ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
1
2


The alternative field plans in the first tab offer many options for alternative field placement activities, mostly that can be done from home. The trainings in another tab are one resource for offering activities. Field contracts require some direct contact. Here's how some people are meeting this obligation.

"be my eyes" is an app for people who are blind. Sighted people can register to receive phone calls when a person who is blind needs to know what something says, such as the directions for a medication bottle. Help calls may be infrequent.

The website 7 cups has a brief (30 min) training, after which "listeners" can talk to people by chat

The crisis text-line has a 30-hour volunteer training that begins every 2 weeks. https://www.crisistextline.org/faq

Food delivery and food pantry help is needed in many communities, including schools, universities, meals on wheels. Often these are quick low-risk car drop-offs

Some communities are setting up video visits for people who are sheltered and need to talk- this is usually community specific- google search in your community using words like "video chat" "COVID-19" "your city/state name".

Consider reaching out to your field sites to see if they have phone-based check-ins that are needed for their vulnerable communities. Consider providing group supervision on Zoom for those performing these tasks.

Above all, be flexible. Some students are facing increased work demands and have little capacity to work from home with kids/others in the house. Some states are working to reduce field hours based on emergency declarations in their states. Be advocates for your students. They are learning so much right now about crisis, community, macro problems.

Begin to consider how these kinds of flexible arrangements might serve students in the future. We know that our most margainalized students are often negatively impacted by our rigid unpaid field hour requirements. This is an opportunity for all of us to reconsider what is possible. We can all benefit from a stronger social justice perspective in these times, and learn lessons from them that move us into the future.

Melanie Sage, PhD, MSW
msage@buffalo.edu




3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100