ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZAAABACADAEAFAGAHAIAJAKALAMANAOAP
1
florian.club
2
3
SUMMARY:
4
OVERALLWORKOUT 1WORKOUT 2Glucose AvgHeart Rate AvgBP (sys/dia)
5
YearDaysWktsHoursMin/DayDays w/oAvg Int.Int. >=7Int. <=3HoursMin/DayDays w/oAvg Int.Int. >=7Int. <=3HoursMin/DayDays w/oAvg Int.Int. >=7Int. <=34amPreW1PostW1PreW2
PostW2
8pmPreW1PostW1PreW2PostW2PreW1PostW1PreW2
PostW2
6
20238617269480 (0%)4.4233 (19%)63 (36%)423005.0924 (27%)18 (20%)261803.769 (10%)45 (52%)1099911410210210749865381127/76154/80126/75
151/80
7
2022365729314520 (0%)5.09221 (30%)180 (24%)1923205.78157 (43%)49 (13%)1222004.4164 (17%)131 (35%)10910312610610910751825674130/75147/76131/74145/77
8
9
10
NOTES:
> See other sheet tabs below for each year's detail. This tab is only the summary of all years (pulled out automatically).
> Workout 1 is usually around noon at the end of the fast since 8pm, then breaking the fast at 1pm w/ my "Badass Superfood Smoothie" (17/7 intermittent fasting every day).
See recipe somewhere on my website (make sure it's the last version).
I still do it on a fast even when running nearly 20 miles, it trains the body to find energy when there isn't any, and to become extremely efficient. But after a 20-hour fast and 20 miles I immediately LOAD UP with an absurd amount of food.
> Workout 2 is usually around 5-6pm.
> I never rest between sets of strength workouts, fitness dancing instead (like aerobics, 30-60s max, usually 45s). Doing it in the form of dancing not only prevents the heart rate from dropping too much
but also teaches the brain that "It's no big deal" so even when it's very hard I can act like it's not and get my mind to believe me to some extent.
> You might say, why not make a single workout of an hour? Because I could never sustain the level of intensity as a single workout, at least for all the level 6 workouts and above, and I cannot predict the level in advance.
Also, the first workout is always on an 18-hour fast minimum (often 20) which is fine once in a while even for a 2-3 hour run, but not something I would want to do daily.
> Workout times include ~3min of warm-up (except runs and rides)
> When I go for high intensity I never count the reps. Instead, I count "1" until the point of collapse where I couldn't do one more even if my life was at stake, and I mentally visualize that one only, fully in the now.
For that reason I don't need to do too many sets. 5 of each exercise is already great.
> "123bpm min" is a type of strength workout where I wear a HR monitor and prevent the HR from dropping below that number. I imagine there is an explosive-vest connected to it.
So this is a combination of cardio and strength w/ jumping around and intense fitness dance moves.
> My absolute max HR is 178 (184 on very hot day). Resting HR during sleep is 37-40, or a bit higher depending on how over-trained and under-slept I am and how long were my cardios in the last 2 months.
Of course it also gets A LOT higher on hot days, and tends to rise too when I know I'm about to workout..
> HGH is a way of executing the movements that develops growth hormones. These are usually complex moves that recruit all muscles, especially big ones,
with fairly heavy weight, while bringing a high level of mental aggression to each rep.
11
INTENSITY LEVELS EXPLAINED (1-10)
I determine the intensity level relatively to what my absolute physical max could have been. So a same EFFORT ("intensity level") corresponds to an always greater performance because I keep getting fitter over the years.
> Level 4 would be the way the average person works out in a gym. They push, they sweat, but they're still very far from their full potential (which I define as "If they had an explosive vest connected to a heart-rate monitor").
> I call level 6 "quite hard", level 7 "very hard", and 8-9 is absolute savage.
> Level 10 would be passing out or vomiting. I would have to be able to honestly say "I could not have done 0.1% better even if my life was at stake", which is usually an impossibility because there's always more.
It happened only once in my life so far, it was at the 2021 Malibu Triathlon where I made the fastest cycling time of the day followed by a run I did not prepare for since I wasn't supposed to run. Unfortunately I didn't have that spreadsheet back then, but you can see both on Strava (September).
> Level 1 would be a day when I was about to quit (typically for physical or emotional reasons) and rather than missing the workout entirely I went for something ridiculously easy just to say "At least I did something".
This regularly happens when the joints are inflamed as a result of overtraining, in this case I go very light with low ampitude and call it a level 1.
I never commit to any level of intensity in advance because I would run the risk of missing the workout entirely. I only commit to doing something and then bring the intensity once I'm in it, if possible.
Making a 10-minute workout at level 1 acceptable (without falling into the trap of making it the new standard) is the way to guarantee the workout will be done because no one could possibly have a valid excuse to
miss that, even on the worst day of their life. I understand if the most disciplined person in the world misses a 2-hour maniac-level workout once in a while, but even the least disciplined should be able to do short and easy.
There's never anything worse than doing nothing at all. When we break our own commitments we learn that we cannot trust that person in the mirror.
This is the main reason why so many people have a low self-esteem. Showing up every day even in a small way is the only antidote.
I think most people unfamiliar with high-level fitness would be shocked to see me workout at level 7 and especially above. They would have to make it wrong in order to make sense of it
(see the 4 ways people use to make sense of things, that I described in my post about fitness psychology in the page "The Big Dilemma of Relationships" - Link on my website).
Most people miss the consistency, but the few who have it are nowhere near any decent level of intensity because they never allowed themselves to be exposed to and to embrace the ultimate maniac level
that changes our mind forever so that we're never quite the same person again. It's because of this low standard of intensity that most people who are actually consistent never get truly great results.
At extreme intensity even a 10-15 minutes workout is enough for a total destruction of an entire muscle group.
INTENSITY BIAS OVER TIME:
Over time I started suspecting that a bias occurs with the level of intensity. As I become more used to extreme intensity there is a tendency to no longer call it that intense.
I realized that I often have a much harder time than before calling a workout "level 9" and yet in absolute terms they might in fact be harder than the ones I used to call level 9.
For that reason I never compare long-term levels but only use them to look at a week and see how many maniac-levels I did and make sure that low levels don't become a new habit.
12
RECOVERY?
> I don't believe in "recovery days". It seems to me that those who talk about it most are the same people who never really push hard enough to actually justify a "recovery". Nights are what recovery is for.
> I work on a treadmill desk at 1mph, doing about 10mi/day on it. It won't make anyone fit but it is an excellent recovery practice to circulate the blood and also a great thing for core and posture, minimizing back pain.
> Twice 20-25min of stretching per day. This is the only way to never get injured.
> 20min of back massage right before going to bed. Without this and the large amount of stretching the nervous system would accumulate too much tension over time. These two habits are what makes rest unnecessary.
> Never missing a single workout is the best way to avoid spiraling down the road of bad habits. If there is no recovery day it makes it so much easier because it is no longer a question whether we workout or not today.
Having to answer that question every day would be much harder. And not missing a second time would be 100x harder than not missing the first time, because as soon as we missed once that option now becomes available for the future.
A person who missed became a "misser", and a misser misses.
For more mental tips about health & fitness discipline please check a link I shared on my website that leads to 3 pages about the psychology of working out, with probably some things you've never heard before.
13
BLOOD / GLUCOSE TRACKING
As you can see I track HR, blood pressure, and glucose level before/after every workout, as well as glucose at wake up and bed times (so glucose 6 times a day).
Why that many data points? Well, if I could get my hand on a CGM I would definitely wear one. I found glucose to be an excellent piece of data for tweaking the nutrition.
With the large amounts of healthy fat I take I'm certainly not worried about becoming diabetic, but it gives me a good indication of whether I ate enough, and took enough carbs
(which I keep fairly low and are usually sweet potatoes and/or black rice that I sprout).
I even tracked urine pH for a while because I can see how good of an indicator it is for hydration as well as vegetables intake. It usually starts around 5.8 at wake up because of lack of hydration during the night,
then climbs above 7 and peaks around 7.7 (very alkaline) once my "Badass Superfood Smoothie" made it to the bloodstream (it has extremely little sugar and is loaded with alkaline foods, see recipe on my website).
pH can sometimes also reveal the amount of lactic acid in the bloodstream after extreme intensity workouts.
The glucose and HR post-workouts are much less useful than the pre-workouts measurements because they change very quickly. As the intensity of the workout gets high glucose is released from the liver and muscles into the bloodstream.
This can sometimes peak to extreme levels. But as soon as the workout is over the opposite happens. The HR also climbs but drops extremely quickly (in a minute or two max) so both of these measurements are more useful as an average
because they highly depend on how many seconds it took me to sit down and measure. Comparing the average of a month with the average of another is the main purpose of these post-workout measurements.
The pre-workout measurements however are extremely useful. They can reveal nutrition issues (esp. the amounts in my case since I always eat extra-clean), lack of sleep, dehydration, lactic acid, etc.
Having a lot of data points allows me to notice quickly if anything that I tweak in my nutrition does not steer things in the right direction (e.g. I can compare with high accuracy a month average with the previous month).
I cannot wait to see these wearable sensors in the market, I want them all and I do want them in a database with some AI watching over them 24/7. This will completely transform heath-care.
My resting (sleeping) HR is around 37-40, on the low-end of that when my cardio training has been great and consistent.
The pre-W1 HR is often an excellent indication of how overtrained I am. I am constantly overtrained but how much is a good thing to know.
AR means arrhythmia. I do have some degree of arrhythmia which is probably genetic and I started to keep track of it so I can see without bias if it ever becomes more frequent from a month or year to the next.
The pre-W1 diastolic is often high due to the fact that I often take a cold plunge just an hour before W1 which hardnens the blood vessels.
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100