is in the Eastern U.S. and California. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to FNA ("Lakes, rivers, and canals"). Riparian habitat modification and disturbance from farming, residential-highway development and the grazing-related impacts of cattle are a threat to this species. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. AlexanderDec 2014xxx
43
878OphioglossaceaeOphioglossaceaeOphioglossaceaeBotrychium crenulatumBotrychium lunaria, in partDisj11unkunk1unkunk37Status UncertainUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Reported for UT in FNA 1993. Stone (1998) cites collections from Uintas
44
879OphioglossaceaeOphioglossaceaeOphioglossaceaeBotrychium hesperiumBotrychium hesperiumDisj11unkunk1unkunk37Need DataUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Reported for UT in FNA 1993. Stone (1998) cites records from Summit and Juab counties.
45
883OphioglossaceaeOphioglossaceaeOphioglossaceaeBotrychium paradoxumBotrychium paradoxumDisj11unk11unkunk47Need DataUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Reported for UT in FNA 1993. Stone (1998) cites records from Garfield Co. Windham has questioned whether this is a good taxon or just an odd growth form. If recognized, disjunct in UT on Aquarius Plateau and Duchesne Co, some taxonomic issues, pops small, threats need to be detNumber of Populations changed from "unkown" to "1" based on Windham's comments. These changes do not re-rank this taxon [Alexander, Aug 2015]; Specimens now known from Duchesne and Garfield County [Windham Mar 2015].Alexander & M. WindhamAug 2015xx
46
886OrchidaceaeOrchidaceaeOrchidaceaeCypripedium calceolus var. parviflorumCypripedium calceolus var. parviflorum C. parviflorum var. pubescens (FNA), C. pubescens, C. calceolus var. pubescens,G5T1FS - sensitiveDisj1011unk1156HighUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008many extirpated pops [UNPS 2008]The master list was scored differently than the High list for this taxon, without adequate documentation of who did the rescoring. The intrinsic rarity was scored as both "1" and "unknown" without any support in the comments. The value of "unknown" is retained in herein. It is assumed that the comment "many extirpated pops" was a justification for the scoring Trends for this taxon as "1". It does not affect the ranking, but this taxon was scored both as a "Disjunct" and as "Sparse" in the 2009 lists. The published distributions lean toward this species being a slight disjunct from the main body of the western populations in the Rocky Mountains. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah.AlexanderNov 2014x xxxx
47
887OrchidaceaeOrchidaceaeOrchidaceaeCypripedium fasciculatumCypripedium fasciculatumG4S1FS - sensitiveDisj101101unk45MediumFertig2/1/2009; reviewed/unchanged Nov. 2019MediumThreats from over-harvest for roots (medicinal use), collection of orchids by gardeners [Fertig 2009] The Summit County Record for this taxon is at UVSC (Harper 2001-97, 23 June 2001, Highway 150, Lodgepole campground [Yellowpine Campground]). Threats to this taxon include disturbance from the grazing-related impacts of cattle and naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is alarming that across its range in Utah, the last specimen was collected over 30 years ago. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah. Known from Wasatch Co. (Bonanza Flats/Utah Open Lands Report); 2019: logging threats from aspen restoration proposals, also the species may be in a downward trend due to climate change and as a result of studies outside of Utah but the trend for plants in Utah remains unknownAlexanderNov 2014x?xxxx
48
899PapaveraceaePapaveraceaePapaveraceaePapaver uintaenese Papaver uintaenese P. lapponicum var. occidentale, P. radicatum ssp. kluanense, P. radicatum var. pygmaeum, P. kluanenseDisj111101unk56WatchUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Could be considered a local endemic of the Uintas (and score higher) - there are taxonomic issues to resolve. Threats perhaps higher?22 specimen at BRY have been collected in Utah. Threats to this taxon include disturbance from the grazing-related impacts of cattle and naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah.AlexanderFeb 2015xxx
49
911PoaceaePoaceaeGramineaeBouteloua unifloraBouteloua unifloraDisj1unkunkunk0unkunk16Need DataUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Reported for UT in IMF 1977 & FNA 2003 from Zion NP, disjunct from Texas?
50
913PoaceaePoaceaeGramineaeBromus stichensisNot in Utah sensu A Utah FloraDisj10unkunk0unkunk35Status UncertainAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Although no specimens at BRY have been collected of this taxon and no specific vouchers were listed in FNA. It is reported for Rich County Utah in FNA. This taxon's primary range is in California and the Pacific Northwest. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude and types of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. This taxon is placed on the "Status Uncertain" list until specimens can be confirmed to a species based on the FNA treatment. AlexanderDec 2014??
51
932PoaceaePoaceaeGramineaeMuhlenbergia frondosaNot in Utah sensu A Utah FloraDisj10unkunk0unkunkExcludedAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Although no specimens at BRY have been collected, it is reported for Utah County in Barkworth et al. 2007 (Manual of Grasses for North America). A specimen at UTC from Utah County is likely the basis for this record (Harrison 11354, 11 November 1948, B.Y.U. Botanical garden Provo, UTC). These plants were likely introduced into the garden as a weed from nursery stock. It should be considered an introduced waif. Another record in the manual for this taxon was from cranberry bogs in Oregon. It was speculated that this was an introduced weed in that locality also. A Utah Flora excludes this taxon from Utah and states that specimens determined as this taxon are most likely M. mexicana. This taxon is ranked on the "Excluded" list until specimens from native habitats can be confirmed to a species based on the FNA treatment.AlexanderDec 2014x
52
934PoaceaePoaceaeGramineaeMuhlenbergia mexicanaMuhlenbergia mexicanaDisj11110unkunk46WatchAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 3 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found in Grand and Utah Counties. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to A Utah Flora ("Along waterways and in other moist, often disturbed sites") and FNA ("along muddy or sandy shores of lakes and rivers"). Threats should be scored as "1" due to the impacts to the integrity of wetland habitats from grazing and residential-highway development in Utah County. In Grand County, residential-highway development threats are less (but not absent) but threats from riparian habitat modification and disturbance from ATV & Boating recreation and the grazing-related impacts of cattle may be significant. Trend is scored as "unknown" since populations of this taxon have not been recently relocated in Utah. It is unknown how development has impacted this taxon. It could be assumed that the trend is downward.AlexanderDec 2014xx
53
937PoaceaePoaceaeGramineaeMuhlenbergia schreberiMuhlenbergia schreberiDisj10110unkunk35MediumAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 1 specimen at BRY has been collected. It was found in Washington County (Deming 159, 03 July 1937, Water Canyon [along Short Creek, N of Hildale]). This taxon's primary range is in the Eastern U.S. and Canada with disjunct populations in Colorado and Arizona. Habitat Specificity scored as "0" since the habitat does not seem unusual according to FNA ("moist to dry woods and prairies on rocky talus slopes, in ravines, and along sandy riverbanks"). Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from cattle, but it is scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude and types of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. AlexanderFeb 2015x
54
939PoaceaePoaceaeGramineaePanicum flexilePanicum flexileDisj10unkunk0unkunk15Status UncertainAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 1 specimen at BRY has been collected. It was found in Utah County (Cottam 206, 28 Jul 1925, BRY). It was reported only for San Juan County in Barkworth et al. 2007 (Manual of Grasses for North America). In either case, Utah populations are a long-distance disjunct from the remainder of the species. This taxon's primary range is in the Eastern U.S. and Canada. The other disjunct populations in Oklahoma and Texas are the closest to Utah. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" due to its status as mostly a riparian species on calcareous substrates according to FNA ("fens and other calcareous wetlands, in dry, calcareous or mafic rock barrens, and in open woodlands, especially on limestone derived soils"). Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from cattle, but it is scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude and types of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. This taxon is placed on the "Status Uncertain" list until specimens can be confirmed to a species based on the FNA treatment.AlexanderDec 2014??
55
941PoaceaePoaceaeGramineaePoa bolanderiPoa bolanderiDisj10110unkunk35MediumAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 3 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found in Cache, Garfield, and Rich Counties. It was also reported for San Juan County in FNA. This taxon's primary range is in the Pacific Northwest and California. Habitat Specificity scored as "0" since the habitat does not seem unusual according to A Utah Flora ("Dry to moist, open or wooded habitats"). Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from cattle, but it is scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys.AlexanderDec 2014xxx
56
942PoaceaePoaceaeGramineaePoa laxa ssp. banffianaNot in Utah sensu A Utah FloraDisj101101unk45MediumAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Although no specimens at BRY have been collected, it has been found in the La Sal Mountains in San Juan County (Maguire & Redd 1659, 05 July 1932, Saddle between Mt. Peale and Mt. Tukuhnikivatz, UTC). Habitat Specificity scored as "0" since the habitat does not seem unusual according to FNA ("mesic alpine locations"). Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from cattle and naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. Trend may be downward since this species has not been collected since 1932. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah.AlexanderDec 2014?x
57
943PoaceaePoaceaeGramineaePuccinellia simplex Puccinellia simplex Disj10unkunk01unk25Status UncertainUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008high grazing use in habitatThe two vouchers for Utah were collected in Weber Co. (Arnow 3986, 21 May 1974, UTC; Arnow 4411, 8 June 1975, UTC). This taxon is reported for Box Elder, Cache, Grand, Duchesne, Millard, San Juan, Sanpete, and Weber Counties in Barkworth et al. 2007 (Manual of Grasses for North America). It is only reported for Weber Co. in A Utah Flora. This taxon may be non-native in Utah, since Barkworth states that the populations in Utah are likely introductions. It's main range is in California only. At least in the Weber County location, it has not been collected in Utah since 1975. As a result of these data, Number of Individuals and Number of Populations is changed from "1" to "unknown". Since the vouchers determinations are in dispute and it is not known whether or not this taxon should be considered a native in Utah, this taxon is re-ranked to the "Status Uncertain" list. AlexanderFeb 2015???????x
58
950PoaceaePoaceaeGramineaeTrisetum canescensTrisetum canescensDisj101101unk45MediumAlexanderDec 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 3 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found in Cache, Salt Lake, and San Juan Counties. It was last collected for San Juan County in the Abajo Mountains by Rydberg in 1911. This taxon's primary range is in the Pacific Northwest and California. Habitat Specificity scored as "0" since the habitat does not seem unusual according to A Utah Flora ("Under maple, aspen, and spruce-fir, and on open slopes"). Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from cattle, but it is scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys.AlexanderDec 2014xxx
59
972PolemoniaceaePolemoniaceaePolemoniaceaeNavarretia saximontanaNavarretia saximontanaDisj11110unkunk46WatchAlexanderNov 2014mediumThe type was collected in Dog Valley, Garfield County. N. saximontana is presently known from a single location in Utah. It could be in nearby springs and the general region where it occurs; it is abundant in the Flagstaff area and in Colorado east [Johnson Jan 2014]; this taxon was scored a 1 for all categories except intrinsic rarity, threats and trends. It is currently unknown whether the populations at this one locality in Utah is impacted by any threats or what the long term trend in the populations are. This taxon has been placed on the Watch list [J. Alexander, Mar 2015]Alexander & L. JohnsonMar 2015x
60
981PolemoniaceaePolemoniaceaePolemoniaceaePolemonium brandegeei Polemonium brandegeei P. viscosum ssp. mellitumDisj101unk0unk135MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Historical in Tushars, disj from WY and COThe Utah voucher is from the Tushar Mountains, Piute County (Jones 5942, from 1894, NY). Sensu IMF: " 'The NY specimen of this collection, annotated by Davidson as P. viscosum subsp. mellitum, is in my [A. Cronquist] opinion a dwarf form of P. viscosum. It has leaflets only 1.5-3 mm long and corollas about 15 mm long, the original color now indeterminable." There are multiple collections of P. viscosum from the Tushars on SEINet and none have been determined to P. brandegeei. AlexanderDec 2014x
61
983PolygalaceaePolygalaceaePolygalaceaePolygala verticillataPolygala verticillataP. verticillata var. isocyclaDisj10110unkunk35MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008The one voucher for Utah was collected in Uintah Co. (2 mi s. of Whiterock, S. Hutchings 285, 9 Jul 1932, BRY).AlexanderFeb 2015x
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1045PolygonaceaePolygonaceaePolygonaceaeKoenigia islandicaKoenigia islandicaG4S1?Disj111101unk56WatchUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Newly reported for UT (based on 2000 coll from Gilbert Peak, Uintas)Only 1 specimen at BRY have been collected in Utah. It is known only from Duchesne County on Gilbert Peak (Goodrich et al. 26308, 9 Aug. 2000, BRY). This taxon's primary distribution is in the Rocky Mountains and western Canada. Habitat Specificity scored a "1" due to its status as an alpine seep species according to A Utah Flora ("mossy margins of seeps and on stream banks and on frost hummocks"). Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from cattle, sheep, and naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah. [see Doug Reynolds article in Fall 2018 Sego Lily repeating some of the foregoing]
AlexanderJan 2015xNorthern circumpolar distribution from Alaska across Canada to Greenland, across Eurasia from Candinavia to Siberia, and elsewhere.
63
1054PortulacaceaeMontiaceaePortulacaceaeCistanthe parryiCalyptridium parryiDisj10110unkunk35MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008The three vouchers for Utah were collected in Millard Co. (Tilley & Tilley 1265, 3 Jun 2000, BRY) and Sevier Co. (Albee 4850, 18 Jul 1980 BRY; Franklin 7220, 25 Jun 1990, BRY).AlexanderFeb 2015xx
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1062PotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogeton epihydrusPotamogeton epihydrusDisj111unk01unk46WatchAlexanderAug 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 1 specimen at BRY has been collected. It has been found in Utah in Salt Lake County. The specimen data is not listed in A Utah Flora. This taxon is not reported for Utah in FNA. Number of populations scored as "unknown" since the specimen was not cited in detail in A Utah Flora and it is not reported for Utah in FNA. The record at BRY should be confirmed to determine the status of the determination. This taxon's primary range is in the Pacific Northwest, Eastern U.S. and Canada with disjunct populations in Wyoming, South Dakota and Montana. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to FNA ("Still or flowing waters of lakes, ponds, streams, and rivers"). Threats to this taxon include riparian habitat modification and disturbance from residential-highway development and the grazing-related impacts of cattle. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys.AlexanderAug 2014x
65
1063PotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogeton foliosus ssp. fibrillosusPotamogeton foliosus var. fibrillosusDisj111unk01unk46WatchAlexanderAug 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 3 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found in Utah in Grand (Holmgren 2358, 03 August 1965, Uintah and Ouray Indian Reservation (Hill Creek extension) Hill Creek, vicinity of Weaver Reservoir, BRY) and Summit County. The Summit County specimen data has not been relocated yet. This taxon is reported only for Cache County in FNA. It is likely based on a specimen collected by Thorne (Thorne 4778, 04 July 1986, Wellsville Mountains, Dry Lake South shore, BRY). It is not known why Welsh did not include this specimen in A Utah Flora. He may have considered it a different species. The records at BRY should be confirmed to determine the status of the determinations. This taxon has a narrow distribution in Oregon and Idaho with disjunct populations in California, Washington and Wyoming. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to FNA ("Warm waters of shallow lakes, springs, streams, and rivers"). Threats to this taxon include riparian habitat modification and disturbance from residential-highway development and the grazing-related impacts of cattle. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys.AlexanderAug 2014xxx
66
1064PotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogeton friesiiPotamogeton friesiiDisj111101unk56WatchAlexanderAug 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 3 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found in Utah in Sevier (Thorne 4078, 17 August 1985, Fish Lake, Pelican Point, BRY; Atwood 10587, 15 August 1984, Pelican Point, Fishlake, BRY) and Summit County (Hobson 52, 27 July 1939, Lyman Lake Blacksfork Creek, UTC). This taxon's primary range is in the northeastern U.S. and Canada with disjunct populations in Nebraska, the Dakotas, and Idaho. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to FNA ("Calcareous to brackish waters of lakes and slow-flowing streams"). Threats to this taxon include riparian habitat modification and disturbance from grazing-related impacts of cattle. However, the populations in Fish Lake may be threatened by yet unknown source, possibly recreation and development disurbances and riparian modifications along the lake shores. Several riparian species have not been relocated in this area for over 40 years. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys, but it is likely downward.AlexanderAug 2014xx
67
1065PotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogeton illinoensisPotamogeton illinoensisDisj111101unk56WatchAlexanderAug 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 1 specimen at BRY has been collected. It was found in Cache County. FNA reports this taxon from Sevier County only (Maguire 16220, 25 August 1938, vicinity Twin Creeks, Fish Lake, UTC) The data for the BRY record is not known. It is also not known if Welsh has seen the UTC specimen. The records at BRY and UTC should be confirmed to determine the status of these county records. This taxon's primary range is in the northeastern U.S. and Pacific Northwest with disjunct populations in the southern U.S. and Rocky Mountains. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to FNA ("Alkaline waters of streams, rivers, lakes, ponds, and sloughs"). Threats to this taxon include riparian habitat modification and disturbance from grazing-related impacts of cattle. However, the populations in Fish Lake may be threatened by yet unknown source, possibly recreation and development disturbances and riparian modifications along the lake shores. Several riparian species have not been relocated in this area for over 40 years. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys, but it is likely downward.AlexanderAug 2014xx
68
1066PotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogeton natansPotamogeton natansDisj111101unk56WatchAlexanderAug 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 7 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found in Duchesne, Rich, Uintah, and Utah Counties. A specimen from Kane County is likely misidentified (Hill 329, 01 August 2003, Lake Powell, Escalante Arm, Explorer Canyon, Alcove and hanging garden at the end of canyon, ASC). This taxon's primary range is in the Eastern U.S., California, Pacific Northwest and Canada with disjunct populations in the Nevada, Kansas, Arizona, and the Rocky Mountains. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to FNA ("Quiet or slow-flowing waters of ponds, lakes, and streams"). Threats are high in at least the Uinta Mountains, but it is not known if that holds true throughout this species' range in Utah. Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from cattle and naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah. AlexanderAug 2014xxxx
69
1067PotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogeton robbinsiiPotamogeton robbinsiiDisj111101unk56WatchAlexanderAug 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 3 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found in Utah in Sevier County (Piranian s.n., 04 September 1936, vicinity of Twin Creeks, Fish Lake,UTC; Higgins 16070, 17 August 1985, Fish Lake at Pelican Point, BRY DES UTC; Thorne 4077, 17 August 1985, Fish Lake, Pelican Point, BRY). It was reported from Rich and Daggett Counties in A Utah Flora without citation of the source. This taxon's primary range is in the Northeastern U.S., Pacific Northwest, and Canada with disjunct populations in the Rocky Mountains. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to FNA ("Shallow to deep water of ponds, lakes, and slow-flowing rivers"). The populations in Fish Lake may be threatened by yet unknown source, possibly recreation and development disturbances and riparian modifications along the lake shores. Several riparian species have not been relocated in this area for over 40 years. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys, but it is likely downward.AlexanderAug 2014??x
70
1068PotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogeton strictifoliusPotamogeton strictifoliusDisj111unk0unkunk36Status UncertainAlexanderAug 2014LowSensu A Utah Flora, "known in Utah from a single collection (taken in 1869) along the Bear River (Summit Co.?)" A taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Welsh did not see this specimen and reported that Cronquist in IMF was the first to report this specimen as this species. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to FNA ("Alkaline waters of lakes and slow-moving streams"). Threats to this taxon may be primarily from disturbance related to farming and grazing-related impacts but it is scored as unknown due to uncertainty. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. This taxon is placed on the "Status Uncertain" list until the status of this report can be confirmed. AlexanderAug 2014?
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1069PotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogetonaceaePotamogeton zosteriformisPotamogeton zosteriformisDisj111101unk56WatchAlexanderAug 2014LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 3 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found in Utah in Sevier County (Maguire 16207, 24 August 1938, East side of North bay, Fish lake, BRY UTC; Maguire 16226, 25 August 1938, North Bay Fish Lake, UTC). It is not known if any of the 3 vouchers cited by Welsh are more modern collections. This taxon primary range is in the Northern U.S. and Canada with disjunct populations in Kansas and the Rocky Mountains. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" due to its status as a riparian species according to FNA ("Lakes, ponds, and slow streams"). The populations in Fish Lake may be threatened by yet unknown source, possibly recreation and development disturbances and riparian modifications along the lake shores. Several riparian species have not been relocated in this area for over 40 years. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys, but it is likely downward.AlexanderAug 2014x
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1085PteridaceaePteridaceaePolypodiaceaeAspidotis densaAspidotis densaCheilanthes siliquosa, Pellea densaDisj111100unk45MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008xx
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1086PteridaceaePteridaceaePolypodiaceaeCryptogramma stelleriCryptogramma stelleriDisj111101unk56WatchAlexanderAug 2015lowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 8 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found only in Utah County. The map in FNA suggests that the records for Utah are in Summit County but this may just be an error. This taxon's primary range is in Rocky Mountains and Canada. Habitat Specificity scored as a "1" since this taxon appears to be an edaphic, montane rock crevice endemic sensu FNA: "sheltered calcareous cliff crevices and rock ledges, typically in coniferous forest or other boreal habitats". Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. These data rank this species to the "Watch" list. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah. AlexanderAug 2015?x
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1087PteridaceaePteridaceaePolypodiaceaeMyriopteris gracillimaCheilanthes gracillimaDisj11unk100unk35MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008x
75
1091PteridaceaePteridaceaePolypodiaceaePolystichum krukebergiiPolystichum krukebergiiDisj11110unkunk46WatchAlexanderAug 2015lowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 3 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found only in Box Elder County in Utah. This taxon's primary range is in Pacific Northwest, California and Idaho. Populations of this taxon are characteristically difficult to determine since "populations sometimes consist of only two or three dwarfed plants that are difficult to distinguish from P . scopulinum , with which they may occur. The spreading teeth of equal size at the pinna apex will usually distinguish this species. Polystichum kruckebergii is a tetraploid presumed to be of hybrid origin, with P . lonchitis and P . lemmonii as its diploid progenitors" according to FNA. Habitat Specificity scored a "1" due to its status as a rock crevice species according to FNA ("Rocks and cliffs in subalpine to alpine habitats") and A Utah Flora ("crevices other mesic sites"), although it does not appear to be an edaphic endemic like some fern species. Threats and Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude and types of threats on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. These data rank this taxon to the "Watch" listAlexanderAug 2015x
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1092RanunculaceaeRanunculaceaeRanunculaceaeAnemone parvifloraAnemone parvifloraDisj111101unk56WatchAlexanderAug 2015LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 13 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found in the Uinta and Wasatch Mountains in Duchesne, Salt Lake, and Summit Counties in Utah. This taxon's primary range in North America in Alaska, the northern Rocky Mountains and Canada. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" since this taxon appears to be an meadow and subalpine rock crevice species (mostly restricted to limestone in Utah) according to A Utah Flora ("Spruce-fir and meadow communities, often in limestone talus") and FNA ("Streamsides, meadows, rocky slopes"). Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from naturalized mountain goats (in addition to sheep grazing in the Uinta Mountains). Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah. This taxon is ranked on the "Watch" list.AlexanderAug 2015xxx
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1093RanunculaceaeRanunculaceaeRanunculaceaeAnemone piperiAnemone piperiDisj10110unkunk35MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008The two vouchers for Utah were collected in Cache Co. (Hatch 128, 6 May 1966, NY) and Salt Lake Co. (Cottam s.n. 9 June 1961 NY, BRY).AlexanderFeb 2015xx
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1108RanunculaceaeRanunculaceaeRanunculaceaeRanunculus flabellarisRanunculus flabellarisDisj111101unk56WatchAlexanderAug 2015LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 3 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found only in Cache, Duchesne, Salt Lake, and Summit Counties in Utah (only 3 specimens are cited but there are 4 counties listed). This taxon's primary range is in the Pacific Northwest and the eastern U.S. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" since it is montane riparian species according to A Utah Flora ("Ponds, marshes, and other wet sites") and FNA ("Shallow water or drying mud"). Threats scored as "1" since riparian habitat modification and disturbance related to residential-highway development, farming, and grazing-related impacts are degrading wetlands in northern Utah. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. This taxon is ranked on the "Watch" list.AlexanderAug 2015xxxx
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1109RanunculaceaeRanunculaceaeRanunculaceaeRanunculus gelidusRanunculus gelidusRanunculus grayi, in partDisj111101unk56WatchAlexanderAug 2015LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 5 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found in the Uinta and Wasatch Mountains in Duchesne, Salt Lake, and Summit Counties in Utah. This taxon's primary range in North America in Alaska, the northern Rocky Mountains and Canada. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" since this taxon appears to be an alpine rock crevice species according to A Utah Flora ("Smelowskia-sedge community in alpine tundra") and FNA ("Open arctic and alpine slopes"). Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah. This taxon is ranked on the "Watch" list.AlexanderAug 2015xxx
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1110RanunculaceaeRanunculaceaeRanunculaceaeRanunculus gmeliniiRanunculus gmeliniiDisj111101unk56WatchAlexanderAug 2015LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 6 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found in Daggett, Duchesne, Morgan, Piute, Rich, Sanpete, Sevier, Summit, and Weber Counties in Utah (only 6 specimens are cited but there are 9 counties listed).. This taxon's primary range is in Alaska, the Rocky Mountains, the Pacific Northwest, and Canada. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" since it is montane riparian species according to A Utah Flora ("Pond margins and wet places often exposed as water dries") and FNA ("Shallow water or drying mud, wet meadows, swamps, marshes, ponds, shores of rivers"). Threats scored as "1" since riparian habitat modification and disturbance related to residential-highway development, farming, and grazing-related impacts are degrading wetlands in northern Utah. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. This taxon is ranked on the "Watch" list. AlexanderAug 2015xxxxxxxxx
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1117RanunculaceaeRanunculaceaeRanunculaceaeThalictrum venulosum Thalictrum venulosum Disj101101unk45MediumAlexanderAug 2015LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 5 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found only in the Uinta Mountains in Duchesne, Summit and Uintah Counties in Utah. This taxon's primary range is in the Pacific Northwest, the Rocky Mountains and Canada. Habitat Specificity scored as "0" since the habitat is variable and does not seem unusual according to A Utah Flora ("Sagebrush and mountain brush upward to spruce-fir communities") and FNA ("Prairies, riparian woods, and coniferous, deciduous, and mixed forests"). Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from cattle, sheep, and naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah. This taxon is ranked on the "Medium" list.AlexanderFeb 2015xxx
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1122RosaceaeRosaceaeRosaceaeCrataegus macracanthaCrataegus columbiana Crataegus columbiana , misappliedDisj10unk101unk45MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008In FNA, C. columbiana is recognized as a synonym of C. douglasii, which no longer considered to be found in Utah. Utah populations are now considered to be C. rivularis. The hisutulous plants with red pomes from the canyons along the Wasatch are now considred this taxon, not C. columbiana. Habitat Specificity scored as a "0" since it does not seem to be a riparian species according to A Utah Flora (" Indigenous on dry gravelly slopes in the mountain brush"). Threats scored as "1" since riparian habitat modification and disturbance related to residential-highway development and grazing-related impacts are impacting canyons in northern Utah. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. AlexanderAug 2015x
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1143RosaceaeRosaceaeRosaceaePotentilla plattensisPotentilla diversifolia var. madsenii, Potentilla plattensisDisj11110unkunk46WatchUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Newly described in 2008 [var. madsenii]; taxonomic issues need to be resolvedErrter and Reveal place this taxon within P. plattensis. It is no longer considered a variety of P. diversifolia (which is also now recognized as P. glaucophylla now that the types of P. diversofolia have been determined as a hybrid; even if you recognize var. madsenii as a seperate variety, it has been orphaned without a new combination in the legitimate new names P. glaucophylla or P. plattensis). In A Utah flora, var. madsenii is known only from the type specimen. Including those types, P. planttensis is known from 6 collections at BRY. It has been found in Box Elder, Garfield, Kane, Sevier, and Wayne Counties in Utah. This taxon's primary range is in the Rocky Mountains, Great Plains, and Canada. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" since this taxon appears to be an montane riparian species according to FNA ("Moist meadows, streamsides, reservoir margins"). Disturbance related to wetland development, ATV recreation, and grazing activities may be a threat to this species, however it is scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty. Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude and types of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. These changes re-rank this taxon from "Need Data" to the "Watch" list.AlexanderAug 2015x
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1164SaxifragaceaeSaxifragaceaeSaxifragaceaeSaxifraga hirculus subsp. hirculusSaxifraga hirculusDisj111101unk56WatchAlexanderAug 2015LowA taxon not included in previous versions of the UNPS Rare Plant list, but its apparent rarity in Utah warrants further research. Only 5 specimens at BRY have been collected. It has been found only in the Uinta Mountains in Daggett County in Utah. This taxon's primary range is in the northern Rocky Mountains and Canada. Habitat Specificity scored as "1" since it is subalpine meadow and bog species according to A Utah Flora ("Wet meadows with sedges, calamagrostis, and sphagnum"). Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from cattle, sheep, and naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah.AlexanderAug 2015x
85
1230SolanaceaeSolanaceaeSolanaceaeQuincula lobataPhysalis lobataQuincula lobataDisj10110unkunk35MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008The two vouchers for Utah were collected in the foothills of the La Sal Mountains in Grand Co. (Goodrich & Atwood 20393, May 1984, BRY) and San Juan Co. (Atwood et al. 8738, May 1982, BRY). This taxon was last collected in Utah in 1984.AlexanderFeb 2015xx
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840NajadaceaeHydrocharitaceaeNajadaceaeNajas flexilisNajas flexilisNajas caespitosa (Utah population only)G5SNRDisj - FNA; LocEnd-Maguire/Reveal1011unk1156X (extinct/extirpated)UNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Geog Range score = 2 if considered a local endemic of Fish Lake (N. caespitosa), Fish Lake pop has not been relocatedThe populations in Fish Lake may be threatened by yet unknown source, possibly recreation-development disturbances and riparian modifications along the lake shores. Numerous riparian species have not been relocated in this area for over 40 years. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "1". It is downward. [2018 - taxon is believed to be exptirpated and if treated as a variety/species, extinct, perhaps the first documented extinction of a globally rare species with a distribution in Utah. The lake's water level was changed starting with a dam in 1935 and the level rose over time changing the water depth and temperature and then combined with introduced species via boating and other human-caused impacts.]Alexander/Frates12/1/2014/Oct 2018x
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28ApiaceaeApiaceaeUmbelliferaeCymopterus purpureus var. rosei Cymopterus purpureus var. rosei C. roseiLoc End21unk000unk35MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Mostly on Carmel Formation ridgetops, threats probably low overall, well protected in Zion NPx?xxxxxxx
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35ApiaceaeApiaceaeUmbelliferaeLomatium minimum Lomatium minimum Loc End210100044MediumFertigJan 2009MediumClaron endemic, often locally abundant but patchy, threats seem low, many pops are protectedxxx
89
92AsteraceaeAsteraceaeCompositaeCirsium arizonicum var. bipinnatumCirsium calcareum var. calcareumLoc End201100unk45MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Does this occur outside UT? Check FNA [UNPS 2008]The plants called C. calcareum in Utah belong to the C. arizonicum complex according to FNA. The var. bipinnatum includes C. calcareum and C. calcareum var. pulchellum in synonymy. As such, the former C. calcareum var. calcareum is no longer an endemic to Utah and forms matching the type can also be found throughout the Colorado Plateau in Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico.AlexanderNov 2014xxxxx
90
97AsteraceaeAsteraceaeCompositaeCirsium clavatum var. markaguntenseCirsium clavatum var. markaguntense Cirsium clavatum var. clavatum, in partLoc End20unk100unk35MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Taxonomic issues? Single coll from Cedar Canyon with glabrate, thin, toothed lvs. Last observed in 1973Only 1 specimen at BRY has been collected. The single specimen is also the type of this variety. It has only been collected in Iron County in Utah (Atwood & Higgins 5918, 18 Aug 1973, BRY). FNA places this specimen within C. clavatum var. clavatum and states: "The recently described C. clavatum var. markaguntense S. L. Welsh is a minor variant with subentire glabrous leaves." Documenting this taxon's presence in Utah requires more collections.AlexanderFeb 2015x
91
130AsteraceaeAsteraceaeCompositaeErigeron abajoensisErigeron abajoensisIncludes E. awapensisLoc End20unk100unk35MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008UT Flora (08) combines Erigeron awapensis herexxxx
92
165AsteraceaeAsteraceaeCompositaeGaillardia flavaGaillardia flavaG. pinnatifida, in partLoc End20010unkunk35MediumFertigFeb 2009LowRiparian species of limited range- unusual!, pop #s perhaps scored too high, threats not knownxx
93
169AsteraceaeAsteraceaeCompositaeGutierrezia petradoriaGutierrezia petradoriaXanthocephalum petradoriaLoc End210100unk45MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008quartzesx
94
266AsteraceaeAsteraceaeCompositaeThelesperma subnudum var. alpinumThelesperma subnudum var. alpinumThelesperma subnudum, in partLoc End201100unk45MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008x
95
Note: taxa previously also include var. maliterrimum however these plants including T. caespitosum, T windhamii, and T. pubescens have all been syonymized under T. subnudum by FNA - wil require future review
96
358BrassicaceaeBrassicaceaeCruciferaeDraba globosa, in partDraba densifolia var. decipiensLoc End20unkunk0unkunk26Need DataUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Taxonomic questionsBoth IMF and FNA regard Welsh's var. decipiens to be a part of an expanded concept of D. globosa (or as var. globosa in IMF). It is difficult to separate the two for the purposes of ranking and scoring due to discrepancies between A Utah Flora and these two works. Both var. globosa and var. decipiens are relegated here to the "Need Data" list until more research on the taxonomic boundaries of these taxa is published.AlexanderJan 2015xxx
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360BrassicaceaeBrassicaceaeCruciferaeDraba inexpectataDraba inexpectataLoc End211101unk67HighUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008Only 7 specimen at BRY have been collected in Utah. It is known only from the Uinta Mountains (Uinta and Summit Cos.). The habitat does not seem unusual based on the description in A Utah Flora ("Subalpine fir, krummholz, and fell fields"), however, it is lacking in detail for a precise scoring. According to FNA, this taxon is a subalpine talus species, although it cannot be labeled an edaphic endemic since neither FNA or A Utah Flora provide precise geological substrate data. Following FNA, Habitat Specificity was rescored as "1". Threats to this taxon include grazing-related impacts from naturalized mountain goats. Goats were introduced by the State of Utah for trophy hunters. Climate change is also a threat. Droughts and rapid snowmelt due to wind-blown sediments are melting snowpack earlier than normal in our region. These are the primary reasons for the upgrade of the threats to this species to a "1". Trends are scored as "unknown" due to uncertainty of the magnitude of the impacts of disturbance on extant populations and the lack of population-level surveys. It is a high priority to monitor these alpine endemics that may be impacted by naturalized animals introduced by the State of Utah. These changes re-rank this taxon from the "Medium" to the "High" list.AlexanderJan 2015x
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370BrassicaceaeBrassicaceaeCruciferaeDraba zionensisDraba asprella var. zionensisLoc End210100unk45MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008mostly on Navajo SstoneSensu FNA, "Rollins (1993) treated Draba zionensis as a variety of D. asprella, but its true relationships appear to lie with two other southern Utah endemics, D. sobolifera and D. subalpina. Draba zionensis is easily distinguished from D. subalpina by having orange-yellow (versus white) petals, and from D. asprella and D. sobolifera by its glabrous (versus pubescent) pedicels and stems distally. Nearly all populations of the species are found in and around Zion National Park in southwestern Utah (Iron, Kane, and Washington counties). A specimen supposedly from the Deep Creek Mountains (Juab County) may be mislabeled." Molecular research in the genus may continue to support the assertion that this species is not closely related to D. asprella.AlexanderAug 2014xxx
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391BrassicaceaeBrassicaceaeCruciferaePhysaria acutifolia var. stylosaPhysaria acutifolia (in part)P. stylosaLoc End201100unk45MediumUNPS Rare Plant Committeeprior to 2008See also comments for var. repanda and var. purpurea. Although this is recognized as a synonym of P. acutifolia in FNA, it seems reasonable to keep each of the varieties of P. acutifolia recognized by Welsh as separate entities until a more conclusive study is performed. Recognized by Rollins as a species in 1984, moved to a var. by Welsh in 1986.AlexanderAug 2014xxx
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403BrassicaceaeBrassicaceaeCruciferaePhysaria lepidota var. lepidotaPhysaria chambersii var. membranacea, in partP. lepidota ssp. lepidotaLoc End20unk100unk35MediumAlexanderAug 2014Low As with the character Welsh uses to split two varieties of P. chambersii, it is possible that the characteristics used to separate the two varieties of P. lepidota are genetic and not just phenotypic changes due to the environment. It seems reasonable to keep each of the varieties of P. lepidota recognized by FNA as separate entities until a more conclusive study is performed.AlexanderAug 2014xx
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