Stakeholder platform for inputs by Major groups and all other stakeholders (Responses)
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SDG Summit 2019 - Collection of inputs by Major groups and all other stakeholders
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This file compiles inputs from MGoS on the SDG Summit 2019. Outcomes may contain advice, opinions and statements of various information providers. The United Nations does not represent or endorse the accuracy or reliability of any advice, opinion, statement or other information provided through this e-consultation. Our office reserves the right to delete any content/input that is not aligned with the United Nations Charter and/or the principles and purposes of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
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Timestamp1. Name2. Name of Organization3. Country4. Email Address5. If you represent a major group or other stakeholder constituency, please indicate which one?6. What are your key expectations for the Summit and how can stakeholders best contribute? (Maximum 1200 characters)7. What are the most important areas of progress and main gaps and challenges since the adoption of the 2030 Agenda? (Maximum 1200 characters)8. Please, share best practices from your own experience of working with the SDGs that can serve as inspiration to others ahead of the Summit. (Maximum 1200 characters)9. Please, list three political messages that could be outlined by the Summit in order to accelerate implementation, including for the mobilization of means of implementation and promotion of partnerships. (Maximum 1200 characters)10. How could the principles of ‘leaving no one behind’ and ‘reaching the furthest away first’ be reflected in the Summit? (Maximum 1200 characters)11. Other comments? (Maximum 1200 characters)
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4/23/2019 11:13:00Jessie Henshaw
HDS natural systems design science & NGO MG
United States
jessilydia@gmail.com
Women, Science & Technological Community, Older Persons, The common sense communities of people who fall between the silos
The Summit needs to look holistically at the SDG failure to reduce globally growing societal, economic, and environmental distress, failing to act on climate change, to stem growing inequality, the dramatic loss of life on earth, and sectarian violence. It appears we have failed as a community to look at a fast-growing common source of global stress, how compound economic growth escalates demands on every society, community, and environment on earth in the pursuit of profit.

This rising global distress under our watch is unacceptable. We need to see what we're doing.

Defining the proper use of profits for thriving on earth is what stakeholders can best contribute. Should our goal be to secure societies and their long term creative success on earth? Or should our goal be to protect the use of profits to grow more profits whatever growing distresses on society and the earth it causes?
Our important successes in recognizing women's, gender, cultural and other human rights are sadly overshadowed by our failing to see that stimulating growth puts escalating pressures on every human and environmental system on earth.

Little noticed is how the profits of growth go to investors (of all sorts), to reinvest for maximum growth of their profits. It makes investment a runaway feedback loop of growing demands on every societal, personal and environmental resource that can generate more profits.

Yes, it also plays on everyone's desire to succeed, to see their solutions spread. When the economy’s profits from those personal achievements are managed by others to multiply with a cost of spoiling our place on earth, it's clear other things would be of more importance. So it is time we faced the neglected problem of how the profits of societies are managed, which now seems to control the fate of the earth.
That studying nature's designs can yield profitable solutions is widely recognized. It is also a way to discover how healthy growth systems manage their profits to remain secure and profitable. Recurring feedback of profits producing more profits, potentially dangerous for creating conflict, is also part of any startup, any business, and any life too, as well as any emergent culture or social movement. Feedback gets things going. Success in nature, however, then depends on how a system adapts at the END of growth, such as how new systems mature and integrate with their environments. That is how systems thrive after growth, also seen in how a usual successful family business does too.

The successful family business usually stops growing to the limit of what is comfortable to manage. A world economy might also do that, limiting growth to a scale that remains manageable. We should NOT be aiming to "sustain growth" caving in to the desires of finance, but "growing sustainability," fostering the higher purposes that kick as enterprises reach their limits of sustainable growth.
Without any ill will, we should call for the impeachment all climate change deniers in government. They are in the way, and we are out of time.

Invest our profits in becoming sustainable, not in growing our demands on each other and the earth.

Change the formula for success to bringing others along, not leaving them behind.
Economic growth has long been driven by successful competitors investing their profits in becoming more profitable, very purposefully leaving everyone else behind.

That logic has also been part of our cultures for thousands of years too. Now, however, it's been systemized and perfected, to now make life torture for everyone left behind too. So to counteract that natural global devaluing of life we need a shift from promoting the success of the successful, at the expense of others, to using success to bring others along. Cultures that have been "left behind" still need to learn to take care of themselves, and to have access to world culture, as we can’t change history. Being allowed to bring their own cultures along, as complex as that might become, would both enrich world culture and make them more successful in the end.

Leaving others behind economically, by growing the success of the successful, is an implicit central purpose of modern economic growth. It cripples the cultures of those left behind as one of the greatest harms done, as healthy cultures are the actual foundation of economic success.
Wish I could find scientists or activists interested in learning how to recognize the activity of living natural systems.
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4/24/2019 11:59:35Atef SolimanGatef organizationEgypt
tfgrgs@yahoo.com.au
Together 2030
I expect the success of this summit, and this will also have a positive impact on the stakeholders
most important areas of progress and main gaps and challenges since the adoption of the 2030 Agenda ، All this will be discussed in detail at the conference
I have practices from my own experience of working with the SDGs that can serve as inspiration to others ahead of the Summit. But All this will be discussed in detail at the conference
I have already list three political messages that could be outlined by the Summit in order to accelerate implementation, including for the mobilization of means of implementation and promotion of partnerships. ALL this will be discussed in detail at the conference
ALL this will be discussed in detail at the conference
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4/24/2019 12:09:31
Rebecca Enobong Roberts
LOTS Charity Foundation
Nigeria
rebeccaenoroberts@gmail.com
Indigenous Peoples, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
My key expectations is for the summit to highlight the SDG challenges from an updated perspectives? E.G. internal displacement is spilling over to homelessness in cities, how are state governments preparing? how are project interventions reflecting this reality? how is it impacting school enrollment and attendance for children in this population? what can stakeholder groups do?
For poorer countries, for example, Nigeria, the lack of data is still a major challenge and also, the abuse of human rights of vulnerable groups by their own government is a growing issue and hugely going to impact progress with the 2030 Agenda.
One of the key practices that, we in our organization began to explore is exploring ways to include powerful voices and organizations in advocacy and interventions. For example, in Nigeria, the churches are so powerful, it is almost a form of government to the people and there is so much more they can do to intervene in situations between the government and the people. One of the ways, I am exploring this, is getting the diplomatic communities in Nigeria to host stakeholder engagements and discuss what the church can do to mitigate the oppression and abuse of LGBTI persons by the government as well as the rapid forced and illegal evictions, and it is beginning to yield some positive outcomes
Government often require assistance from various stakeholders but never want to seem weak or ignorant by asking for such assistance, it is time to see push the agenda that, it is not "we" and "them" but us.
By pushing the agenda that equality is not giving equal opportunities, but giving more to the most marginalized, excluded and oppressed.
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4/24/2019 18:06:53
Vivienne Solis Rivera
CoopeSoliDar R.Costa Rica
vsolis@coopesolidar.org
c
Active participation of the different civil society sectors, resources to be present and participate int he active discussions.
Important areas of progress towards a common world vision, gaps and challenges still there on the equitable and just distribution of benefits of biodiversity conservation, burden still in the most vulnerable sectors of societies, which is from my point of view a primary challenge for success on the agenda implementation.
Working with small scale fisheries in my region, the best practice has been to promote fisher to fisher exchanges to share advances and challenges for small scales sustainable fisheries. The implementation of SSF guidelines ( FAO) has been a primary best practice in Central America.
“By 2030, assure that women and girls are taking on effective stewardship and are equitable benefits from biodiversity of environmental services.” ( From CBD and Gender post 2020 agenda meeting).
" Small scale fisheries need particular and urgent attention towards sustainable oceans"
Fishing should be considered as a broad concept that includes pre and post activities most of which are implemented by women and youth.
Values, discussion on the model of development, blue economy and/or blue justice?
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4/24/2019 20:05:46Dr. Amos Obi
HETAVED SKILLS ACADEMY AND NETWORKS
Nigeria
kofizino@gmail.com
Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological Community, Volunteer Groups, Education & Academic Entities
To me , the best areas needing attention and critical consideration by the summit should be how to:
1- Inform and mobilize the grass-root people of the world to know and be involved as well reap the benefits of the SDGs
2-How to take the SDGs from mere theories and rhetoric to practical terms and applications.
3- How to turn the Global Goals into local sustainable businesses and thereby eradicate poverty, hunger and injustices
4- The issue of the environment , climate change and renewable energy for all
5- Above all, issues of balance gender and inclusive policies and innovations.

Since September 2015 when the 2030 Agenda was adopted, there have been some areas of progress such as : 1- Mobilization of world leaders through the HLPF
2- Emphases on gender equality is gradually closing the gender gap
3- Investment in critical among developing countries has of recent increase
4- More global unity and combined efforts in tackling global challenges such as: -climate change, Terrorism and issues of inclusive economy
Some best practices SDGs related projects from our Hetaved Skills networks that could be scaled up and as inspiration for other include:
1- Our HETAVED DIGITO EDU-PRENEURSHIP concept, an digital program aimed at revolutionizing Vocational Education Technology (VET) in Africa toward new skills, affordable education and entrepreneurship. This innovation has been endorsed by the Africa Union as one of the education innovation in Africa. Please kindly refer https://www.dropbox.com/s/3d2hs3jwafz1yh6/Africa_Education_Innovations_Handbook_2018_final.pdf?dl=0
2- The course and program of study: INNOVATIONS FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND GREEN ENTERPRISES- as initiated and introduced into colleges and universities in Nigeria
3- The HETAVED SKILLS ORGANIC PRODUCTION AND AQUACULTURE CENTER at Ozoro Town, Delta State, Nigeria which serves as a resources and training place for aquaculture, Snailry and organic farming as means of multiplying sustainable businesses models towards poverty, hunger, injustices and unsustainable practices eradication
4- Others, Please kindly refer to https:///www.youtube.com/c/AMOSAOBI Or https://www.hetaved-skills-acaedemy.teachable.com
Statements for accelerating SDGs implementation and promotion of partnership:
1- To actualize the global goals, countries and all stakeholders must give priorities to Inno-Native designs on how to discover and harness indigenous technologies in catalyzing the achievement of the 2030 Agenda
2- Innovative financing and technology exchange with volunteering resources must be properly channeled through public and private partnership. By this, all are made to be active participants and benefactors of the SDGs programs.
3- The inequality gap must not be allowed to by opened but rather be bridge through innovations in Gender Responsive Innovations and inclusive economy. By this, No One Shall Be Left Behind in the 2030 Agenda.
The principles of " leaving no one behind and reaching the furthest away first' must be a focal area of the summit through,
1- Prioritizing programs and projects for those who are already being neglected like the physically challenged and gender - women and youths,
2- Balanced budgeting and execution of projects and programs for the benefit of all stakeholders
3-Proper accountability, monitoring, evaluation and formal regular feed-backs on public finances and projects execution on transparent platforms,
4- Trust among leaders and subjects for partnership, complementary and Harmonious working relationship
5- Investment on people oriented projects and programs for the benefit of all citizenry.
6-Ati-corruption policies must be put in place and enforce by all to aviod wastage and inefficient use of funds and resources.
From practical in our works in Nigeria and Africa, it is obvious that the masses who are the suppose beneficiaries of the SDGs, are still not well informed at all on the mandate of the SDGs and the 2030 Agenda. Much need to be done to bridge this gap and carry the grass-root populace along if no one should not be left behind. Thus, to bridge this gap, we have initiated and compiled the two books on 1- A B C AND 1 2 3 ON THE SDGs CAMPAIGNS, and 2- SKILLS FOR SDGs-PRENEURSHIP - on how to turn the global goals into local sustainable businesses. We hereby recommend that these materials be used to inform and mobilize the world towards active participation in the SDGs. We are available with our expertise in this regards. Please kindly see and access these materials at https://www.amazon.com/author/amosobi
In this regards also, we wishes to recommend and suggest the deployment of special UN SDGs Marshals at every local government to national , regional and global levels who are to play the roles of monitors , supervisors and reporters of SDGs projects initiated and executions across board. This will give room for competitions, transparency and proper evaluation of programs.
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4/24/2019 20:07:34Dr. Amos Obi
HETAVED SKILLS ACADEMY AND NETWORKS
Nigeria
kofizino@gmail.com
Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological Community, Volunteer Groups, Education & Academic Entities
To me , the best areas needing attention and critical consideration by the summit should be how to:
1- Inform and mobilize the grass-root people of the world to know and be involved as well reap the benefits of the SDGs
2-How to take the SDGs from mere theories and rhetoric to practical terms and applications.
3- How to turn the Global Goals into local sustainable businesses and thereby eradicate poverty, hunger and injustices
4- The issue of the environment , climate change and renewable energy for all
5- Above all, issues of balance gender and inclusive policies and innovations.

Since September 2015 when the 2030 Agenda was adopted, there have been some areas of progress such as : 1- Mobilization of world leaders through the HLPF
2- Emphases on gender equality is gradually closing the gender gap
3- Investment in critical among developing countries has of recent increase
4- More global unity and combined efforts in tackling global challenges such as: -climate change, Terrorism and issues of inclusive economy
Some best practices SDGs related projects from our Hetaved Skills networks that could be scaled up and as inspiration for other include:
1- Our HETAVED DIGITO EDU-PRENEURSHIP concept, an digital program aimed at revolutionizing Vocational Education Technology (VET) in Africa toward new skills, affordable education and entrepreneurship. This innovation has been endorsed by the Africa Union as one of the education innovation in Africa. Please kindly refer https://www.dropbox.com/s/3d2hs3jwafz1yh6/Africa_Education_Innovations_Handbook_2018_final.pdf?dl=0
2- The course and program of study: INNOVATIONS FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND GREEN ENTERPRISES- as initiated and introduced into colleges and universities in Nigeria
3- The HETAVED SKILLS ORGANIC PRODUCTION AND AQUACULTURE CENTER at Ozoro Town, Delta State, Nigeria which serves as a resources and training place for aquaculture, Snailry and organic farming as means of multiplying sustainable businesses models towards poverty, hunger, injustices and unsustainable practices eradication
4- Others, Please kindly refer to https:///www.youtube.com/c/AMOSAOBI Or https://www.hetaved-skills-acaedemy.teachable.com
Statements for accelerating SDGs implementation and promotion of partnership:
1- To actualize the global goals, countries and all stakeholders must give priorities to Inno-Native designs on how to discover and harness indigenous technologies in catalyzing the achievement of the 2030 Agenda
2- Innovative financing and technology exchange with volunteering resources must be properly channeled through public and private partnership. By this, all are made to be active participants and benefactors of the SDGs programs.
3- The inequality gap must not be allowed to by opened but rather be bridge through innovations in Gender Responsive Innovations and inclusive economy. By this, No One Shall Be Left Behind in the 2030 Agenda.
The principles of " leaving no one behind and reaching the furthest away first' must be a focal area of the summit through,
1- Prioritizing programs and projects for those who are already being neglected like the physically challenged and gender - women and youths,
2- Balanced budgeting and execution of projects and programs for the benefit of all stakeholders
3-Proper accountability, monitoring, evaluation and formal regular feed-backs on public finances and projects execution on transparent platforms,
4- Trust among leaders and subjects for partnership, complementary and Harmonious working relationship
5- Investment on people oriented projects and programs for the benefit of all citizenry.
6-Ati-corruption policies must be put in place and enforce by all to aviod wastage and inefficient use of funds and resources.
From practical in our works in Nigeria and Africa, it is obvious that the masses who are the suppose beneficiaries of the SDGs, are still not well informed at all on the mandate of the SDGs and the 2030 Agenda. Much need to be done to bridge this gap and carry the grass-root populace along if no one should not be left behind. Thus, to bridge this gap, we have initiated and compiled the two books on 1- A B C AND 1 2 3 ON THE SDGs CAMPAIGNS, and 2- SKILLS FOR SDGs-PRENEURSHIP - on how to turn the global goals into local sustainable businesses. We hereby recommend that these materials be used to inform and mobilize the world towards active participation in the SDGs. We are available with our expertise in this regards. Please kindly see and access these materials at https://www.amazon.com/author/amosobi
In this regards also, we wishes to recommend and suggest the deployment of special UN SDGs Marshals at every local government to national , regional and global levels who are to play the roles of monitors , supervisors and reporters of SDGs projects initiated and executions across board. This will give room for competitions, transparency and proper evaluation of programs.
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4/25/2019 7:49:18Shaima Aly
Kenana Association for Women Empowerment and Sustainable Development
Egypt
shimali2001@gmail.com
Women, Non-Governmental Organizations, Together 2030
We aim at restructuring the MGOs engagement process in the HLPF, more accountability has to be ensured from the governments side of the CSOs in general and women led NGOs in particular in the process of SDGs nationalization and engagement in the VNRs. We expect to see a participatory negotiations to issue the final political declaration, might be in the form of CSOs representatives observers or statements from global south CSOs specifically. New mandatory like modality has to be offered as an alternative to the VNRs where countries practice more transparent way to provide the reviews in closer co-operation and actual discussions with CSOs, minority groups, other ethnical groups, marginalized inhabitants ..etc to provide such reviews in a comprehensive integral way.
No accountability or enforceability to engage NGOs and CSOs by governments. Lack of funding to integrate CSOs in the discussions and proceedings of the HLPF and other related forums and conferences.
Engaging grassroot organization was found as a key to nationalize and implement SDGs. In Upper Egypt, we worked with youth led groups where we introduced them to SDGs, Agenda 2030 and let them come up with ideas that they believe it can nationalize the SDGs in the country and have a direct impact on people lives. They focused on coming up with solutions addressing issues related to SDG3 and SDG4. We found out that engaging youth and grass root level associations might be the most pragmatic and realistic modality to implement SDGs, and hence report on them. Some countries in the region, as Oman, created SDGs hub and interactive portal where they placed data closely related to SDGs achievements and gaps so it can be open to the public.
"More open spaces for civil society to accelerate implementation process of the SDGs", "Partnerships are now to mobilize resources and develop effective implementation strategies", "no one is left behind in the way to Agenda 2030".
Having speakers from grass root NGOs and marginalized population groups are inevitable in order to ensure equality and hear from everyone in the summit. NGOs and CSOs, as well as UN Major Groups, have to be present through the summit and possibility to provide inputs to the declaration draft, attend the negations and share statements before the summit proceedings and negations will ensure that all perspectives are integrated.
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4/26/2019 7:10:35NILUSMAS
Nouveau Point De Vue ( N.P.D.V.)
France
npdv@nayanco.com
Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Together 2030, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
apporté un nouveau plaidoyer sur les ODD pour les outre-mer et la caraïbe
des document officiel des institution qui permet au ONG de mieux nous représenté dans notre engagement comme par exemple le statu D'ecosocc
Réflexion action
projet VACECC Vision, Adhésion Compréhension, Changement, Comportement
diversité des représentant
volontaire
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4/27/2019 6:41:02Dosse SOSSOUGA
Amis des Étrangers au Togo: ADET
Togo
sossougadoss@yahoo.fr
Non-Governmental Organizations
2015 was a year for the SDGs adoption septembre 25, Paris agreement December 12, Addis-Ababa Agenda for SDGs financing 13-16 july, for the world transforming we thank you. But 2030 is tomorrow, how can we achieve it?
The main progress is that many countries participe to the HLPF. Political acceptance and involvement in the SDGs implementation in all countries ( NVRs) and
Political declarations, Regional hight level Forums, HLPF Global Major Group and Stakeholders coordination mechanism. SDGs progress rapports, the SG rapports on the SDGs.
For me, the SDGs implementation is easy.
- create a SDGs national office with government part and Major group, private sector , academic and anti- corruption parts.
- create subnational SDGs sections with public administrative and Major groups membres for rapports synthetis.
- create at municipal levels municipal committees composed like this:
1 representative elected of traditionaliste authorities
1 representative elected of religions authorities
1 representative elected of local Civil society
1 representative elected of Community based organisation
and the Mayor

This committee creates at the municipal level a SDGs centre with 3 departments:
1 for social developpent(for data revolution: older persons, disable perdons, migrants, chronic diseases, widows, orphans, indigenous people, other minorities for social projects) and leave no one behind.
1 for economic developpent(agriculture, trade or business, etc...project.) and
1 for environmental developpent(environmental resiliency, electrisation, water and sanitation for all, climate mitigation projects, adaptation, cities
This center coordination is under the municipal committee with an additional personnal.
We, head of states, recommit to create the SDGs reforms, collaborate with all Major Groups and stakeholders, financing or allow there financing in the Addis-Ababa Agenda line, protect them to accélérate the SDGs implementation. Exchange knowledges with them délivre as one the SDGs.
Local data revolution and follow-up localy is the way to leave no one behind. This will help insuring social protection, inclusiveness, poverty eradication, inequality réduction at all levels
These reforms can allow people to be at the center of all developpent programmes with making- decisions from local to national where the SDGs rapport prepared by national SDGs office will be summited to the ministry council for adoption. This national SDGs rapport will be normaly summited to regional hight level Political forum for review before the final review at the HLPF in the UNHQ.
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4/30/2019 5:32:29Emem Omokaro
Dave Omokaro Foundation
Nigeria
firstdavem@yahoo.com
Older Persons
Summit will evaluate SDGs mechanisms of inclusion and its effectiveness in ensuring no one has so far been left behind. Identify gaps and address intersessions of SDGs Goals and where lack of disaggregated data has affected vulnerable populations of ALL ages The submit should highlight policy priorities and revisit indicators for vulnerable populations using the Life Course Approach
The areas of progress has been in Goal 1; There has been a surge of interest of member states and international agencies in Policies and implementation of Social Security and Social Protection including social protection floors as well as universal health coverage especially in African region.
However, Implementation coverage of SGGs has not been inclusive; older persons are left behind .
The focus on demographic dividend due to the youth bulge has left older persons behind.

Insufficient disaggregated Data and the missing indicators relevant to older population as well as effectiveness of civil society engagement mechanisms are posing challenges to inclusion
My best practice is through inter- sector capacity building on SDGs.where barriers are brought down and the approach is about the Life Course including All Ages and interrelatedness of goals are emphasized
Where administrative efforts are not focused on one population cohort but on equity, equality on All selected Goals
Equality of ALL Ages ;
Interrelatedness of All Goals;
Disrupting Trends of silo approach and promoting ;
Inclusiveness within the Life Course;
Development and Human Rights are Not Exclusive ; participation of All Ages in the Process and in the Sharing of Benefits are the signpost to Economic Growth & Prosperity

Campaigns for partnerships across the globe should be for the Equality in Rights to Share Prosperity.
It could be reflected on the Emphasise on ensuring that Everybody's Right to Be Included is Recognized as Human Right. Regardless of age, status, color, gender, location, SDGs is a framework for all because Each is Human.
The principle of inclusion on the basis of equality, social justice and opportunity should transcend prioritizing of application of universality according to perceived traditional needs of age groups. This selective application diminishes the rights of older persons in spite of the growing population and undocumented contributions to family and community
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4/30/2019 15:12:51Carine BambaraBrookeUK
carine.bambara@thebrooke.org
Non-Governmental Organizations
The key expectations are the review of the goals and the targets of the goals to see if there are areas that could be narrowed down or broadened to ensure inclusivity of people in hard to reach communities. Stakeholders would best contribute by having prepared a list of considerations about the SDGs where they believe there is more room for inclusion and equality mainstreaming and be prepared to discuss them in dialogue and discussions. The HLPF coordinating team could support this by sending us priority areas and specific targets we could make a difference in ahead of time e.g. if there will be a talk on a specific theme it would help stakeholders prepare for the discussion if we know about them as soon as possible.
Areas of progress have been seen increasing access to education slowly but surely and access to water and sanitation because governments have realised the importance of this and the importance of building infrastructure to support this. However more work needs to be done on disaster risk and resilience planning and the lack of consideration of livelihoods is a big challenge to DRR planning.
We work with governments improving animal health and welfare training in hard to reach rural areas that are dependent on livestock and agriculture for their income. In Senegal we have worked with Christian Aid and Heifer International so that we can see the impact of youth working in this sector and train youth with the skills needed to progress their careers, as well as at government level to ensure the veterinary profession and highly skilled farriery professions are mainstreamed as apprenticeships so that they are valued positions. We work with FAO to mainstream some of our work in including women and girls in all our training to ensure best practice and this has led in a net economic gain for the country of Senegal which we detail in our case study report on this
Partnership with organizations from agriculture and livestock sectors must be considered as these sectors contribute highly to low and middle income economies.

Facilitation of shared learnings is essential to reaching the goals

Planning for implementing each SDG must include a variety of key stakeholders in the room who have had measurable impact in advancing the goals
By considering the top livelihoods of these groups and including planning for how to upskill and upscale work within these livelihood sectors
It would be great to allow NGOs with Consultative Status to give very brief interventions at this summit and allow multiple sector side meetings to progress the goals
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4/30/2019 15:31:40Amro Selim
Elmoustkbal for media, policy and strategic studies
Egypt
amrojournalist@gmail.com
Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
I expect the summit to be a bit routine, because most of the action now is based on condoning some political behavior in order to achieve some gains (political games).
Most of the challenges lie in low-income countries for poor participation, popular interest and neglect of the role of youth in development.
The best participation are the result of the real popular participation after activating the media role in low-income countries and not exploiting it politically. Because there is now a gap between the paper reports and the reality on the ground.
Attention to real participation without any discrimination for young people in developing countries - What is being carried out on the ground is mentioned on paper without exaggeration (the reports are a mirror of reality) - Do not forget the peoples of the developing countries,
The work of committees of specialists and interested, for example, HLPF Political Mechanism Group 2019 the extent of making real progress on the ground and take these reports seriously and faced by various governments around the world and be part of decision-making
we in low income countries need more attention form UN separated the facts from paper reports.
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4/30/2019 16:44:46Jack KupfermanGray PanthersUSA
jkupferman@aol.com
Older Persons
Increased short term and long term commitments (planning, policy, financing, coordinated with civil society) to addressing the challenges of dramatically increasing number of older persons. Increased formal inclusion of the constituency of older persons in financing, policy, assurance of progress for older persons.
One of the main gaps in implementation of the SDGs is the lack of attention to the SDGs' focus on older persons. Ageism and invisibility of older persons must be reversed, in each country and region of the world. For instance, despite clear language in SDG 4 (Health), there is precious little attention to the health concerns of older persons. The goal reads "Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages" The part "at all ages" is ignored. Let's fix this.
1. Please review the 2019 position paper of the Stakeholder Group on Ageing for numerous examples of inspiration to address issues of necessity for older persons. 2. It is important to include the global initiative combatting ageism from the WHO.
1. Assurance that older persons are given "a seat at every table."
2. Progress is slow. Time is short. We have to make significant progress towards reversing climate change. Enough talk.
3. Money reflects political will. Careful planning and compassion must be the components of all policies and programs.
No doubt, there will be many others providing excellent inputs on this essential subject.
Grateful for the opportunity to contribute.
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5/1/2019 18:12:26Adula DicksonNuephaUganda
nuepha.org.ug@gmail.com
Non-Governmental Organizations
It will help us to cooperate with other organisattion on how to manage the project and training local community on Sdgs and how they will benefit the programs.
Local community need to be addressed on sdgs agenda,and it impect
Am been trying to trained them on income generating acctvities but they are still behind it needs more effort
Me as Ugandan we are suffering for oppressed government citizens has been touchered by Uganda government,no freedom of speech,no democracy, people are been harassed by the Uganda government, others are imprisoned therefore, local community should be trained for right and freedom of speech
We as citizens of Uganda,we needs to be train on human rights
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5/3/2019 16:33:47Atef SolimanGatef organizationEgypt
tfgrgs@yahoocom.au
Together 2030so goodI WILL BE TELL YOU AT ATTENDINGNOT NOWNOT NOWATEF ATTENDINGNO THANKS
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5/5/2019 8:33:05Comfort OnyeeAVwDHANorge
avwdha@gmail.com
Indigenous Peoples
996234843-AVwDHA.Org expectations for the Summit are; Concern the implementation of the UN June 2012 resolution and outcome “future we want”; resolution 183 concerning Africa Needs – SDG-4; Mother Language UNESCO SDG-4 quality education by 2030 Africa is striving with Africa Classic studies in school corridors so why not the above tools become crystal clear tools for Africa to apply so that by Year 2022 Africa Spoken Languages Reunion with Mother Language in Antiquity are in the School Core-Curriculum. Implementation of SDG10 so that by Year 2022 he or she who wants to enter to Live, Work and Research in Africa Must Have at Least a Certificate in General Knowledge of Ranykemet; Mother Language in Africa. Ranykemet is the first written down language in Africa and the common mother language to Africa spoken languages. Consequently, Africa Education System Must base on Africa Worldview. This should be possible the same way colonial languages are teachable in Africa from pre-primary to the highest level of education. Query to United Nations HLPF Africa needs a development aid to take Africa Classic Studies to School Core-Curriculum taught from pre-primary to all levels of education.
Progress made among others; advocating and implementation of SDG4, SDG10 by conducting information seminars and sponsoring On-line Studies in Africa Classic Studies “Historical Africa Studies”. We gain experience in what questions to ask in the United Nation June 2012 resolutions and outcome “future we want” resolution 183 concerning Africa Need … The gaps; SDG10; to enter to live, work and research in elite conceptual Western, one must integrate in their languages and culture. While for them they enter to live, work and research in indigenous societies unconditionally. The challenges; by 2022 emphasis to enter Africa you must abide by Africa Common Denominator which is a certificate in general knowledge of Africa Classic Studies is “future we want. The challenge to the Africa governments/ States, UN-HLPF/ EASG; By 2020 Africa children and youths must have Ranykemet studies; pre-primary must know the basic day to day greetings in Ranykemet like; /bk nfr/, /it. m. Htp/, /Sm. m. Htp/ Africa fifth grade should know and should recite at a /Htp D. Nswt/ and Africa story. PLE take an exam in Ranykemet, this way children/ upcoming leaders understand Africa better and change happens
Initiative in “Saga first language; a mother tongue”. In our case descendants of Africa, we are helping Africa States and Governments put on an inquiry to the United Nations June 2012 resolutions and outcome; “future we want” Africa spoken languages reunion with mother language in Antiquity come out of school corridors and actively be a part of School Core-Curriculum. If Africa wants change in leadership. The right place to effect change is the school Curriculum reform so that by 2022 whoever wants to enter to live, work and research in Africa must have a certificate in at least general knowledge of Africa spoken languages reunion with mother language in Antiquity. This is benign experience from 996234843-AVwDHA.Org to share. So far; we know of and participate in USA based On-line Studies engaging Africa Classic Studies; we do 3 – 5 hours information seminars and then top-up with On-line studies in Africa history Studies for 2 hours one day of the week for 12 weeks. This is a Calling to strive for. We think this is consonant with the United Nations June 2012 resolutions and outcome “future we want” … resolution 183 concerning Africa needs …
1. To the Africa Governments/ States, UN- HLPF/ EASG; what is there for you to question Diop and Obenga symposia in UNESCO-Cairo Conference 1974 regarding the whereabouts of Africa History in School Core-curriculum; the History of Africa will remain suspended in air and cannot be written correctly until Africa Historians dare to connect it with the History in Kemet?
2. What about “inversion of traditions” on the African graduate – “African politicians, historians etc. are left with ambiguous legacies from the colonial invention of traditions; the body of invented traditions imported from Europe to Africa still exercises an influence on ruling class culture. Africa must free themselves from the illusion that the African custom recorded by officials like; United Nations etc. is any sort of guide to the African past. But they also need to appreciate how much invented traditions of all kinds have to do with the history of Africa …?”; PDF; Eric Hobsbawm and Terence Ranger 1983
3. Educated persons know what a Library, Art Gallery, Museum etc. Nonetheless, such institutions are meaningless to modern African without Africa Spoken Languages Union with Mother Language in Antiquity.
If the Summit Emphasize “future we want” must come from implementation of SDG4 and SDG10 Take for example of Africa or global south. Do we think that ‘reaching the furthest away first’ will happen by changing sitting regimes? Of course not. We do not change the test of food by changing the stove. The test of food changes by changing the ingredients. Same effect, without change in School Core-Curriculum modern people thinking remains within the colonial education system. But colonialism education system has no place in the “future we want”! Resolution 183 concerning Africa the future for Africa must base on Africa Worldview rather than the near recent history of Africa adopting foreign languages as official languages. History Education of Africa Worldview before the Inversion of traditions is replete with evidence of the ability, capacity and resourcefulness of African indigenous educational systems and languages to solve Africa problems. For example, African (indigenous) educational systems then, produced graduates who built Modern Civilization (please see below question number 11). Once again, 21st. century is time for a Rebirth of Knowledge, happily this time for Africa.
21st. century is time for Africa Sankofa, go back to km.t to drink from the Fountain of Birth of Knowledge, get the skills right, with reference to works by hand of early man who Migrated from nTr; the place of plenty to establish society, did it with sense for “future we want” –
• Rebirth of knowledge is a custom.
• What a True Judge in the courtroom does is Custom.
Custom or common law must not be confused or interchanged with inversion of “tradition” –
• The wig and gown the judge wears in court is inversion of tradition not custom
• Napoleon sitting on Pharaonic Throne is inversion of tradition not custom
(“Eric Hobsbawm and Terence Ranger 1983; refers to modern societies as Traditional Societies. The object and characteristic of traditions in those societies, is seen how inconsistence or invariance show off … in most cases these Traditions are the rituals commonly invented, constructed and formally instituted, emerging in a less easily traceable manner within a brief, and dateable period a matter of a few years perhaps- and establishing themselves with great rapidity”)
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5/5/2019 12:24:26Jessie Henshaw
HDS natural systems design science
United States
jessilydia@gmail.com
Women, Non-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological Community, Older Persons, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
2020 needs to be THE YEAR OF CLEAR VISION, a parting of the fog, cutting through what is preventing us from seeing the pursuit of wealth has become the source of our great problems not the solution.

It is crystal clear in the data. Our deep problems have grown in pace with our growth driven war with nature. Our effort to use growth to solve all our problems is a true marvel of human misdirection. Look to nature for true direction. Growth is essential to begin things, but what comes AFTER growth for ALL living things is what we generally call “real life.”

Successful growth is judged by how it ends, not by how far it gets, particularly not how far it gets in subjugating the whole world it is the child of. Successful growth ends with the beginning of a more gradual maturing of the new life, on the way to its peak of vitality and resilience. Look to nature; she has the real answers. What we should want for humanity is for us to begin our long slow and healthy maturation.
The most important progress has been in human rights, the main gaps and challenges from trying harness growth to solve the side effects and excesses of growth in the past. The whole problem is growth's endless acceleration, leaving no time secure our new place on the earth.

Because our problems come from creating wealth, more wealth will not cure the problem. Our hope that efficiency might “decouple” growth from its impacts has entirely failed to materialize. CO2 pollution is increasing ever faster, animal life is vanishing, and humanity facing increasing not decreasing struggles, feeling trapped not liberated by growth, having to struggle harder and harder to stay even.

What it comes from is how business and investor profits are used to expand their own profits, concentrating power to control the earth and society. It forces the whole economy to be more and more competitive, not secure and relaxed. At the limit it terrorizes the whole world with growing leaps and bounds of increasing stress. It is getting to even those who once were comfortably rich, as they too have to be just as driven at single moms with three jobs, struggling just to get by.
My best practice is the model for "Finite Development." Our familiar paradigm of “Infinite Development” is the promise of our capitalist economy, fated to succeed ever more grandly till it fails. It’s a fool’s errand indeed, as even now that we see it drastically failing to produce real satisfaction today.
Finite development is like many family businesses, that get started with a family loan, and then struggle to grow till they pay off their debts and are managing all they need to. Then debt free they can switch the use of their profits from growth to living. That's what we need to do to survive, globally cap compound investing so we can continue to be highly creative but also able to live in peace.
We mistakenly designed our economy as a rocket ship, to just accelerate as fast as possible forever, with no goal. We should not be burning up the earth as fast as humanly possible, all that endless compound growth can do.

Turning from growth to maturation is like getting a car, equipped with a windshield, steering wheel, break, and accelerator on can take one’s foot off of when approaching a change in direction, a steering machine. That’s done by redirecting the economy’s profits from acceleration to navigation, using the same people largely, with the instruction to make the earth our good home.
You can't “leave no one behind” in an economic system designed to enable investors leave everyone behind as fast as possible. That’s been the whole purpose of investing for centuries. Now that we’ve expanded helter-skelter for so long investors need to change goal, to take care of the systems their investments built.

The principle of finite investing forces that question, first building things that pay back with interest, but then not driven to expand ever faster to instead be allowed to become cash cows for distributing future returns in giving others good work. If you think about it we nearly everyone else does that with our careers, building them up to support *other things,* a perfect model of finite investing.
I wish I could find more natural systems thinkers, planners and scientists to collaborate with.
22
5/7/2019 20:13:19Fanny DolletMedical IMPACTMexico
dolletfanny@gmail.com
Non-Governmental Organizations
- Allowing a greater participation for civil society, since the present selection is carried out on a biased basis as NGOs have to be part of the consultative status of ECOSOC, preventing a wide and fair inclusiveness.
- Implement key indicators, practical measures and ensure political will following the agreements and recommendations so that changes and concrete actions can be implemented on the field. For instance, stakeholders can contribute by providing indicators according to their skills in their field of work
- Lay the groundwork to further allocate adequate domestic funding, enhance international cooperation for development and lead to integrated decision-making.
- Get to transposable outcomes that member states can develop on a local scale, taking into account their own economic, political, social and environnemental context.
- Represent vulnerable populations and promote scientific decision-making towards the creation of impactful long-term public policies in order to reach the SDGs
- Respond population’s fundamental needs in situations of vulnerability, extreme marginalization, or difficult access through the improvement of access to health services is the best way of ensuring that no one is left behind while stimulating sustainable development
- Stimulate member states to include an indicator in order to encourage more leadership positioning in women in the VNRs
- Improve current mechanism of open channel communication for partnerships, enrollment, and feedback-rich communication, ensuring more transparency through the Summit and its process, including the creation of VNRs.
- Reflect a multi-stakeholder approach where each actor can deliver expertise and inputs to the audience’s attention to set on equal footing, ensuring a democratic, egalitarian and diverse reflection during the Summit
- Make integration and accountability priorities to include each individual in the process and raise awareness, essential to better accomplish the SDGs
23
5/7/2019 23:14:32Angelina B. Ortiz
SILDAP Southeastern Mindanao, Inc
Philippines
lyngelina@yahoo.com
Women, Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations
Report on each region at the level of improving the status of indigenous women through implementing on the SDG.
The difficulties/ hardships of indigenous women in the remote communities are slowly announcing the indigenous people about the SDG and the lack of projects that will help women
The good & best practices that we have experienced & practices with the indigenous women was the continuation/sustaining their traditional ways & system of cultivating indigenous food crops/ seedlings with the protection of the land without the medicines inputs.
1. Representation of indigenous women in the local legislative body should be mandatory, so that we can assure the voice of indigenous women.
2. Local laws that control the businessman in introducing to the farmers of synth ethic medicines
3. increase organic food production and will be documented
No one will left behind if the government will include the the indigenous communities in the implementation of their annual plan. The indigenous has the venue to expressed their needs that will enhance their lives & awarness.
thank you
24
5/9/2019 11:29:11Matt Mayer
Economy for the Common Good
United Kingdom
matt.mayer@ECGuk.org
Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
To find unity amongst stakeholders that for us to achieve meaningful change, we need to push for a change in economic paradigm (and a new definition for
SDG 8)
the kind of incremental progress we have seen is simply not enough considering the urgency of the situation.
Being courageous and unrelenting in challenging the bureaucratic orthodoxy, seems to work and be infectious;)
- unite around the need to abandon the GDP growth obsession
- push for a change in the definition of SDG 8
- demand immediate action for this to be made the #1 agenda point at the General Assembly
Let this be the HLPF of meaningful change by finding the courage to speak and act in unity around the need to abandon the current limited paradigm of economic growth as measured in GDP!
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5/10/2019 14:10:06Julius AdegbiteEarth Push Ltd/gteNigeria
ayodele_adegbite@yahoo.com
Non-Governmental Organizations
We expect that there will be political declarations calling on the UN GA to approve international conventions that will empower governments and other stakeholders for the speedy implementations of the SDGs
Unlike the MDGs SDGs have not been well mainstreamed into the strategies of National governments, bilateral and multilateral institutions and other Donors. Policies and programs are not referenced to the achievement of the SDGs and not much financial measures are in place to actualize the targets
Legislations and policy pronouncements are vital tools to accelerate the achievement of the goals, new laws and guidelines are required to reallocate resources and realign efforts
The enactment of a United Nations convention on CREDIBLE ELECTORAL PRACTICES that will prescribe for worldwide application minimum legislation in the areas of Electoral Administration, electoral systems, Vote Counting and Results, Gender and Elections, and the Resolution of Electoral Disputes is very important
A new UN GA and UNSC resolution classifying certain levels of corruption especially THOSE ACTS OF CORRUPT PRACTICES THAT LEADS TO THE LOSE OF INNOCENT LIVES OF CITIZENS TO BE CLASSIFIED AS CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY AND TO BE TRIABLE AT THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT IN THE HAGUE is essential
(2) A new UN GA and UNSC resolution classifying certain levels of corruption especially THOSE ACTS OF CORRUPT PRACTICES THAT LEADS TO WIDESPREAD POVERTY AND INEQUALITIES TO BE CLASSIFIED AS TREASON AND ALSO TRIABLE AT THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT IN THE HAGUE is required.
Representatives of MGOS should be selected to reflect the inclusive theme of the Forum and must be allowed t take part in all activities of the event
26
5/12/2019 7:29:23Judith Hitchman
Intercontinental Network for Social Solidarity Economy
Global
hitchman@club-internet.fr
Non-Governmental Organizations
More genuine commitments from States to real implementation that breaks with the current economic model of growth and causes increased gap between rich and poor and climae change
The fact that there is real implementation of many SDGs by Local/territoiral Authorities represents progress. The biggest challenge is that the SDGs are still based on a growth model that fails to take plaentary boundaries into consideration, and not on solidarity economy that is redistributive and based on social, economic and environmental equity
Community Supported Agriculture practice, agroecology, community led finance, community led energy, community/movement led popular education
Growth can not exceed our planetary reserves. We need to preserve our planet from biodiversity collapse and current unsustainable production and consumption models (IPBES). Social solidarity economy and agroecology combined in peasant agriculture/family farming and sustainable short/direct food chains enable agrobiodiversity, carbon caputre, sustainable local food systems that preserve people and planet. The recent UN Declaration of Peasants Rights and other people living in rural areas supports this. Social solidarity economy enables an inclusive, redistributive economy, decent work and social, environmental and cultural equity and justice. Examples abound and there is already existing framework legislation in over 30 States. The Intercontinental Network for Social Solidarity Economy (RIPESS) urges all States to adopt measure and cinding legislation to support the above.
See above
27
5/14/2019 9:58:15Atef SolimanGatef organizationEgypt
tfgrgs@yahoo.com.au
Non-Governmental Organizations, Together 2030
At conferenceKids and womenI have more , but I will share it laterNot nowNot nowNo thanks
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5/14/2019 12:20:39Marina El Khoury
Franciscans International
United States
m.el.khoury@fiop.org
Non-Governmental Organizations
The Summit is an excellent opportunity to evaluate the progress made in achieving the Agenda 2030 and identifying the main challenges in enhancing the process at national and local levels. We expect more encouragement to be shared to Member States who have yet to take on a proactive approach to the process. We also expect Member States to reflect on the continuation of their efforts in light of other cross-cutting obligations, especially in applying international human rights obligations to national policies addressing the SDGs.
There seems to be a genuine consensus on the importance of sustainable development for people, countries, the environment, and the planet. This is itself could be considered progress, as the narrative around sustainable development is more informed and constructive with the 2030 Agenda than ever before. However, the main gap is the lack of connectivity between Agenda 2030 and Human Rights. For FI, there can be no sustainable development without the promotion and protection of human rights. Avoiding to address this interdependence is the main challenge as it is counter-productive to successfully achieving the SDGs. The OHCHR matrix that matches SDGs to their relevant human rights obligations is essential to understanding where the implementation challenges lie. While targets and indicators have yet to be perfected, the above-mentioned structural challenges can impede a more dynamic and strong implementation of the Agenda 2030.
In July 2018, Franciscans International, together with the Permanent Missions of Cabo Verde, El Salvador, Finland, Portugal, Spain and Uruguay, as well as with the OHCHR and UN Water, joined forces to highlight the role of the right to water in achieving SDG 6. The event showcased practical examples that demonstrate the value of a human rights-based approach to achieving SDG 6 and other related Goals, with a central focus on the role of the right to water and sanitation in building resilience. Several countries have successfully integrated human rights based approaches in their legislative and policy frameworks regulating access to water and sanitation and resilience building.

By putting forward evidence-based examples of how national policies can be inclusive of both human rights and SDG implementation, FI aims to inspire Member States to consider the increased longer-term benefits to these approaches to their citizens, governments, and environments.
1) No development without human rights: Committing to the SDGs means providing all people with the right opportunities to improve their lives at the economic, social, cultural, environmental, civil and political levels. Human rights violations are the most dangerous man-made threats to the implementation of SDGs.

2) Addressing climate change should be at the heart of the Summit's goals to strengthen the commitment of Member States to their existing obligations. Climate change is the single most dangerous natural threat to the implementation of SDGs.

3) Addressing the growing influence of private actors in governmental negotiations and global policies is essential to truly respect the 2030 Agenda's vision and long-term impact. Corporations and some Member States are increasingly threatening the survival of the process and multilateralism as we know it. The UN needs to show strength in its principles and values, and the Summit is a great opportunity to do so.
The principles could be reflected as the end result of the following triptych of non-interchangeable elements: sustainable development, human rights, and local democracy.

These principles are incomplete if they are not combined with a genuine commitment to ensuring the respect of the rights of those that have been left behind for so long. For example, persons experiencing extreme poverty live in a vicious cycle of powerlessness, stigmatization, discrimination, exclusion and material deprivation, which all mutually reinforce one another. More needs to be done if we aim to reach these set SDG 1 targets by 2030, especially in terms of indicators such as the implementation of social protection floors, ensuring equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services.

Reaching the furthest away means giving them ownership over the process of developing their environment sustainably. This moreover implies that they are empowered enough in the decision-making process over policies that affect their lives, which is a sine qua none condition to the achievement of their human rights as well.
29
5/14/2019 23:20:55Md Biozid Jessorey
Shorab Ali Dewan Cultural Society
Bangladesh
info.sadcs@gmail.com
Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations
Major key expectation is exchange of knowledge and build partnership to achieve agenda 2030.
Knowledge transfer and financial for development.
Here in Bangladesh we are working with youth and entrepreneurs. Our focus area are food and energy.
Listen to youth act inter-generation to achieve 2030
Commitment and working towards commitment will make this summit success.
30
5/15/2019 16:57:41ElsaMarie DSilvaRed Dot FoundationIndia
elsamarieds@gmail.com
Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations
Key expectations from the Summit will be providing a voice to everyone, transparency regarding achievements of the SDGs and a renewed urgency to achieve the goals. An accountability mechanism must be put in place.
Lack of uniform data to identify if there is actual progress or not.
Lack of awareness about the SDGs at the citizen level.
Lack of accountability on the parts of Government to implement the SDGs.

Challenges are funding for NGOs to implement the SDGs.

Progress is slow.
We have used social media to educate people on the SDGs and through our work with Safecity we are working on SDG5, 11, 10, 16 and 17. Our work is on sexual violence prevention, gender equality, creating resilient and inclusive cities through partnerships.
All organisations should report their work through the SDGs.
It should be part of the educational curriculum.
Gender equality which cuts across all SDGs must be given an important platform.
Give space to indigenous people, rural people, youth and senior citizens to share their voice. This can be done in each country through FGDs and on social media. We need more voices than the same old voices. Amplify innovations already identified through Solutions Summit, SDG Action festival to be replicated.
Despite the Beti bachao, beti padhao (Save daughters, educate daughters) of the Government of India, we still have a horrific sex ratio. The latest statistics for 2 of the states - Rajasthan and Andhra Pradesh indicate that female births have declined to 806 per 1000 male births.

This skewed sex ratio indicates that girls are seen as a liability and a burden and impacts their status in society. In rural areas, education of girls is still not a priority.

Unless we take a holistic and multi perspective approach which places the girls at the centre of our policy design, we will not be able to solve this problem. In our work, we have come across girls who want to aspire for more - they want to be astronauts, police officers, doctors and teachers. But in many homes they are not allowed to pursue education beyond a point for a multitude of reasons as explained above. We have to change the way girls are perceived and build their confidence in themselves and in those around them.
31
5/17/2019 3:42:42Kirsty LeongWWF-International Singapore
kaleong@wwfint.org
Non-Governmental Organizations
• The summit should emphasize an integrated approach to climate, nature and sustainable development, to accelerate progress on achieving global goals, by underlining that human well-being, food security and poverty eradication cannot be achieved without restoring nature and tackling climate change, and that environmental stewardship and sustainable development reinforce one another
• Member states should acknowledge the urgency of the need to address the interlinked climate and nature crises
• The summit must reinvigorate high level political commitment to the 2030 Agenda and strengthen commitments and scale up actions to ensure that no one is left behind, through representative, inclusive and transparent SDGs implementation and monitoring mechanisms at country level, recognizing the important role of IPLCs
• A clear way forward must be found to ensure continuity of environmental and other SDG targets with an end date of 2020 or 2025. We must raise global ambition and accelerate action to restore nature in order to achieve the SDGs, recognizing the multiple benefits of nature-based solutions for climate, community livelihoods, health and well-being as well as for biodiversity
● Establish sustainable development governance mechanisms that include transparent, representative and participatory, multi sectoral and multi stakeholder implementation and monitoring at country level
● Avoid cherry-picking of individual SDGs for implementation. Only in tackling the Goals together can transformative outcomes be achieved
● Need to facilitate integrated implementation of SDGs through adequate investment and governance reforms to ensure policy coherence across government at multiple levels
● Lack of progress on environmental goals and targets; nature must become a head of state/government and cross-sectoral priority, while action and investments must be massively scaled up to reverse biodiversity loss
● Financing the goals in an equitable manner and raising the trillions required, including re-directing environmentally harmful subsidies and investments towards addressing climate change, nature decline and sustainable development.
● Develop innovative, just and new transformative business and economic models that are pro-SDGs and pro-nature, with transfer of technology and sustainable financing to SIDS and developing countries
Strengthening local and regional implementation:
• WWF India is working with the state of Uttar Pradesh to develop and implement a road map for integration of SDGs at the district level
• WWF Kenya plays a leading role in the SDG Kenya Forum – a multi-stakeholder forum for SDGs implementation. They are also working with 4 (sub-national) counties to integrate SDGs monitoring into county plans and have delivered awareness raising workshops on SDGs to local and indigenous communities
• WWF Switzerland works with universities, that act as “living lab” and host multi-stakeholder collaboration to find concrete and effective solutions for the implementation of SDGs at local and regional level
Facilitating multi-stakeholder partnerships for SDGs implementation:
• WWF DRC, in partnership with the DRC Ministry of Rural Development, have developed and scaled a monitoring tool for communities and indigenous peoples to monitor progress on SDGs
Enhancing knowledge sharing for SDGs implementation:
• WWF runs an internal global community of practice (SDG Hub) that aims to accelerate national SDG implementation through knowledge exchange and collective action on SDGs
1. Express alarm at rapid and severe nature and biodiversity loss that is putting at risk human health and wellbeing and risk of reversing decades of progress in development and fight against poverty and hunger. In line with the best science available (see IPBES Summary for Policy Makers), commit to take urgent, ambitious and transformative action to protect and restore the web of life that supports humanity. Commit to support the President of the General Assembly in organizing a Heads of State Nature Summit in 2020.
2. Recognize that climate change, nature loss and sustainable development are different facets of the same challenge. Call for relevant conventions to come together to enhance coherence, alignment, cooperation and collective impact to address our duel climate and nature crises. Commit to ensuring continuity of the biodiversity related SDG targets with an end date of 2020, to maintain integrity and ambition of the 2030 Agenda.
3. Commit to creating enabling conditions and to strengthen mechanisms at the national and local levels for coherent, integrated implementation of the 2030 Agenda, through inclusive partnerships, to ensure positive impact for nature and people.
● Adequate space, and UN funding should be given to representatives of Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Defenders that are at the forefront of the fight for sustainable development and to protect Nature.
● In the Declaration, include commitment to any international agreements and conventions supporting the rights of Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Defenders.
● Provide targeted funding, capacity building for youth-led organisations and networks to be part of planning and decision making of the Summit.
● Speeches, declaration and outcomes systematically recognize that a completely new relation with nature is required based on long term sustainable management.
● Increase awareness by Heads of State of the brave efforts of many communities and indigenous peoples to protect the environment from rapid and massive loss in the right places for guaranteeing the future of communities and livelihoods.
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5/17/2019 10:19:22Atef SolimanGatef organizationEgypt
tfgrgs@yahoo.com.au
Non-Governmental Organizations, Asia Pacific Regional CSO Engagement Mechanism
Not nowWomen , kids and youth
Already I have more than 3
LaterNot now
33
5/17/2019 12:57:19Abigail Ruane
Women's International League for Peace and Freedom
Global
abigail.ruane@wilpf.org
Women
The Ministerial Declaration should commit to tackling structural gender inequalities, discrimination, and violence to ensure the SDGs truly benefit those who are marginalized and systematically excluded. It should take a bottom-up approach that builds on national and regional forums and outcome documents to maximise input from regional spaces addressing key structural challenges.
It should recognise gender equality as central to sustainable peace and development and commit to action to tackle systemic obstacles -- including patriarchy, militarism, and corporate power -- in order to realise the 2030 Agenda and create a sustainable and equitable future for people and planet.
The success of the SDGs is their transformative vision to leave no one behind, and call for policy coherence and coordination that should fundamentally shift business as usual to support the participation, rights, and livelihoods of those most marginalised and the planet we live in.

The challenge of the SDGs is that instead of transformation, the focus has been on incremental, technical change, and coordination and coherence has not been realised. As a result, the SDGs have failed to address how current discredited neoliberal paradigm has brought on multiple crises and deepening inequality, exclusion and marginalization, especially of poor women from poor communities in the South. They have failed to recognise how rich countries are undermining other countries' efforts to achieve the SDGs through weapons exports, tax havens, environmental damages, and trade flows which undermine peace and security, economic stability, and environmental flourishing. They have ignored how current institutions rely on and reinforce systems of coercion and control of women, marginalised communities, and planet, and reinforce power and privilege of men, rich corporations, and global north.
In Sweden, political leadership by Minister for Foreign Affairs Margot Wallström, resulted in the country becoming in 2014 the first country in the world to launch a feminist foreign policy; this aimed at systematically integrating a gender perspective into the foreign policy agenda by “strengthen[ing] all women’s and girls’ Rights, Representation and Resources, based on the Reality in which they live.”

In Colombia, mobilisation by women-led civil society organisations resulted in a constitution with over 100 gender provisions, including on zero tolerance for sexual and gender-based violence.While continued action is needed to translate these commitments into reality, post-conflict reconstruction offers an opportunity to re-set the baseline away from segregated and gender-blind approaches and toward inclusive and equitable alternatives: this requires designing democratic systems for non-discriminatory participation, investing in reparations for harms suffered during the conflict, and prioritising social protection floors that ensure economic, social and cultural rights, rather than austerity measures that undermine and re-institutionalise discrimination and violence.
1. Strengthen interlinkages between SDGS and Human Rights:
Call on UN HR Special Rapporteurs and treaty body members including CEDAW, UPR, CRC, CESCR to make interpretive comments on SDGs and integrate SDGs into their work
Call on ECOSOC and DESA to invite HR Special Rapporteurs and treaty body members to participate in HLPF
Call on member states to address CEDAW, UPR, and other treaty body recommendations in VNRs
Call on UN to include queries on action on CEDAW/UPR reviews in VNR Guidelines

2. Strengthen synergies between SDGs and other UN processes:
Call for an integrated approach that joins up action across UN system and in country
Call on Member States to support actions and platforms promoting policy coherence for gender equality (including around Beijing+25, WPS+20, NPT+50, UN+75)

3. Strengthen women’s meaningful participation:
Reaffirm Rio Principle 10 for substantive participation based on access to information, public participation, and justice
Call for SDG review processes to publish alternative reports, increase time to discuss VNRs and Q&A, and support civil society engagement mechanisms and feminist civil society core, sustained funding
Leaving no one behind requires tackling structural obstacles. It requires leadership and policy coordination and coherence to align budgets with priorities for people and planet. It requires a focus on gender equality, climate justice, and peace, and data that enables more responsive governance. It requires strengthening risk assessment procedures to address gendered, environmental, and peace risks, and taking action on these assessments to not just evaluate sector risks within sectors (i.e., environmental risks in environmental work, or gender risks in social sectors), but holistically across sectors as well (i.e, assessing environmental, gender, and peace impacts of overarching fiscal priorities as well as addressing multiple risks within each sector). It requires taking action based on these assessments to shift away from traditional gender blind approaches that subsidize climate catastrophe and militarised violence. Instead, it requires shifting towards investment in gender equitable social protection systems, reparations, and the institutions guaranteeing women’s human rights, including sexual and reproductive health and rights, livelihoods, and restorative justice systems.
At the Security Council, the Women, Peace and Security Agenda puts forward a vision of peace that works for women and all people. Realising SDGs requires accelerating WPS commitments as a key priority for SDG16 in line with CEDAW General Recommendation 30 and Beijing Platform for Action Area E. It also requires ensuring extraterritorial accountability including on flows of small arms and light weapons (16.2) to strengthen prevention of gender based and other forms of violence (5.4, 16.1) in line with the Arms Trade Treaty gender criterion (Article 7(4)); this means strengthening implementation of national action plans on small arms and light weapons in line with the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat, and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects (PoA). It requires strengthening coordination and accountability to reduce current expansion of militarised security and strengthen peace governance and protection of civilians.

Delaying action for women and girls is not an option. The time is now for women’s leadership and a women’s rights and peace agenda for every women and every girl of every age, place, ability and status, and for all of us!
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5/19/2019 2:59:46NZOA GERVAIS
Centre Accompagnement des Alternatives Locales de Developpement (Caald)
Cameroon
gervaisnzoa@gmail.com
Indigenous Peoples
Implementation of the UNDRIP, the Convention 169, the WCIP, the SWAP, the participation of the indigenous peoples and the agenda 2030 in the UNDAF and the Review national voluntary.
Implementation of the UNDRIP, the Convention 169 and the Agenda 2030 in the UNDAF
Examen national volontaire done by States member during the HLFP and local, regional and international levels.
1. "Ne laisser personne pour compte" dans l'implementation de des examens nationaux volontaires;
2. Integrer Agenda 2030 dans les reformes du systeme des Nations Unies et des Etats membres;
3. Consolider la paix par la mise en oeuvre des 17 ODD et le suivi systematique des examens nationaux volontaires.
Etablir des plateformes internationales, regionales et locales de suivi des examens nationaux volontaires et de l'agenda 2030 y compris des ODD.
Etablir une planification systematique des examens nationaux volontaires, de l'agenda 2030 et des ODD.
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5/19/2019 8:43:32Samir Kumar Das
International Movemennt for Advancement of Education Culture Social & Economic Development (IMAECSED)
India
samirkdaslegal@gmail.com
Non-Governmental Organizations, Together 2030
SDG is a vital issue before the present Summit which requires countries over the next 15 years to set targets for delivering on social, economic and environment for SD. HLPF as the highest platform empowering people, ensuring inclusiveness and equality, particularly focus on issues related to within-country inequalities. Participants will share knowledge about success stories, good practices, how to strengthen their challenges and identify areas of concern.
Stakeholders are one of the most integral and significant in the summit to contribute their best for the development and adoption of the 2030 Agenda. They are as a group can gather their knowledge, innovative idea and strengthen activity towards the summit and communicate it through networking and other. The stakeholders engagement in the summit provide an opportunity to access & submit all official information and documents, attend forum meetings, present written and oral contributions, recommendation, organize side events and round tables, in regional civil society coordination mechanisms, the preparatory process for thematic reviews, submit input and comments to the Ministerial Declaration.
The paradigm of 2030 Agenda for SD is a plan of action for people, planet, prosperity, peace and partnerships to ensure progress from the bottleneck. The development of these goals should not divert focus or effort from the achievement of the MDG. In 2015 September the world leader took the charge of 17 new Agenda inclusive of its commitment to complete the unfinished job from the earlier Agenda. Over the next 15 years, the target was set for delivering on social, economic and environmental tenets for sustainable development. The SDG to be action-oriented, concise and easy to communicate, limited in number, and universally applicable to all countries while taking into account different national realities, capacities and levels of development policies and priorities.
All the countries including UN and all other sectors are putting their utmost effort to away from the human race from the tyranny of poverty and want to heal and secure our planet. weak planning, coordination gaps, data and reporting inadequacies, human and financial resource insufficiency, collaboration gaps, weak public-private partnerships and mobilizing the population around the development agenda.
To attain the best practice we embrace a strong Forum to foster progress towards the attainment of the 17 ambitious and indivisible SDG towards inclusive, equitable, and prosperous societies for all. We put our best effort to enhance national capacity to formulate and implement development policies, plans and programmes. The ambitious and comprehensive nature of the 2030 Agenda calls for further enhancement of national capacity on how best to steer inclusive development across time, sector, and regions. We have undertaken a number of planning how to improve institutional functionality and steer coordination and implementation for national development programs. We thrive to ensure the best result to encourage and inspire other to work for the Agenda with mass support, devising new means to holistically plan, addressing challenges to implement and monitor development programs, etc. The summit itself as a commitment, the participants here already mobilise their achievements or goals either individually or with the coordination of others. We will continue to move forward, make progress, and accelerate further efforts in a more robust, and action-oriented manner.
The HLPF is the UN central platform, during the summit, three political messages noticed for progress made and challenges encountered empowering people and ensuring inclusiveness and equality has been considered as one of the most important factor for progress. It aims to transform our world and to improve people's lives and prosperity on a healthy planet. It applies to all countries through partnerships and peace. Countries, regions, cities, the business sector and civil society are actively engaged in implementing the Agenda and the SDG. They are mobilizing efforts to end all forms of poverty, fighting inequalities and tackling climate change, while ensuring that no one is left behind. The summit will be a space to discuss the huge efforts that are being made and to identify future actions for accelerating progress towards the SDG.
The summit is an opportunity presents to renew commitment to sustainable and inclusive growth, build stronger partnerships for implementation of the national development agenda, and accelerate efforts and to mobilise the means of implementation of progress
Ensuring that growth is equitable and sustainable, leaving no one behind is a commitment, in an effort to help countries promote inclusive growth and achieve the hallmark of SDG. The people left behind who has received too little attention or structurally locked out of progress is at the heart of the SDG and key feature to the commitment ‘leave no one behind’ and is a prerequisite for achieving 2030 Agenda. leaving no one behind requires not only a targeted focus on the youth, children, women, aged, persons with disabilities, eradicate poverty in all its forms, income and gender inequalities, limited access to socioeconomic services impede inclusive growth and development, exacerbate the vulnerabilities. There is a moral imperative to address social exclusion.

They are mobilizing efforts to end all forms of poverty, fighting inequalities and tackling climate change, while ensuring that no one is left behind. The summit will be a space to discuss the huge efforts that are being made and to identify future actions for accelerating progress towards the SDGs. These all reflects certain categories to enrich the furthest away first and to ensure that no one is left behind.
HLPF embraced the principles for sustainable development stipulated in the 2030 Agenda. as being the key issue this Agenda is a plan of action for people, planet, prosperity, peace and partnerships to ensure that no one is left behind. It builds for the unfinished business of MDG and committed to eradicate poverty in all its forms. Building on this progress, the 2030 Agenda therefore, presents an opportunity to all concern to refocus its development, address the bottlenecks that hamper development, network with others and accelerate its efforts towards achieving best results.

Despite the above progress, still this summit has significant space for improvement in pursuit with the agenda. The economy is still heavily reliant on natural resources and agriculture; the current demographic structure propagates a high dependency ratio and low domestic savings; there is continued pressure for limited access to modern forms of energy; inequality, vulnerability among different segments of the population, economic turmoil especially at regional level.
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5/19/2019 18:43:28Mabel Bianco
FEIM , WMG OP for LAC
Argentina
bianco.mabel@gmail.com
Women
To be able to participate and that all MGoS will be able to enter the room and also we were able to share our positions speaking , so if its possible each MGoS can have time assign to express our opinions and have our voice in the session .
The Ministerial Declaration should commit to tackling structural gender inequalities, discrimination, and violence to ensure the SDGs truly benefit those who are marginalized and systematically excluded. It should take a bottom-up approach that builds on national and regional forums and outcome documents to maximize input from regional spaces addressing key structural challenges.
1. Strengthen interlinkages between SDGS and Human Rights:
Call on ECOSOC and DESA to invite HR Special Rapporteurs and treaty body members to participate in HLPF. Call on member states to address CEDAW, UPR, and other treaty body recommendations in VNRs
2. Strengthen synergies between SDGs and other UN processes: including around Beijing+25, WPS+20, NPT+50, UN+75
3. Strengthen women’s meaningful participation: include in the whole process and support technically and funding .
Call for SDG review processes to publish alternative reports, increase time to discuss VNRs and Q&A, and support civil society engagement mechanisms and feminist civil society core, sustained funding

Call on UN HR Special Rapporteurs and treaty body members including CEDAW, UPR, CRC, CESCR to make interpretive comments on SDGs and integrate SDGs into their work
Reaffirm Rio Principle 10 for substantive participation based on access to information, public participation, and justice
Consider the whole Agenda in each HLPF independently of the principal SDGs consider in each HLPF and always crosscutting SDG5 with all others SDGS . Emphasize interlinkages particularly with SDG5 and include considerations and relations to HR Resolutions particularly CEDAW, CDC, UPR , and others .
Promote meaningful participation of CS including access to the whole process at country level, promote the access of all NGOs not only those bigs and in the capitals. Include the funding support of CS participation .
The Ministerial Declaration should commit to tackling structural gender inequalities, discrimination, and violence to ensure the SDGs truly benefit those who are marginalized and systematically excluded.
It should take a bottom-up approach that builds on national and regional forums and outcome documents to maximize input from regional spaces addressing key structural challenges. Implementation aspects must be prioritize in Regional and national level .Not at Global level.
Ensure women's groups and CSOs particularly indigenous and afro descendants women as well as migrants must be ensure to be consider and incorporate in the national regional and global level .
if all CS groups are mentioned we need to listing all women's, girls and adolescents groups, LGBTI, Migrants, Indigenous , afro descendants , disabled , persons living with HIV, and rural women as well as entrepreneurs . So the Summit declaration needs to recommend listing all those in the Declaration in order MS understand no one of this must be leave behind .
Also the Summit Declaration must recommend the consideration of the integral Agenda 2030 and to incorporate the needs of all those groups previously mention in order "not leave anyone behind its a real commitment nor merely a promise .
Recommend aDESA and ECOSOC to adopt a more flexible programe of HLPF in the next cycle allowing more dialogue among MS and all other Stake holders in the Global level , increasing the time to Q&A and being more flexible in the method to manage the questions . Recognize the Alternative reports and giving visibility and time to discuss with MS their comments and proposals .
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5/20/2019 11:50:37
GIULIA MASSOBRIO
INTERNATIONAL TRADE UNION CONFEDERATION
Belgium
giulia.massobrio@ituc-csi.org
Workers & Trade Unions
First of all, we expect the Summit to raise the level of ambition on SDG8. We expect the Political Declaration of the Summit to include an explicit commitment to a Universal Labour Guarantee that provides a protection floor for all workers. This means rights and women’s equality are respected, jobs are decent with minimum living wages and collective bargaining, workers have some control over working time, social protection coverage is universal, due diligence and accountability drive business operations, access to free and quality public services is guaranteed to all without discrimination, and social dialogue ensures Just Transition measures for climate, technology and displacement.
Secondly, we expect a strong commitment to reform the follow-up and review mechanisms of the 2030 Agenda (based on the HLPF and the Regional Fora), in order to ensure the monitoring system is anchored to binding criteria (such as international labour and human rights standards), it provides an adequate follow-up process on the VNRs and it enables the effective participation of MGoS in the implementation of SDGs at the local, national, regional and global level.



Evidence shows we are out of track to achieve the SDGs. The analysis of SDG 8, under review in 2019, already shows the urgency of delivering on Agenda2030’s commitments. Indeed, the recent ILO’s Report “Work for a brighter future” highlights that “unemployment remains unacceptably high, billions of workers are in informal employment, a staggering 300 million workers live in extreme poverty and millions of men, women and children are victims of modern slavery”.
Likewise, modalities for effective engagement of non-state actors in national development plans on SDGs must to be improved (SDG 17). Indeed, according to our trade union SDGs country profiles (https://www.ituc-csi.org/2030Agenda), limitations to information access were registred in a number of forms, while only a few countries were shown to have adequate consultation processes in place. Finally, social dialogue is still insufficiently integrated into the implementation process of the SDGs, even though the use of tripartite or bipartite social dialogue to establish common positions between employers and employees has been shown to yield significant results towards achieving the 2030 Agenda.


Trade Unions’ best practices on SDGs include:
- The elaboration of trade union shadow reports on SDGs, which proved to be a useful tool to reinforce the accountability of governments, call for the effective involvement of trade unions in national development strategies, as well as to build alliances with other stakeholders. The reports provide independent monitoring of key SDGs (1,5,8,10,13,16) by evaluating the implementation based on transparency, consultation and social dialogue, and highlighting workers’ priorities at national level.
- The promotion of Social Dialogue as a mean of implementation of A2030: the ITUC has conducted several case studies demonstrating the important contributions workers can make to sustainable development where their rights are guaranteed in an enabling environment and when they can participate in institutional social dialogue structures to advance social, economic and environmental policies

1) A Commitment to a Universal Labour Guarantee that provides a protection floor for all workers. This means rights and women’s equality are respected, jobs are decent with minimum living wages and collective bargaining, workers have some control over working time, social protection coverage is universal, due diligence and accountability drive business operations, access to free and quality public services such as health and education is guaranteed to all without discrimination, and social dialogue ensures Just Transition measures for climate, technology and displacement.
2) A commitment to business accountability in development, in order to ensure private sector engagement in development is aligned with the SDGs, and comply with international labour standards, responsible business conduct based on due diligence, and fiscal and environmental liability.
3) A Commitment to reform the follow-up and review mechanisms of the 2030 Agenda. We need to ensure the monitoring system is anchored to binding criteria (such as international labour and human rights standards) and enables the effective participation of trade unions and civil society organizations.

The principles of ‘leaving no one behind’ and ‘reaching the furthest away first’ will be properly reflected in the Summit if and only if the Summit delivers a truly renewed commitment to reach the SDGs and a meaningful commitment to reform the SDGs monitoring and review system currently in place.
In order for that to happen, as mentioned in our answer to the first Question of the Consultation, we expect the Summit to:
- raise the level of ambition on SDG8. Given the centrality of SDG8 for the achievement of all the other Goals, and in the framework of the centenary of the ILO, we expect the Political Declaration of the Summit to include an explicit commitment to a Universal Labour Guarantee that provides a protection floor for all workers;
- commit to reform the follow-up and review mechanisms of the 2030 Agenda (based on the HLPF and the Regional Fora), in order to ensure the monitoring system is linked to anchored to binding criteria (such as international labour and human rights standards), it provides an adequate follow-up process on the VNRs and it enables the effective participation of MGoS in the implementation of SDGs at the local, national, regional and global level.
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5/21/2019 5:54:32Nozipho Wright
ENERGIA Internation Network on Gender and Sustainable Energy
Botswana
honeybushnw@gmail.com
Women
Firm commitment and and accountability by national governments to implement clean cooking solutions.

Women and children who spend on average 1.4 hours a day collecting solid fuels (i.e., wood, crop wastes, charcoal, coal or dung) and cooking with inefficient stoves.
Large scale power projects prioritized over provision of energy for clean cooking. These projects do not by nature target the marginalized/ women/ poor rural households.
Global warming (heat waves) has led to exposure to extreme heat for women cooking in open fires.
Countries where IAP appears not to be an issue e.g. open fire cooking, may not feel the urgency to deploy clean cooking solutions.
Who is holding governments to account for implementation of clean cooking solutions?
Corrupt practices, lack of sustainable long-term clean energy development plans, and unfit investment environment, are some of the reasons for deteriorating energy state in any developing country.
Progress: 1. Research has been done: Polluting fuels used for cooking in 75% of HHs in rural communities across the world, 91% of rural households in Africa, and 82% rural households in the Western Pacific (IEA, 2017). 2. Ministerial declaration, HLPF 2018: ‘We call upon governments and all stakeholders to make clean cooking solutions a priority’.
Women's Rights Organisations holding government to account with regard to clean cooking. Notifying the policy makers that by place 'cooking programmes' at the bottom of the implementation list showed lack of commitment and that addressing cooking was obviously not a priority for the government. Government encouraged to review this situation and treat cooking as an urgent issue.
1. Partner with Women's Rights Organisations, communities and other CSO to develop and implement clean cooking solutions.
2. Develop and approve budgets for implementation of clean cooking solutions.
3. Support women's organisations working on clean cooking.
Need to involve more grassroots organisations even at the level of the summit.
1. Capacity building is crucial: communities, women, youth, IPPs, policy makers, CSO, private sector, universities, etc. should understand why there is a need for a cleaner environment, what energy represents in their individual life, and economy.
2 Capacities in all domains: education, sensitization, information, knowledge sharing mechanisms, technical, organizational, financial, technological, innovations
3. Ensure rights based approach in addressing cooking solutions. Lack of clean cooking solutions impugn on the right to life.
4. Each stage of energy planning and policy-making needs to factor in gender dimensions and actively support and advance women’s rights to meet SDG 7 and SDG 5
5. Support clean cooking fuels and technologies: National governments should be encouraged and supported to demonstrate greater political and financial commitment to ensure that all households switch to clean fuels and stoves. Government in developing countries could subsidize clean cooking solutions in HHs.
6. Financial allocations / commitments have to be made for capacity building of rural women to address this issue.
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5/21/2019 17:13:24
Vivienne Solis Rivera
CoopeSoliDar R.LCosta Rica
vsolis@coopesolidar.org
Women, Non-Governmental Organizations, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
A concise and well thought route towards 2030. We should contribute in all possible ways.
Poverty, inequity, development model favoring only power sectors.
We have been following up on SDG 14th, working with the implementation of the Guidelines for the sustainability of small scale fishers in the context of food security and erradication of poverty. Great work and amazing impacts at the local coastal and marine level.
1.- Their is a strong need for a human-rights base approach to marine conservation.
2.- Implementation of the guidelines for the sustainability of small scale fishers in the context of food security and poverty erradicación is a most.
3.- By 230, assure that women and girls are taking on effective stewardship and are equitable benefits from biodiversity of environmental services
With strong participation of major groups and within it the most vulnerable sectors as small scale fishers from all over the world.
Lets go for it!!!!!
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5/22/2019 6:27:46Terry ObathHelpAge KenyaKenya
terryobath@helpagekenya.com
Older Persons
Key expectation for the Summit need to be the formulation of generic solutions and implementation of older persons issues including all people of all ages. Different countries they may be, but the issues for the older persons are the same globally. Access to health, protection, transport and government departments for intervention need to be flagged. Older persons also need to be recognised and enumerated during census operations in order for their needs to be considered during budgeting.
Some countries have done well in some areas. In Kenya for example, the provision of a cash transfer system to older persons has been initiated and is very successful. Unfortunately, many were not captured in data for the last census and have missed out on the cash transfer. Whereas this is an internal country problem, it may also have occurred elsewhere. Access to health facilities is limited due to distances and/or lack of such facilities. Infrastructure development has happened in some areas making travel easy but this is usually on the back of a motorcycle which is the most unsafe for the elderly.
We recently concluded an e-citizen registration exercise whose aim is to capture data on all citizens. Children were also included for the first time. This data capture goes a long way in country planning in meeting SDG goals.
You are here because the elderly preceded you.
The only way to avoid growing old is to die young.
The elderly are the custodians of our treasures of tradition, history and the future.
Although globally the number of older persons is diverse, it is increasing where there is low child birth exists, and where medical interventions are available. They must always be considered alongside all people of all ages in government planning.
The mortality rate for adults in parts of Africa has increased to 60+. This in total makes a considerable number of older persons who are still able to participate in nation building, pay taxes through the businesses they have set up after retirement, and contribute to the greater growth of the nation.
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5/22/2019 15:35:31Atef SolimanGatef organizationEgypt
tfgrgs@yahoo.com.au
Non-Governmental Organizations, Volunteer Groups, Together 2030
At the conferenceAt the conferenceAlready I have moreAlready I have moreManyNo thanks
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5/22/2019 16:16:37
Rosario del Pilar Diaz Garavito
The Millennials Movement
Peru
r.garavito@themillennialsmovement.org
Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations
I expect from the summit to see a real 4 years evaluation that do not only showcase the good experiences but also a serious review of the lessons learned, challenges are experiences that did not achieved the expected results, so we can start with a clearer panorama, building over the stronger bases. I also expect to see government commitments not with abstract concepts but but specialized processed that are running in parallel with the 2030 Agenda and directly contribute with the SDGs achievement, such as clear responses with the Paris agreements, the Escazu Agreement, the 2250 Resolution and others. We can contribute by giving a feed back of how we perceived the 2030 Agenda implementation in our context and also help to identify actions lead by civil society that effectively contribute with the government efforts to achieve the SDGs by 2030.
We have build a global and regional structure to follow up the agenda and we have created the needed rules to work on these processes. However, even so we have these structures and rules I have perceived that we are mobilizing resources and efforts to contribute with those processes but there are not clear commitments taken on them. The discourse of lets fight poverty does not match national and local actions to truly implement the agenda. Political interest, corruption and apparent negative to set up rules to change our consumption patrons to change a system that is depressing our natural resources and is leaving no hope for future generations is a reality we face.

The Member States representatives have mention many times that the agenda needs to be focus on people and the defense of their human rights but we still run the multilateral process within structures that allow certain states to have a veto power and impose their political agenda over the humanitarian crisis people are suffering in diverse context in world.
The 2030 Agenda Citizens Ambassadors Program, aims to engage local youth lead and focus civil society organizations in the 2030 Agenda sensitization, implementation and monitoring processes in the LAC region. On 2018 the program delivered it's 3rd edition engaging youths in 8 countries of the region benefiting 68 young lead civil society organizations, who engaged 15000 people in the region.
https://sdgactioncampaign.org/2017/03/16/programa-de-embajadores- peru-agenda-2030-por-el-desarrollo-sostenible-y-el-mundo-que-queremos/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDDqsxBJ0BU

2030 LAC Youth Forum / 2019, was a participatory process on the frame of the LAC Countries Forum for Sustainable Development organized by ECLAC. The 6 months process allowed 1000+ youth from diverse countries in the region to engage and create contributions on the frame of the 6 SDGs under review on 2019, by leading more than 50 youth local dialogues, participating of an online consultation and participating of a regional forum held on Santiago de Chile at the ECLAC venue.
• https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jVzRT4mRyLk&t=13348s 2:30:40 minute
• http://conferencias.cepal.org/jovenesODS2019/
"Do not leave youths behind, do not let this generation and the next ones disappear with this planet and find yourselves in a future with no people and humans rights what to defend.”

We count on you (governments), with your political will, with your commitment. We take into account each time you mentions in your speeches youths were one of your priorities, each of the occasions when you encouraged us to look with hope at the present and the future, even so humanity is threatened by a new process of massive extinction, inequality, violence and conflicts. We still trust you.

The LAC region is considered the most violent and unequal in the world, where youths are objects of systematic violence in all of its forms, objects of social stigma because our young condition, victims of conflicts and consequences of climate change that force us to leave our homes and families in the look for a better future, for our survival. We urge your action otherwise we will be those decision makers and adults who won’t have the right skills and tools to face much more complex challenges, reducing opportunities for older generations and the future ones.
By sharing the process by different media spaces, by requesting the member states to notify the local constituencies about the process. To support the participation of diverse actors who had engaged their communities through a diverse range of processes at the local level, bringing their voices and aspirations. By running open consultations for citizens to bring their perceptions on the 2030 Agenda implementation.
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5/22/2019 17:20:03Peter Carter
Climate Emergency Institute
Canada
petercarter46@shaw.ca
Non-Governmental Organizations
The obvious climate, oceans and biodiversity emergency must be declared. A report on Our Common Future Survival.The murderous destruction of Mother Earth must stop. A vast Manhattan-Marshall venture rebuilding the world for zero combustion energy, and air CO2 removal, is required for our survival. Climate and oceans greenhouse gas disruption must stop. Global emissions must drop 50% by 2030 (IPCC 2018). If not our common future survival is doubtful. It is universally agreed global emissions must decline fast from 2020. Deforestation must stop, land and marine protected areas greatly expanded. Presently most governments are preventing the rapid global emissions decline, by subsidizing fossil fuels. Over many years there is agreement on elimination of fossil fuel subsidies, which must now be immediate. The IMF review (May 2019) finds “Globally, subsidies remained large … projected at $5.2 trillion (6.5 percent of GDP) in 2017. All agree that these are damaging environmentally, socially and economically. Rights for Mother Earth and future generations enshrined.
There has been no substantive progress. Ecosystems and life are collapsing faster than ever. This document is out of touch with today’s dire climate, oceans and biodiversity emergency reality,despite the UN assessments. Today all GHG pollution adverse indicators and direct effects are accelerating (StateofOurClimate.com at https://static.secure.website/wscfus/9167827/10145658/egu-co2-jump-8-mar-2019.pdf). Atmospheric CO2 is at 411 ppm (mean) accelerating faster than ever (first quarter 2019). In 2017 the WMO reported “such abrupt changes in the atmospheric levels of CO2 have never before been”. CO2 is increasing faster than life has ever experienced, as is ocean acidification. Atmospheric methane is increasing faster than ever. Global surface warming (NASA 1.32C 1st quarter 2019), ocean heat and de-oxygenation are all accelerating. The challenge is gargantuan including to correct the economic market failures by prohibiting Earth destructive practices: subsidies; future discounting; and externalization of costs, with Earth respecting protective governance. Human beings are not in fact at the center of our affairs- Earth is.
Best practices involves environmental health risk assessment management and regulation, with global catastrophic risk aversion. This works well for example in protecting us from carcinogenic pollution, but has not been applied for Earth- protecting the forests, atmosphere, and oceans on which all humanity depends for survival. This management has to be human and Earth ethics based. Perverse free market economics can no longer be allowed to rule over environmental conservation and protection. The multi-stakeholder works and needs to be routine with expenses paid where needed. Integrating environment economy and social equity can work but requires economics to be reformed by ethics (human and Earth).
The Burning Age is Over. Mother Earth rules over profit. Future generations have the right to survive and with a decent life.
Human and economic rights for youth and future generations. 'No one' and 'furthest way' must include future generations, other species and social groups of other creatures- as sacred trusts. We all (present and future) have no future with fossil fuels. It must be formally acknowledged at all levels that our survival is severely threatened by environmental pollution and degradation. Today we are all condemned to increasing unprecedented suffering and massive death ending in global greenhouse gas pollution oblivion. The world economy allows exploitation, oppression and societal theft. Our amoral economics is now the source of the greatest evil ever. National accounting (GDP) must include costs of environmental damages and benefits of environmental protection and regulation, extending to future generations. Free trade rules must not trump environment. This requires the involvement, cooperation and regulation of the corporate banks. The crime of usury must be restored. National debts must be periodically wiped clean (Jubilee) and lenders must not allow large oppressive debts to build up. Financing of Earth and future destructive projects prohibited.
Multiple lines of overwhelming evidence prove that the future has been written off and is rapidly being wiped out. This is global homicide and ecocide and should be declared an unprecedented moral crime. The public everywhere have the right to be told the truth and this should be documented by a new report Our Common Future Survival. This tragic state must be the starting point of the new agenda. Under Rio +12 all governments reaffirmed their commitments under the Rio documents, including the comprehensive Agenda 21 (see 2012 Review of implementation of Agenda 21 and the Rio Principles Synthesis) The world needs the Rio Agenda 21 principles as the binding basis of the 2030 agenda. These include inter and intra-generational equity, pollution prevention, full cost accounting, polluter pays, precautionary, environmental impact risk assessment and no externalizing socio-environmental costs. The living healthy Earth defines sustainable development. Change "..environmental purposes should not constitute a means of arbitrary or unjustifiable discrimination etc" to .. Trade and profit must not discriminate against Nature or environmental values present or future.
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5/23/2019 4:47:56Shaima Aly
Kenana Association for Sustainable Dev.
Egypt
kenana-egypt@socialworker.net
Women
An inclusive binding declaration that considers women needs in all regions, in all ages and in all sectors. We need a language that considers gender equality and focuses on women engagement in the sustainable development process.
The main areas of progress is represented in the enhance of environment awareness and the advocacy that surrounds global warming and the focus on the SDGs that tackle environmental issues. The main gaps are yet in some SDGs as SDG 8 especially in our region given the protracted conflicts and the political transformation periods in several countries. Creating decent work for women and men is still major challenge. On other hand, the SDG 5 and indicators still constitute a major gap. We need more inclusiveness for women in the political and economic arena in our region, but what women we want, we need to see marginalized women, new faces and real transparent equality process.
One of our best practices is engaging women with disability from Upper Egypt to discuss about the SDGs and Agenda 2030 and be engaged in the local nationalization process of relevant SDGs. No question that people with disability and women with disability in particular are quite aliened from the sustainable development process in North African countries. Therefore, we provided our volunteers with specific pillars and how the SDGs are aligned with their needs and expectations as vulnerable group.
We engaged them in several advocacy campaigns related to SDG 3, specifically on Aids prevention in co-operation with MENAHRA NGO for harm reduction. We also engaged them in advocacy campaigns related to quality education to call for including their needs in equality based education in the country.
- SDGs implementation is not a voluntary process, it is a binding pact. - Resources have to be mobilized to achieve the SDGs and leave no one behind. - Accountability and transparency are part and parcel of the sustainable development process.
A speakers from marginalized and less represented groups from each region has to speak. NGOs, and grassroot CSOs have to be present as monitors, and finally the chance to have statement from the Major Groups have to be considered.
Starting with UN and the 2020 reform, women from Arab Countries have to have further role in the political and development agenda in their region. Also, UN has to consider having more women from the region in the decision making bodies of the UN.
45
5/23/2019 10:44:17
Génesis Rafael López Ramírez
Fundación Colectivo Hombres XX, A. C.
México
hombresxx@gmail.com
Non-Governmental Organizations, Población LGBTI

Reach the goals of the SDGs and these will be fulfilled only if you pass from a National Voluntary Exam to a National Obligatory Exam
There are significant advances in SDG 10, but there is no point in having laws that protect vulnerable groups (specifically LGBTI) if they are not met.
Deficiencies and challenges in SDG 13, 15, 16.
Currently the defenders of land, water, fight against corruption and human rights have no protection and are being killed
The work is based on the correlation between the 17 SDGs and the alliances that have been woven with other groups outside the LGBTI theme.
We have achieved a vision of the other towards us as agents of change and fighting for a planet that is about to collapse and that is everyone's responsibility, regardless of skin color, sexuality, identity and gender expression, corporal characteristics, language or level of education.
We are all in this spaceship called planet earth and it is everyone's duty to take care of it

1. No more simulations, we want real actions
2. Fight against corruption and protection of human rights activists, no more killings for complaints and protection of defenders to the environment
3. Please! That the National Examinations cease to be voluntary and are Mandatory
Through the political will of the States and translating it into facts, not simulations
46
5/23/2019 12:34:28
ADAM MOHAMMED MUSTAPHA
FEEP-TAMALEGHANA
feeptamale@yahoo.com
Children & Youth
47
5/23/2019 13:01:10
SHAQUIRA GABRIELA LLANQUI CASTRO
HATITATPROPERU
quechuayllu@yahoo.es
Women, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Together 2030
enfrentar cambio climatico ,desarrollo sustinible.desechos humanos y educacion a pueblos indigenas.
prepararse a afrentar cambio climatico y resistir desafios que viene mas frecuente para mundo.
mas quenada prepararse lo es seguridad alimentaria es la primera prioritaria y vestimentas adaptables segun clima que nos acoje en nuestras zonas . el resto de actividades continuareamos todo los paises normal en forma paralelo segun causa.
prorisar actividad agropecuaria, priorisar actividad industria textiles confecciones ,priorisar actividad sanitaria educacion y derechos humanos.
todos nesecitamos vivir bien alimentados , bien vestidos y sanos ser bien recurso humano para pacificar al mundo.
adaptarse al actual como estamos en nuestros paises y hacer trabajos filantroficos bien basados a la realidad del clima que nos asotan.
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5/24/2019 6:45:29
M. Crispin Swedi Bilombele
Aube Nouvelle pour la Femme et le Développement (ANFD)
DR.Congo
crispin.bilo2015@gmail.com
Non-Governmental Organizations
Share the information and our experiences with other participants or civil society organizations that will be invited to this program in relation to the SDGs objectives and take concrete actions for the valorisation of millennium goals for sustainable development.
- We call on the summit to promote greater awareness of women's environmental issues and inclusive empowerment so that everyone and all countries feel concerned by the resolutions that will be taken by the world. Mountain peak ; Enable women to participate fully in decision-making,
- Respect the cultural integrity and rights of Aboriginal people and communities;
- Support civil society organizations to better work in the field in partnership with the government
- So our contribution will be to make better recommendations for the summit.
The most important areas of progress and information capacity building to provide local communities and resource users with the information and methodologies they need to sustainably manage their local environment and resources, using, as appropriate, local traditional knowledge and methods.
The main gaps and difficulties encountered since the adoption of the 2030 Agenda and focused on knowledge and skills to help communities or individuals find employment and participate in activities related to environment and development. Also, the lack of competent human resources can contribute to the success of such work. The obstacles we see in the adoption of the Program are related to lack of financial resources and lack of planning strategies.
Lack of non-extension information on the SDG objectives of the 2030 Agenda,
Lack of financial support to grassroots NGOs to support a community sustainability dynamic, which would include:
- Promote or create mechanisms at the grassroots level so that lessons and experience and knowledge can be shared among communities.
Proposed and widely promoted public awareness as an integral and essential part of a global education effort to strengthen attitudes, values ​​and activities that are compatible with sustainable development.
Promote training as one of the most important ways of developing human resources focused on specific trades and aim to fill knowledge and skill gaps to help marginalized communities find employment and skills. participate in activities related to environment and development.
To promote greater awareness of environmental and development issues with the following objective:
- Establish or strengthen vocational training programs that meet the needs of the environment and development and provide assured access to training opportunities, regardless of social condition, gender, age or religion,
Under the partnership, it would be beneficial to improve capacities and means at the regional level to enable sustainable development with the participation of non-governmental sectors. The aim will be to foster the capacity-building offered by human resources and non-governmental organizations and the need to better leverage one and improve the functioning of others, with a view to facilitating the exchange of data and information. information and experiences.
Evaluate the capacity and means of integrating environmental and development management to determine the impact of development projects on the environment and assess the ability to meet the needs for cooperation with respect to the environment. know-how in the context of biodiversity and climate change.
We will carry out outreach and awareness actions on the Millennium Development Goals for our members of our community and other concerned people. Thus, the means used will be: organization of sensitization workshops on the achievements of its objectives, exchanging experiences and sharing of information on the vision of the 2030 agenda, distribution of leaflets. For the most remote areas of our radius of action our animators will be able to sensitize the population by word of mouth by megaphone interpose on the achievements of its objectives.
Women have a vital role in managing conflict and protecting the environment and development. Their full participation is therefore essential to the achievement of sustainable development. Marginalized indigenous peoples and other local communities have a vital role to play in environmental management and development because of their local knowledge and traditional practices. States should recognize their identity, their culture and their interests, give them all the necessary support and enable them to participate effectively in achieving sustainable development of the 2030-2063 agenda
Establish a global partnership on a new and equitable basis by creating new levels of cooperation between states, key sectors of society and people,
Enabling the poor to have sustainable livelihoods Build the capacity of women and girls, especially in science education and training, to enable workers to achieve their environmental and development goals.
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5/24/2019 12:09:49Annie Weaver
World Organization of the Scout Movement
Malaysia/International
annie.weaver@scout.org
Children & Youth
An honest stock-taking and new concrete commitments to accelerate progress without wasting time on ceremonials and appraisal; reaffirmed and strengthened, not weakened, government commitments made in 2015; meaningful participation of INGYOs at the event and the opportunity to contribute to the negotiations of the outcome document; to have a document that clearly contains the demands of young people, recognizing they make up the majority of the population; that stakeholders can contribute with subject-matter expertise, knowledge, and experience of the actual progress made, represent the rights-holders, carry the voices of those left furthest behind, amplify the voices of grassroots movements, and exercise accountability.
Continuing challenges are financing, politics, recognition and involvement of stakeholders that are not States, grassroots buy-in without putting the onus of the responsibility on NGOs and grassroots actors, recognition and validation of non-formal education under Goal 4, and the role of non-state actors under Goal 4.
The Scout Movement has been successful in mobilizing young people at scale across our 50 million members for the Sustainable Development Goals with the Scouts for SDGs initiative, giving concrete tools and actions to young people to take action at the grassroots level and log their community service projects on our website (sdgs.scout.org). Since 2012, Scouts have completed over 1.2 billion hours of community service towards the SDGs (and MDGs) and we've pledged 3 billion more by 2030. We firmly believe that the SDGs can only be achieve with policy action by governments, drastic changes from the private sector, and mass mobilization at the grassroots level, which is what Scouting has committed to contributing to. From young people installing water tanks in schools in South Sudan so their peers can access education without falling ill to Scouts starting Scout groups in juvenile detention centres so young offenders can learn the skills needed to thrive upon release, Scouts are doing incredible things at the grassroots and this can be scaled up by: supplying easily accessible resources and calls to action, recognizing good work, and putting funding behind successful projects.
Empowered young people are instrumental to any society's resilience and sustainable development; Government, corporations, and multi-laterals must work with existing youth organizations and grassroots actors who have been implementing successful solutions for years instead of investing in creating replicas of existing programmes and solutions; Youth, Peace, and Security and other associated Security Council Resolutions are a cross-cutting precondition to the achievement of the 2030 agenda. There is no sustainable development if we aren't also able to invest in lasting peace.
Young people need to be meaningfully included in the Summit itself instead of just being a topic for discussion. We represent the majority of the world's population yet are systematically disadvantaged to take part in these discussions. Large international organizations with the reach of millions need to prioritized as we reach millions of people around the world at all levels of society and have the greatest potential to create lasting change. We hope that there will be extensive civil society participation at the Summit that will also allow questions to Member States in plenary.
50
5/24/2019 15:19:44
Monica Jahangir-Chowdhury
International Movement ATD Fourth World
International
monica.jahangir@atd-quartmonde.org
Non-Governmental Organizations
Expectations for the Summit revolve around recognizing that efforts deployed so far by governments are uneven or limited: as long as true political will is not followed by actions that can be tracked and better monitored, a part of humanity - the most vulnerable and disadvantaged amongst us - will still be left behind. Recognizing and advancing the issue of governments’ responsibility and accountability in this process is therefore essential. Equally crucial is the reaffirmation of human rights being at the core of the Agenda 2030 and the importance of exploring human rights accountability mechanisms/indicators in the implementation of the Agenda.

Stakeholders – especially representatives of MGoS and people with the direct experience of poverty and injustices – should be given the floor during the Summit to share their life experience and knowledge and explain what is the reality they are faced wih everyday. Reconnecting government leaders and officials to the stark reality of poverty and discrimination is essential if we want to stop the “business as usual” talk and make them sincerely commit to changing the lives of everyone – including that of those most left behind.

There are three characteristics that make Agenda 2030 very different from the many other agendas that the UN has negotiated:
The signatories of the agenda, for the first time, commit to leave no one behind and reach the furthest behing first
The SDGs integrate the UN economic and social development with the peace agenda and the climate change agenda and commit to take a human rights approach
Most countries are not taking a holistic approach to the implementation of Agenda 2030 and are not using a human rights approach. The 2030 Agenda applies to all countries. If we look at the overaching goal of the agenda: the eradication of poverty we can see that many developing countries are having trouble to implement Goal 1; it is very worrisome to see how little effort developed countries, that have economic resources, social infrastructure and capability are little committed to eradicate poverty and reduce inequalities.
At the core of our action is the commitment to always create the specific conditions for the poorest and most vulnerable members of our society to feel empowered so they can speak up for themselves and participate in decision-making processes that directly affect them. The knowledge and experience gathered by people and communities should be considered as essential in both research and design of SDG programming and monitoring.

For example, ATD Fourth World and Oxford University released on May 10th, 2019 the results of the “Hidden dimensions of poverty” research that brought together an international team of co-researchers comprising people living in poverty, practitioners and academics. The long-term goal of this project - that gave an international platform to the struggle and resistance of people living in poverty - is to help develop better policies to eradicate of poverty. In the context of the UN system, UN agencies – UNDP, Unicef – and UN country teams should be encouraged to create spaces for contribution by those who experience the deepest levels of poverty in the design, implementation and evaluation of UN policies and programs.
Partnerships: very rarely is the partnership with the poorest communities mentioned nor acknowledged. Yet, full realization of the Agenda 2030 relies on the full agency and empowerment of these communities, combined with the provision of sound economic and social policies from the part of governments. Recognizing the knowledge and experience of the most marginalized communities and integrating it to local programs will enable them to take the ownership, and therefore allow for efficient funds allocation.

Showcasing best practices: the Summit should be a place to present policies and practices that work. As such, Social Protection Floors constitute an essential tool to ensure the basic needs of the poorest segments of the population are covered. Governments should commit to expand social coverage in priority to those most vulnerable and expand their fiscal space to do so.

Connecting with the Addis Abeba Action Agenda: governments have to expand their fiscal space and one important way to do so is to increase international efforts in the areas of fiscal justice, progressive taxation, and tax evasion, as key issues in the funding of social protection systems and social policies.
Those principles could be reflected by creating the space and conditions for people with the direct experience of poverty, discriminations, injustices, to intervene during the Summit 1) to share their life experience and knowledge 2) highlight the obstacles they face 3) show how they find ways to live in dignity and propose solutions or highlight programs that would benefit them. Giving the floor to those who are “left behind” (one per Major Group and Other Stakeholders) would be a meaningful and symbolic way to show governments are truly committed to implementing the Agenda 2030 in a way that leaves no one behind, including at the Summit.
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5/25/2019 9:52:13Winifred Doherty
Congregation of Our Lady of Charity of the Good Shepherd
Global
winifreddohertyrgs@gmail.com
Women
Strong and active engagement of Civil Society within the Summit processes.
Recommitment to the 2030 Agenda with coherent policies, sustainable finance and concrete actions towards achieving the 2030 agenda leaving aside political expediency in favour of people and planet.
Decisive action for gender equality and human rights. Support, mainstream and integrate these issues throughout the discussion.
Renewed focus on addressing systemic issues related to poverty, inequality, and all forms of exploitation and child labour.
Full and active participation of vulnerable groups – girls, children, survivors of trafficking, migrants, persons with disabilities in all that concerns them.
Progress: Enthusiastic engagement of most member states in Voluntary National Review (VNR’S)
Rollout and sensitizing with regard to the SDG Agenda – Health, Education and Climate Action initiatives.
Implementation of National Floors of Social Protections – ILO Recommendation 202
Human Trafficking legislation that criminalizes anyone who purchases sex.
Paris Agreement
Gaps:
Lack of robust sustainable financing and budgeting
Little if any genuine reaching of the furthest behind first
Failure to engage CSOs in the national VNR process and in national policy debate and delivery of services.
Challenges
Corporate sector capture of the SDG’s and public sector that further marginalizes those already left behind. The concept of Public Private
Implementation of austerity measures due to a neoliberal economic worldview that puts profit over people and planet and further fuels growing global inequality and multidimensional poverty.
War mongering, and increased military expenditures at the expense of people and planet with no real peace initiatives.
Global attacks on human rights values including backlash against girls and women and girls and women’s rights.
Early Childhood intervention programmes
Fundación Mujer Levántate and Fundación Madre Josefa, with concerns to human trafficking, the exploitation of women and children and gender violence. http://mujerlevantate.cl
Children not Miners Maisha www.maishafilm.com SDG 8.7
Livelihood and Economic Justice/ Women and Girl Empowerment Programs Mahila www.mahilafilm.com https://www.fondazionebuonpastore.org/our-impact/
Indonesia - Flores Women take a special Place in Indonesia Fashion Week
http://www.goodshepherd-asiapacific.org.au/project/340
France - In 2017, France adopted a “Corporate duty of vigilance law” obligating French companies to implement an effective “vigilance” or due diligence plan that directly and practically addresses environmental, health and security, and business-related human rights risks, including serious violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms.
Lebanon - Over the last 5 years, Good Shepherd has facilitated women empowerment programs in Beirut working with Iraqi women refugees. Another successful program was with refugee children in Bekaa. Good Shepherd set up an education program with 350 children.


Take critical action steps to significantly increase revenue to close resource gaps through progression taxation policies, and reallocation of military expenditures
Implement Universal Social Protection including floors for all with Universal Child Benefits and Pensions
Ensure that all stakeholders, including those furthest behind are active participants in the budgeting, policy making, implementation, acceleration and review processes of the Agenda.
Ensure that representatives of those left behind and furthest away address the Summit and their voices are recognized by member states.
Call for dedicated political will urging all member states to put in place deliberate laws and policies to prioritize and accelerate outcomes for those furthest behind, and more importantly make deliberate budget allocations that allow for the realization of these policies and laws.
Implement Social Protection Floors in accordance with ILO Recommendation 202
Recognize the contribution of NGO’s and partner with them in constructive and
positive ways.
Ensure active participation by civil society during the Summit.
Commitment by member states to policies and laws that oblige leaders to consult with government, non-state actors and citizens when developing budgets to fund the Agenda, ensuring that taxation will be equitable and not negatively affect those furthest behind.
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5/27/2019 11:24:19Marcela BallaraSEDRA, REPEM ( member) Chile
marcela.ballara@gmail.com
Women
. All MGoS should be able to participate, speak and and share positionspapers , Important to assigne a space to speak during the sessions
Call on UN HR Special Rapporteurs and treaty body members including CEDAW, UPR, CRC, CESCR to make interpretive comments on SDGs and integrate SDGs into their work
Reaffirm Rio Principle 10 for substantive participation based on access to information, public participation, and justice
Consider the whole Agenda in each HLPF independently of the principal SDGs consider in each HLPF and always crosscutting SDG5 with all others SDGS . Emphasize interlinkages particularly with SDG 4 and 5 and include considerations and relations to HR Resolutions particularly CEDAW, CDC, UPR , and others .
Promote meaningful participation of CS including access to the whole process at country level, promote the access of all NGOs not only those bigs and in the capitals. Include the funding support of CS participation
"The Ministerial Declaration should commit to tackling structural gender inequalities, discrimination, and violence to ensure the SDGs truly benefit those who are marginalized and systematically excluded. It should take a bottom-up approach that builds on national regional , local forums and outcome documents to maximize input from regional spaces addressing key structural challenges.
1. Strengthen interlinkages between SDGS and Human Rights:
ECOSOC and DESA should invite HR Special Rapporteurs and treaty body members to participate in HLPF. Call on member states to address CEDAW, UPR, and other treaty body recommendations in VNRs
2. Strengthen synergies between SDGs and other UN processes: including around Beijing+25, WPS+20, NPT+50, UN+75
3. Strengthen women’s meaningful participation: include in the whole process and support technically and funding .
Call for SDG review processes to publish alternative reports, increase time to discuss VNRs and Q&A, and support civil society engagement mechanisms and feminist civil society core, sustained funding
"Call on UN HR Special Rapporteurs and treaty body members including CEDAW, UPR, CRC, CESCR to make interpretive comments on SDGs and integrate SDGs into their work
Reaffirm Rio Principle 10 for substantive participation based on access to information, public participation, and justice
Consider the whole Agenda in each HLPF independently of the principal SDGs consider in each HLPF and always crosscutting SDG5 with all others SDGS . Emphasize interlinkages particularly with SDG 4 and 5 and include considerations and relations to HR Resolutions particularly CEDAW, CDC, UPR , and others .
Promote meaningful participation of CS including access to the whole process at country level, promote the access of all NGOs not only those bigs and in the capitals. Include the funding support of CS participation .
All CS groups need to be listed specially all women's, girls and adolescents groups, LGBTI, Migrants, Indigenous , afro descendants , disabled , persons living with HIV, and rural women as well as entrepreneurs . So the Summit declaration needs to recommend listing all those in the Declaration in order MS understand no one of this must be leave behind .
Also the Summit Declaration must recommend the consideration of the integral Agenda 2030 and to incorporate the needs of all those groups previously mention in order ""not leave anyone behind its a real commitment nor merely a promise Recommend DESA and ECOSOC to adopt a more flexible programe of HLPF in the next cycle allowing more dialogue among MS and all other Stake holders in the Global level , increasing the time to Q&A and being more flexible in the method to manage the questions . Recognize the Alternative reports and giving visibility and time to discuss with MS their comments and proposals .
53
5/27/2019 18:01:46Lorena Liendo Rey
Sinergia, Red Venezolana de OSC
Venezuela
proyectos@sinergia.org.ve
Non-Governmental Organizations
We expect that the Summit will allow generating more binding commitments by governments in compliance with the 2030 Agenda. In this sense, the revision of the principles on which the SDGs are based, that is, the guarantee of the exercise of human rights in spaces conducive to the work of civil society and with respect to environmental limits, is essential for feasibility of the Agenda. Therefore, it is essential to generate a real link to the legal framework provided by the Covenants and Treaties on human rights and that aspects related to technical and financial cooperation address a rights-based approach from which a real and effective participation of all stakeholders can be promoted.
In spite of the fact that the link between issues related to the environment, human rights and the enabling social environment is considered positive, because it has allowed addressing these issues from a holistic perspective, the promises to "leave no one behind" have not been fulfilled. The injustices and inequalities in the world have been exacerbated in the last five years and great gains in human rights matters are put at risk. Indeed, the challenges are greater and, therefore, the commitment of government beyond the speeches should be redoubled.
The strengthening of CSOs and citizens to face the challenges of monitoring and compliance with the 2030 Agenda is essential to achieve some kind of success in achieving the SDGs. The approach to the private sector and the cultivation of alliances with the authorities, where the political context allows it, is of utmost importance to effectively advance these issues.
It is essential to build a cooperation based on rights approach.
It is impossible to talk about sustainable development without freedom, justice and equity.
Human rights include environmental rights. The extractive practices that affect the rights of native inhabitants and violate the biodiversity of terrestrial and marine species go against these premises, so they must be eradicated.
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5/27/2019 18:10:28CATALINA HERRERACGT / CNV COLOMBIA COLOMBIA
anacatalinaherrera@gmail.com
Workers & Trade Unions
Promoting freedom asociation in all kind of workers not just whom have labour contract and decent jobs and due diligence in all suplly chain
Main gaps in Colombia is about ilegal intermediation and kind of contracts are not labour contracts
I have been working about SDG´S focusing in decent work and it habe been hard in Colombia because union voice is not hear
Real participation of unions about to find SDGs, due diligence to find decent work and others SDGs and create a Convent about business and human rights
About principles "leaving no one behind" for CGT in Colombia reflect about all workers has rights independet if they have or not labour contract
55
5/28/2019 7:46:59Atef SolimanGatefEgypttfgrgs@yahoo.com.au
Non-Governmental Organizations, Volunteer Groups, Together 2030
at the meetingat the meetingat the meetingat the meeting at the metingno thanks
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5/28/2019 7:48:53Mariana RudgeHelpage InternationalGlobal
mariana.rudge@helpage.org
Older Persons
The Summit is an excellent opportunity to strengthen political commitment for Agenda 2030 and encourage member states who have yet to report to the HLPF to do so. It is a moment to truly evaluate progress made in achieving the goals so far. That means sharing best practice and success stories but also being honest about challenges and gaps that need further attention by all member states. In this respect, particular focus should be placed on how well all member states are doing in meeting their commitment to ‘reach the furthest behind first’ and what else could be done to ensure the most marginalised can benefit from the Goals. There should be an acknowledgement that much more needs to be done to ensure countries have the capacity and resources to collect disaggregated data by ALL ages.
To ensure stakeholders can make the most effective contribution information about the summit should be released in advance, participation of all stakeholders encouraged and in particular that the most marginalised are given a voice at the summit.
There has been some progress across the world in setting up national mechanisms for SDG implementation. While it is useful to have a common universal agenda for sustainable development, the ambitions of Agenda 2030 will not be met if countries only repackage existing policies and fail to truly look at policy coherence, the interlinkages between goals and reflect about how their policies can be more inclusive of people of all ages and of the most marginalised.
The success of the SDGs will be measured against how much countries succeed in leaving no one behind and we are still a long way from meeting this promise. We are living a climate emergency and inequalities are growing across the world. There are huge gaps in data collection which make whole sections of the population invisible to policy makers, such as older people.

There is very little awareness about the SDGs in all countries and participation of marginalised and vulnerable communities is still minimal. Lack of integration between Agenda 2030 and other existing conventions and human rights mechanisms is also a challenge.
We commit to focusing on the furthest behind first and will adopt measures to evaluate the coherence of our policies and ensure our actions – nationally and internationally – do not further exacerbate inequalities
We commit to linking our national planning processes and strategies to Agenda 2030 and to adopting clear, open and accountable governance mechanisms to monitor and implement the SDGs
We commit to continuously improve our collection and use of disaggregated data to ensure that by 2030 we have information about people of all ages and all segments of society
The principle of ‘leave no one behind’ should be reflected throughout the whole day in each and every SDG summit. Proper time should be given to discuss the challenges of reaching the most marginalised. All countries must adopt a multi-stakeholder approach to implementation, monitoring and review of SDGs.
During the summit speakers from grassroots CSOs and marginalised groups should be given proper funding, time and space to share their concerns and their input should be meaningfully considered in all consultations, including on the political declaration. Major Groups should also be present throughout the summit, given opportunities to provide input in advance and allowed to take part in all meetings.
Thanks for the opportunity to provide input. Please ensure everyone's input is meaningfully considered as member states have already started discussing versions of the political declaration. There should be clarify about how this form will be linked to that process and feedback given to all who provided input.
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5/28/2019 7:58:55EPAL-RATJEN SandraFranciscans InternationalSWITZERLANDs.ratjen@fiop.orgNon-Governmental Organizations
The Summit is an excellent opportunity to evaluate the progress made in achieving the Agenda 2030 and identifying the main challenges in enhancing the implementation and monitoring process, especially at the national and local levels. We expect more encouragement to be shared to Member States who have yet to take on a proactive approach to the process. We also expect Member States, individually and collectively, to reflect on the need to strengthen their efforts to comply with their international human rights obligations when designing, implementing and assessing international and national policies and measures in the context of the Agenda 2030.
There seems to be a genuine consensus on the importance of the sustainability of development models for people and the planet. This in itself could be considered a progress coming from the 2030 Agenda. However, the main gap is the lack of connectivity between Agenda 2030 and Human Rights. For FI, there can be no sustainable development without the promotion and protection of human rights. Avoiding to address this interdependence is an obstacle to successfully achieving the SDGs. The disconnect between the existing human rights obligations and the SDG implementing measures prevent policy coherence and maintain the accountability gap for lack of progress. The OHCHR matrix that matches SDGs to their relevant human rights obligations is essential to understanding where the implementation challenges lie. Human rights provide tools and standards, including indicators and benchmarks that have yet to be used more systematically to assess the implementation of the SDGs. However, human rights also address qualitative processes and individual freedoms and entitlements for which States are accountable and that are still too often ignored by measures implementing the Agenda 2030.
In July 2018, Franciscans International, together with the Permanent Missions of Cabo Verde, El Salvador, Finland, Portugal, Spain and Uruguay, as well as with the OHCHR and UN Water, joined forces to highlight the role of the right to water in achieving SDG 6. The event showcased practical examples that demonstrate the value of a human rights-based approach to achieving SDG 6 and other related Goals, with a central focus on the role of the right to water and sanitation in building resilience. Several countries have successfully integrated human rights based approaches in their legislative and policy frameworks regulating access to water and sanitation and resilience building. More generally, FI is "connecting the dots" between the SDGs, human rights and climate actions in it monitoring and advocacy work at national level and reflects its analyses in submissions to UN mechanisms.

By putting forward evidence-based examples of how national policies can be inclusive of both human rights and SDG implementation, FI aims to inspire Member States to consider the increased longer-term benefits to these approaches to their citizens, governments, and environments.
1) No development without human rights: Committing to the SDGs means providing all people with the right opportunities to improve their lives at the economic, social, cultural, environmental, civil and political levels. Human rights violations are the most dangerous man-made threats to the implementation of SDGs.

2) Addressing climate change should be at the heart of the Summit's goals to strengthen the commitment of Member States to their existing obligations. Climate change is the single most dangerous natural threat to the implementation of SDGs.

3) Addressing the growing influence of private actors in governmental negotiations and global policies is essential to truly respect the 2030 Agenda's vision and long-term impact. Corporations and some Member States are increasingly threatening the survival of the process and multilateralism as we know it. The UN needs to show strength in its principles and values, and the Summit is a great opportunity to do so.
The principles are fundamental links between the political commitments that States have made with the Agenda 2030, and the pre-existing legal obligations that States had accepted under international human rights law. They should appear as such in the outcomes of the Summit. A renewed commitment to these principles should be made a priority at the Summit. There should be a genuine commitment to the respect of the rights of those that have been left behind for so long. For example, more needs to be done to reach SDG 1 targets by 2030, especially in line with relevant indicators such as the implementation of social protection floors, ensuring equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services. Reaching the furthest away means listening to their needs and involving them as agents of change and owners of solutions to the economic, social and environmental crises. This thus implies that they are fully involved in decision-making processes over policies that affect their lives, and that resource distribution should give them priority.
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5/28/2019 10:05:46Comfort Onyee996234843-AVwDHA.OrgNorwayavwdha@gmail.comIndigenous Peoples
– implementation of SDG4 quality education by 2030 must concern School Core-Curriculum Reform in Africa if not everywhere. Colonial languages are teachable in Africa from pre-primary to the highest level of education. Indo-European languages are sister languages, have a mother language “Latin” in Antiquity. No wonder descendants of Indo-European languages tell their History properly, in school they are taught to use and Reason in Indo-European languages with reference to the Mother Language; “Latin”. Same way, Africa Spoken Language reunion with Mother Language; Ranykemet in Antiquity – if Africa is to Tell Her History Properly, Africa must know and use Africa Spoken Languages with reference to Mother Language; Ranykemet Historical Africa Studies in Sound Law sSw mdw nTr. That is what HLPF must emphasis on Africa Implementation of SDG4 quality education Pschological Time and Space, rather than shying away with word like; “an education which includes everybody”, “no one left behind” etc. what do you mean by inclusion, but remain dead silent about Africa luck of knowledge in spoken language united with mother language Ranykemet in Antiquity?



The Progress is the 2015 announcement of SDGs, the United Nations HLPF/ EASG June 2012 resolutions and outcome; “future we want” - invitation to the initiative of MGoS Stakeholders to Contribute in SDGs. The Gaps please refer to question 6 above.
996234843-AVwDHA.Org has prepared an information seminar manual – Subject; Principles of Building Local Libraries in Rural Africa”. implementation of SDG4 quality education, must concern School Core-Curriculum Reform in Africa to foster Africa Spoken Languages Reunion with Mother Language in Antiquity, in turn to foster Principles on which to build local libraries in Africa – Here is the Scenario; by year 2022 he or she who wants to enter to live, work/ research in Africa must enter Africa with at least a Certificate of Knowledge of Ranykemet. Africa School Curriculum Reform Must have start-up phase Year 2022 whereby Ranykemet is taught in every school at all levels in Africa. year 2022 start-up phase for Africa to know a local library is built on Principles of insight in spoken languages union with Mother Language, the Lore, Chants, word creativity etc. told by the natives themselves. So, when written Literature is added to the local library, natives relate to it with reference of knowledge in Spoken Language on Mother Knee. Please read both this book and the Book Title; Mother Language – Our Common Good by Tolofaina KudambangaMwanna 2019.
I. SDG10 reducing inequality within a nation and among countries is in support of SDG4 – HLPF should replace vague wordings in SDG4 “no one left behind” “and “education that is inclusive” with measurable projects; by Year 2022 School Curriculum Reform in Africa and everywhere Spoken languages reunion with mother language in Antiquity.

II. No chef changes the Test of Food by changing the Stove. This is the challenge in Africa, the problem is not just removing current leaders. Upcoming leaders in Africa must come from School Curriculum of education unlike the education of current leaders in Africa.

III. The solution to corruption is not a matter of accountability, transparence, and legitimate. Solution to corruption is that and global south research in global north just as global north research on global south. Corruption is persistent because one global region gives himself the power to be called the researcher while the other global region is a mere asylum seeker! Corruption is persistent because one region collects information on the other region to keep them under submission. Which brings us back to SDG10
Implementation of SDG4 quality education must concern Start-up Phase a people doing participatory information seminars and studying mother language on mother knee union with mother language in Antiquity. second phase must concern building of local libraries basing on the gathered Literature by the natives themselves. This way quality jobs will automatically fall in place. Excellence is what we repeatedly do, not what others repeatedly do for us.
Do you think in the era of SDGs pschological Time and Space, Africa can tell Africa History properly if implementation of SDG4 quality education, does not emphasize Africa Spoken Languages union with Mother Language Kemet in Antiquity?
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5/28/2019 10:12:44Comfort Onyee996234843-AVwDHA.OrgNorwayavwdha@gmail.comIndigenous Peoples
– implementation of SDG4 quality education by 2030 must concern School Core-Curriculum Reform in Africa if not everywhere. Colonial languages are teachable in Africa from pre-primary to the highest level of education. Indo-European languages are sister languages, have a mother language “Latin” in Antiquity. No wonder descendants of Indo-European languages tell their History properly, in school they are taught to use and Reason in Indo-European languages with reference to the Mother Language; “Latin”. Same way, Africa Spoken Language reunion with Mother Language; Ranykemet in Antiquity – if Africa is to Tell Her History Properly, Africa must know and use Africa Spoken Languages with reference to Mother Language; Ranykemet Historical Africa Studies in Sound Law sSw mdw nTr. That is what HLPF must emphasis on Africa Implementation of SDG4 quality education Pschological Time and Space, rather than shying away with word like; “an education which includes everybody”, “no one left behind” etc. what do you mean by inclusion, but remain dead silent about Africa luck of knowledge in spoken language united with mother language Ranykemet in Antiquity?



The Progress is the 2015 announcement of SDGs, the United Nations HLPF/ EASG June 2012 resolutions and outcome; “future we want” - invitation to the initiative of MGoS Stakeholders to Contribute in SDGs. The Gaps please refer to question 6 above.
996234843-AVwDHA.Org has prepared an information seminar manual – Subject; Principles of Building Local Libraries in Rural Africa”. implementation of SDG4 quality education, must concern School Core-Curriculum Reform in Africa to foster Africa Spoken Languages Reunion with Mother Language in Antiquity, in turn to foster Principles on which to build local libraries in Africa – Here is the Scenario; by year 2022 he or she who wants to enter to live, work/ research in Africa must enter Africa with at least a Certificate of Knowledge of Ranykemet. Africa School Curriculum Reform Must have start-up phase Year 2022 whereby Ranykemet is taught in every school at all levels in Africa. year 2022 start-up phase for Africa to know a local library is built on Principles of insight in spoken languages union with Mother Language, the Lore, Chants, word creativity etc. told by the natives themselves. So, when written Literature is added to the local library, natives relate to it with reference of knowledge in Spoken Language on Mother Knee. Please read both this book and the Book Title; Mother Language – Our Common Good by Tolofaina KudambangaMwanna 2019.
I. SDG10 reducing inequality within a nation and among countries is in support of SDG4 – HLPF should replace vague wordings in SDG4 “no one left behind” “and “education that is inclusive” with measurable projects; by Year 2022 School Curriculum Reform in Africa and everywhere Spoken languages reunion with mother language in Antiquity.

II. No chef changes the Test of Food by changing the Stove. This is the challenge in Africa, the problem is not just removing current leaders. Upcoming leaders in Africa must come from School Curriculum of education unlike the education of current leaders in Africa.

III. The solution to corruption is not a matter of accountability, transparence, and legitimate. Solution to corruption is that and global south research in global north just as global north research on global south. Corruption is persistent because one global region gives himself the power to be called the researcher while the other global region is a mere asylum seeker! Corruption is persistent because one region collects information on the other region to keep them under submission. Which brings us back to SDG10
Implementation of SDG4 quality education must concern Start-up Phase a people doing participatory information seminars and studying mother language on mother knee union with mother language in Antiquity. second phase must concern building of local libraries basing on the gathered Literature by the natives themselves. This way quality jobs will automatically fall in place. Excellence is what we repeatedly do, not what others repeatedly do for us.
Do you think in the era of SDGs pschological Time and Space, Africa can tell Africa History properly if implementation of SDG4 quality education, does not emphasize Africa Spoken Languages union with Mother Language Kemet in Antiquity?
60
5/28/2019 10:16:47RaquelCCOOSpainraquelgomez@ccoo.esWomen, Workers & Trade Unions
Esperamos que la declaración política de la Cumbre incluya un compromiso explícito con una Garantía Laboral Universal que ofrezca una base de protección para todos los trabajadores y trabajadoras: los derechos y la igualdad de las mujeres son respetados, los empleos son decentes y se acompañan de salarios adecuados y negociación colectiva, los trabajadores disfrutan de un cierto control sobre el tiempo de trabajo, la cobertura de la protección social es universal; se garantiza el acceso a servicios públicos gratuitos de calidad para todos sin discriminación, y el diálogo social garantiza medidas de transición justa en relación con el cambio climático, la tecnología y el desplazamiento.
En segundo lugar, esperamos un compromiso firme para reformar los mecanismos de seguimiento y examen de la Agenda 2030 (sobre la base del FPAN y los foros regionales) para garantizar que el sistema de supervisión esté ligado a criterios vinculantes afianzados proporcione un proceso de seguimiento adecuado de los exámenes nacionales voluntarios y permita la participación efectiva de los grupos principales y otros interesados en la aplicación de los ODS a nivel local, nacional, regional y mundial.
El análisis del ODS 8, que se examina en 2019, ya muestra la urgencia de cumplir los compromisos de la Agenda 2030. De hecho, el informe reciente de la OIT “Trabajar para un futuro más prometedor” pone de relieve que “el desempleo sigue siendo inaceptablemente alto y millones de trabajadoras y trabajadores tienen un empleo informal. 300 millones de trabajadoras y trabajadores viven en condiciones de extrema pobreza. Millones de hombres, mujeres y niños son víctimas de la esclavitud moderna”.
Además, se deben mejorar las modalidades de participación efectiva por parte de los agentes no estatales en los planes nacionales de desarrollo relativos a los ODS (ODS 17). Por último, el diálogo social sigue sin estar lo suficientemente integrado en el proceso de aplicación de los ODS, aunque se ha demostrado que el uso del diálogo social tripartito o bipartito para establecer posturas comunes entre los empleadores y trabajadores obtiene resultados considerables hacia la consecución de los objetivos de la Agenda 2030.
Las mejores prácticas de los sindicatos en materia de ODS incluyen:
La elaboración de informes paralelos sindicales sobre los ODS, que resultaron ser una herramienta útil para reforzar la rendición de cuentas de los gobiernos, pedir la participación efectiva de los sindicatos en las estrategias nacionales de desarrollo, así como crear alianzas con otras partes interesadas. Los informes proporcionan una supervisión independiente de los ODS clave (1, 5, 8, 10, 13 y 16) mediante una evaluación de su aplicación basada en la transparencia, la consulta y el diálogo social y ponen de relieve las prioridades de los trabajadores en el plano nacional.
La promoción del diálogo social como medio de aplicación de la Agenda 2030: La CSI ha realizado varios estudios de caso (https://www.ituc-csi.org/documento-tematico-dialogo-social-desarrollo) que demuestran las contribuciones importantes que los trabajadores pueden hacer al desarrollo sostenible cuando se garantizan sus derechos en un entorno propicio y pueden participar en las estructuras institucionales de diálogo social para impulsar políticas sociales, económicas y ambientales.
Compromiso con una Garantía Laboral Universal que ofrezca una base de protección para todos los trabajadores y trabajadoras: los derechos y la igualdad de las mujeres son respetados, los empleos son decentes con salarios adecuado y negociación colectiva, los trabajadores disfrutan de cierto control sobre el tiempo de trabajo, la cobertura de la protección social es universal, se garantiza el acceso a servicios públicos gratuitos de calidad para todos sin discriminación.
Compromiso con la rendición de cuentas de las empresas en el ámbito del desarrollo para garantizar que la participación del sector privado esté en consonancia con los ODS y respete las normas internacionales del trabajo, la conducta empresarial responsable basada en la debida diligencia, y la responsabilidad fiscal y ambiental.
Compromiso para reformar los mecanismos de mecanismos de seguimiento y examen de la Agenda 2030. El sistema de supervisión se basa en criterios vinculantes afianzados (como normas internacionales del trabajo y de derechos humanos) y permite la participación efectiva de los sindicatos y las organizaciones de la sociedad civil.
Los principios de “no dejar a nadie atrás” y “llegar primero a los más rezagados” solo se reflejarán adecuadamente en la Cumbre si en ella se alcanza un compromiso verdaderamente renovado para lograr los ODS y un compromiso satisfactorio para reformar el sistema actual de supervisión y examen de los ODS.
Para ello esperamos que la Cumbre:
aumente el nivel de ambición respecto del ODS 8. Dada la importancia del ODS 8 para la consecución del resto de los objetivos, y en el marco del centenario de la OIT, esperamos que la declaración política de la Cumbre incluya un compromiso explícito con una Garantía Laboral Universal que ofrezca una base de protección para todos los trabajadores y trabajadoras, y
se comprometa a reformar los mecanismos de seguimiento y examen de la Agenda 2030 (sobre la base del FPAN y los foros regionales) para garantizar que el sistema de supervisión se base en criterios vinculantes afianzados proporcione un proceso de seguimiento adecuado de los exámenes nacionales voluntarios y permita la participación efectiva de los grupos principales y otros interesados en la aplicación de los ODS a nivel local, nacional, regional y mundial.
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5/28/2019 10:44:59Jesper Lund-Larsen
United Federation of Danish Workers
Denmark
jesper.lund.larsen@3f.dk
Workers & Trade Unions
First of all, we expect the Summit to raise the level of ambition on SDG8. We expect the Political Declaration of the Summit to include an explicit commitment to a Universal Labour Guarantee that provides a protection floor for all workers. This means rights and women’s equality are respected, jobs are decent with minimum living wages and collective bargaining, workers have some control over working time, social protection coverage is universal, due diligence and accountability drive business operations, access to free and quality public services is guaranteed to all without discrimination, and social dialogue ensures Just Transition measures for climate, technology and displacement.
Secondly, we expect a strong commitment to reform the follow-up and review mechanisms of the 2030 Agenda (based on the HLPF and the Regional Fora), in order to ensure the monitoring system is anchored to binding criteria (such as international labour and human rights standards), it provides an adequate follow-up process on the VNRs and it enables the effective participation of MGoS in the implementation of SDGs at the local, national, regional and global level
Evidence shows we are out of track to achieve the SDGs. The analysis of SDG 8, under review in 2019, already shows the urgency of delivering on Agenda2030’s commitments. Indeed, the recent ILO’s Report “Work for a brighter future” highlights that “unemployment remains unacceptably high, billions of workers are in informal employment, a staggering 300 million workers live in extreme poverty and millions of men, women and children are victims of modern slavery”.
Likewise, modalities for effective engagement of non-state actors in national development plans on SDGs must to be improved (SDG 17). Indeed, according to our trade union SDGs country profiles (https://www.ituc-csi.org/2030Agenda), limitations to information access were registred in a number of forms, while only a few countries were shown to have adequate consultation processes in place. Finally, social dialogue is still insufficiently integrated into the implementation process of the SDGs, even though the use of tripartite or bipartite social dialogue to establish common positions between employers and employees has been shown to yield significant results towards achieving the 2030 Agenda.
Trade Unions’ best practices on SDGs include:
- The elaboration of trade union shadow reports on SDGs, which proved to be a useful tool to reinforce the accountability of governments, call for the effective involvement of trade unions in national development strategies, as well as to build alliances with other stakeholders. The reports provide independent monitoring of key SDGs (1,5,8,10,13,16) by evaluating the implementation based on transparency, consultation and social dialogue, and highlighting workers’ priorities at national level.
- The promotion of Social Dialogue as a mean of implementation of A2030: the ITUC has conducted several case studies (https://www.ituc-csi.org/issue-paper-social-dialogue-development) demonstrating the important contributions workers can make to sustainable development where their rights are guaranteed in an enabling environment and when they can participate in institutional social dialogue structures to advance social, economic and environmental policies.
1) A Commitment to a Universal Labour Guarantee that provides a protection floor for all workers. This means rights and women’s equality are respected, jobs are decent with minimum living wages and collective bargaining, workers have some control over working time, social protection coverage is universal, due diligence and accountability drive business operations, access to free and quality public services such as health and education is guaranteed to all without discrimination, and social dialogue ensures Just Transition measures for climate, technology and displacement.
2) A commitment to business accountability in development, in order to ensure private sector engagement in development is aligned with the SDGs, and comply with international labour standards, responsible business conduct based on due diligence, and fiscal and environmental liability.
3) A Commitment to reform the follow-up and review mechanisms of the 2030 Agenda. We need to ensure the monitoring system is anchored to binding criteria (such as international labour and human rights standards) and enables the effective participation of trade unions and civil society organizations.
The principles of ‘leaving no one behind’ and ‘reaching the furthest away first’ will be properly reflected in the Summit if and only if the Summit delivers a truly renewed commitment to reach the SDGs and a meaningful commitment to reform the SDGs monitoring and review system currently in place.
In order for that to happen, as mentioned in our answer to the first Question of the Consultation, we expect the Summit to:
- raise the level of ambition on SDG8. Given the centrality of SDG8 for the achievement of all the other Goals, and in the framework of the centenary of the ILO, we expect the Political Declaration of the Summit to include an explicit commitment to a Universal Labour Guarantee that provides a protection floor for all workers;
- commit to reform the follow-up and review mechanisms of the 2030 Agenda (based on the HLPF and the Regional Fora), in order to ensure the monitoring system is linked to anchored to binding criteria (such as international labour and human rights standards), it provides an adequate follow-up process on the VNRs and it enables the effective participation of MGoS in the implementation of SDGs at the local, national, regional and global level.
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5/28/2019 12:52:20Stephen K. Cheboi
Action on Sustainable development Goals Kenya National Coalition
Kenya
cheboi.stephen09@gmail.com
Non-Governmental Organizations
To share practical experiences and achievements in the SDGs implementations process and possible challenges
financing and tracking of success stories
Grassroots communities,sensitization,understand and practical lessons and aspects in SDGs implementations
1.Each country to allocate sufficient funds to SDGs implementations
2.Countries to make practical leave no one behind ion SDGs implementations and monitoring process.
3. Countries to ensure Country stakeholders reporting of SDGs
By ensuring grassroots representation of communities and amplifying their voices e example i could appreciate to see one of our grassroots community representative considered to attend and share with Member states practical examples on how SDGs implementations has contributed to changing their community living standards into better. we work with grassroots communities in Kenya to ensure understanding pushing implementation of SDGs
Thank you and look forward for a fruitful engagements in the process.
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5/28/2019 13:00:26
Mohammad Shahidur Rahman
Projonma AcademyBangladesh
pacademy89@yahoo.com
Non-Governmental Organizations
My proposal is to link politics to the voting right of people in democracy. Strengthening partnership processes among the parliamentarians and governments. In many countries people are losing their voting right that creates lack of people participation in the democratic and developmental process. Drug abuse causes the destruction of human capital formation especially youth are affecting and raising unrest situation in the many countries. In this situation socio economic political process to be agreed through participation of all actors groups including governments. Environmental hazards are increasing by manmade that to be coping strategies to be strengthen through political commitment by parliamentarians, scientists and the governments. Euthenics are depriving and suffering of human rights have to bound displacement in other countries in that situation socio political rights to be restored by involving parliamentarians and the government.
It is noting that partnership process has evolved within the governments and other developmental socio economic and political organizations. Political commitment pressure is increasing within governments through participation through partnership process. It is noticing putting budget in the humanitarian and environmental crisis periods by the governments that are a great achievement. Several socio economic and political platforms have been formed in the many countries by the imitative of governments and developmental organizations. But there are also noticing gap and challenges such as ignoring people demands and access to rights. Attitude of nationalization, dictatorship, faith upholds unethical business competitions that are challenges exist in the globe.
Participatory monitoring and follow up could be formulated and implanted in the partnership process and enhancing accountability. Cross country visits that will help to build up confidence, inspiration and commitment. Case studies to be shared for better information exchange and reviewing targeted results or goals. Enhancing parliamentary dialogue and debates for achieving outputs that to be shared in other countries. Educational and research institutions are to be involved for exchanging new knowledge and experience share.
a) Accelerating democratic process at all levels
b) Up hold political will within parliamentarians and governments
c) Building partnership with trust and accountability.

Uphold respect and values to the all participating countries and governments. Encouraging to all to share experience without fear and threat. Must be created enabling environment so that everybody will get encouragement to share the experience. Avoid to open criticize for holding dignity and image.
Putting a good amount of budget to implement the SDG,s action plans.

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5/28/2019 16:02:53David StyersVolunteer Groups AllianceUSA
volunteergroupsalliance@gmail.com
Volunteer Groups
The Summit should accelerate the need for progress on SDG implementation, maximizing political will in the buildup to the September Summit.

Volunteer groups – a key stakeholder – are driving implementation of the SDGs, supporting localization of the agenda and holding Member States to account, and they deserve formal recognition and support.

Civil society as a whole should also be positioned as prominent stakeholders at the Summit, contributing questions to Member States and participating in debates.

There should be easy opportunities for people to participate both in person and virtually.
Although a majority of countries have demonstrated some progress in implementation and reporting and we appreciate the improved inclusion of non-state actors in governance, more progress is needed to establish key SDG building blocks, including policies for and engagement of volunteers. Volunteers can also be critical to localizing the 2030 Agenda.

In addition, there needs to be focused efforts and increased reporting on leaving no one behind as a central point of the 2030 Agenda to make it truly transformative. The Declaration needs to stress and emphasize the essential role of volunteers and volunteer groups in achieving the SDGs.
• SDG 4: In Nepal VSO is working to promote access to the education for marginalised girls who are at risk of dropping out of school through volunteer mentors.

• SDG 8: Skills for Life over the last decade has brought professionals from partner companies and 1,300 vulnerable youth together to facilitate the development of soft skills.

• SDG 10: In Pakistan, youth volunteers have established peace forums to bring together different ethnic and religious groups to foster social cohesion.

• SDG 13: TERO project raises awareness of the threat of climate change among oasian communities and how to address it thru volunteers’ mobilisation.

• SDG 16: In Sierra Leone, community volunteers have worked to harmonise local gender-based violence laws with national laws and gain support from local leaders.

• SDG 17: Habitat for Humanity’s global leadership programme has supported volunteer youth advocates to train more than 5,000 young people in Cambodia, the Philippines, India, Indonesia, and Nepal about the importance of sustainable development.

• Volunteers and support for their efforts are essential to the successful implementation of the 2030 Agenda. As recognised by the UN Secretary General’s Synthesis report on the post-2015 agenda, the ambition of the SDGs will not be realised without the “contributions of millions of properly supported and enabled volunteers” and volunteer-driven organizations in both developing and developed countries.

• The social, legal, and political context in which volunteers operate matters greatly for what they can or cannot contribute to eradicating poverty. The political bargain between states and citizens, the constitution and legal framework, the social fabric in different countries, the interaction between local, national and global governance, and the diversity of governance actors working at various levels are all elements that affect who can and cannot enter spaces, whose voices are heard, and who influences decision-making.

• It is through the effort of all stakeholders working together, including one billion volunteers worldwide, that we will achieve the Sustainable Development Goals of the 2030 Agenda.
The Summit needs to allow for all voices and experiences, especially of those who are left behind, to be front and centre in the discussions at the HLPF.

There also needs to be more space for questions from civil society during the country presentations of VNRs during the HLPF.
• All stakeholders are involved in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. They are interlinked and therefore support collaboration across goals and sectors. Corporations and their employees, government, educators, students, and civil society are creating partnerships to work together to educate each other and to actively work towards meeting the Goals.

• Volunteering connects people within local communities and across borders and cultures. Through innovative corporate partnerships, volunteers are making a substantial contribution to the implementation of the 2030 agenda.

• Many countries and civil society organisations also promote international volunteering, which promotes and develops a principle of reciprocity bringing together people from different cultures and communities to develop common solutions to shared issues - complying with the universal spirit of the 2030 agenda.
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5/29/2019 2:40:40Shawna Bader-BlauSolidarity CenterUnited States of America
sbader-blau@solidaritycenter.org
Non-Governmental Organizations
Raise the level of intention on SDG 8 in the Summit Political Declaration with an explicit commitment to a Universal Labor Guarantee with a protection floor for all workers, in particular legal protection and enforcement of the fundamental worker rights and social protections at the heart of inclusion and sustainable development. This means respect for freedom of association and collective bargaining rights, nondiscrimination, and women’s equality; decent jobs with minimum living wages; universal social protection; due diligence and accountability in business operations; guaranteed access to free, quality public services for all; and the use of social dialogue to guide Just Transition measures for climate, technology, and displacement. Reform Agenda 2030 follow-up and review mechanisms; anchor the monitoring system to binding criteria-specifically international human and labor rights standards-to foster an effective VNR follow-up process and effective MGo participation in SDG implementation at the local, national, regional, and global levels. Encourage greater policy coherence among UN bodies, governments, and other stakeholders, in alignment with ILO standards on decent work.
Agenda 2030 was a conceptual milestone in sustainable global development, with an unprecedented participation and range of stakeholders, inspiring new partnerships and collaboration. However, we are off track to achieve it. The targets that will actually ensure that development becomes sustainable – the protection and enforcement of decent work principles, including fundamental worker rights and the rule of law – have not been prioritized. Instead, policymakers have often focused on less controversial targets, such as job creation, investment, and technological development; set development and trade policies that conflict with decent work principles; failed to harmonize their laws with core ILO standards; or failed to build strong enforcement systems. Fundamental worker rights, as framed in decent work, are key to ensuring that no one is left behind. Without these, development will be undermined. Sustainable goals are based on a foundation of peaceful, just societies, with human and worker rights for all, enshrined in law and enforced in practice (See Goals 1, 3, 4, 5, 8, 10, and 16). Their implementation must be prioritized. Rights cannot wait at the end of the line.
Expanding the inclusion in SDG policy discussions of groups that have direct contact with their constituencies; reach from the national policy level to the local workplace; cut across religious, ethnic, racial, and class lines; and represent the most disenfranchised people, can help move SDG policy from discussion to action. Trade unions uniquely encompass all of these elements. Working with other CSOs, they can socialize the SDGs more broadly and advocate for needed change, bringing the voice of those left behind into social dialogue. Unfortunately, unions often report that they have neither been informed nor consulted by their governments. To address this gap, unions and civil society organizations from Pakistan attended a workshop to learn about the SDGs. As a result of enhanced awareness, a participant provided input into the development of the Punjab government’s new labor policy to combat child labor in brick kilns and produce "clean" child-labor-free bricks. The revised policy, aligned with Indicator 8.7 under SDG 8, was adopted by the Punjab government in January 2019. Increased awareness, genuine inclusion, and political will yielded tangible progress.
1. Commit to a Universal Labor Guarantee with a protection floor for all workers, including legal protection and enforcement of fundamental worker rights and social protections. This means respect for freedom of association and collective bargaining rights, nondiscrimination, and women’s equality; decent jobs with minimum living wages; universal social protection; accountability in business operations; access to free, quality public services for all; and social dialogue to guide Just Transition measures for climate, technology, and displacement.
2. Commit to business accountability in development; ensure that private sector engagement is aligned with SDGs and compliant with international labor standards and responsible business conduct.
3. Commit to reform Agenda 2030’s follow-up and review mechanisms, anchoring monitoring to binding criteria in international human and labor rights standards to foster effective VNR follow-up and union and civil society participation in SDG implementation at the local, national, regional, and global levels. Encourage greater policy coherence among UN bodies, governments, and other stakeholders, in alignment with ILO standards on decent work.
Call for the accelerated implementation of the proposed New Social Contract with a universal labor guarantee that provides a protection floor for all workers, directly addressing the intentions to reach the furthest away and leave no one behind: ratification of ILO conventions and recommendations related to decent work, and their enactment into domestic law; ensuring that the fundamental rights to freedom of association and to organize and bargain cover all workers, regardless of their status, including formal and informal economy workers, domestic workers, farmworkers, migrant workers (documented and undocumented), and refugees; ensuring universal social protection coverage to workers in all forms of work, and formalizing the informal economy, which will assist in that process and promote the development of more informed social policy; enacting laws to counteract gender-based discrimination and protect women and men from gender-based violence in the world of work; and ending forced labor, child labor, and human trafficking by ensuring labor rights, transparency and due diligence throughout the supply chain. Equally important to passing laws is enforcing them.
Implementation of fundamental worker rights for all is essential to ending forced labor, trafficking in humans, and child labor. Migrants’ fundamental rights as workers must be respected and enhanced by additional policies that provide pathways to residency and citizenship and promote full family unification. Labor migration can only be sustainably beneficial to development if attention is given to creating decent work in countries of origin, so that workers migrate out of choice and not economic coercion.Encourage stakeholders to place the universal labor guarantee, with enforceable labor rights, at the heart of their development interactions, including donor country and IFI-funded projects. Development and project agreements should set rights-based criteria for private sector participation and establish transparency and accountability mechanisms.
Expand inclusion and consultation, both among HLPF constituencies within the major groups and other stakeholders, and at the national level. Improve the incorporation of union and civil society input into national SDG decision-making and processes. To leave no one behind, hear feedback from those working with marginalized populations.
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5/29/2019 10:52:28Kristina Johansson
Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)
Sweden
Kristina.Johansson@siwi.org
Non-Governmental Organizations
At this stage in the process, there is a need for an analytical and honest assessment of where we are in achieving the SDGs. There is a need for data and case studies on efficient implementation that provide long term and sustainable impacts, rather than quick fixes. Inclusive and transparent processes are key for long term and sustainable impact; hence the processes need to be evaluated and ensure no one is left behind, neither humans nor the environment. The SDGs need to be addressed in an integrated way, across all goals and targets as well other global agendas such as the Paris agreement, to ensure alignment and avoid trade-offs. There is a need for a clear way forward, as well as a recognition of bottlenecks. The Summit should provide a reaffirmation of the world we want, including holistic and long-term strategies.
Non-party stakeholders can provide examples and know-how from the ground, which is why their participation is crucial in implementing the SDGs. Change also means all stakeholders in our societies must be on-board throughout the process, which is why these actors must be recognised, included and heard in decision making processes.
Today we have several agendas, such as the 2030 Agenda and the Climate Paris Agreement, which is a challenge for national implementors to report and deliver on. There is a need to make connections on how the agendas are interlinked and streamlined. Water is presented as the number one priority for most of the NDCs whilst a majority of other priority areas and identified hazards are water related or water dependent. Since many of the SDGs and their relevant targets are also addressed by these NDC priorities, transforming water related commitments into national adaptation/action plans gives the opportunity for countries and cities to address the needs in an integrated, efficient and sustainable manner. To enable that, institutions must break free from silo thinking.
Today, discussion on sustainable development are more prominent and there has been an alignment of messaging and an increased awareness, both in public and at decision making levels. The increase in communication and awareness around the 2030 Agenda has influenced the discourse to focus more on sustainable development, but there is still a need to make sure those messages trickle down to national and implementing levels.
As a water institute working with freshwater resources, SIWI strive to work cross-sectorally, linking different areas to water such as food/agriculture, energy, cities, human and environmental health. Our work on exploring water’s interconnections has allowed us to approach the SDGs in an integrated way and as a result, identify cross-cutting solutions for national and local institutions to tackle the SDGs with efficiency and wider-ranging impact. Many SDGs and NDCs are dependent on smart and integrated water management. For example, climate change will increase the exposure to water scarcity, especially for disadvantaged groups such as rural households engaged in agricultural production in low income countries. Equitable access to water for agricultural production can make the difference between farming as a mere means of survival and farming as a reliable source of livelihoods, contributing to not only SDG 6 but also SDG 10.
Water is a master variable for life on earth and if we fail to consider water management within our broader development plans and actions, we will fail to reach our goals and targets. This risk is underscored by the annual World Economic Forum Global Risks Report, which for the past five years has included water crises in their list of top global risks. At the same time, resilient water management tools and approaches not only improve water security, but they also can provide important mutual benefits across a range of sectors and economies, improving the overall resilience of our communities and ecosystems. Parties must ‘walk the talk’ and highlight what they are implementing and be transparent about what funding and resources are allocated for implementation. There is a need to enable improvements, not only recognising the necessity for it. All initiated programmes should make sure to include all three pillars of sustainable development (social, economic and environmental).
Companies are one of the key stakeholders in achieving the SDGs and they must accept that not everything has a short-term investment return, but achieving the SDGs require long-term commitments and plans.
For the Summit to reflect the principles of ‘leaving no one behind’ and ‘reaching the furthest away first’, those affected should be present at the Summit representing and speaking for themselves. There is a need to ensure space for marginalised voices to be heard and allow those interests to set the agenda. Decision makers should not be telling others what to do but come ready to earnestly listen. By conducting honest and transparent analysis of where we are at in realising the SDGs, necessary measures to ensure inclusivity can be taken.
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5/29/2019 15:14:50Sofia SvarfvarCONCORD SwedenSweden
sofia.svarfvar@concord.se
Non-Governmental Organizations
Main gaps: gender equality and democratic space for civils society
- Highlight the crucial role of civil society and democratic space for the achievement of each SDG, including the rights to freedom of expression, freedom of religion or belief and freedom of assembly, and the need to enable a meaningful engagement of civil society at all levels of society. Policies must support diverse civil society actors in their own right to advocate and follow up on the agenda and governments´ commitments.
- Gender equality: Promote gender equality and integrate a gender responsive approach for the full and effective enjoyment of the rights to women and girls.
- Policy Coherence for Sustainable Development PSCD: Emphasize the importance of PCSD including actions to manage conflicting policies and goals, eliminate obstacles to sustainable development and better contribute to each of the SDGs. Policy Coherence for Sustainable Development should be guided by the commitment in the Agenda 2030 to Leave No One Behind and the Human Rights.
- Financing for Development: Mention the necessary and suitable development finance strategies to achieve each SDG, so that financing issues are integrated in the follow up of the 2030 Agenda and specific to the different goals.
The commitment of Leaving No One Behind in the 2030 Agenda should guide all policy areas. Policies need to include proactive measures and be based on what creates results for people with disabilities, or who are living in extreme poverty and vulnerability, or are facing discrimination or violence. The ambition must be to consider these groups first in the analysis of all policies.

Gender equality and the full enjoyment of human rights of all people regardless of their gender are at the core of the 2030 Agenda, both as a standalone goal and as a cross-cutting priority consistent with the commitment of Leaving No One Behind.

The declaration needs to commit to accelerated action on concrete areas how to change structural inequalities. For ex. data (2019 SDG process report” UN Secretary general) suggests that achieving universal access to the human right to basic sanitation service by 2030 would require a doubling in current annual rate of process.
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5/29/2019 16:09:13Dr Jane Barratt
International Federation on Ageing
Internationalmacton@ifa-fiv.orgOlder Persons
The IFA’s key expectations would include: articulation by Member States of a clear and honest understanding of the status of SDG implementation, where action has been insufficient, what has worked and what has not worked, and inclusion of specific recommendations for what needs to be done in order to meet the targets, move towards the next cycle and address emerging issues.

The Summit Declaration should be bold, forceful and ambitious, clearly stating re-commitment to General Assembly resolution 70/1 on Transforming Our World: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Emphasis should also be given to the necessary involvement of all stakeholders, not just Governments, and in this connection, Major Groups and Other Stakeholders should be viewed as dedicated implementers and partners and not only as watchdogs.

Member States must not be timid or cautious, but rather show a serious determination to lead and collaborate, in a spirit of cooperation to take action on all issues related to the planet, prosperity, peace and partnership (see Preamble of the 2030 Agenda).
The IFA acknowledges the progress made by the UN to further the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to be inclusive of individuals at all stages of life, and particularly applauds the acknowledgement that achieving healthy ageing for all is an indicator of success on the agenda.

However, challenges remain in promoting the notion that older persons are more than just a vulnerable group. Although it is important to emphasize that older people living with unequitable access to resources may face added obstacles to achieving healthy ageing, it is also essential to recognize that older adults are key contributors to societal advancement.

Additionally, there is no legally binding international human rights instrument (such as a convention) that focuses specifically on older people. Civil society, organizations and government must capitalize on opportunities to highlight gaps and offer recommendations for protection of older people’s rights and build capacity within countries so that these rights are respected in health-related policy and frameworks.
Goal 3: IFA leads ongoing projects related to health and wellbeing across the life course including vision health, diabetes care, adult vaccination and cognitive reserve.
Goal 10: IFA has provided inputs to the Global Compact on Refugees advocating for the inclusion of older refugees, convened the 2018 Addressing Inequalities Summit to highlight the common issues faced by subpopulations of older people, and established a Call to Action for older LGBTQI people, garnering over 300 signatories.
Goal 11: IFA leads the Age-Friendly Innovation Exchange project which serves to build capacity among those working to enable cities and communities to become more supportive environments for older people and is an Affiliate of the World Health Organization Global Network for Age-Friendly Cities and Communities.
Goal 16: IFA is a part of the Secretariat of the WHO Global Campaign to Combat Ageism and provides capacity to Global Alliance on the Rights of Older Persons for knowledge dissemination through webinars.
Goal 17: IFA’s membership base is comprised of NGOs, governments, academia, and industry and older people and conducts projects in partnership and collaboration with diverse stakeholders
1. Energy from across sectors and disciplines must be harnessed and mobilized to engage communities and implement the SDGs around the world.
2. Older people require formal legal protection to ensure their rights are met. A UN Convention on the Rights of Older People would help to hold all stakeholder accountable for effective and measurable policies promote the health, wellbeing and contributions of older people.
3. Health systems must be aligned to the needs of older persons and therein improve access to health promotion and prevention plans (including screening) and safe and effective treatments and follow up that can help maintain and improve functional ability. Focus includes but is not limited to immunization across the life course, and sensory changes such as vision and hearing in healthy and at-risk populations.
1. Reaffirming equality of all people of all ages everywhere
2. Committing to prioritize the voice of marginalized individuals, including older persons who are often invisible, ignored and sidelined
3. Recognizing older people as a diverse group that includes those who are independent, healthy and active; those with chronic disease or disabilities; and those belonging to ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities to ensuring no older person is left behind
4. Reaffirming a multi-sectoral, multi-disciplinary and multi-stakeholder approach to create transformative change
5. Recognizing that progress has been slow on many Goals, that the most vulnerable people and countries continue to suffer the most, and that the global response thus far has not been ambitious enough (Secretary-General’s progress report)
6. Providing leadership, guidance and recommendations to ensure transformative change
7. Renewing commitment to multilateralism and ensuring that multilateral institutions keep pace with the rapid changes taking place, in order to build peaceful, just and inclusive societies for all people of all ages, with full respect for their rights and dignity throughout the lifecourse
The Political Declaration to be adopted at the Summit should adequately reflect the culmination of four years of efforts to implement the SDGs during the first cycle, taking note of persistent problems, lessons learned and emerging issues. It must be the vehicle to provide political leadership, guidance and recommendations, in compliance with General Assembly resolution 67/290, in order to move the process forward for the second cycle.

SDG Goal 17: All populations must be included in the data. All data, wherever possible, be disaggregated in order to accurately describe all populations. Data should be disaggregated by age, sex, geographic location, and disability status and where possible, by income, race, ethnicity, migratory status, and other characteristics relevant in national contexts. (Take from Inclusive Data Charter/Global Partnership for Sustainable Data. Following the recommendations of the Titchfield group to insure older persons are not left behind.
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5/30/2019 3:11:46Kate CarrollActionAid International
Johannesburg, South Africa (Head Office)
kate.carroll@actionaid.org
Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Civil Society Financing for Development Group, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
The Summit keeps to it’s own vision and recognises and upholds the “supremely ambitious and transformational” nature of the commitments made. Rather than business as usual, we wish to keep focus on the promise of “bold and transformative steps” for change.
The pledge that “no one will be left behind” is viewed from an intersectional feminist perspective whereby attention is given to breaking down the power structures which systematically exclude marginalised people to ensure these people are broad to the centre of the political debate.
The Summit provides an opportunity to connect and convene with CSOs and movements to address - from an intersectional feminist perspective - key systemic and structural issues (austerity and cuts on social services, jobless growth, political space, providing concrete alternatives to address financing for development, climate and migration)
The Summit provides an opportunity to translate the narrative of disrupting business as usual into a basket of change at national level by engaging with governments and working with national coalitions.
Gaps high level discussions:
Governments had committed to a revitalized Global Partnership between states and declared that public finance has a vital role in achieving the SDGs. However, embrace of the private sector and public-private partnerships was foregrounded in the outcome document of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development. IFIs, led by the World Bank, have argued for private finance and the PPP model for the implementation of the SDGs. Despite a growing body of evidence on the exorbitant cost of PPPs to the public exchequer and their detrimental and gendered impacts on human rights, the push against public financing is growing, as IFIs suggest there is no alternative.
Gaps global environment:
Austerity economics has led to social policies cuts; persistent gender inequalities, violence and discrimination against women and girls; jobless growth & precarization of work; lack of progress on climate change; shrinkage of political space for civic action, criminalization of movements and persecution to human rights defenders; anti-migration policies; and lack of domestic and international funding for implementing the required policy reforms.
The SDGs cannot be achieved without addressing the underlying causes that prevent its achievement.Alternatives to neoliberal austerity policies (universal social security, de-privatisation of public services, decent work) are required to advance women’s rights, safeguard young people’s rights and resilience, and redistribute power and wealth.Set out enhanced ambition and an immediate action plan to respond to the climate crisis in an equitable manner.Wealthy developed countries must substantially increase their mitigation commitments&their finance and technological support for governments in developing countries to strengthen their own mitigation and adaptation efforts.Recognise that the climate crisis is a global problem that requires unprecedented global cooperation, all countries must do their fair share, including in terms of climate finance, in order to have any chance of meeting the Paris Agreement’s goal to limit global warming to 1.5°C.Ensure universal, accessible publicly funded gender responsive public services (education, health, childcare,access2justice, transport).Recognize that the privatization of public services to create profits is an unresolvable contradiction.
Address the multiple intersecting dimensions of inequality and the pledge to ‘leave no one behind’ from a feminist perspective throughout all discussions, including ensuring that the voices of traditionally excluded groups are heard within national planning processes.
Provide practical support in ensuring that the most marginalised are able to travel and actively engage in the spaces at the summit (i.e. support the provision of visas, funds for travel to/from the US, work with CSO partners to identify potential speakers, ensure translators are available etc)
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5/30/2019 4:29:02Fatma Öğücü Şen
Arguden Governence Academy
Türkiye
info@argudenacademy.org
Non-Governmental Organizations
The Summit is an excellent opportunity to evaluate the gap analysis of where we are on the Agenda 2030. Stakeholders will present their progress on their projects and declare new ones emphasizing common values with SDG.
• Member states should acknowledge imoportancy of the urgency of the need to address the SDG's. Sustainability Governence Scorecard also inludes a section where it measures which SDG's are more popular than others. For instance more than half of the companies in the report are aligning their business with SDG's. mostly companies prefer subjects like: 13Climate Action,8 Decent Work and Economic Growth, 12 Responsible Consumption and Production. On the other hand 16 Peace and Justice Strong Institutes, 14 Life Below Water, 2 No Hunger ; are SDG's that are least popular and may posess lots of opportunities. You can find more details on: http://sgscorecard.argudenacademy.org/findings-and-good-practices/guidance
Good examples are listed in Sustainability Governence Scorecard in order to provide learning opportunity for other companies. Also the good examples mentioned includes SDG goals.
*to improve our aproach to the 2030 agenda SDG subjects 16-17 are very critical. Prioritization of these SDG's and therefore partnerships is the key for good governence. Goog governence is the key for enhancing life quality of others.
In order to achieve a goal the most critical SDG in our opinion is 17 Partnership For the Goals. Because good examples of SDG aproaches mentioned in the report Sustainability Governence Scorecard, it directs reader to a pear to pear learning opportunity. Learning from good practices of others improves the quality of others aproaches.
Good Governance for Quality of Life
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5/30/2019 7:51:09kanumuri s raju
kkr ks charitable turst ( kanumuri krishnam raju and sarojini charitiable trust)
India
srajukanumuri@gmail.com
Non-Governmental Organizations, Together 2030
connecting next 3.4 billion based on 7 SDG and Goals we are planning to achieve. Make them into reality.
Making Simple SDG. it is noting but making main sdg's into reality. making sustianble innovators citizens making eco system live in peace which gives fresh water ear earth education shelter happiness security . All humans are one all communities are one make ECO system safe . make farmers live happily. make sustainable world communities.
Best practices we can see make Main SDG's reach grass root levels into reality. SDG's are not getting achieved because of corruption lack of will in political circles as well as communities. This is mainly due to poverty and also divide and rule acts . If we remove these barriers in human minds which are living based on caste races religions regions etc make all are one . Each country have different problem issues and also states districts with in country .we must address this at grass root levels make them educated . woman children youth are key. Discipline is compulsory to make goals into reality. make smart villages smart communities.
Three simple Political messages - 1) AWAKE MY FELLOW COUNTRY MAN WITH 7 main SDG to be GREAT HAPPY NATION. ( each country main SDG's need are Different 1st main SDG must be implmented). 2) LIBERTY FREEDOM OF HAPPY SELF DEVELOPMENT HOMES VILLAGES IS OUR Innovation. 3) our best start up is - SUSTAINABLE nation Co -operative corporate villagers community labs.
Leaving no one behind by connecting next 3.4 billion open innovative minds who are communities at large. Open Knowledge commerce making minds humans work at grass root levels. One SDG light ray can reach million's of lifes with my home my village my state my mind SDG.
When 1st SDG models where created . I told make simple SDG. Last year also most of leaders members teams groups shared the same. In order to make SDG into reality make things practical Simple understandable make civilizations old practices resulted projects implemented in all countries. Rather Knowledge projects are getting duplicated wasting money resources implemented best works which made SDG implemented at grass root levels. More and more junk data junk knowledge junk team work don't give best results. Make SDGs into sustainable for ever. Education to all woman in villages is key as most of them are poor uneducated . Make all stake holders politicians to have SDG classes at village. If any village head , Member of parliament , Legislative assembly county mayor governor etc elected he must be given Training on SDG goals models. Then only funds to SDG goals will be allocated. No corruption classes. Environmental basics .
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5/30/2019 14:42:41Margie SimoTogether 2030Global
margie.simo@together2030.org
Together 2030
Transparency and participation- It is critical to show a perspective on SDGs implementation that includes Civil Society. Ensuring Major Groups and Other Stakeholders are able to participate meaningfully and their voices are heard is the best way to contribute to the Summit.
1. Awareness of VNRs and national planning is relatively high, but knowledge on VNR processes is much lower. From our survey, while 80% reported being aware their country is undertaking a review, awareness on how to engage remains low- less 40%. This indicates that follow up processes fall short regarding participation and transparency. 2. Clear obstacles to CSO participation- 66% expressed frustration at the challenges to participation, citing a range of external obstacles from lack of government transparency and superficial consultation, to lack of funding and government repression of NGOs. 3. VNRs are not perceived as inclusive of marginalised groups- Only 14% regarded the most vulnerable and marginalised groups as being included in VNR. 4.Limited progress since previous VNRs- Respondents indicate that progress following a country’s VNR is best in planning, policy implementation, and CSO engagement. Despite these positives, political will, public awareness and budgeting are regarded as showing little progress. Most stakeholders do not see good progress in review following a VNR. This suggests VNRs run as standalone exercises and are not being translated into lasting structures
1. Engaging Parliamentarians on Agenda 2030:
Engaging parliaments on the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs: representation, accountability and implementation – a handbook for civil society https://bit.ly/2VYEDQM
2. Annual Perception Surveys gathering stakeholders’ perspectives on national follow up and review of the SDGs.
From principle to practice: stakeholder participation in Voluntary National Reviews, 2018,
https://bit.ly/30RWyfr
3. Civil Society Mapping reviewing the organization of national civil society coalitions on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):
NATIONAL CIVIL SOCIETY COALITIONS ON THE
SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS - A MAPPING
https://bit.ly/2HL5fAQ
1. The ambition of the HLPF must be increased: The review of the HLPF must ‘benefit from lessons learned’ rather than to reduce ambition (70/299).
2. Better alignment and integration of the 2030 Agenda with other frameworks, particularly environmental and human rights: Sustainable development recognises and aligns with environmental, climate, human rights and
other sectors. It is therefore important that the HLPF provides more space for the input from the relevant sector mechanisms and agencies. This needs to be in both the HLPF as a whole and within VNRs.
3. More opportunities for meaningful follow up, learning and review: In order to see greater focus on the sharing of experiences, including successes, challenges and lessons learned, and provide political leadership, guidance
and recommendations for follow-up’ (2030 Agenda, 82), a rethink on the current focus on specific goals - the HLPF needs to be organised in a way for clear presentation of progress and identification of shared challenges,
and add value beyond repetition of the Expert Group Meetings - it might be that they are integrated into VNR presentations
Fore more: https://bit.ly/2VANug1
Ensure that there is a focus on leaving no one behind: In line with the 2030 Agenda, there is a responsibility for
countries - governments and all stakeholders - to ensure no one is left behind in progress towards achieving the
SDGs, and that the furthest behind are reached first. The HLPF should ensure that the voice of marginalised
people are heard, through:
a. Increasing opportunities for the voice of those left behind in the HLPF, including representative groups
through civil society support
b. Ensuring engagement of left behind groups in development and presentation of VNRs
c. Safeguarding a space for left behind groups in goal-specific discussions
d. Providing resources to facilitate travel for marginalised people to attend the HLPF
73
5/30/2019 15:58:11Steering CommitteeCoalition 2030Irelandsarah@ien.ie
Women, Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Workers & Trade Unions, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Older Persons, Persons with Disabilities, Education & Academic Entities, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development, Coalition 2030 is an alliance of 50+ organisations numbering on more than two million members by affiliation
Review the VNR process & strengthen accountability by:
• Ensuring recommendations and outcomes from VNR

• Mechanism for follow-up on VNRs needed - this could be at
regional level

• More political weight needs to be given to HLPF. Likewise,
political declaration should contain action-oriented
outcomes and be assessed the following year

• Greater input of stakeholders is essential to build an
accountability framework to document progress with SDGs

• Accelerate implementation: more focus required on the
connection between goals & targets - indivisible and
interrelated nature of Goals

• Addressing interlinkages in thematic reviews is required
PROGRESS:
• Number of governments participating in VNRs & presented high quality
reports (often 2nd and 3rd time) that demonstrate robust use of evidence

• HLPF has served to mobilise action in countries. However,
more space must be allocated for increased stakeholder input, including
space & time for participation during reviews to engage/ask questions

GAPS & CHALLENGES:

• MAPPING, MONITORING, MEASURING & EVALUATION of progress: robust,
coherent frameworks for accountability are required

• To support this, provision of better quality, more frequent & fully
disaggregated data is needed across all SDGs

• Cohesive strategies required to gather data on vulnerable/excluded/
marginalised groups

• Many indicators lack sufficient data

• Lack of funding to support development of accountability
mechanisms for progress

• Global data deficiency is a key obstacle to policies being adequately
supported to programming being able to reach those left behind

• Lack of policy coherence with policies that may drive progress
on certain Goals and targets contradicted by action in other depts.
• COLLABORATION: DRIVING POLICY
Working closely with Gov. (Dept. of Climate Change,
Energy & Environment) to ensure their full backing & support for the
delivery of SDGs strategies within all national policy

• RAISING AWARENESS
Running cultural events (i.e. SDG Week Sept. 23rd-25th) in collaboration with
all SDG stakeholders i.e. Coalition member organisations/academic
institutions/CSOs

• Creating national campaigns/events & collaborating with EU groups on
action campaigns that mobilise & build partnerships that bring together
all sectors of society

• Cultivating high profile SDG ambassadors/key influencers to raise
awareness & mobilise action

• EDUCATION
Running nationwide SDGs training/education workshops for CSOs
Coalition, such that individuals can internalise ownership of the SDGs in
both personal &professional life

• INNOVATION & TECHNOLOGY: SCALING UP
Collaborating with the Tech sector to develop dynamic, fun online
engagement platforms & accountability mechanisms that gather data
to map, measure, monitor & evaluate progress in real time



• Strengthen, streamline and homogenise accountability mechanisms for
SDG review, reporting and follow-up

• Increase international public finance available for implementation strategies
in line with the Addis Ababa Action Agenda

• Ensure greater integration of dimensions of sustainable development and
principles (5 P’s) in SDG implementation and review
• Capacity-building and financial support to build inclusion of excluded
groups at HLPF

• Make it mandatory that HLPF delegations must consist of at least one
delegate per country that represents an excluded/marginalised/hard-to-
reach group

• At every HLPF ensure that there is space and provision of side events with
representatives from this group to examine progress to reaching those
furthest behind

• Allocate time in presentations for countries to address how they are
implementing LNOB and Reaching the Furthest First and progress towards it
74
5/30/2019 16:05:38Steering CommitteeCoalition 2030Irelandsarah@ien.ie
Women, Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Workers & Trade Unions, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Older Persons, Persons with Disabilities, Education & Academic Entities, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development, Coalition 2030 is an alliance of 50+ organisations numbering on more than two million members by affiliation
Review the VNR process & strengthen accountability by:
• Ensuring recommendations and outcomes from VNR

• Mechanism for follow-up on VNRs needed - this could be at
regional level

• More political weight needs to be given to HLPF. Likewise,
political declaration should contain action-oriented
outcomes and be assessed the following year

• Greater input of stakeholders is essential to build an
accountability framework to document progress with SDGs

• Accelerate implementation: more focus required on the
connection between goals & targets - indivisible and
interrelated nature of Goals

• Addressing interlinkages in thematic reviews is required
PROGRESS:
• Number of governments participating in VNRs & presented high quality
reports (often 2nd and 3rd time) that demonstrate robust use of evidence

• HLPF has served to mobilise action in countries. However,
more space must be allocated for increased stakeholder input, including
space & time for participation during reviews to engage/ask questions

GAPS & CHALLENGES:

• MAPPING, MONITORING, MEASURING & EVALUATION of progress: robust,
coherent frameworks for accountability are required

• To support this, provision of better quality, more frequent & fully
disaggregated data is needed across all SDGs

• Cohesive strategies required to gather data on vulnerable/excluded/
marginalised groups

• Many indicators lack sufficient data

• Lack of funding to support development of accountability
mechanisms for progress

• Global data deficiency is a key obstacle to policies being adequately
supported to programming being able to reach those left behind

• Lack of policy coherence with policies that may drive progress
on certain Goals and targets contradicted by action in other depts.
• COLLABORATION: DRIVING POLICY
Working closely with Gov. (Dept. of Climate Change,
Energy & Environment) to ensure their full backing & support for the
delivery of SDGs strategies within all national policy

• RAISING AWARENESS
Running cultural events (i.e. SDG Week Sept. 23rd-25th) in collaboration with
all SDG stakeholders i.e. Coalition member organisations/academic
institutions/CSOs

• Creating national campaigns/events & collaborating with EU groups on
action campaigns that mobilise & build partnerships that bring together
all sectors of society

• Cultivating high profile SDG ambassadors/key influencers to raise
awareness & mobilise action

• EDUCATION
Running nationwide SDGs training/education workshops for CSOs
Coalition, such that individuals can internalise ownership of the SDGs in
both personal &professional life

• INNOVATION & TECHNOLOGY: SCALING UP
Collaborating with the Tech sector to develop dynamic, fun online
engagement platforms & accountability mechanisms that gather data
to map, measure, monitor & evaluate progress in real time



• Strengthen, streamline and homogenise accountability mechanisms for
SDG review, reporting and follow-up

• Increase international public finance available for implementation strategies
in line with the Addis Ababa Action Agenda

• Ensure greater integration of dimensions of sustainable development and
principles (5 P’s) in SDG implementation and review
• Capacity-building and financial support to build inclusion of excluded
groups at HLPF

• Make it mandatory that HLPF delegations must consist of at least one
delegate per country that represents an excluded/marginalised/hard-to-
reach group

• At every HLPF ensure that there is space and provision of side events with
representatives from this group to examine progress to reaching those
furthest behind

• Allocate time in presentations for countries to address how they are
implementing LNOB and Reaching the Furthest First and progress towards it
To deliver on this time-sensitive Agenda 2030, adequate financing must be allocated to ensure delivery on national SDGs commitments. Goals/targets will not be met if governments perceive the SDGs to be an "add-on" programme to their existing budgets. This will require a major shift in political thinking and practice with regard to creating policy frameworks and bringing policy coherence across all sectors.
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5/30/2019 16:56:12CURBATOV Oleg
International Association of University Professors and Lecturers (IAUPL)
FRANCE
oleg.curbatov@univ-paris13.fr
Non-Governmental Organizations, Education & Academic Entities, UNESCO NGO partnership
Despite the Intrernational Association of University Professors and Lecturers submission to the HLPF, outcomes of the recent Regional Forums on Sustainable Development also informing the process and other efforts, the zero draft of the Political Declaration of the SDG Summit issued on 21 May makes NO REFERENCE to education. We call on the negotiators HLPF 2019 to accelerate our collective efforts by NGOs so that the role of quality education, and more particularly higher education, as a catalyst for Agenda 2030 is effectively included in the zero draft of the Political Declaration of the Summit of the SDGs published on May 21, 2019
Neglect of higher education in programs, a gap in the specificities of higher education and attempts to restrict academic freedom.This message by the International Association of University Professors and Lecturers (IAUPL) summarizes SDG 4 and more particularly the higher education component, along with the goals of its set of transversal and related SDGs (Goals 4, 8, 10, 13, 16 et 17) examined at the HLPF 2019. IAUPL reaffirms that through a process of transmission and creation of knowledge Higher Education is still a social “equalizer”. It enables the development and empowerment of individuals, progress in countries and world peace. Nevertheless, this dual process is facing problems relating to quality of education and the free status of university teacher-researchers - quite unequal across countries – which are reproduced by already existing inequalities. It is generally known that the quality of Higher Education depends on a research activity based on academic freedoms (freedoms in teaching, research and speech). Within this framework and the context of higher education, the professional autonomy and decent work of teachers-researchers are consistent with ACADEMIC FREEDOMS.
This message calls for supporting academic freedoms which help improve the quality of higher education steadily and reduce economic and social inequalities across countries (SDG 10). It also calls for strengthening the links between future teachers’ academic trainings at all levels, life-long learning and sharing professional practices. International Association of University Professors and Lecturers (IAUPL) notes that a high-quality higher education as well as the recognition of academic titles and qualifications (also in countries in conflict situations) are essential to achieve the decent work objective (SDG 8) and build peaceful societies worldwide (SDG16). The international partnership between academics/scientists and states (SDG 17) « Academic Diplomacy - Pax Academica IAUPL » involves academic teachers-researchers through training/research programmes on dialogue between states concerning natural disasters (SDG 13) and on the resolution of military, environmental, economic and unequal conflicts across countries.
Key Message by International Association of University Professors and Lecturers (IAUPL) to HLPF 2019 :
KEY-MESSAGE 1: we call on the negotiators to accelerate our collective efforts by NGOs so that the role of quality education, and more particularly higher education, as a catalyst for Agenda 2030 is effectively included in the Political Declaration of the Summit of the SDGs published on May 21, 2019
KEY-MESSAGE 2: reaffirms and calls on governments to support the key goal of education at all levels, which consists in providing young people, university teachers and teachers-researchers the knowledge required for the development of their empowerment and ensuring decent work.
KEY-MESSAGE 3: reaffirms that the quality of higher education at the global level is reflected in a partnership and international cooperation by academics, based on the approaches of Academic Diplomacy and University Freedom.
MESSAGE: we call on the negotiators to accelerate our collective efforts by NGOs so that the role of quality education, and more particularly higher education, as a catalyst for Agenda 2030 is effectively included in the Political Declaration of the Summit of the SDGs published on May 21, 2019
this is a message from IAUPL, an NGO in official UNESCO partnership, member of the collective consulation Education 2030 "CCONG 2030" to develop a collective response
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5/30/2019 17:01:52Curbatov Oleg
IAUPL International Association of University Professors and Lecturers
France
oleg.curbatov@univ-paris13.fr
Non-Governmental Organizations, Education & Academic Entities, ONG in official partnership with UNESCO and membre of CCONG Education 2018
Despite the Intrernational Association of University Professors and Lecturers submission to the HLPF, outcomes of the recent Regional Forums on Sustainable Development also informing the process and other efforts, the zero draft of the Political Declaration of the SDG Summit issued on 21 May makes NO REFERENCE to education. We call on the negotiators HLPF 2019 to accelerate our collective efforts by NGOs so that the role of quality education, and more particularly higher education, as a catalyst for Agenda 2030 is effectively included in the zero draft of the Political Declaration of the Summit of the SDGs published on May 21, 2019
Neglect of higher education in programs, a gap in the specificities of higher education and attempts to restrict academic freedom.This message by the International Association of University Professors and Lecturers (IAUPL) summarizes SDG 4 and more particularly the higher education component, along with the goals of its set of transversal and related SDGs (Goals 4, 8, 10, 13, 16 et 17) examined at the HLPF 2019. IAUPL reaffirms that through a process of transmission and creation of knowledge Higher Education is still a social “equalizer”. It enables the development and empowerment of individuals, progress in countries and world peace. Nevertheless, this dual process is facing problems relating to quality of education and the free status of university teacher-researchers - quite unequal across countries – which are reproduced by already existing inequalities. It is generally known that the quality of Higher Education depends on a research activity based on academic freedoms (freedoms in teaching, research and speech). Within this framework and the context of higher education, the professional autonomy and decent work of teachers-researchers are consistent with ACADEMIC FREEDOMS.
This message calls for supporting academic freedoms which help improve the quality of higher education steadily and reduce economic and social inequalities across countries (SDG 10). It also calls for strengthening the links between future teachers’ academic trainings at all levels, life-long learning and sharing professional practices. International Association of University Professors and Lecturers (IAUPL) notes that a high-quality higher education as well as the recognition of academic titles and qualifications (also in countries in conflict situations) are essential to achieve the decent work objective (SDG 8) and build peaceful societies worldwide (SDG16). The international partnership between academics/scientists and states (SDG 17) « Academic Diplomacy - Pax Academica IAUPL » involves academic teachers-researchers through training/research programmes on dialogue between states concerning natural disasters (SDG 13) and on the resolution of military, environmental, economic and unequal conflicts across countries.
Key Message by International Association of University Professors and Lecturers (IAUPL) to HLPF 2019 :
KEY-MESSAGE 1: we call on the negotiators to accelerate our collective efforts by NGOs so that the role of quality education, and more particularly higher education, as a catalyst for Agenda 2030 is effectively included in the Political Declaration of the Summit of the SDGs published on May 21, 2019
KEY-MESSAGE 2: reaffirms and calls on governments to support the key goal of education at all levels, which consists in providing young people, university teachers and teachers-researchers the knowledge required for the development of their empowerment and ensuring decent work.
KEY-MESSAGE 3: reaffirms that the quality of higher education at the global level is reflected in a partnership and international cooperation by academics, based on the approaches of Academic Diplomacy and University Freedom.

MESSAGE: we call on the negotiators to accelerate our collective efforts by NGOs so that the role of quality education, and more particularly higher education, as a catalyst for Agenda 2030 is effectively included in the Political Declaration of the Summit of the SDGs published on May 21, 2019
this is a message from IAUPL, an NGO in official UNESCO partnership, member of the collective consulation Education 2030 "CCONG 2030" to develop a collective response
77
5/30/2019 21:01:04
Tcharbuahbokengo NFINN
Federation of Environmental and Ecological Diversity for Agricutural Revampment and Human Rights (FEEDAR & HR)
Cameroonfeedar97@yahoo.com
Farmer, Civil Society Financing for Development Group
Many more smaller organizations around the world especially in forgotten regions should be invited to this important forum. The summit should be a game changer where parties and larger or funding organizations are determined to make financial resources readily available to smaller organizations facing a lot of barriers to access finances to facilitate them effectively achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and Leaving No One Behind. Countries should make additional commitment to achieving the SDGs Agenda by 2030.
Awareness raising on the UN Sustainable Development Goals Agenda 2030 at the national level and among main stakeholders, towns and cities and local communities have been one area of progress. Identification of areas of intervention in order to meet the needs of communities and to relief them from their immediate burden to development if the necessary resources are made available is another progress and development of Tools to effectively achieve the UN Sustainable Development 17 Goals Agenda 2030 and Leaving No one behind. Many gaps exists among these communities in achieving these Goals, first is lack of financial resources to encourage the efforts of workers and Volunteers, lack of infrastructure, not easily accessible communities, absence of electricity, communication facilities and hard to accept by many abandoned and left out communities in the country.
The Spirit of Volunteering is one important aspect. With Volunteering we were able to develop Tools to fully achieve the UN Agenda 2030 in the entire Republic of Cameroon. These Tools have paved the way for us to propose to the government to create the Commission on UN Sustainable Development Goals Agenda 2030 as the only solution to effectively approach and meet up to standards the Leave No One Behind slogan. Secondly is the engagement and sacrifices to meet the people and doing by example. Our Volunteers met with communities directly especially Councils, Traditional Rulers, Heads of Institutions, Delegation of Government Ministries, Businesses, Universities, Financial Institutions, researchers, Forces of Law and Order, Civil Society, Farmers and Students. Partnership Agreements were made and signed among some of these Stakeholders to implement the Agenda Goals. Taking action and to assure a sustainable solution to their circumstances. Our Volunteers worked with these communities as Farmers, Teachers, Nurses, Care givers, Financial Experts, Counsellors, Environmentalists, Peace Builders,and all the 17 Goals.
1) Take action now by providing an atmosphere conducive and make resources accessible to achieve these United Nations 17 SDGs, 2) Meet communities on the ground directly and now, 3) Follow up and measure progress made.
Make financial resources readily available to grass root organizations and now. Most of the time and very often few from recognized or larger organization are on the table making the decisions. I suggest more from very small organizations based in the very poor communities around the world should be part of every thing.Most of the time these small organizations feel abandoned. Let resources be made available where most of such institutions are invited. United States has a very difficult Visa procedure. Invitations should be confirmed and sent out at least 8 weeks before conference stating date. Leaving no one behind should be more encouraged especially by supporting volunteering initiatives.
Support small organizations more to attend and make available invitations at least 8 weeks before conference due to visa constraints from especially developing countries. Leaving No One Behind should be a reality and not fiction.
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5/30/2019 22:21:04Stephen Leonelli
MPact Global Action for Gay Men's Health & Rights
USA
sleonelli@mpactglobal.org
Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, LGBTI Stakeholder Group
A substantial focus of the SDG Summit and its outcome document must be on leaving no one behind and what actions must be taken in order to move beyond just rhetoric and commit to concrete steps to remove all the structural barriers to achieving the SDGs, including punitive and discriminatory laws and policies, violence, poverty, and marginalization of certain groups. The language in the outcome document should be people-centered, action-oriented, and contain a gender perspective inclusive of all people.

All segments of the SDG Summit programme must provide opportunities for Major Groups and other Stakeholders to contribute, through oral interventions. Major Groups and other Stakeholders should also have meaningful roles in the follow-up and review of the outcomes of the SDG Summit.
Access to Antiretroviral (ARV) treatment for people living with HIV has increased from 680,000 people in 2000 to 21.7 million people currently. This has resulted in the number of AIDS-related deaths to decrease to fewer than 1 million people each year. However, new HIV infections are not decreasing fast enough: in 2017, 180,000 children became newly infected with HIV; women and girls and key populations (sex workers, gay men, people who use drugs, transgender people, prisoners, and migrants) continue to be disproportionately affected. Multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination and violence within health systems prevent excluded groups from accessing the most basic health services. Laws that criminalize HIV transmission, sex work, drug use, same-sex relations, and gender identity create barriers to achieving Goal 3, and the lack of protective and non-discriminatory laws renders these groups vulnerable. Global assistance for health has flattened since 2010, and international aid for HIV has been reduced by roughly 20% from 2013 to 2016. Finally, a deteriorating environment for human rights and shrinking space for civil society undermines the possibility of realizing the SDGs.
1) Country governments must review, revise, and repeal discriminatory and punitive laws, policies and practices that violate the rights of the most marginalized and vulnerable to health conditions and poverty, including sex workers, people who use drugs, and LGBTI people. Governments and development institutions must comply with principles of non-discrimination and promote inclusiveness.
2) Civil society and communities should be considered as equal partners in implementation and governance of SDG priorities and there should be adequate and sustainable funding for them to play this role. Donors and country governments must be accountable to civil society and communities for achieving results.
3) In order to tailor development interventions to better serve communities, countries should strive to disaggregate development data based on age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, and sex characteristics, while respecting the confidentiality of individuals and security of their personal information during the data collection and disaggregation process.
Leaving no one behind means putting the last mile first. The needs of the poorest and most marginalized members of society need to be put at the start and center with legal and policy frameworks that address the full range of, and barriers to, realizing their full potential and the SDGs overall.

Human rights and putting the poorest and most marginalized people first should be at the core of the Summit, cross-cutting through the different panels, statements and interventions at the Summit and prioritizing the representatives of these communities for panel and speaking slots.

The Summit Political Declaration should include concrete recommendations on leaving no one behind, including language that ensures transformation from rhetoric to reality. These commitments should include: meaningful participation of the “furthest behind” in design, implementation, review, and decision-making in country plans for achieving the 2030 Agenda; earmarked funding to support civil society organizations that represent marginalized communities; and, ongoing assessment of punitive and discriminatory laws, policies, and practices that continue to leave people behind.
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5/31/2019 1:46:23Atef SolimanGatef organizationEgypttfgrgs@yahoo.com.au
Non-Governmental Organizations, Volunteer Groups, Together 2030
At the meeting
I have more than one , but I will telling you at the meeting
LaterAlready I have more than 5LaterNo thanks
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5/31/2019 5:24:17Ege Yildirim
International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS)
Turkey
ege.yildirim@icomos.org
Non-Governmental Organizations
To create effective momentum and propose tangible solutions, for national, regional and local governments and other major stakeholders to implement, in the fight against CLIMATE change and the collapse on BIODIVERSITY, in particular not leaving behind the CULTURAL dimension, which is key to CHANGING MINDS AND BEHAVIORS toward peace, cooperation and EQUITY.
As progress, the SDGs have been EMBRACED WIDELY around the world by a great variety of stakeholders, thus becoming EVERYDAY TERMINOLOGY, being harnessed to provide direction, momentum and synergies for sustainability efforts. As gaps, firstly, we need more focus on INTEGRATED approaches to TERRITORIAL development at national, regional and local levels, on financial and political support to develop territorial strategies and policies, as the territories are meaningful UNITS OF IMPLEMENTATION where synergies happen to affect change. Secondly, some NATION STATES’ GOVERNMENT POLICIES adopted on some issues pose serious obstacles to full achievement of the SDGs, and other actors, such as local and regional governments, civil society and responsible business, should be empowered to balance and overcome this bottleneck. Thirdly, MEASUREMENT is not applied in a MEANINGFUL enough way, taking into account QUALITATIVE aspects and making sure all issues are addressed, such as the essential component of CULTURE and its special measurability challenges.
For TERRITORIAL DEVELOPMENT & CULTURAL HERITAGE (SDG 4, 8, 10, 11, 16, 17): National, urban and regional development schemes in Ethiopia (urban-rural balance), Saudi Arabia (partnerships between sectors), Paris (compact city principles for a megapolis), Mumbai (real estate equity, heritage and environmental protection), Algiers (casbah rehabilitation, public participation, historic center revitalization), Istanbul (Balat-Fener rehabilitation prioritizing social rights and heritage). Global network of metropolitan and territorial urban agencies, launched at Habitat3. International Council on Monuments (ICOMOS) Victoria Falls Travel Grant (participation of experts from developing countries and young professionals at meetings and symposia); ICOMOS-UNESCO-ICCROM-IUCN partnership for ‘Our Common Dignity: Rights-Based Approaches in World Heritage’; Sustainable Preservation Initiative (SPI) for creating economic stability and self-reliance in disadvantaged communities; Climate Heritage mobilization to help communities achieve climate targets through cultural heritage; Project Anqa for documentation, capacity building, knowledge transfer for cultural heritage at risk in the Middle East.
1: Mobilize URBAN AND TERRITORIAL ACTORS (governments, professionals civil society, etc), to give substance to political and social debates and to offer solutions on sustainable cultural development of territories and to complement and balance States Parties’ policies and actions.
2: Recognize CULTURE as the FOURTH DIMENSION of sustainable development, connecting the social, economic and environmental pillars, stating in the Political Declaration that we must “build peaceful, just and inclusive societies through a culture of dialogue, identity and dignity for all”.
3: Mobilize CULTURAL HERITAGE as the way to integrate identities, enable diversity and inclusivity, foster socio-economic and environmental resilience and drive change for cities and communities.
- Reduce the impact of global finance on territorial development. Financial markets are not regulated today to drive finance for development, but mainly for speculation. Creation of huge funds for speculation cannot resolve public debt. Speculation produces empty towns (30% in Egypt; 20% in China; 25% in Dubai)., consumes high levels of natural resources, benefiting nobody except speculators. This increases the price of real estate and create conditions for social exclusion from city centers (London, Vancouver, Toronto, Bamako, Phnom Penh…). States and local governments should REGULATE THE EFFECT OF FINANCIALIZATION OF URBAN DEVELOPMENT to reduce its negative impact for the planet and society.
- Harness the power of CULTURE to change mindsets, habits, behaviors, policies and actions.
- Support DIGITAL EMPOWERMENT for democracy and harnessing YOUNG GENERATIONS to overcome entrenched habits blocking implementation of sustainable development.
- SPREAD POWER and resources away from national government to other stakeholders, including local and regional government, civil society and responsible business.
- Strengthen ACCOUNTABILITY to prevent exploitation of finance for development.
Territorial planning is the way to think differently, in the short and long term, cross-sectorally and cross-territorially, achieving social mix, diversity and cohesion. It should be strengthened at national, regional and local levels with specific technical bodies dedicated to monitor, develop policies and strategies for sustainable development.
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5/31/2019 5:41:16Dr J Kay Richmond
Soroptimist International Great Britain and Ireland
UK based but covering 28 countries
programmedirector@sigbi.org
Women, Children & Youth
• Agreement on ways of implementing all the SDGs – they are interdependent.
• The equitable involvement of women at all levels will be key.
• Accurate timely data collection which includes disaggregation by gender in order to ensure equity between all peoples, regardless of age, gender, disability or any other distinguishing characteristic.
• Thank you for qualifying quality in SDG3; without this quality could, justifiably, be anything from unacceptable to excellent. This applies wherever the word quality appears.
1. Progress has been made in some areas but this remains patchy and variable across countries. The Human Development Index 2019 (http://www.hdr.undp.org/en/2018-update) and the SDG Index (https://www.sdgindex.org/assets/files/2018/02%20SDGS%20Country%20profiles%20edition%20WEB%20V3%20180718.pdf) provide evidence of these disparities.
2. Wealth distribution and absolute poverty across all countries is still evident with wider gaps in some than others.
3. Under-representation of women in all strata continues to exist with some exceptions such as governments in Rwanda and Wales.
4. There needs to be linkages between all SDGs. For example, SDG5 cannot be achieved fully without success in SDG6, SDG3 and SDG1.
5. Progress in the SDGs needs to be rooted in human rights articles – to quote Hilary Clinton when opening the Beijing Platform for Action in 1995 “women’s rights are human rights”. This extends, of course, to all people.
We attempt to help women and girls through the project work we do. Some is based in our clubs and is local to each whilst others can be across the whole of SIGBI and in partnership with the worldwide Soroptimist International (SI).
A main project across SIGBI at present is the MERU Women’s Garden Project (https://meruwomen.org ) which aims to create sustainable gardening techniques and tools for enabling women to become mentors and pioneers of agricultural sustainability within the community. In addition girls are educated on their rights, empowering them to stand up to damaging cultural practices such as FGM.
The President’s Appeal for Soroptimist International is Water and Women (https://www.soroptimistinternational.org/campaigns/women-water-and-leadership-2017-2019/), SDG 6.
SIGBI runs a database of projects undertaken by our clubs - across all 28 countries. We are in the process of amending it to show all SDGs, grouped into the 5 Ps. Annual reports are produced by all countries but not focused on the SDGs until 2020.
Evidence shows that involving women in all sectors leads to better 'health and wealth' across all sectors, thus education of the whole population is required on the benefits and the targeting of resources equitably. We cannot achieve equality without first addressing and implementing equity.
1. Strengthen links between Human Rights and the SDGs;
2. Strengthen links between all UN processes;
3. Ensure women’s participation in all areas and at all levels.
Stronger support, based on equity, for all sectors of the populations worldwide. Education for all leads to empowerment and enablement of all. This can be done through raising awareness, advocacy and appropriate action.
Language is important if we are to get 'buy in' from all UN entities and member countries. This is particularly important at CSW each year and applies to initiatives such as the mandate on freedom of religion or belief which, at the moment implies exclusion of those of no faith, even though I suspect that is not the intention.
When exploring issues all stakeholders need to be involved otherwise appropriate language and desired outcomes will not be achieved.
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5/31/2019 6:15:18Baela Raza JamilIdara-e-Taleem-o-AagahiPakistan
afzan.munir@itacec.org
Non-Governmental Organizations
Our expectations for the Summit are to stock take on success stories and country examples where programs and mechanisms were implemented for the acceleration of SDGs. This will provide us with an opportunity to learn from the processes put in place by all such countries and how a similar process may be relied upon in Pakistan for the achievement of SDGs by 2030. Moreover, examples pertaining to the steps which were taken by different countries for partnerships to accelerate implementation would be very critical. Finally the exchanges on popularization of SDGs at the level of citizens and decision makers will also prove to be beneficial for all participants. In this regard, ITA has proactively initiated the process of building alliances for SDGs in general and SDG 4 in particular to facilitate the popularization of SDGs and SDG 4 in Pakistan with support from government, civil society, development partners and other organizations.
Civil society organizations have worked actively for the promotion of SDGs. It is due to such efforts that various indicators have been upgraded e.g from Tier 2 to Tier 1 for SDG 4.1.1.a (lower primary). However, much more needs to be done. Following are some of the key challenges that Pakistan (and other countries) is facing. Firstly, there is an overall lack of awareness among the masses with regards to SDGs. Secondly, there is a need for the alignment of SDG 4 with the country’s Right to Education (RTE) Acts. ITA’s own research states that both SDG 4 and RTE have substantive overlaps in targets and indicators. Thirdly, the implementation of the laws/acts/policies, which are in line with SDGs, has also been a major challenge for Pakistan and others. In order to smoothen the implementation process, proper strategies and action plans need to be devised. Lastly, monitoring of SDGs as per the indicator definitions provided in the metadata is also challenging. Over the course of last 4 years, Pakistan has been able to monitor only 55% of the total number of global indicators due to lack of proper data systems.
Realizing the need to monitor SDG 4 for informed policy making, ITA , in collaboration with the relevant government departments and other stakeholders, has prepared a template for tracking the progress on SDG 4 indicator by indicator. This template provides a comprehensive way of monitoring not only the global indicators, but also the thematic ones as well. On the basis of this template, SDG 4 cards are going to be prepared at the national and provincial levels. Therefore, making it easier for all to understand and monitor the progress on SDG 4. The collected information is also to be used for the training of parliamentarians, judges and lawyers so that they may also be equipped with the proper understanding of SDG 4 and Right to Education. On inclusive education, ITA has adapted the mainstream ASER Pakistan Learning Assessment Tools into two disability-friendly formats: Braille and Pakistan Sign Language (http://itacec.org/inclusion) . This has been done for the first time in Pakistan which means that the learning outcomes of children with disabilities can now also be assessed, thus paving the way for their inclusion in the mainstream schools.
•Financing of SDGs is a major challenge in all countries- it needs to be safeguarded for maintaining trends to meet the 17 SDGs. Domestic financing of SDGs is volatile due to political cycles, changes in governmental priorities which leads lack of predictability in the implementation process. Similarly, international financing and support from development partners is also dipping as recorded in the GEM Report 2017. Therefore, it is necessary that there is a formal commitment by domestic governments and development partners for continued expansion of resources at both the domestic and international levels as agreed in G 20, G7 and SDG Summit declarations.
•Governments must be open to bold Partnerships for Agenda 2030; these need to become more concrete, predictable with Industry, Civil Society and Innovators if we are to achieve the SDGs by 2030.
•Governments and political parties must commit to aligning SDGs with the 21st century challenges- collaborating especially in the areas of technology e.g. AI and Machine Learning. Countries with advanced level of sophisticated technologies may also transfer the same to Low and Low Middle Income countries.
Voices of vulnerable people and especially children need to be heard during the Summit. For this purpose, Persons and Children with Disabilities can be invited through the DPOs.
• There is a need for the governments to take ownership of the work which is being done by the CSOs. In order to make the governments realize this aspect, it is important that CSOs are made a permanent and a major part of all discussions related to SDGs, including HLPF and the SDG Summit.
• Voices of children also need to be heard at the summit in order to know of their expectations from the world of tomorrow.
• Corporate/ private sector has a major role to play in the implementation of SDGs. Governments and the private sector needs to collaborate for the promotion and implementation of the Agenda 2030. Thus, it is required that there is a representation of this sector at the Summit.
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5/31/2019 8:48:54Ann Vaughan
Mercy Corps on behalf of Zurich Flood Resilience Alliance
USA
avaughan@mercycorps.org
Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
Achieving the SDGs will require a radical rethink of how we manage risks, including climate change impacts (SDG 13). The Summit must put a renewed focus on preventing and mitigating flooding, the most prevalent disaster globally, as well as other natural hazards. Governments must make firm, time bound commitments to increase funding for adaptation and DRR and implement climate smart development plans.

Integrate DRR, climate adaptation and resilience building into development policies, strategies and practices to avoid losing SDG gains is a successful best practice. The integration of flood risk reduction policies with development plans, for example, can reduce risk while also advancing community development goals. Likewise, the integration of disaster risk management and climate change adaptation policies and institutional structures can reduce duplication of efforts. By aligning laws and policies, countries and communities can build flood resilience in a more integrated way.
1. Floods and other disasters are undermining progress towards countries reaching the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These threats can be addressed if countries and donors invest more in resilient, climate-smart development.
2. The September SDG Summit is an important opportunity to embrace and integrate resilience thinking into development planning. By investing in resilience and account for climate change in infrastructure and other investments, countries can better reach their development objectives and SDGs.

3. Foster Partnerships. As called for by SDG 17, new partnerships are needed to address the complexities of global problems. The Zurich Flood Resilience Alliance offers a model of how to address the complex problem of flood resilience by bringing together INGOs, the International Federation of the Red Cross, Zurich Insurance Group and academic institutions to identify and implement practical ways to help communities in developed and developing countries strengthen their resilience to flood risk.
Leaving No One Behind: This requires not only scaling up action to prevent hazards from becoming disasters, but ensuring that the most vulnerable and the most marginalized are prioritized for inclusive climate change adaptation (CCA) and disaster risk reduction (DRR) investment and programming.

The Summit must also take concrete action to Support Local Responses and ensure domestic and international funding reaches the community level. Currently, only 10% of climate finance reaches local levels. The impacts of floods are felt most immediately at the local level, and communities and local authorities hold important knowledge on where and how to build resilience. Effective resilience building demands working with vulnerable communities. Therefore, increased decision-making and funding need to be directed to the local level to empower communities to manage changing risks.
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5/31/2019 9:00:05Dana MortensonWorld SavvyUnited Statesdana@worldsavvy.orgNon-Governmental Organizations
The SDGs have tremendous potential for bringing youth into the global discussion and drawing on their contributions to make the world better for all people and other living species. However, due to disparities in youth engagement, a large section of young people are excluded from learning about or contributing to the SDGs. In the United States, we could provide opportunities to a much wider cross-section of youth by incorporating the SDGs into core educational curriculum. This way young people can learn about the SDGs in their schools, and have the opportunity to create and collaborate with peers and their local communities to implement the SDGs.
Since 2002, World Savvy has focused on bringing locally relevant issues (like several of the SDGs), into K-12 classrooms across the U.S., to help students develop critical thinking and actively engage with issues that are relevant to them, their communities, and their world. We provide global competence professional development for educators, and work with teachers to align complex subject matter into core classroom content, in a way that establishes real world connections to the material. Our tried and tested methodology uses project-based learning in K-12 classrooms, which encourages students to research and study issues that are of significance to them and collaborate with peers and their local communities to determine real world solutions. At World Savvy we’re able to demonstrate that this type of active learning benefits young people in their personal, educational and career development, enhances their community involvement, and encourages them to see themselves as change makers.
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5/31/2019 9:17:16LawrenceZUNASouth Africalawshto@yahoo.co.uk
Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
My key expectations for the summit and how stakeholders can best contribute.
I am expecting to further widen my knowledge in as far as the SDGs are concerned for the benefit of localizing them to my country and continent at large. I also look forward to exchange practices with otherSDGs champions coming from across the globe. Having attended the Global Festival of Action on SDGs Conference in Germany in May this year 2019, I look forward to a summit that is much broader in terms of ideas and actions on SDGs as it involves all peoples of all nations, the rich, the poor and the marginalized. Mingling, associating and networking with various people of different parts of the world, facing different challenges and testimonies brings much needed knowledge as well as the capacity to influence and to act on the global goals at the same time ensuring that no one is left behind.
Stakeholders can contribute by sharing their respective experiences and challenges with others. Teaching and learning from one another so that we move together as one.

The most important areas of progress is in the awareness campaigns of the SDGs, though more is to be done to reach to the grassroots levels. The channels of campaigns or awareness are mostly for the educated and that leaves others with little or no information on the global goals to be achieved yet it should be inclusive, leaving no one behind.
- financing of the SDGs has been one of the greatest challenge especially for developing countries which normally struggle with debts. To reach out to as many people as possible needs finance which is hard to get for most organisations or activists.
- Insufficient democracy structures which ensures accountability and transparency adds to the challenges faced since adoption of the SDGs especially in Africa. Most African governments or states are found not to prioritize the global goals as they should be, because of politics and greediness. The moneys meant for the SDGs programs are channeled to other personal or government activities for political gains.
As a staff member of the university of Pretoria, in the food department, I have managed to reduce food wasting by not throwing away excess food but distributing excess food to feed the underprivileged members of the societies especially the high density suburbs. This is in line with SDG # 2, zero hunger. If people could use their professions or occupations to try and make changes in as far as SDGs are concerned, achieving a better world for all is possible.
3 Political messages
- Non politicization of SDGs so that no one is left behind, non partisan distribution of resources.
- Internal resources mobilization above external sourcing as it is not sustainable and increase debt burden for countries.
- Translation of the SDGs into local languages so that they can be well received and known well by the locals who can then act on them.
By ensuring that minority groups, cultures, religions, gender etc drawn from across the globe are well represented in the summit.
- Having a wide range of translators at the summit to cover most if not all languages present at the summit.
The success of the SDGs is a collective effort, by each and every individual to organizations, therefore if most or all the people of the world could prioritize these global goals, the world would be a better place for everyone.
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5/31/2019 9:36:53Rebecca L. Schafer
Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing
United States
rebeccas@sigmanursing.org
Non-Governmental Organizations
Expectations include: 1) a forum that allows all stakeholders to have the opportunity to share concerns, solutions, and expertise, and address the delegation through written and spoken statements as well as breakout sessions dedicated to each SDG. 2) Participants should come to the Summit with specific ideas, progress reports and calls to action to meet the goals. In advance of the meeting, participants should be sent guidelines, questions, and other preparatory instructions to ensure meaningful and prepared contributions; this planning process will set the foundation to develop effective implementation strategies that encourage the exchange of experiences, peer learning, and gap identification. 3) Summit outcomes should include a coordinated plan, engaging large and small groups of like-minded individuals, to influence all stakeholders to take action on the SDGs. There should be an opportunity to network and create new partnerships so stakeholders can solidify ways in which groups can collaborate to achieve goals. 4) For interested parties who are unable to attend, the meeting should be live-streamed with the ability to ask questions via an effective interactive online platform.
Progress has been made with the open discussion and networking that has occurred as a result of the 2030 agenda adoption. Events such as the SDG Summit serve as vehicles for sharing knowledge and mobilizing much-needed partnerships. Overall, the 2030 agenda is far-reaching and facilitates long-term sustainable development. It also creates avenues for citizens to engage while helping to amplify voices of community leaders.
Challenges to address include the acknowledgement that good health and well-being, including primary health care and universal health coverage are a basic human right, and this can help achieve all 17 SDGs. Health and well-being is of vital importance for creating and maintaining sustainable development. Global health has a major impact on all SDGs but there are still disparities in health care access, opportunity and funding across the globe.
A secondary challenge is how to engage all resources necessary to build capacity to meet the above challenges. What are the policies and procedures available that can be applied to these challenges.
Individual members of our organization have incorporated information about the 2030 agenda into presentations offered to nurses globally, and in the nursing curriculum at their respective universities as a competency that a nurse will have upon completion of their education.
As an organization, we have interwoven the relevance of the goals into the work of committees, councils; We continually educate our 135,000 members regarding the SDGs and continually encourage our members and chapters to identify and implement ways that they can directly impact the achievement of the SDGs, including using the SDGs as a guideline when planning activities, programs, or events. We have mapped the global principles and strategies within the Global Advisory Panel on the Future of Nursing (GAPFON) www.gapfon.org report to the SDGs, demonstrating how the SDGs are relevant to our work on a national, regional and global level. This provides a demonstrated pathway through which we can leverage the experience of leaders who advocate for the SDGs at the national and global level to create momentum at the grass roots level.
1) Collaborate to Educate: Public/private, governmental/non-governmental organizations need to collaborate to make citizens aware of and educated about the SDGs. This should include a global analysis of current data/status regarding the specific SDGs, and state/national calls for collaborative action, including resources to do so. One intervention could be a citizen committees of experts (including nurses) that partner with national teams locally, regionally and globally to educate and help develop plans of action.
2) Collaborate to Achieve: The SDGs will not be achieved without collaboration between all stakeholders. Place more emphasis on collaborative interventions among stakeholders. Collaborating organizations can start with small local projects and then scale up and develop culturally appropriate, population-focused interventions for global impact.
3) Collaborate to Inform and Compel Action: Call on the global media to provide regular updates on the status of achieving the SDGs and interventions/mechanisms to do so.
SDGs affect all of us. We are one world. As healthcare providers we believe that these matters are and should be apolitical in nature
All issues should be discussed through the lens of these two principles.
No matter what type of meeting it is, always include the voices of the most vulnerable and share stories that made a difference for them. Give them an identity. These stories can be told by those who are vulnerable and/or those who work with them. Their stories should outline commonalities and interlinkages, emphasizing what worked and what didn’t.
Include health care workers that provide most of the medical care for vulnerable populations in the discussion as they are familiar with the barriers that can impede a well-planned intervention. Nurses are on the front lines serving vulnerable populations and hearing the voice of the people caring for the most vulnerable is the best way to ensure that we are “leaving no one behind”.
This summit will give us the opportunity to determine if we, as major groups and stakeholders, are moving in the right direction. And if we are not, what needs to change so we are prepared to implement this agenda over the next ten years.
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5/31/2019 10:55:04
Prince Bengha Martin Ngochia
Regional Center for the Welfare of Ageing Persons in Cameroon (RECEWAPEC)
Cameroon
recewapecorg11@yahoo.com
Older Persons, Persons with Disabilities
I wish to know how to make more significant contribution to achieving Sustainable Development Goads 3-Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages - by improving thee lives of older persons especially those displaced and living with disabilities
RECEWAPEC introduces and expands income generating activities such as bee farming, mushroom cultivation, pig rearing to the vulnerable older persons within her reach(SDG target 1.1, 1.2, 2.1)

RECEAPEC also organizes workshops, educating the older vulnerable persons on their rights, healthy living practices and also advocates for the rights of persons for inclusion in socio-economic and political decisions and for community development at the National and international level(SDG target 1.4, 2.2, 3.D)

RECEWAPEC was able to push the government of Cameroon to formulate a National Policy on ageing which includes social protection for older vulnerable persons(SDG target 1.3)

RECEWAPEC through her eye care hospital carryout free consultation and distribution of eye drugs and medicated eye spectacles for older vulnerable persons. RECEWAPEC also carries out outreach programs where these older persons are visited in their own local communities and consulted. (SDG target 3.8)

RECEWAPEC sponsors, trains and recruits eye health staffs. (SDG target 3.C)

RECEWAPEC donates blankets, mattresses and adjustable beds to older persons with her working grounds. (SDG target 1.4, 1.2, 1.1)
Not leaving anyone behind;
> RECEWAPEC strives to still work with the older persons in communities that have been affected by the crisis in the English part of Cameroon
1. Protection of older persons with disabilities
2. Building the resilience of older persons affected by sociopolitical crisis in the Northwest and Southwest Regions of Cameroon
3. Promotion of synergy between stakeholders in particular sectors across the world
By creating committees to work on practical steps of Standard Operational Procedures for ensuring inclusive development and inclusive humanitarian responses across the world
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5/31/2019 11:35:52Cielito V. Perez
Center for Women's Resources
Philippinescvperez@cwrweb.orgWomen
A part of the Women's Major Group, we expect the Summit to tackle structural gender inequalities, discrimination, and violence to ensure the SDGs truly benefit those who are marginalized and systematically excluded. It should take a bottom-up approach that builds on national and regional forums and outcome documents to maximise input from regional spaces addressing key structural challenges.
1. Strengthen interlinkages between SDGS and Human Rights:
• Call on UN HR Special Rapporteurs and treaty body members including CEDAW, UPR, CRC, CESCR to make interpretive comments on SDGs and integrate SDGs into their work
• Call on ECOSOC and DESA to invite HR Special Rapporteurs and treaty body members to participate in HLPF
• Call on member states to address CEDAW, UPR, and other treaty body recommendations in VNRs
• Call on UN to include queries on action on CEDAW/UPR reviews in VNR Guidelines

2. Strengthen synergies between SDGs and other UN processes:
• Call for an integrated approach that joins up action across UN system and in country
• Call on Member States to support actions and platforms promoting policy coherence for gender equality (including around Beijing+25, WPS+20, NPT+50, UN+75)

3. Strengthen women’s meaningful participation:
• Reaffirm Rio Principle 10 for substantive participation based on access to information, public participation, and justice
• Call for SDG review processes to publish alternative reports, increase time to discuss VNRs and Q&A, and support civil society engagement mechanisms and feminist civil society core, sustained funding
Ensure enabling environment for members of civil society and people's organizations to participate in the process.
The HLPF should recognise that a rights-based approach to sustainable development is not an option,
but an obligation.
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5/31/2019 11:58:16Justine Marchal
Global Forum for Media Development (GFMD)
Belgiumprojects@gfmd.infoNon-Governmental Organizations
SDG Summit 2019 will chart the course of the 2030 Agenda for the next couple of years and recommit national governments to provide a better future for all. We hope that the high-level representatives do not only reaffirm their dedication, but also raise the stakes and the level of accountability of national for goals at the national level. It’s is an urgent need for reliable, accessible and timely data. Tracking progress, identifying the pressing development gaps, is impossible without data. Solid data provides the very foundation to achieve the SDGs: it ensures well-informed decision-making at all levels, and ultimately achieving SDGs. Only official sources are considered when measuring progress, which sometimes lack independent information and appropriate analysis of the implementation of both legislation and policies. We hope that the SDG Summit and its participants take into consideration the work, efforts and data gathered from civil society actors, independent media, and other stakeholders to close the current data and accountability gap. Governments cannot be the sole authority to monitor, report and address gaps on SDG targets and development issues of public interest.
The Agenda has provided a clear framework for the development efforts of stakeholders. Its focus on interlinkages between both topics and stakeholders has created a space for new avenues in tackling the world’s challenges. However, the latter has yet to fully materialize: silos approach still remains with development actors continuing on the same path with development efforts. In the existing data gap: currently, evaluating progress on SDG targets only takes into account individual targets and data from official data sources. Each development actor has troves of data to provide, often relevant when correlated and analysed in relation to other targets, but the majority of the “nonofficial data” is not accounted for. “Nonofficial” data can provides solutions, opportunities for collaboration, and raise awareness of development goals. According the principle of “leaving no one behind”, UN Member States should also be as inclusive as much possible when it comes to data and opportunities for scrutiny. Data gathering methodologies by civil society are important tools to complement official sources and to document progress on the initial national commitments to the SDGs.
Our key advises to work in the SDGs’ environment/field would be the following:
-Build a network around the Goal/Target/Indicator you are focusing on, notably by targeting the stakeholders of diverse sectors and further, advocate for this community.
-Sharing as much information as you can to foster collaboration between the stakeholders.
-Coordinate your efforts with the community by holding meeting, working group or other form of broader consultation to make sure that everybody is involved into the process.
-Be integrated in broader and international networks to promote and to advocate for holistic approach to SDGs and analyse correlations with other goals and targets. Include yourself into the UN processes and with the UN actors to get known and to ensure your expertise.
-Gather the data and national research into spotlight reports and disseminate them afterwards.
-Contribute to reports, surveys or events from other networks to represent your community notably by contributing to reports from other network to represent your community.
1.UN Member States should aim to integrate “nonofficial” data from diverse stakeholders to measure their commitments to the 2030 Agenda. The government cannot be the only authority to monitor and report on progress on SDGs.
2.The closing of the prevalent data gap needs to be considered a priority for both reporting ad accountability for all development targets and initiatives. Public access to information in relation to public bodies/institutions needs to be guaranteed by public institutions in order to facilitate data gathering by stakeholders who will report progress on specific SDGs. The role of independent media in both gathering as well as disseminating data is of crucial importance in this regard.
3.The 2030 Agenda needs to be considered as a set of interlinked pillars implying various stakeholders from local to international levels. It is needed to have a strategic vision based on synergy rather than on silos approach to measuring progress.
The principles of “leaving no one behind” and “reaching the furthest away first” apply to the measurement of SDG implementation as well. The current data gap inherently implies the lack of data on certain strata of societies, and which are therefore not sufficiently included or represented in development efforts. Closing this data gap ensures that all efforts are as inclusive as possible.
We believe that free and strong independent media are essential for evaluating as well as publicizing the achievements and challenges regarding each of the 17 SDGs. Their inclusion in development efforts and policies would leverage them profoundly, shedding light on what works and what does not. Both media and policymakers need to be aware of which role each can play in ensuring that no one is left behind in building a better future. This requires a focus on SDG Target 16.10, which includes “ensuring public access to information” and “protecting fundamental freedoms”. The dissemination of data is conducive to the achievement of the overall 2030 Agenda, where public access to information and press freedom are quintessential. Without data, 2030 remains at the horizon without edging closer.
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5/31/2019 12:07:38Nikki BrormannCOC NetherlandsNetherlands nikki@coc.nlWomen, LGBTI Stakeholder Group
The outcome documents should be people-centered, action-oriented and strongly contain a gender perspective inclusive of all people. It should underline a strong role and active and meaningful participation of major groups and other stakeholders in all parts of the process, implementation, follow-up and review.
- Challenge: including the communities that are excluded from national development frameworks, initiatives and decision-making, to ensure that no one is left behind, including LGBTI people impacted by multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination and violence;
- Progress: communities facing different forms of exclusion coming together to achieve SDGs, such as people with disability and LGBTI people;
- Gaps: recognize that gender is a wider concept than a binary between women, girls and men, boys. Gender equality means addressing inequality issues for all people regardless of their diverse gender identity. It also means acknowledging that in different settings, different people face discrimination, violence or exclusion based on gender identity and expression in different ways.
Globally, labour productivity has increased and the unemployment rate has decreased. However, to realize SDG 8 and target 8.3 & 8.5 specifically, more progress is needed to increase employment opportunities for LGBTI people, whom through stigmatization and discrimination are often excluded from employment opportunities.
COC Netherlands and MICRO Rainbow have started a pilot in Guyana, Ghana and Myanmar to increase access to Micro Finance for LGBTI people, based on an earlier pilot by MICRO Rainbow that amounted in a best practice on how to work with Micro Financing institutions (MFI’s). The method: LGBTI should be supported in meeting the criteria of MFI and MFI’s should be lobbied to adjust their requirements to the realities of LGBTI communities. These lessons learned will be adapted to engaging with local governments that implement poverty reduction and socio-economic empowerment programs to make them inclusive of LGBTI people.
1. Principles of international development recognize that local communities and CBOs have a voice in development activities and the right to participate in the design, implementation and evaluation thereof. Donor and partner countries are accountable to local communities for achieving results. Governments should remove barriers for engagement such as limiting foreign funding and registration for CBOs.
2. Development activities are dependent on data collection and data disaggregated by SOGIESC is necessary to ensuring meaningful inclusion of LGBTI people in the 2030 Agenda. As development activities and data collection efforts become more inclusive of LGBTI people, we should recognize that laws and policies that criminalize or discriminate people based on their SOGIESC form barriers and risks to safe and inclusive data collection.
3. Governments, institutions and practitioners should develop cultural sensitivity to LGBTI people. Awareness of cultural differences and intercultural competences are vital to remove barriers to development faced by LGBTI people and to establish inclusive and productive engagement, such as by respectful use of identity terms and gendered language.
- The outcome of the Summit must be action oriented recommendations to accelerate the implementation of the Agenda 2030 while mainstreaming the principles.
This could include:
- Guidelines on adequate and well-directed financing and programming to ensure the inclusion of the most vulnerable and marginalized stakeholders including LGBTI and women’s groups;
- Active participation of communities ‘furthest behind’ in design, decision-making and implementation of 2030 Agenda to achieve SDGs on local and national levels.
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5/31/2019 12:36:54LeejaehakWDF(IEO)KOREA,R,O.jhl3003@gmail.com
Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Local Authorities, Workers & Trade Unions, Business & Industry, Science & Technological Community, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Education & Academic Entities, Private Philanthropic Organizations, Civil Society Financing for Development Group, Asia Pacific Regional CSO Engagement Mechanism, Together 2030, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
The WDF (IEO) will establish an exchange network with the leaders of each country. We will identify the necessary technologies for each country and the needs for country development. We will select good companies and exchange them in developed countries.
The UN-mandated 2030 SDGs are very necessary.
But it is very slow for each country to recognize and promote it.
This is the time when NGO's role is needed.
The WDF is committed to the role of the SDGs in the spirit of the United Nations.
Therefore, it is promoting the "UN procurement Expo".
This is because many companies need to be involved.
In addition, "UN University" has been established. It is because we have to train UN specialist leaders.
The WDF believed that we should nurture UN professional leaders. It is because the countries do not know about UN function and SDGs.
We started the following business.
Thank you for your participation.
1. We are preparing to establish a UN University.
We educate UN experts and spread the spirit of the UN. We plan to expand from kindergarten through elementary school secondary school to university and business school. We will educate the future leaders of each country.
2. UN procurement expo.
The United Nations needs many procurement items.
We will select good companies and deliver good technologies to developing countries through UN procurement. As a result, businesses will visit and visit UN organizations.
3. We will bring the United Nations 5th Office to Korea.
We plan to finance ourselves without the financial assistance of the United Nations.
4. We plan to bring the International Court of Justice to Korea.
Asia is alienated from the United Nations. I want to overcome this and make a good environment for the United Nations in Asia.
1. The most important thing that the United Nations should have is a political neutrality declaration.
Because of the political environment, many people should not be sacrificed.
2. Declare a "Peace and Trade Economy" with the exception of politics.
There should be no starvation for politics.
3. Declares the elimination of the agricultural technology gap to eliminate the gap in advanced agriculture.
You need to be prepared to get there first.
This requires enthusiasm. You need to get a lot of participants.
It is a quality education.
Governments should cooperate.
You must declare "a government that cooperates with NGOs".
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5/31/2019 13:06:29Megan McHaneyBridge 47Finland
megan.mchaney@bridge47.org
Non-Governmental Organizations
Our key expectations are for member states and other bodies to actively engage in discussions about developments and actions on how to meet the Agenda 2030 SD goals and their targets. In particular, we expect that the tracking of the implementation of the 6 goals that will be reviewed during the Summit and in particular SDG 4 - Quality of Education as it is extremely important for the execution of all SDGs. We also expect that civil society organisations will be able to fully participation in the discussions.
The main challenges after the adoption of 2030 Agenda are linked to the relatively small number of states on a global scale have seriously engaged to their engagements towards the SDGs and haven't yet implemented them to their strategic documents regarding the sustainable development in the national context. That can be also seen in the lack of strategic document on an EU level. Linked to this lack of engagement, is insufficient financial investment in implementing SDGs. Another key gap is the monitoring and reporting of the SDGs, with many of the qualitative indicators not being recorded at all.
Bridge 47 is currently developing a minimum of 16 effective partnerships at European and national levels, using global citizenship education as a tool to form partnerships. Through this work Bridge 47 partners have learned that to form a successful multi-stakeholder partnership for target 4.7 implementation, requires rigorous research and importantly, investment in language challenging CSOs to change and adapt their language to interact with different partners and organisations – as organisations have similar visions but can find it difficult to communicate it to new audiences.

AKU an NGO partner has set up the Estonian Coalition for Sustainable Development, uniting NGOs, private sector enterprises, academia, state institutions in order to value non-formal GCE and support the 2030 Agenda as a tool. The Coalition came out with a good-will memorandum to show their commitment in helping Estonia reach SDGs, with their expertise and actions, which combines civil society’s knowledge on how to build a more sustainable society, the private sector’s economic power to move towards it and policy makers interested in contributing to a good governance model.
1) Governments and other decision makers must invest financially into achieving Agenda 2030 vision and its aims. But to achieve the SDGs Governments and other decision makers must also invest financially into GCE

2)Global citizenship education (GCE) empowers us to transform ourselves and the world. GCE enables people to be active citizens and enhances civic participation. Decision makers should value GCE and recognise GCE as a way of achieving SDGs, and doing International Development, education with skills for the future and social inclusion beyond the labour market. For that matter Governments and institutions should apply GCE in their stategic documents, implementation plans and work in order to achieve the objectives in a better and effective way

3) Delivering the SDGs will have an impact on business - governments will introduce new policy, regulation, incentives and taxes to drive new behaviours. Business will play a key role in helping to achieve the Goals. GCE can help CEOs and staff understand how their business helps or hinders the SDGs being delivered and can empower them to identify opportunities too.
Growing polarization in the world, poverty that is declining but not as fast as we hoped, there are still many who have no access to clean water, in parts of the world fundamental human righst are not respected, all these can be overcome by the principles mentioned above. One of the main goals that is important is to ensure access to quality education, in order to overcome the differences in the city - village relation, but also the states to recognize global citizenship education as a means to achieve all SDGs.
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5/31/2019 13:12:12Karen HallowsPeace BoatJapankaren@peaceboat.gr.jp
Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
Receiving transparent and genuine assessments of progress in relation to the 2030 deadline for each goal
Leaving with clear priorities - where do we need to focus our efforts for maximum effect?
A Summit that is organized and held in a sustainable fashion (for example by making use of green energy sources, using local and organic produce, etc.)

Stakeholders can contribute by
- showcasing successful cases of both implementing the SDGs and raising awareness of the SDGs including through partnerships
- being honest in their assessments - to not be afraid to draw attention to areas that are falling behind to seek solutions and improvements
- keeping in mind that a holistic approach is necessary. We should be careful not to focus too much on one goal, but keep exploring and utilizing the possibilities for collaboration between
- looking more at overlapping targets and the interconnectedness of the goals than only goals
- helping to define priorities and urgent actions which need to be taken; the urgency of next actions in order to reduce climate change effects, within the UN and internationally, should be stronger emphasized and underlined.
PROGRESS:
Gender equality and LGBTQ+ rights have significant areas of progress in some countries (while increased challenges in others)
Greater access to education
Clean energy sources have become cheaper and better
An increasing number of partnerships and more collaboration between different sectors

CHALLENGES:
Lack of action on climate change mitigation with continued investment in fossil fuels and carbon-heavy industry, as well as lack of funding for adaptation for the most vulnerable communities on islands and coastal areas.
Increased inequalities between countries and within countries.
Food security and distribution (food waste, biodiversity/crop diversity, unfair trade laws)
Deforestation (making the effects of climate change even more severe) and loss of biodiversity (1million species facing extinction)
Ocean biodiversity and plastic issues

Peace Boat’s work is focused on education and awareness raising for the SDGs mainly through global voyages on a large passenger ship with the SDG wheel painted on the hull. Peace Boat is an official partner of the SDG Action Campaign. Educational and capacity training programmes focus on understanding local realities through first-hand experiences including study programmes in ports with universities and CSOs.
First-hand accounts related to particular SDGs, for example from Hibakusha (atomic bomb survivors) for SDG16 and youth from SIDS for SDG 13 and 14, are used to personalise the SDGs through storytelling of personal experience.
Capacity training and education for all ages as part of a life-long learning agenda, in particular to youth.
Focusing on specific targets rather than the goals to develop better campaigns and partnerships
Peace Boat is the Northeast Asia Regional Secretariat of the Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC) , and chair of GPPAC’s working group related to SDGs policy. In that regards we are involved in monitoring, capacity building and awareness raising around SDG16+ and its relation to peacebuilding and conflict prevention.
An emphasis on the synergies and connections between the 2030 Agenda and the Paris Agreement to show that they are both part of the same plan, and connection to the SG’s climate summit immediately prior to the SDG Summit.
Strategy and clear priorities - where do we need to focus our efforts for maximum effect, and how can we advance this focus through multiple approaches?
Emphasis on collaboration, sharing and commonalities between the sectors.



Making sure the group of plenary speakers is diverse and representing different genders, sectors, geographic locations, SDGs, and age groups.
A format that provides space for group-based discussion sessions that allow more representatives to be heard rather than a series of speeches and presentations.
The Summit should focus on dealing with the most dire of challenges as this/these challenges most likely are root causes of other issues.
Allowing online participation
Providing financial support for civil society actors participating in the side events
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5/31/2019 13:27:47Maina Sharma
Global March Against Child Labour
India
maina@globalmarch.org
Civil society organisation
1. The Summit must acknowledge the urgency needed in prioritising children and their rights
2. The Summit must reinvigorate high level political commitment to the agenda 2030 through strong and renewed pledges and commitments, keeping children at the centre
3. The Summit must recognise the vital role of stakeholders such as civil society, children and youth in the successful achievement of SDGs and therefore must create and enhance conditions for their inclusive participation in the SDG implementation, reporting and monitoring process.
4. The target for ending child labour is 2025. However as it is clear that it will be difficult for member states to achieve this target, it is the responsibility of HLPF to ensure a clear way forward beyond 2025.
6. The Summit must recognise the need for global concerted, coordinated and accelerated action for achieving all SDGs, particularly SDGs such as ending child labour by 2025.
7. The Summit must make VNR process mandatory or have compulsory points to be reported, for ensuring accountability by the governments.
8. Stakeholders must be able to contribute in consultations, data collection, implementation and monitoring process of SDGs.
1. Even though the world has seen some progress in the achievement of SDGs; for example, number of child labourers has been reduced from 168 million to 152 million and many countries have taken progressive policy measures, more efforts are required for integrated implementation of SDGs through adequate investment and governmental and social reforms at multiple levels.
2. While many countries have reported progress on SDGs, a trend has been observed on cherry-picking of individual SDGs by most governments. This has resulted in many vital issues to be left out. If the world has to achieve the SDGs, it must have an integrated and inter-linked approach for implementation of goals.
3. Due to issues and SDG targets such as on child labour and education not finding its due place in many governmental and UN priority lists, there have been disproportionate allocation of budgets in addressing these SDGs. While many goals have secured trillions of funding from multiple sources, many issues such as child labour have only received marginal financial support
4.Lack of awareness on VNR process in governments and civil societies .

1. During Global March Against Child Labour’s work in Asia, Africa and Latin America to build capacities of civil societies and other stakeholders on the 17 SDGs; especially on SDG 8.7, SDG 4, and 16.2, a sense of empowerment has been felt by civil societies to use SDGs as a tool to advocate better with the governments.
2. Instances have been reported by Global March partners where governments have welcomed civil society input and support in the achievement of SDGs.
3. Examples of policy changes such as the recently adopted Child Labour Due Diligence Bill of The Netherlands and ratification of ILO Convention 182 and 138 since 2015 by many countries, has proved to be an exercise in the right direction, aiming towards the achievement of SDG 8.7.
4. Many of Global March Against Child Labour’s members in Asia and Africa have taken lead in understanding the process of VNRs and encouraged their governments to carry out this review and also ensure participation of multi-stakeholders.
5. Global March Against Child Labour through its website facilitates information sharing of on the work done by its members on SDGs, latest opportunities and good practice of SDG implementation.

1.The Summit must chalk out a clear vision for the future and the urgent steps that the governments can take to eliminate all forms of violence against children, especially exploitation of children in child labour and ensure protection and promotion of their rights. Governments, businesses and overseas development assistance must ensure issues of vulnerable children such as child labour, child trafficking and education receive adequate financial and human investment.
2.The outcome document must not only emphasise on renewed commitment and action plan needed to accelerate progress of SDGs and break away from business-as-usual approach, but also make consistent linkages with SDGs and human rights framework, keeping children at the centre of policy action.
3.The Summit must re-emphasise the need for an active role and participation of all stakeholders of society and promotion of collaboration, to ensure no one is left behind and farthest- to –reach-first principle is truly implemented in spirit and action.
1. By ensuring the hard to reach children and youth participate in the Summit and have an opportunity to voice their concerns in front of world leaders
2. By ensuring political and non-political leaders who are child rights champions are able to represent the voices of children and youth at the UN forum, side events and other high level events during the summit.
3. By ensuring the most vulnerable children and their issues find inclusion in VNR process.
4. By ensuring targeted funding and capacity building is received for addressing issues of farthest behind children.
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5/31/2019 13:33:57Jenessa Bryan
CSO Forum to End Violence against Children
USA
csoforumevac@gmail.com
Children & Youth
The Summit must include children, and address their recommendations. Children have valid perspectives and undeniable knowledge. They are good informants. Violence against affects more than one billion girls and boys around the world, and costs societies up to US$7 trillion a year. It erodes the very foundation of stable societies and threatens future sustainable and inclusive economic growth.

Violence against children incurs major costs to social services, criminal justice, and health systems’ budgets while also eroding the fabric of local economies through productivity and human capital losses, and the social fabric through loss of trust across individuals and communities. Failing to address violence against children jeopardizes the achievement of several SDGs and the specific targets. We can not eradicate poverty, achieve prosperity or a fully meet targets on nutrition, health, education and equality without ensuring that girls and boys are safe from violence in every context. Civil society organizations actively engage children, families and communities to end violence against children, and to contribute at the local, national and global levels to meeting the SDGs.

• Lack of sufficient law, or weak implementation of existing laws to end violence against children causing significant gap between policy and practice and allowing problem to persist.
• Inadequate investment on prevention of violence against children –particularly in interventions that support good parenting and in social support to families at risk.
• Data systems for monitoring prevalence of different forms of violence and effectiveness of responses lack proper disaggregation of national/local data to enable solid policy decisions.
• Inadequate budget allocations to address violence against children.
• Lack of protection from violence for the children on the move and children in humanitarian situations especially conflicts.
• Persistence on norms and values that condone violence against children.
• Limited and dysfunctional child safeguarding systems in many large public national and international institutions, including religious institutions and UN agencies.
The CSO Forum EVAC represents the global CSO community and facilitates civil society contributions in the work of End Violence. Examples from CSOs include:
• In Indonesia, the CSO alliance Aliansi PKTA worked with government ministries and UNICEF on the National Strategy on Ending Violence Against Children (EVAC). At a sub-national level, it works with partners to support its implementation and develop Provincial Action Plans on SDGs Target 16.2. This work has contributed to operationalisation on Indonesia’s commitments as Pathfinding country.
• In the Philippines, the CSO Coalition on the Convention on the Rights of the Child, an alliance of 19 organisations, conducted a baseline study of public investment for child protection systems at the local level during 2018. The budget study identified indicators and benchmarks for measuring the application of child-friendly budget principles critical for the implementation of SDG 16.2.
• In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania, CSOs collaborate with law enforcement, industry, and governments to develop online reporting platforms that report and remove online child sexual abuse images and videos.
1. Prohibit all forms of violence in all settings: Governments should prohibit all forms of violence in all settings and against all children and ensure national legislation is aligned with international human rights standards. Strengthen accountability mechanisms for commitments made to end violence against children, especially through the SDGs, and international human rights instruments.
2. Change harmful social norms and practices: Address state legislation, invest in systems, use public campaigns, and secure long-term financing for national action plans that promote gender equality, positive parenting and child rights education. The Forum is particularly dedicated to ensuring the participation of children in all efforts to end violence.
3. Increase funding to end violence against children: Ensure child-centred budgets, allocate adequate funding in legal and child protection systems, and collect and share data. Invest in what works to prevent violence: Scale up solutions such as INSPIRE strategies by integrating them into government strategies and plans to address violence against children. Provide clear policy guidance on priorities and implementation modalities.
Violence against children adversely impacts children’s development, health and education, and increases their risk of poverty, deprivation and exclusion. Therefore, we must:
• Listen to and involve children: Governments, international agencies and partners must formalize and fund processes to ensure meaningful and active inclusion of children.
• Leave no one behind: Using inclusive, age- and gender-responsive approaches National Plans of Action must reflect the needs of the most vulnerable children who are living in extreme poverty, LGBTQI, on the move or in humanitarian crises.

To ensure no one is left behind in national and sub-national efforts to end violence against children, we must commit to children’s participation, ensure social norms change by applying gender-sensitive approaches, and ensure every child has the right to learn in a safe and secure environment. CSOs have identified structures and interventions to reach the most vulnerable children and communities. What is most needed now is to invest in what works and scale up existing solutions.
Violence against children is a public health issue. The detrimental effects of violence on children can contribute to various non-communicable diseases (such as diabetes, depression, obesity and even suicide). Following the INSPIRE strategies, cross-sector work between public health campaigns and child protection have proven effective, and need to be scaled-up. Examples from CSOs working with governments and UN agencies include birth registration efforts as part of immunization campaigns.

Civil society strengthens the processes to achieve results for SDG 16.2 through implementation of the strategies (including INSPIRE), delivery of services, local data collection, and holding governments accountable. At the national level, along with providing input to policy development and advocacy, local CSOs advocate for child-centred budgets to strengthen child protection and legal systems and to respond to and prevent violence against children. Investing in prevention must include civil society partnerships to expand and scale up what works, including evidence-based positive parenting, capacity building with skilled professionals, and public awareness campaigns.
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5/31/2019 13:56:18Mome Saleem Institute of Urbanism Pakistan gul.mome@gmail.cpm
Women, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations
Summit is able to include marginalised voices. Municipalities/City administrations are given leadership role and expressing their point of view and share hurdles in implementation if any. Also youth from global South steers discussions and dialogues.
Climate change is an area that is suffering the most when it comes to leadership. However we have seen progress at many fronts. Collective action is missing despite the landmark Paris accord. Natural resources are under grave threat because the businesses are not acting responsible except a few..
City administration could take up the agenda of mitigation and somewhat adaptation as well. At the end of the day it is the cities that will be relevant and important. In Pakistan billion tree tsunami was a carbon sequestration project that was successful because the provincial administration was independently implementing it.
Don't wait for our governments to tell us how to switch our individual habits to bring about climate justice. It's every individuals responsibility to act NOW!

Rise above geographies and act as global citizens to protect Thai planet.
Let the marginalised and youth drive the discussions or atleast be give opportunity to speak.
I work on Urbanism and environment and have set up many citizens action drives. I would be happy to share my work at the summit.
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5/31/2019 14:02:17Miranda HurstMercy CorpsUnited Kingdom
mhurst@mercycorps.org
Non-Governmental Organizations
We are looking to the Summit to deliver:

Support from Member States for significant civil society representation during high-level sessions that empowers local communities to play a prominent role in peacebuilding.

A clear road map for accelerating progress (post-HLPF), including:
- List of concrete actions to facilitate strong evaluation of the steps different countries are taking towards SDG indicators.
- A commitment to review SDG16 annually;
- Clearer articulation of how Agenda 2030 aligns with other initiatives;

A commitment to pursue all SDGs in fragile and conflict affected contexts in a way that deliberately reinforces conditions for peace.

Prioritisation of the conflict-climate change nexus, and linkages between SDG 13&16, in fragile states.

Recognition that NGOs need greater access at all levels of IASC in order to fulfil the ambitions of The Whole-of-Society Approach and Collective Outcomes.

Adequate opportunity for peer-to-peer learning during the presentation of Voluntary National Reviews.
The majority of the world’s poor live in fragile and conflict affected contexts. The world is experiencing a 25-year peak in violent conflict. Yet only around 1.4% of ODA worldwide is spent on peacebuilding and conflict management. Business as usual, when it comes to promoting development and advancing peace in these contexts will not fulfill the SDGs.

We cannot wait for humanitarian crises to pass before addressing root causes, including governance and climate exacerbating drivers. Climate change is a threat multiplier which amplifies existing environmental, social, political, and economic challenges, increasing the risk of conflict. Short-term approaches alone will not result in strong and secure communities in the long-term. We must pursue multiple opportunities to advance peace during complex crises.

To advance the 2030 Agenda and help communities escape the nexus of extreme poverty-fragility-violence, we need the world’s most powerful civic bodies to: address the root causes of conflict; lessen systemic and proximate drivers of conflict; increase community resilience to those drivers; and ensure humanitarian responses do no harm and lay the ground for non-relief efforts.
Reducing violence (Target 16.1) The Community-Based Conflict Management & Cooperative Use of Resources program reduced conflict between pastoralists and farmer community groups in Nigeria through joint projects and forums to address economic tension. Violent incidents decreased by 30% in target locations and households included in the program were 44% more likely to report increased freedom of movement.

Improving the responsiveness and inclusivity of decision-making (Target 16.7) The Yes Youth Can! program in Kenya’s Central and Rift Valley Provinces strengthened youth participation in policymaking. Over 200 youth were elected or appointed to leadership roles in government and 70% of youth parliaments formed were invited to participate in county-level policy and budget processes.

Strengthening resilience and adaptive capacity (Target 13.1) A program working in 20 villages in the western plains of Nepal enhanced stability through resource-based conflict resolution and inclusive natural resource management. Over 400 stakeholders were trained in community mediation, negotiation and dialogue. Nearly 50 forest-based resource conflicts were resolved during the program
Double conflict prevention and peacebuilding investments: Accelerate all SDGs by making conflict prevention and peacebuilding central pillars of domestic and foreign policy —including foreign aid. Violent conflict is the primary driver of suffering and poverty today yet less than 2% of ODA worldwide is spent on peacebuilding and conflict management.

Commit half of all climate adaptation financing to fragile and conflict affected states; focus on addressing climate drivers of conflict in fragile contexts: Climate change is a threat multiplier which amplifies existing environmental, social, political, and economic challenges, increasing the risk of conflict. Inattention to the interlinkages between SDG13 & 16 risks impeding progress and may undermine commitments on climate change.

Maximise opportunities to advance peace in complex crises: The humanitarian system is overstretched. Double-down on reducing violence and addressing root causes earlier in humanitarian crises. Incentivise states to act and fulfill the OECD-DAC Recommendation on the ‘HDP Nexus.’ Improve coordination, financing and collaboration across silos to enhance the prospects for sustainable peace and development
The Summit could agree to adding an outcome across all SDG targets for ‘people in crisis’.

The Summit could, ahead of meeting, commit to a minimum standard for integrating voices of those left behind to be heard both in presentations of VNRs and during goal-specific discussions.

Every session organiser and rapporteur could be asked to report on diversity and how they are furthering the Whole-of-Society Approach.
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5/31/2019 14:27:23Md Zakir Hossain
Krisoker Sor (Farmers Voice)
Bangladesh
farmers.voice@gmail.com
Local people
Declaration will be robust and largely based on the field reality. Stakeholders will be able to contribute better , if the state parties listen more of them
Progress have been made in hardware section, while software portion yet to be explored.
Intertwining SDGs, SFDRR and CCA is being initiated at the local level.
1. Committing certain percent of GDP to implement SDGs in country and abroad.
2. Intertwining SDGs, SFDRR and CCA
3. Redesign HLPF
Initially bringing them on dias.
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5/31/2019 14:33:55Didier JacobsOxfamUnited States
didier.jacobs@oxfam.org
Non-Governmental Organizations
1. The Declaration should adopt two changes to the targets and indicators for SDG10, because leaving no one behind is more difficult when rich people capture an ever bigger portion of income and wealth and concentrate political power.
a. Change Target 10.1: By 2030, progressively achieve and sustain income growth of the bottom 40 per cent of the population at a rate higher than the top 10 per cent.
b. Add an indicator to Target 10.4: The difference between the Gini coefficient of the income distribution before and after taxes and transfers.

2. The Declaration should call for a data revolution for inequality research, to produce timely data on consumption, income and wealth in every country. The data should be disaggregated by gender and properly reflect the top of the income and wealth distributions.

3. Donor countries should build on the example of the World Bank and establish two legally binding goals that ensure all aid that is given is clearly (i) reducing inequality and (ii) reducing poverty. Bilateral aid agencies should use these twin goals to evaluate all their programs and assess their impact on reducing poverty and inequality.
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5/31/2019 14:49:47Fadeke Ayoola
NET Africa (Natural Environment Technology in Africa)
Belgiumfayoola@netafica.be
Women, Non-Governmental Organizations
To reflect, change were it is not working and move forward. Listen, take stock, change and take action where it is most needed.
There is still not enough inclusion of indigenous communities.

We developed the weekly wetlands sustainability report to raise awareness the SDGs, holistic value of wetlands as well as the importance of improving environmental management and auditing of natural resources. Each week the wetlands sustainability report will feature different aspects of the value of wetlands across Africa, focusing on a wide range of environmental, social, cultural, economic, political and sustainable issues. The stories, news, research, case studies and reports are developed by our new team of SDG Youth Ambassadors from all over Africa, who are inspired to make a difference in their local communities and speak out about issues affecting their communities, which are also linked into the SDG targets and goals.
For no one to be left behind! All citizens, particularly in the developing world, should be trained to monitor and conduct surveillance of natural resources such as ecosystems and wetlands during all stages of their education and community life; it would reinforce their ecological knowledge, improve citizen participation, and enhance holistic approaches to environmental management. The cultural contributions to the monitoring and surveillance of the natural environment, which includes the traditional ecological knowledge systems, should be reflected within the educational system, through the formal curriculum, textbooks, syllabi, documents, and teachers’ resource materials. If the connections between traditional ecological knowledge, education in schools and citizen science is not implemented within the primary and secondary school system then education for sustainable development, particulalry in the developing world, will not be viable.
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