Fall Recommended Courses by LFS Peers
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Fall Courses Recommended by LFS Peers
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Course numberCourse titleProfessorWhy you recommend this course
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AAE/Econ/Env. St. 343Environmental and Natural Resource EconomicsCorbertt GraingerThis is a microeconomics course applied to environmental resource management. This is a must for students interested in environmental policy. You will benefit from an understanding of the economics behind these policies.
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CommArts575Communication in Complex OrganizationsLyn Van SwolThis course was a nice introduction to cognitive biases and how to improve communication structures such as: feedback loops, facilitating office meetings, addressing institutional weaknesses, and building collaborative workplaces.
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COUNPSY620Special Topics in Counseling and Guidance Travis WrightGood opportunity for service learning. Keeps you connected to the human implications of policy
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CounsPsych620Building Academic and Socio-Emotional Skills (BASES)Travis WrightThis course is a fantastic way for policy students to gain personal experience working with a member of the population that many LFS students will be impacting through their careers.
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CURRIC719Intro to Qualitative MethodsSimone SchweberEngaging class assignments and readings, diverse majors in class, welcoming environment, and Dr. Schweber has deep knowledge of qual research and ethics -- I think she's among the best professors at UW.
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ECON 441Analytical Public FinanceJesse GregoryThis is a microeconomics course applied to the role of government in the economy. Quite relevant to public affairs students who enjoyed the required economics course.
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ECON 450Labor EconomicsChao FuThis is a microeconomics course looking at labor markets! Fantastic for understanding how economists view labor. Very relevant if you are interested in labor policy.
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ECON 690Economics of Health, Aging, and Social ProgramsCorina MommaertsCourse material is very policy relevant: Social Security, workplace pensions, private retirement accounts, health insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, long-term care, disability insurance, social insurance benefits like SNAP, etc. Approaches material with three lenses: traditional economics graphs & maximization problems to model insurance, policy context & relevance of these programs/market & government failures, and reading & critiquing empirical research papers (academic economics). Professor is very interested in material and responsive to student questions. Helpful if you or a friend in the class has a decent econ background - e.g., there are simple derivatives.
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Econ 690Health, Aging, and Social Insurance ProgramsCornia MommaertsGreat introduction to the economics of social insurance.
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Ed Policy Studies (various options)EPS 600 or Publ. Affrs 765Annalee GoodShe is best professor I have had. All her work is applied and the project are client based if you want them to be.
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ED POL 789Mixed Methods Approach to Policy Amy ClaessenThis course taught me so much about research methods. It is a perfect class for someone who wants a methods class that is not math based. Amy is a statistic genius, but she really believes there is more to methods than statistics. Her class is very discussion based and she is open and approachable.
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EdPol719Intro to Qualitative MethodologyTravis WrightLFS only teaches quantitative methodology. This course doesn't go deep into methods but made me better able to understand qualitative research and begin to think deeply about how to incorporate qualitative components into policymaking. Furthermore, this course had an extremely varied group of students from a wide range of graduate programs which offered an opportunity to see what researchers throughout campus are working on.
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Financial PlanningURPL 751Kurt PaulsonI haven't taken State and Local with Rourke yet, but I would imagine that they will complement each other nicely. It ended up being a little more concept heavy than practical-numbers heavy, but while the technical aspect would have been nice, I very thoroughly understand why local governments make budgeting and finance decisions the way they do and how we got into the state of the world we are in. This would be good for probably any domestic policy student could benefit from this course, but anyone looking into local policy should definitely take it.
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FOLKLORE 320Wisconsin FolkloreAnna RueThis would be good for anyone who plans to stay in or return to Wisconsin. It's a good primer on Wisconsin culture and, as Sir Nicholas said in the Princess Diaries II, "How can one rule [govern] the people if they do not know the people?" Topics such as immigration patterns (from our inception to modern day) and vernacular architecture (read: historic preservation) would be especially interesting for policy students.
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GEN BUS 310 (All Online)Principles of Accounting and Finance for Non Business MajorsMark LaPlanteAnyone interested in economic development, taxes, or rulemaking/regulations, especially on corporations, should take this course to gain the perspective of the businesses being taxed. It is also impeccably organized, though I would not call it an easy A.
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LAW 942European Union LawHeinz KlugGreat exploration of the modern development of human rights in Europe.
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LSC902Public Opinion and ScienceDietram ScheufeleI had a really positive experience in this course. As an EAP student, this course really bridged the gap between the science/ energy courses and social sciences/policy. This is a communications course that introduces the theories and concepts of the Life Sciences Communication field. It is a discussion based theory class that requires weekly readings that the class discusses together -- so it's very participation focused. This course provides an incredible framework for the role that public opinion plays in the acceptance of controversial issues. So much of what we discussed tied back to policy, how public opinion affected policy/ policymakers. I was the only LFS student in this class and was consistently able to contribute with a policy perspective. I highly recommend this class and Dietram as a professor.
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MH 509 or HS 509The Development of Public Health in AmericaDayle DeLanceyThis was truly one of the most fascinating courses I ever took in my life. I can't call it the most relevant course for your short time as a masters student, but I think this is a must for those students who are getting dual degrees in public affairs and MHPs.
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Neuroscience & Public Policy Seminar Series
NTP660Michael KoenigsThis seminar and discussion based class examines the intersection of science (particularly neuroscience) and public policy. The speakers are truly phenomenal experts in their field. The students have a myriad of backgrounds, which makes for rich discussion of the readings. We examine not only the science, but also the policy and legal implications. I can not recommend this course enough! Take it!
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PA809Energy Analysis and Policy Greg NemetGreg is a phenomenal lecturer and you learn a ton.You learn a ton about an interesting and relevant subject. This class convinced me to apply to the EAP program. Can't recommend it enough.
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PHS/BMI 451Introduction to SAS Programming for Population HealthJohn HamptonIf you expect to use SAS in your career (e.g., healthcare, government), this is a solid course. The course strucuture and assignments help you learn the basis of the fairly... finicky SAS programming language.
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PHS/IES 560Health impact assessment of global environmental changeJonathan PatzRelevant topic, thoughtful policy-related assignments, Dr. Patz is an excellent lecturer and course is well-organized & fun.
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