AESS PROGRAM APRIL 23
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Session TitleSession AbstractDate and TimeLocationTitles of all Talks in SessionAuthor Last NameType of SessionIndividual Paper TitleIndividual Paper AbstractAdditional Abstracts for Full Panel
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“It’s really white in here”: Fostering diversity and inclusion in the environmental departments, programs and organizationsPeople of color comprise 40 percent of the United States population
and are projected to become a majority by 2042, however, they are
grossly underrepresented in environmental organizations. A 2018 study
showed that only 15 percent of the staff and 17 percent of the board
of environmental nonprofit organizations are people of color. In
addition, environmental studies departments struggle with recruiting
students of color, which leads to fewer qualified professionals in the
field. This talk will present the historical, cultural, and
institutional barriers for people of color in the environmental
movement in the United States. It includes a case study on Citizens'
Climate Lobby (CCL), a grassroots climate advocacy organization that
has experienced enormous growth in membership the last few years. The case study examines differences in civic engagement on climate change from whites and people of color at CCL, expressed barriers and
motivations. We will also discuss case studies from environmental
studies departments and other environmental organizations and their
efforts to engage more people of color. This panel discussion will
give an overview of where we are in terms of diversity and the
environment and provide best practices in fostering more diversity and
inclusion in environmental programs, departments, and organizations.
6/28/19 10:00“It’s really white in here”: Fostering diversity and inclusion in the environmental departments, programs, and organizations Fang, ClaraDiscussion SymposiaClara Fang

Clara Fang works at Citizens’ Climate Lobby and is a PhD student at
Antioch University New England. Her presentation examines the
historical, cultural, and institutional barriers for people of color
in the environmental movement in the United States. It includes a case
study on Citizens' Climate Lobby (CCL), a grassroots climate advocacy
organization that has experienced enormous growth in membership the last few years. The case study examines differences in civic
engagement on climate change from whites and people of color at CCL,
expressed barriers and motivations. It suggests ways in which
environmental organizations working on climate change can engage more people of color as advocates, partners, and supporters.

Thomas Easley

Thomas Easley, an educator who has tackled diversity challenges in the
academic classroom and on the stage, was appointed the first Assistant Dean of Community and Inclusion at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies in December 2017. At F&ES he works with the entire community — faculty, staff, and students — on a range of diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives. They include facilitating
workshops on diversity, telling the personal stories from people who
have been through the program, and doing outreach to students of
diverse backgrounds. His presentation will show how F&ES is achieving
diversity, equity, and inclusion in its academics, student body, and
faculty, with best practices that can be applied to other
environmental studies departments and schools.Additional possible presenters:

Thomas Easley, Vice Dean of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies;

Staff member from Green 2.0
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A Multidisciplinary Perspective on Hurricanes: Impacts, Integration of Technology, Lessons Learned,An increase in the frequency and severity of tropical cyclones is one of the major predictions of climate change models. The theoretical link is simple. As the planet warms due to the greenhouse effect, most of the extra heat is absorbed by the world’s oceans. In turn, warm oceans provide the fuel for cyclones that are more frequent, larger, and more powerful.
This prediction appears to have become an all too scary reality in the US, with 2017 and 2018 marking the most expensive Atlantic hurricane seasons in history. Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in 2017, and Florence and Michael in 2018, proved to be some of the most powerful hurricanes on record to hit the US. It is no coincidence that 2017 also happened to be the warmest year on record for the world’s oceans.
While the 2017 and 2018 hurricane seasons left a path of destruction throughout the Gulf and East Coasts, they also provided fertile ground for social science research. This panel provides a multi-disciplinary social science perspective of advances in the study of hurricanes, including their impacts on agriculture, the decision-making of evacuees, integration of technology into the activities of first responders, and the lessons learned by county governments after major storms. The panel integrates approaches from economics, remote sensing, computer science, and emergency management to provide an overview of advances in damage assessment, transportation, emergency response, and planning to improve preparedness and resilience.
6/28/19 14:15A Multidisciplinary Perspective on Hurricanes: Impacts, Integration of Technology, Lessons Learned, and the Way Forward Alvarez, SergioFull Panel SessionUtilizing Crowdsourcing and Real-Time Road Condition Data for Assisting Search and Rescue Volunteers: Following 2017 Hurricane Harvey in Houston - Jungwon Yeo Volunteers for disaster and crisis management are categorized into two groups, physical volunteers and virtual volunteers. Physical volunteers are the ones physically involved in disaster relief and response activities such as distributing foods, rebuilding damaged buildings, or participating in search and rescues. Virtual volunteers are the ones analyzing data and disseminate information to support physical volunteers’ disaster relief coordination in practice. While the major activities between the volunteer groups are distinctive, the performance of each group is interdependent to the other.
In the current digitalized society, the role of virtual volunteers have become more important in the practice of physical disaster relief practice in our digitalized society since they guide the response behaviors of physical volunteers. Yet, challenges for them has been timely data collection and analyses that leads to timely dissemination of valid information to support to physical volunteers in practice. This paper aims to assist volunteers involved in emergency search & rescues by integrating the crowdsourcing data with real-time road condition data following 2017 Hurricane Harvey. The crowdsourcing crisis data on Aug 29, 2017, are extracted from the crowdsourcing platform HOUSTON HARVEY RESCUE (2017), and the road condition data is collected directly from Houston TranStar (2017). We designed multiple scenarios to test the utility and functionality of the integrated data set in assisting the volunteers. The findings indicate that the use of integrated data can provide the timely data to assist both virtual and physical volunteers in search and rescue during the hurricane. Based on the findings, we provide some strategies to enhance the performance of volunteers involved in search and rescue operations as well as directions to future research.
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A Multidisciplinary Perspective on Hurricanes: Impacts, Integration of Technology, Lessons Learned,An increase in the frequency and severity of tropical cyclones is one of the major predictions of climate change models. The theoretical link is simple. As the planet warms due to the greenhouse effect, most of the extra heat is absorbed by the world’s oceans. In turn, warm oceans provide the fuel for cyclones that are more frequent, larger, and more powerful.
This prediction appears to have become an all too scary reality in the US, with 2017 and 2018 marking the most expensive Atlantic hurricane seasons in history. Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in 2017, and Florence and Michael in 2018, proved to be some of the most powerful hurricanes on record to hit the US. It is no coincidence that 2017 also happened to be the warmest year on record for the world’s oceans.
While the 2017 and 2018 hurricane seasons left a path of destruction throughout the Gulf and East Coasts, they also provided fertile ground for social science research. This panel provides a multi-disciplinary social science perspective of advances in the study of hurricanes, including their impacts on agriculture, the decision-making of evacuees, integration of technology into the activities of first responders, and the lessons learned by county governments after major storms. The panel integrates approaches from economics, remote sensing, computer science, and emergency management to provide an overview of advances in damage assessment, transportation, emergency response, and planning to improve preparedness and resilience.
6/28/19 14:15A Multidisciplinary Perspective on Hurricanes: Impacts, Integration of Technology, Lessons Learned, and the Way Forward Hasan, SamiulFull Panel SessionUnderstanding the Dynamics of Hurricane Evacuation Decisions from Real-time Social Media Data - Samiul Hasan Evacuations play a critical role in saving human lives during hurricanes. But individual evacuation decision-making is a complex dynamic process, often studied using post-hurricane survey data. Alternatively, ubiquitous use of social media generates a massive amount of data that can be used to predict evacuation behavior in real time. In this paper, we present a method to infer individual evacuation behaviors (e.g., evacuation decision, timing, destination) from social media data. We develop machine learning models to infer evacuation decisions from user tweets. To extract the underlying evacuation context from tweets, we first estimate a word2vec model from a corpus of more than 100 million tweets collected over four major hurricanes. Using variables such as evacuation context, time to landfall, type of evacuation order, and the distance from home, the proposed model infers what activities are made by individuals, when they decide to evacuate, and where they evacuate to. To validate our results, we have created ground truth data from 324,012 tweets posted by 4,046 users during hurricane Irma. Our findings show that the proposed method provides critical insights on evacuation behavior in real time from social media data. As traditional surveys are infrequent, costly, and often performed at a post-hurricane period, the proposed method can be very useful for predicting evacuation behavior as a hurricane unfolds in real time.
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A Multidisciplinary Perspective on Hurricanes: Impacts, Integration of Technology, Lessons Learned,An increase in the frequency and severity of tropical cyclones is one of the major predictions of climate change models. The theoretical link is simple. As the planet warms due to the greenhouse effect, most of the extra heat is absorbed by the world’s oceans. In turn, warm oceans provide the fuel for cyclones that are more frequent, larger, and more powerful.
This prediction appears to have become an all too scary reality in the US, with 2017 and 2018 marking the most expensive Atlantic hurricane seasons in history. Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in 2017, and Florence and Michael in 2018, proved to be some of the most powerful hurricanes on record to hit the US. It is no coincidence that 2017 also happened to be the warmest year on record for the world’s oceans.
While the 2017 and 2018 hurricane seasons left a path of destruction throughout the Gulf and East Coasts, they also provided fertile ground for social science research. This panel provides a multi-disciplinary social science perspective of advances in the study of hurricanes, including their impacts on agriculture, the decision-making of evacuees, integration of technology into the activities of first responders, and the lessons learned by county governments after major storms. The panel integrates approaches from economics, remote sensing, computer science, and emergency management to provide an overview of advances in damage assessment, transportation, emergency response, and planning to improve preparedness and resilience.
6/28/19 14:15A Multidisciplinary Perspective on Hurricanes: Impacts, Integration of Technology, Lessons Learned, and the Way Forward Knox, ClaireFull Panel SessionTwo Steps Forward and One Step Back: Evidence from Hurricane Irma After Action Reports - Claire Knox Hurricane Irma devastated most of south and central Florida and tested many of the policy and institutional recommendations from 13 years prior, when hurricanes Charley, Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne affected nearly every Florida county. Recommendations and lessons learned during the response and short-term recovery phases link directly to long-term planning efforts. However, many local governments lack the capacity for long-term recovery planning and implementation, which is an essential element of a community's resiliency. This lack of capacity has led to repeated failures and repeated policy and organizational recommendations during and after disasters.
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A Multidisciplinary Perspective on Hurricanes: Impacts, Integration of Technology, Lessons Learned,An increase in the frequency and severity of tropical cyclones is one of the major predictions of climate change models. The theoretical link is simple. As the planet warms due to the greenhouse effect, most of the extra heat is absorbed by the world’s oceans. In turn, warm oceans provide the fuel for cyclones that are more frequent, larger, and more powerful.
This prediction appears to have become an all too scary reality in the US, with 2017 and 2018 marking the most expensive Atlantic hurricane seasons in history. Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in 2017, and Florence and Michael in 2018, proved to be some of the most powerful hurricanes on record to hit the US. It is no coincidence that 2017 also happened to be the warmest year on record for the world’s oceans.
While the 2017 and 2018 hurricane seasons left a path of destruction throughout the Gulf and East Coasts, they also provided fertile ground for social science research. This panel provides a multi-disciplinary social science perspective of advances in the study of hurricanes, including their impacts on agriculture, the decision-making of evacuees, integration of technology into the activities of first responders, and the lessons learned by county governments after major storms. The panel integrates approaches from economics, remote sensing, computer science, and emergency management to provide an overview of advances in damage assessment, transportation, emergency response, and planning to improve preparedness and resilience.
6/28/19 14:15A Multidisciplinary Perspective on Hurricanes: Impacts, Integration of Technology, Lessons Learned, and the Way Forward Yeo, JungwonFull Panel SessionExamining Impacts of Hurricanes on Food and Fiber Production: Lessons Learned from Hurricanes Irma and Michael in Florida - Sergio Alvarez
Hurricanes Irma and Michael will live in infamy within Florida’s agricultural community. In 2017, Hurricane Irma cut a path of destruction through the heart of the Florida peninsula that coincided with some of the state’s most productive agricultural landscapes, causing heavy losses to all segments of production agriculture. Florida’s emblematic citrus industry, which had been fighting the deadly citrus greening disease, was among the most heavily impacted sectors. In 2018, Hurricane Michael struck the Florida panhandle, delivering a destructive blow to an agricultural region that was largely untouched by Irma.
Our team used a combination of field surveys, geospatial analysis, and economic modeling to develop rapid assessments of statewide, short-term agricultural losses associated with these storms. Through continued assessment of available agricultural statistics and communication with stakeholders, we have also investigated infrastructure damage, downstream agribusiness losses, and the potential for medium- to long-term impacts on production. We have found that the impact of hurricanes on production agriculture goes beyond wind ripping crops from live plants and breaking fruit trees, storm surge flooding aquaculture ponds, and floods drowning animals. Hurricanes disrupt field preparation and planting, destroy critical farm infrastructure such as irrigation equipment and pumps used to provide animals with water, and result in blackouts that deem much of the equipment that remains unusable. In addition, we have found that existing risk management tools for agriculture, such as crop insurance, are woefully inadequate and do not protect agricultural producers from the risks inherent in a world with more frequent and more severe hurricanes.

Utilizing Crowdsourcing and Real-Time Road Condition Data for Assisting Search and Rescue Volunteers: Following 2017 Hurricane Harvey in Houston - Jungwon Yeo
Volunteers for disaster and crisis management are categorized into two groups, physical volunteers and virtual volunteers. Physical volunteers are the ones physically involved in disaster relief and response activities such as distributing foods, rebuilding damaged buildings, or participating in search and rescues. Virtual volunteers are the ones analyzing data and disseminate information to support physical volunteers’ disaster relief coordination in practice. While the major activities between the volunteer groups are distinctive, the performance of each group is interdependent to the other.
In the current digitalized society, the role of virtual volunteers have become more important in the practice of physical disaster relief practice in our digitalized society since they guide the response behaviors of physical volunteers. Yet, challenges for them has been timely data collection and analyses that leads to timely dissemination of valid information to support to physical volunteers in practice.
This paper aims to assist volunteers involved in emergency search & rescues by integrating the crowdsourcing data with real-time road condition data following 2017 Hurricane Harvey. The crowdsourcing crisis data on Aug 29, 2017, are extracted from the crowdsourcing platform HOUSTON HARVEY RESCUE (2017), and the road condition data is collected directly from Houston TranStar (2017). We designed multiple scenarios to test the utility and functionality of the integrated data set in assisting the volunteers. The findings indicate that the use of integrated data can provide the timely data to assist both virtual and physical volunteers in search and rescue during the hurricane. Based on the findings, we provide some strategies to enhance the performance of volunteers involved in search and rescue operations as well as directions to future research.

Understanding the Dynamics of Hurricane Evacuation Decisions from Real-time Social Media Data - Samiul Hasan
Evacuations play a critical role in saving human lives during hurricanes. But individual evacuation decision-making is a complex dynamic process, often studied using post-hurricane survey data. Alternatively, ubiquitous use of social media generates a massive amount of data that can be used to predict evacuation behavior in real time. In this paper, we present a method to infer individual evacuation behaviors (e.g., evacuation decision, timing, destination) from social media data. We develop machine learning models to infer evacuation decisions from user tweets. To extract the underlying evacuation context from tweets, we first estimate a word2vec model from a corpus of more than 100 million tweets collected over four major hurricanes. Using variables such as evacuation context, time to landfall, type of evacuation order, and the distance from home, the proposed model infers what activities are made by individuals, when they decide to evacuate, and where they evacuate to. To validate our results, we have created ground truth data from 324,012 tweets posted by 4,046 users during hurricane Irma. Our findings show that the proposed method provides critical insights on evacuation behavior in real time from social media data. As traditional surveys are infrequent, costly, and often performed at a post-hurricane period, the proposed method can be very useful for predicting evacuation behavior as a hurricane unfolds in real time.

Two Steps Forward and One Step Back: Evidence from Hurricane Irma After Action Reports - Claire Knox
Hurricane Irma devastated most of south and central Florida and tested many of the policy and institutional recommendations from 13 years prior, when hurricanes Charley, Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne affected nearly every Florida county. Recommendations and lessons learned during the response and short-term recovery phases link directly to long-term planning efforts. However, many local governments lack the capacity for long-term recovery planning and implementation, which is an essential element of a community's resiliency. This lack of capacity has led to repeated failures and repeated policy and organizational recommendations during and after disasters.
This study uses a two-phased, coding methodology to systematically analyze 21 county-level after action reports (68% response rate) breadth and depth across 39 factors of resiliency. After Action Reports, often under analyzed in the literature, include internal and external priorities emergency management staff and responding agencies considered. While local jurisdictions are not mandated to complete these reports, many engage in the process to (1) identify what did and did not go well before, during, and shortly after the disaster, and (2) provide recommendations to improve upon identified weaknesses.
Results highlight multiple strengths across the counties (i.e., shelter capacity, health/wellbeing of internal employees, internal local government collaboration, formal education of staff, and communication capacity) and weaknesses that impacted many of the counties (i.e., referencing the county's land use plans, external institutional change recommendations, long-term relocation of vulnerable populations, faith-based community collaboration, and private sector collaboration). The presentation will conclude with practical and future research recommendations.
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Adaptation and Sustainable Design6/27/19 14:00To Adapt or not to Adapt: Decision-making by residents of urban coastal areas , Recommendations for Early Phases of Engaging Communities in Climate Change Adaptation , Integrating Sustainability, Health and Islam in the Design and Construction of a New Campus at the University of Nizwa, Oman , Study of Geometric Dwelling Patterns in the Semi-Arid Climate: Energy Efficient Design Elements for a House in Lahore , Adapting Urban Landscapes for Carbon Sequestration and Water Conservation Czech, MaryaIndividual Paper PresentationAdapting Urban Landscapes for Carbon Sequestration and Water ConservationAmong the sustainable practices for both Carbon Sequestration and Water Conservation are those which can adopted before these are mandated is a change in lawn-care culture. There are currently few residential and public space maintenance practices that require more time and fuel and produce more pollution than lawn-care practices. A graphic representation of public and academic research from various juried publications will illustrate comparative studies of various types of biomass. Researched websites and other published materials will be available demonstrating more effective carbon sinks than expanses of lawn and turf grasses. Recent literature establishes the fact that more water and fertilizer are used for lawn care than for agriculture. Navigating the future of water consumption highlights the need to prioritize appropriate uses of water, including limiting its use for lawn care. This is of special concern in water-poor and drought-prone areas of the United States. Increasing carbon sequestration should be considered as a means of climate adaptation practices. Additional alternative strategies which will be proposed.

The following questions will be distributed to the audience beforehand and can be used as discussion points at the end of the presentation:
 How can lawn-care be used to sequester carbon?
 What are pros and cons of the challenge to implement any of these strategies in urban and suburban areas?
 In what ways can education and outreach model various lawn-care alternatives?
 Can green infrastructure strategies (Such as Permaculture, Regenerative Gardening, and Restoration Agriculture) be taught as a means of managing urban storm water thus serving a secondary purpose of sequestering carbon?
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Adaptation and Sustainable Design6/27/19 14:00To Adapt or not to Adapt: Decision-making by residents of urban coastal areas , Recommendations for Early Phases of Engaging Communities in Climate Change Adaptation , Integrating Sustainability, Health and Islam in the Design and Construction of a New Campus at the University of Nizwa, Oman , Study of Geometric Dwelling Patterns in the Semi-Arid Climate: Energy Efficient Design Elements for a House in Lahore , Adapting Urban Landscapes for Carbon Sequestration and Water Conservation Madajewicz, MalgosiaIndividual Paper PresentationTo Adapt or not to Adapt: Decision-making by residents of urban coastal areasIncreasing frequency and intensity of coastal flooding is affecting many densely populated sections of coastline around the world. New York City (NYC) is a leader in planning and implementing adaptations. However, even the large public investments planned in NYC will not protect populations in all coastal neighborhoods. At the same time, only a small percentage of residents have begun to take adaptation actions at the individual or community scales. Some of the obstacles include lack of understanding among residents of the future flood risks, available adaptation options and their benefits and costs, as well as constrained resources.

This study develops information that residents need to make educated decisions about adaptation options, which include relocation, retrofitting homes, changes in land use around the home and in the community, and financial planning. The study uses unique primary data that document the cost of the recovery from Hurricane Sandy for residents of the Rockaways and the south eastern shore of Staten Island in NYC to estimate future costs of flooding to households in those neighborhoods in the absence of adaptation actions. The study compares the costs of inaction to the costs of several adaptation strategies, including relocation, elevating the home, and modest retrofit actions such as raising electric utilities.

The main contributions are the focus on decision-making by residents of coastal neighborhoods and data on costs that residents are likely to face in the absence of adaptation. Other studies value likely damages to real estate from future flooding. However, real estate values are different from costs that residents incur. Our data document that more than 80% of residents rebuilt their homes after Sandy as they were before, therefore the recovery costs provide a good estimate of costs due to future flooding. We will discuss the applicability of the results beyond the study area.
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Adaptation and Sustainable Design6/27/19 14:00To Adapt or not to Adapt: Decision-making by residents of urban coastal areas , Recommendations for Early Phases of Engaging Communities in Climate Change Adaptation , Integrating Sustainability, Health and Islam in the Design and Construction of a New Campus at the University of Nizwa, Oman , Study of Geometric Dwelling Patterns in the Semi-Arid Climate: Energy Efficient Design Elements for a House in Lahore , Adapting Urban Landscapes for Carbon Sequestration and Water Conservation Malik, Ayesha MehmoodIndividual Paper PresentationStudy of Geometric Dwelling Patterns in the Semi-Arid Climate: Energy Efficient Design Elements for a House in Lahore
The energy crisis and other environmental problems have reached dangerous levels in the last decade. Considering these problems in the designing of houses could help to develop a sustainable future for the built environment, giving users structures that respond to climate. Every climatic region has different approaches towards addressing energy conservation. There are several traditional and modern architectural solutions in terms of bioclimatic house designs strategies. Choice of the appropriate values for the energy efficiency design parameters result in low energy buildings. This research paper is part of ongoing Ph.D research, the objective of this study is to investigate the early house patterns, house geometry, early design elements and the drift from the early to the new design elements found in parallel case studies of Energy Efficient Houses by primary and secondary sources. This work gives us an understanding of how to adapt energy efficient design elements to create energy efficient house in Lahore. This knowledge shall be made part of the Architectural Environmental control systems course studies at UMT and shall be incorporated in the government housing authorities in Lahore (LDA). This research would further be tested and analyzed using software analysis (CFD) for the adaptation of the design elements in combination for a model house design in Lahore.
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Adaptation and Sustainable Design6/27/19 14:00To Adapt or not to Adapt: Decision-making by residents of urban coastal areas , Recommendations for Early Phases of Engaging Communities in Climate Change Adaptation , Integrating Sustainability, Health and Islam in the Design and Construction of a New Campus at the University of Nizwa, Oman , Study of Geometric Dwelling Patterns in the Semi-Arid Climate: Energy Efficient Design Elements for a House in Lahore , Adapting Urban Landscapes for Carbon Sequestration and Water Conservation Mumford, KarenIndividual Paper PresentationIntegrating Sustainability, Health and Islam in the Design and Construction of a New Campus at the University of Nizwa, OmanFew universities in developing countries, especially in the Middle East, have integrated sustainability practices into campus operations (Abubakar et al., 2016). In 2019, faculty from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire traveled to Oman to learn about the sustainability features being developed at a campus-wide scale at the University of Nizwa. The innovative campus design integrates sustainability practices with public health and Islamic architectural features. Examples of sustainability elements include solar arrays on all buildings, novel building insulation to improve cooling efficiency, building exteriors clad with locally produced marble to reflect heat, a single district cooling plant, and an on-campus wastewater treatment system. Public health features include an enclosed walkway, called the Lifewalk, to promote walking and active lifestyles even during high summer temperatures, and provision of locally produced and organic foods. Architectural features include pointed arches and castle mouldings that represent important Islamic principles, such as unity, beauty and light. In this presentation we describe this novel campus design and highlight the importance of the integration of sustainability, health, and Islam. In particular, we examine how the cultural and spiritual aspects of Islam inform the integration of health and sustainability. This presentation also highlights the global reach of innovative sustainability and health promoting practices and the continuing role of higher education as innovation hubs for sustainable and healthy lifestyles.
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Adaptation and Sustainable Design6/27/19 14:00To Adapt or not to Adapt: Decision-making by residents of urban coastal areas , Recommendations for Early Phases of Engaging Communities in Climate Change Adaptation , Integrating Sustainability, Health and Islam in the Design and Construction of a New Campus at the University of Nizwa, Oman , Study of Geometric Dwelling Patterns in the Semi-Arid Climate: Energy Efficient Design Elements for a House in Lahore , Adapting Urban Landscapes for Carbon Sequestration and Water Conservation Plate, RichardIndividual Paper PresentationRecommendations for Early Phases of Engaging Communities in Climate Change Adaptation A sustainable future in the context of climate change will require measures for mitigating and adapting to impacts of climate change. This presentation will provide a review of published work on climate adaptation program. Communities across the globe have begun planning for and adapting to climate change. Extension agents are in a unique position to use the resources available to them to facilitate climate change adaptation in their communities. Adaptation planning is a local activity that must be context specific. However, general recommendations can be made to help facilitate the planning process. We conducted a systematic review of research about climate change adaptation in communities to explore ideas that contribute to successful adaptation-planning communication. We identified and reviewed 50 articles that described various outreach efforts to engage communities in planning for adaptation across a range of contexts and settings. Five themes emerged addressing how to facilitate early stages of the climate change adaptation process: establishing positive initial engagement, incorporating participatory methods, using tools to facilitate understanding, addressing trust and uncertainty, and maximizing limited time. Based on the review and emergent themes, we offer practical recommendations for educators and Extension professionals as they engage communities in climate change adaptation.
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AESS Branded Book Series DiscussionAuthors of books in the AESS Branded Book Series will highlight the work presented in their volumes. Consider attending to learn about both the existing books in the Series and opportunities for you to publish in the Series.6/27/19 10:30AESS Branded Book Series Discussion Gosselin, DaveDiscussion Symposia
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AESS Branded Book Series DiscussionAuthors of books in the AESS Branded Book Series will highlight the work presented in their volumes. Consider attending to learn about both the existing books in the Series and opportunities for you to publish in the Series.6/27/19 10:30AESS Branded Book Series Discussion Kessler, NeilDiscussion Symposia
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AESS Branded Book Series DiscussionAuthors of books in the AESS Branded Book Series will highlight the work presented in their volumes. Consider attending to learn about both the existing books in the Series and opportunities for you to publish in the Series.6/27/19 10:30AESS Branded Book Series Discussion Smith, KimDiscussion Symposia
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Agriculture6/27/19 10:30Lessons learned about communication and partnership building in a regional multi-stakeholder agricultural conservation initiative , Agent-based Models of a Social Norm that Enhances Resilience in Swidden Agriculture , Pedagogy of Permaculture , Producing Environmental Injustice: Practices and Perspectives of Agricultural Health Stakeholders in Ventura County , Farm Aid, Inc.: Advocacy in the family farm movement Alvarez Noli, KaitlynIndividual Paper PresentationProducing Environmental Injustice: Practices and Perspectives of Agricultural Health Stakeholders in Ventura CountyThe intensive use of hazardous pesticides in agriculture disproportionately burdens Latinx, immigrant farmworker communities. While there has been a proliferation of policies and regulations aimed at managing occupational pesticide risk, these policies do not consider the lived experience of agricultural health stakeholders. Therefore, I employed in-depth, qualitative interviews and observations to explore how the everyday practices and perspectives of diverse stakeholders shape the development and implementation of health protections for farmworkers. I recruited a diverse group of participants, including Spanish and Mixteco speaking farmworkers, growers, pesticide handlers, regulators, public officials, community organizers, and pest management experts. I use several theoretical tools, including practice theory (Bourdieu, 1994; Feldman and Orlikowski, 2011), structuration theory (Giddens, 1984), and actor-network theory (Latour, 1986; Law, 1992), to examine how environmental injustices persist and how they can be challenged. Through inductive analysis, I found that the unique challenges and the unpredictability of agricultural employees’ everyday lives and work lives interfere with adherence to popular policies and safety protocols that pesticide regulators prescribe. I also found that the practices and perspectives of diverse stakeholders’ interlock in ways that divert attention from occupational pesticide risks. By exploring diversionary tactics, who participates in them, and what the consequences are for stakeholders, I shed light on various policy shortcomings and identify opportunities to improve decision-making processes and to enhance health protections for farmworkers.
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Agriculture6/27/19 10:30Lessons learned about communication and partnership building in a regional multi-stakeholder agricultural conservation initiative , Agent-based Models of a Social Norm that Enhances Resilience in Swidden Agriculture , Pedagogy of Permaculture , Producing Environmental Injustice: Practices and Perspectives of Agricultural Health Stakeholders in Ventura County , Farm Aid, Inc.: Advocacy in the family farm movement Correa Duran, FabioIndividual Paper PresentationAgent-based Models of a Social Norm that Enhances Resilience in Swidden AgricultureIn this talk we use agent-based models to show how a social norm of graduated sanctioning contributes to resilience in swidden agriculture. These landscapes depend not only on the swidden cycle but also on regional economic forces, social dynamics, and governance. In southern Belize, swidden agriculture features a social network of labor exchange that might enhance the capacity of the system to absorb demographic shocks and respond to environmental changes. We explore this hypothesis by developing agent-based models (ABMs) in which farmer agents exchange agricultural labor. Some agents seek help to farm a disproportionately large patch of land, and others respond by providing limited to no help. The model explores different scenarios of the length of time that this graduated sanctioning takes place, the limitation in the amount of help, and the proportion of farmers that engage in graduated sanctioning. We implement demographic shocks in the form of agent removal, as well as ecological shocks in the form of decreases in soil fertility. In our exploration we found scenarios in which shocks led to the collapse of the swidden landscape, but collapse was averted once graduated sanctioning was activated. These findings support this social norm as a mechanism for resilience in this system, and they also show the potential of ABMs to aid resilience research. Progress in understanding resilience in southern Belize is based on ethnohistorical methods and network analyses (Downey, 2010; Downey, 2015), while general knowledge of swidden agriculture has benefited from diverse methods such as long-term, local-scale experiments of cultivation in temperate Europe (Rösch, et al., 2017). There are limitations to explore scenarios of swidden agriculture on regional scales and difficulties in documenting events of collapse-reconstruction of swidden landscapes in the field, but computational approaches such as our ABMs provide insight into how these scenarios work.
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Agriculture6/27/19 10:30Lessons learned about communication and partnership building in a regional multi-stakeholder agricultural conservation initiative , Agent-based Models of a Social Norm that Enhances Resilience in Swidden Agriculture , Pedagogy of Permaculture , Producing Environmental Injustice: Practices and Perspectives of Agricultural Health Stakeholders in Ventura County , Farm Aid, Inc.: Advocacy in the family farm movement Hennessey, JoannIndividual Paper PresentationFarm Aid, Inc.: Advocacy in the family farm movementThis paper provides an overview of the history of farm policy and the family farm movement leading up to the 1980 Farm Crisis that prompted the creation of Farm Aid and Farm Aid’s work up to 2018. For purposes of describing the family farm movement, cycles from 1850 forward are described. Using Bill Moyer’s Movement Action Plan framework, the stages of the family farm movement are evaluated. Stage 1, Normal Times, is shown as cycles of prosperity and financial devastation experienced by family farmers. By the 1980s, the family farm movement was in Stage 3, Ripening Conditions, that long period of time in which the problem is critical and worsening, with the public’s awareness increasing. These conditions explain the rapid movement from an offhand comment made by Bob Dylan suggesting farmers in the United States receive some of the funds raised at the Live Aid concert to the preparation and performance of the first Farm Aid Concert in September 1985, only two months later. For the purpose of this paper, Stage 3 Ripening Conditions and Stage 4 Take Off overlap through the 1980s. Stage 5 Perception of Failure is illustrated by a brief period of discouragement articulated by John Mellencamp, one of Farm Aid’s founders. Stage 6, Majority Public Opinion, is presented as the current stage for Farm Aid and the family farm movement. Assessment of Farm Aid’s efforts using Moyer’s construct is challenging due to Farm Aid’s role as Reformer. Apart from their annual concert, much of Farm Aid’s farmer assistance and policy work takes place behind the scenes. This paper shows that Farm Aid has worked consistently over the past 33 years to improve the farm situation for family farmers in the face of corporate consolidation of the food system and continuing effort to force family farmers from the land. Moyer’s Stage 7 Success and Stage 8 Continuing the Struggle will only arise from Farm Aid, the family farmer, and the family farm movement’s continuing to promote a strong and stable family farm economy while providing good quality food to U.S. markets.
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Agriculture6/27/19 10:30Lessons learned about communication and partnership building in a regional multi-stakeholder agricultural conservation initiative , Agent-based Models of a Social Norm that Enhances Resilience in Swidden Agriculture , Pedagogy of Permaculture , Producing Environmental Injustice: Practices and Perspectives of Agricultural Health Stakeholders in Ventura County , Farm Aid, Inc.: Advocacy in the family farm movement Luna, JodyIndividual Paper PresentationPedagogy of PermacultureBuilding on the work of Luna, Davila, and Reynoso-Morris (2018) this theoretical contribution explores the overlap of permaculture and education pedagogy. Permaculture is an environmental design theory that uses patterns that occur naturally to help inform our decision-making. This is an in-depth analysis of how the intersection of traditional educational theory and permaculture can promote environmental justice and social equity. Understanding how education is vital to the success of action Hines, Hungerford, and Tomera (2010), propose predictors of environmental behaviors finding that “knowledge of issues and knowledge of action strategies” (p. 1) were two of the top factors that affect environmental responsibility. This seems like common sense: the more people know about an issue the more people take action. Kumashiro (2018) calls for us to “rattle our common sense about education” and asserts that “how we begin the conversation shapes the way people see that conversation.” This paper attempts to “rattle our common sense” about how sustainability education can increase environmental justice and social equity through a Pedagogy of Permaculture.
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Agriculture6/27/19 10:30Lessons learned about communication and partnership building in a regional multi-stakeholder agricultural conservation initiative , Agent-based Models of a Social Norm that Enhances Resilience in Swidden Agriculture , Pedagogy of Permaculture , Producing Environmental Injustice: Practices and Perspectives of Agricultural Health Stakeholders in Ventura County , Farm Aid, Inc.: Advocacy in the family farm movement Samanta, AritreeIndividual Paper PresentationLessons learned about communication and partnership building in a regional multi-stakeholder agricultural conservation initiativeThrough this research we track the evolution and adaptation of the Saginaw Bay Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) in Michigan, and the overall collaboration among traditional and non-traditional conservation partners within the context of this initiative. Under the auspices of USDA, the Saginaw Bay RCPP is the result of a collaboration between Michigan’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the Michigan chapter of The Nature Conservancy (TNC), and the Michigan Agri-Business Association (MABA).
We learned the following key lessons through a four-year long evaluation process of the RCPP program:1) The importance of iterative social science research in program adaption. Through the multi-year evaluation research project, we identified barriers in communications, values, and worldviews between organizational stakeholders and designed recommendations to overcome these barriers. 2) We identified both vertical and horizontal communication gaps within and between stakeholder organizations that need to be overcome in order for the regional collaborative model to be successful and sustainable. 3) We emphasize the need to acknowledge the ways in which differing structural constraints and concerns affect the partnership's negotiation and formation, and ultimately the implementation of the conservation initiative. 4)We argue that partnering with the private sector has not (so far) been a failure, despite assumptions that Certified Crop Advisors and the agriculture industry are only interested in increasing profit and yield. However, significant barriers remain between public and private sectors.
We use a combination of in-depth interviews and observations for this study. The research process consisted of three stages: formative evaluation, continuing evaluation during program implementation, and summative evaluation. Results from the analysis of interview and observational data form the basis of the lessons presented here. The findings from this research will inform the design of future collaborative and multi-stakeholder watershed management efforts
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Assessing Interdisciplinary LearningThough interdisciplinary learning has been a priority for environmental studies and sciences (ESS), assessment challenges remain high. ESS programs often promote interdisciplinary learning not only in the the traditional classroom but in place-based and project-based courses, where learning is often tied to real-world and ill-structured problems. Assessing interdisciplinary learning in these courses may require drawing on assessment practices developed in other areas (i.e. civic engagement, off-campus studies, etc.). In addition, the challenge of assessing novice thinking is significant; existing research literature and our own stance as expert learners may not be appropriate for novices.

In this symposium, we will engage participants in active discussion so that theoretical grounding and best practices can be shared. We hope to foster discussion of concrete ways to assess interdisciplinary learning at multiple levels: student assignments, courses, and programs. At the assignment level, we will talk about “integrative moves” by novices and how to design assignments that grow to include more sophisticated “integrative” moves. At the course level, we will discuss ways of thinking about interdisciplinarity within courses beyond the familiar co-teaching model. Finally, at the program level, we will consider assessing program features that best facilitate interdisciplinary learning and meet the challenges of institutional culture, disciplinary hegemony, and sustainability.
6/28/19 10:00Assessing Interdisciplinary Learning Ferrett, TrishDiscussion Symposia
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Assessing Interdisciplinary LearningThough interdisciplinary learning has been a priority for environmental studies and sciences (ESS), assessment challenges remain high. ESS programs often promote interdisciplinary learning not only in the the traditional classroom but in place-based and project-based courses, where learning is often tied to real-world and ill-structured problems. Assessing interdisciplinary learning in these courses may require drawing on assessment practices developed in other areas (i.e. civic engagement, off-campus studies, etc.). In addition, the challenge of assessing novice thinking is significant; existing research literature and our own stance as expert learners may not be appropriate for novices.

In this symposium, we will engage participants in active discussion so that theoretical grounding and best practices can be shared. We hope to foster discussion of concrete ways to assess interdisciplinary learning at multiple levels: student assignments, courses, and programs. At the assignment level, we will talk about “integrative moves” by novices and how to design assignments that grow to include more sophisticated “integrative” moves. At the course level, we will discuss ways of thinking about interdisciplinarity within courses beyond the familiar co-teaching model. Finally, at the program level, we will consider assessing program features that best facilitate interdisciplinary learning and meet the challenges of institutional culture, disciplinary hegemony, and sustainability.
6/28/19 10:00Assessing Interdisciplinary Learning McMullin-Messier, PamelaDiscussion Symposia
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Assessing Interdisciplinary LearningThough interdisciplinary learning has been a priority for environmental studies and sciences (ESS), assessment challenges remain high. ESS programs often promote interdisciplinary learning not only in the the traditional classroom but in place-based and project-based courses, where learning is often tied to real-world and ill-structured problems. Assessing interdisciplinary learning in these courses may require drawing on assessment practices developed in other areas (i.e. civic engagement, off-campus studies, etc.). In addition, the challenge of assessing novice thinking is significant; existing research literature and our own stance as expert learners may not be appropriate for novices.

In this symposium, we will engage participants in active discussion so that theoretical grounding and best practices can be shared. We hope to foster discussion of concrete ways to assess interdisciplinary learning at multiple levels: student assignments, courses, and programs. At the assignment level, we will talk about “integrative moves” by novices and how to design assignments that grow to include more sophisticated “integrative” moves. At the course level, we will discuss ways of thinking about interdisciplinarity within courses beyond the familiar co-teaching model. Finally, at the program level, we will consider assessing program features that best facilitate interdisciplinary learning and meet the challenges of institutional culture, disciplinary hegemony, and sustainability.
6/28/19 10:00Assessing Interdisciplinary Learning Rosbach, DerrenDiscussion Symposia
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Assessing Interdisciplinary LearningThough interdisciplinary learning has been a priority for environmental studies and sciences (ESS), assessment challenges remain high. ESS programs often promote interdisciplinary learning not only in the the traditional classroom but in place-based and project-based courses, where learning is often tied to real-world and ill-structured problems. Assessing interdisciplinary learning in these courses may require drawing on assessment practices developed in other areas (i.e. civic engagement, off-campus studies, etc.). In addition, the challenge of assessing novice thinking is significant; existing research literature and our own stance as expert learners may not be appropriate for novices.

In this symposium, we will engage participants in active discussion so that theoretical grounding and best practices can be shared. We hope to foster discussion of concrete ways to assess interdisciplinary learning at multiple levels: student assignments, courses, and programs. At the assignment level, we will talk about “integrative moves” by novices and how to design assignments that grow to include more sophisticated “integrative” moves. At the course level, we will discuss ways of thinking about interdisciplinarity within courses beyond the familiar co-teaching model. Finally, at the program level, we will consider assessing program features that best facilitate interdisciplinary learning and meet the challenges of institutional culture, disciplinary hegemony, and sustainability.
6/28/19 10:00Assessing Interdisciplinary Learning Smith, KimDiscussion Symposia
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Coastal and Marine Issues6/28/19 10:00What is Marine Justice? , Conceptualizing and Facilitating Convergence Research: Coastal Flood Transition Zone Considerations , Sustainable Coastlines Through Value Transfer: A Massachusetts Proposal , Sleeping with the Fishes: The Gaps in International Shark Data DeLorme, DeniseIndividual Paper PresentationConceptualizing and Facilitating Convergence Research: Coastal Flood Transition Zone ConsiderationsThis presentation discusses convergence research as the process evolves beyond transdisciplinary approaches, with special consideration for environmental science problems. Convergence research is characterized by the National Science Foundation as: (1) a specific, compelling, or pressing scientific and/or societal challenge, opportunity, or need and (2) deep and intentional multi-disciplinary integration of knowledge and tools (www.nsf.gov/od/oia/convergence/index.jsp). Highlighted projects with innovations resulting from convergence appear to be primarily involving fields of engineering, health, and computer technology. To date, there is little scholarly literature on this general subject specifically and its potential to help solve environmental problems in particular. More conceptual examination of the tenets of convergence from various perspectives is clearly needed. Thus, this presentation aims to define and explain convergence research processes and outcomes, examine empirical data, and spark ongoing multidisciplinary dialogue about considerations for environmental science. Some questions for consideration: How does convergence relate to the transdisciplinary research process and outcomes? What are compelling problems in the environmental sciences that would be most appropriate for a convergence research approach? Are there unique challenges with and opportunities for convergence research? What are or should be recommended best practices and key metrics for success? This presentation will use coastal flood transition zones as a means to demonstrate utility of transdisciplinary and convergence research to enable coastal resilience in the face of climate change. Flood transition zones are “areas susceptible to hydrologic and coastal flooding and their collective interaction” (Bilskie & Hagen, 2018) that host complex biogeochemical and social issues. Flooding is a serious present and future global concern with impacts spanning the socio-ecological spectrum and, as we will demonstrate, its solutions require convergence research.
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Coastal and Marine Issues6/28/19 10:00What is Marine Justice? , Conceptualizing and Facilitating Convergence Research: Coastal Flood Transition Zone Considerations , Sustainable Coastlines Through Value Transfer: A Massachusetts Proposal , Sleeping with the Fishes: The Gaps in International Shark Data Gray, SummerIndividual Paper Presentation
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Coastal and Marine Issues6/28/19 10:00What is Marine Justice? , Conceptualizing and Facilitating Convergence Research: Coastal Flood Transition Zone Considerations , Sustainable Coastlines Through Value Transfer: A Massachusetts Proposal , Sleeping with the Fishes: The Gaps in International Shark Data McGuire, ChadIndividual Paper PresentationSustainable Coastlines Through Value Transfer: A Massachusetts ProposalThe Commonwealth of Massachusetts provides a unique setting to consider coastal adaptation techniques that aim to maintain and preserve coastline integrity under conditions of climate-induced sea level rise. This paper presents a "least regrets" approach to placing sensitive coastal habitat (developed and undeveloped) into conservation restrictions through the utilization of transfer development rights. The system seeks a mix of public and private funding to compensate coastal landowners for the removal of critical coastal land from development. In exchange, development rights are granted for inland areas that have been identified as priority areas for economic redevelopment and also areas identified as net inland migration centers due to the effects of climate change. The goal is to provide a mechanism that maintains economic value, reduces coastal risk sensitivity, and transfers current coastal property value to inland areas in need of economic redevelopment.
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Coastal and Marine Issues6/28/19 10:00What is Marine Justice? , Conceptualizing and Facilitating Convergence Research: Coastal Flood Transition Zone Considerations , Sustainable Coastlines Through Value Transfer: A Massachusetts Proposal , Sleeping with the Fishes: The Gaps in International Shark Data Mominey, TylerIndividual Paper PresentationSleeping with the Fishes: The Gaps in International Shark DataIn 1982, the United Nations adopted the Law of the Sea Convention, the first international agreement on laws governing the world ocean. The failure of marine policy is more apparent than ever, such as in the stress on shark populations caused, in part, by the shark fin trade, where sharks are dismembered at sea and their bleeding carcasses dumped to rot at the bottom of the ocean. The data on the shark catch and on shark finning contains many gaps, and enforcement appears to be thin. The UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is responsible for reporting the international capture rates for all fishes, including sharks. The FAO’s data has many uncertainties and lacks transparency. Preliminary research has found that problems in understanding the shark data are largely because of two factors. First, the data collected and reported by the FAO is solely dependent on the member nations of the FAO. Second, the level of identification of specific shark species is often far too general and is contained at the class of Chondrichthyes and obscures detailed species data. This paper investigates and describes the production of shark data through National Plans of Action for participating countries in the International Plan of Action for Conservation and Management of Sharks and published reports by the FAO, and Regional Fisheries Management Organizations, which is critical to better understanding the needs for shark conservation efforts.
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Collaborating on campus-community climate resilienceInstitutions and communities are increasingly incorporating resilience assessment and capacity building as an essential element of climate action planning. Colleges and universities who are signatories to the Resilience Commitment must collaborate with their communities in an inclusive manner to align goals of their own resilience plans with those of their greater community. Developing strategies for effective collaboration and aligning shared goals can be a challenge. This Mealtime Roundtable will afford an opportunity to discuss strategies and challenges in building community resilience, including seeking collaborators, available planning resources, and integrating resilience work into Environmental Studies & Science curriculum. We may even develop new partnerships from among the attendees.6/27/19 12:15Collaborating on campus-community climate resilience Warren, KarinMealtime Roundtable Discussion
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Collaborative Leadership 101. From Now to NewThe following propositions provide the basic framework for the workshop. As a teacher, researcher, or employer, our goal should be to take those who are under your mentorship to some place new. To take them someplace new requires change, and learning is a prerequisite to change. The methods and strategies embedded in the workshop activities will engage the brain to maximize learning about the collaborative leadership action model that will make your teaching, coaching, and leading more effective. A collaborative approach requires at the very minimum the creation of a common vision that unites your team. To create a common vision among the different people requires a range of approaches; this requires knowledge of who you are as a leader and whom you are leading, and a commitment to minimizing assumptions about those you are leading. People are different, yet they are all valuable and can contribute uniquely to the team if given the opportunity. An overall outcome of the workshop will be that participants will be able to create an environment for more effective communication that will be foundational to successful leadership. 6/26/19 9:00Collaborative Leadership 101. From Now to New Gosselin, DaveWorkshop
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Community Based Student Research in the ESS Senior CapstoneStudent-community collaborative research is valuable for furthering community sustainability goals and for meeting the learning objectives of ESS programs. Such projects can provide important problem-based learning opportunities for students as well as provide communities with research support for their sustainability efforts. Though community based research can be beneficial throughout an undergraduate education, this discussion symposium focuses particularly on the benefits and challenges of community based student research in the ESS senior capstone. The capstone is a uniquely valuable opportunity to integrate student research with community needs. For communities, the advanced skills of senior students can mean higher quality research. For students, a community based capstone can help them synthesize their undergraduate experience. It can also help students establish relationships they can build upon after graduation. Yet achieving successful capstone projects can be challenging. Community needs may not align with program learning goals. Research projects may not fully utilize the diverse skill sets of senior students. Because many seniors will leave the area after graduation, there may be less continuity for long-term projects. This discussion symposium investigates strategies for creating and implementing effective community based senior capstone projects that overcome these challenges. It also examines questions of relationship building, assessment, and pedagogy in the community based senior capstone. We welcome attendees with experience in ESS capstones as well as those interested in creating them to share their successes, questions, and concerns. This symposium will be an opportunity to learn from each other and share best practices among attendees.

Discussants: Kate Clark, Western Colorado U, kclark@western.edu; Chelsie Romulo, U of Northern Colorado, chelsie.romulo@unco.edu; Barry Muchnick, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, brmuchnick@smcm.edu; Leslie Gray, Santa Clara U, lcgray@scu.edu; Heather M Farley, College of Coastal Georgia, farleyh@gmail.com
6/28/19 14:15Community Based Student Research in the ESS Senior Capstone Clark, KateDiscussion Symposia
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Community Based Student Research in the ESS Senior CapstoneStudent-community collaborative research is valuable for furthering community sustainability goals and for meeting the learning objectives of ESS programs. Such projects can provide important problem-based learning opportunities for students as well as provide communities with research support for their sustainability efforts. Though community based research can be beneficial throughout an undergraduate education, this discussion symposium focuses particularly on the benefits and challenges of community based student research in the ESS senior capstone. The capstone is a uniquely valuable opportunity to integrate student research with community needs. For communities, the advanced skills of senior students can mean higher quality research. For students, a community based capstone can help them synthesize their undergraduate experience. It can also help students establish relationships they can build upon after graduation. Yet achieving successful capstone projects can be challenging. Community needs may not align with program learning goals. Research projects may not fully utilize the diverse skill sets of senior students. Because many seniors will leave the area after graduation, there may be less continuity for long-term projects. This discussion symposium investigates strategies for creating and implementing effective community based senior capstone projects that overcome these challenges. It also examines questions of relationship building, assessment, and pedagogy in the community based senior capstone. We welcome attendees with experience in ESS capstones as well as those interested in creating them to share their successes, questions, and concerns. This symposium will be an opportunity to learn from each other and share best practices among attendees.

Discussants: Kate Clark, Western Colorado U, kclark@western.edu; Chelsie Romulo, U of Northern Colorado, chelsie.romulo@unco.edu; Barry Muchnick, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, brmuchnick@smcm.edu; Leslie Gray, Santa Clara U, lcgray@scu.edu; Heather M Farley, College of Coastal Georgia, farleyh@gmail.com
6/28/19 14:15Community Based Student Research in the ESS Senior Capstone Farley, HeatherDiscussion Symposia
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Community Based Student Research in the ESS Senior CapstoneStudent-community collaborative research is valuable for furthering community sustainability goals and for meeting the learning objectives of ESS programs. Such projects can provide important problem-based learning opportunities for students as well as provide communities with research support for their sustainability efforts. Though community based research can be beneficial throughout an undergraduate education, this discussion symposium focuses particularly on the benefits and challenges of community based student research in the ESS senior capstone. The capstone is a uniquely valuable opportunity to integrate student research with community needs. For communities, the advanced skills of senior students can mean higher quality research. For students, a community based capstone can help them synthesize their undergraduate experience. It can also help students establish relationships they can build upon after graduation. Yet achieving successful capstone projects can be challenging. Community needs may not align with program learning goals. Research projects may not fully utilize the diverse skill sets of senior students. Because many seniors will leave the area after graduation, there may be less continuity for long-term projects. This discussion symposium investigates strategies for creating and implementing effective community based senior capstone projects that overcome these challenges. It also examines questions of relationship building, assessment, and pedagogy in the community based senior capstone. We welcome attendees with experience in ESS capstones as well as those interested in creating them to share their successes, questions, and concerns. This symposium will be an opportunity to learn from each other and share best practices among attendees.

Discussants: Kate Clark, Western Colorado U, kclark@western.edu; Chelsie Romulo, U of Northern Colorado, chelsie.romulo@unco.edu; Barry Muchnick, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, brmuchnick@smcm.edu; Leslie Gray, Santa Clara U, lcgray@scu.edu; Heather M Farley, College of Coastal Georgia, farleyh@gmail.com
6/28/19 14:15Community Based Student Research in the ESS Senior Capstone Gray, LeslieDiscussion Symposia
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Community Based Student Research in the ESS Senior CapstoneStudent-community collaborative research is valuable for furthering community sustainability goals and for meeting the learning objectives of ESS programs. Such projects can provide important problem-based learning opportunities for students as well as provide communities with research support for their sustainability efforts. Though community based research can be beneficial throughout an undergraduate education, this discussion symposium focuses particularly on the benefits and challenges of community based student research in the ESS senior capstone. The capstone is a uniquely valuable opportunity to integrate student research with community needs. For communities, the advanced skills of senior students can mean higher quality research. For students, a community based capstone can help them synthesize their undergraduate experience. It can also help students establish relationships they can build upon after graduation. Yet achieving successful capstone projects can be challenging. Community needs may not align with program learning goals. Research projects may not fully utilize the diverse skill sets of senior students. Because many seniors will leave the area after graduation, there may be less continuity for long-term projects. This discussion symposium investigates strategies for creating and implementing effective community based senior capstone projects that overcome these challenges. It also examines questions of relationship building, assessment, and pedagogy in the community based senior capstone. We welcome attendees with experience in ESS capstones as well as those interested in creating them to share their successes, questions, and concerns. This symposium will be an opportunity to learn from each other and share best practices among attendees.

Discussants: Kate Clark, Western Colorado U, kclark@western.edu; Chelsie Romulo, U of Northern Colorado, chelsie.romulo@unco.edu; Barry Muchnick, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, brmuchnick@smcm.edu; Leslie Gray, Santa Clara U, lcgray@scu.edu; Heather M Farley, College of Coastal Georgia, farleyh@gmail.com
6/28/19 14:15Community Based Student Research in the ESS Senior Capstone McKendry, CorinaDiscussion Symposia
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Community Based Student Research in the ESS Senior CapstoneStudent-community collaborative research is valuable for furthering community sustainability goals and for meeting the learning objectives of ESS programs. Such projects can provide important problem-based learning opportunities for students as well as provide communities with research support for their sustainability efforts. Though community based research can be beneficial throughout an undergraduate education, this discussion symposium focuses particularly on the benefits and challenges of community based student research in the ESS senior capstone. The capstone is a uniquely valuable opportunity to integrate student research with community needs. For communities, the advanced skills of senior students can mean higher quality research. For students, a community based capstone can help them synthesize their undergraduate experience. It can also help students establish relationships they can build upon after graduation. Yet achieving successful capstone projects can be challenging. Community needs may not align with program learning goals. Research projects may not fully utilize the diverse skill sets of senior students. Because many seniors will leave the area after graduation, there may be less continuity for long-term projects. This discussion symposium investigates strategies for creating and implementing effective community based senior capstone projects that overcome these challenges. It also examines questions of relationship building, assessment, and pedagogy in the community based senior capstone. We welcome attendees with experience in ESS capstones as well as those interested in creating them to share their successes, questions, and concerns. This symposium will be an opportunity to learn from each other and share best practices among attendees.

Discussants: Kate Clark, Western Colorado U, kclark@western.edu; Chelsie Romulo, U of Northern Colorado, chelsie.romulo@unco.edu; Barry Muchnick, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, brmuchnick@smcm.edu; Leslie Gray, Santa Clara U, lcgray@scu.edu; Heather M Farley, College of Coastal Georgia, farleyh@gmail.com
6/28/19 14:15Community Based Student Research in the ESS Senior Capstone Muchnick, BarryDiscussion Symposia
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Community Based Student Research in the ESS Senior CapstoneStudent-community collaborative research is valuable for furthering community sustainability goals and for meeting the learning objectives of ESS programs. Such projects can provide important problem-based learning opportunities for students as well as provide communities with research support for their sustainability efforts. Though community based research can be beneficial throughout an undergraduate education, this discussion symposium focuses particularly on the benefits and challenges of community based student research in the ESS senior capstone. The capstone is a uniquely valuable opportunity to integrate student research with community needs. For communities, the advanced skills of senior students can mean higher quality research. For students, a community based capstone can help them synthesize their undergraduate experience. It can also help students establish relationships they can build upon after graduation. Yet achieving successful capstone projects can be challenging. Community needs may not align with program learning goals. Research projects may not fully utilize the diverse skill sets of senior students. Because many seniors will leave the area after graduation, there may be less continuity for long-term projects. This discussion symposium investigates strategies for creating and implementing effective community based senior capstone projects that overcome these challenges. It also examines questions of relationship building, assessment, and pedagogy in the community based senior capstone. We welcome attendees with experience in ESS capstones as well as those interested in creating them to share their successes, questions, and concerns. This symposium will be an opportunity to learn from each other and share best practices among attendees.

Discussants: Kate Clark, Western Colorado U, kclark@western.edu; Chelsie Romulo, U of Northern Colorado, chelsie.romulo@unco.edu; Barry Muchnick, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, brmuchnick@smcm.edu; Leslie Gray, Santa Clara U, lcgray@scu.edu; Heather M Farley, College of Coastal Georgia, farleyh@gmail.com
6/28/19 14:15Community Based Student Research in the ESS Senior Capstone Romulo, ChelsieDiscussion Symposia
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Community Organizing and Sustainablity6/27/19 16:00Using digital tools for community disaster response: Social media and the 2018 Kīlauea Volcano eruption , Measuring Community Sustainability: Applying Life Cycle Assessment to Three Ecovillages , Community resilience and sustainability through decentralized decision making on the urban food-water-energy (FEW) nexus , Moving a Community from Awareness to Action: The Borough of Forest Hills Net Zero Energy Project DeMarco, PatriciaIndividual Paper PresentationMoving a Community from Awareness to Action: The Borough of Forest Hills Net Zero Energy ProjectLocal governments offer the most personal and pragmatic opportunities for shifting systems that can shape a transition to a sustainable future. The Borough of Forest Hills, PA, a community of 5,600 people east of Pittsburgh, has adopted a comprehensive approach to the issue of climate change inspired in part by the Chatham University Eden Hall Campus.

The process of building awareness of the need for change began in 2014 with citizen concern about the advance of hydraulic fracturing operations for natural gas. With leadership from within the community and from members of Council, the Borough adopted a ban on fracking. When the Pennsylvania courts ruled that every municipal entity MUST make accommodation for access to “mineral rights” by state law, the Borough adopted a very restrictive zoning ordinance that allowed technical compliance, but eliminated any realistic option for fracking.

Second, the failing infrastructure of the Borough administrative building precipitated discussion of a new building. As the financial requirements for continued patching, repairs, and physical limitations became increasingly evident, two people on the Council brought examples from Germany and from the Eden Hall Campus of Chatham University into the picture as options. A new vision for a borough building based on passive solar design emerged through four community dialogue sessions. The new Borough Building completed in 2018, housing the library, a community room, the Police Department and the Borough Council and administrative functions, has a net zero energy profile and incorporates storm water management.

Finally, the experience of achieving the net zero energy building built support for a unanimous Council resolution to support the Paris Climate accord, adopted in April 2018. Broader community actions are being incorporated into the updated Comprehensive Plan for Development.
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Community Organizing and Sustainablity6/27/19 16:00Using digital tools for community disaster response: Social media and the 2018 Kīlauea Volcano eruption , Measuring Community Sustainability: Applying Life Cycle Assessment to Three Ecovillages , Community resilience and sustainability through decentralized decision making on the urban food-water-energy (FEW) nexus , Moving a Community from Awareness to Action: The Borough of Forest Hills Net Zero Energy Project Kapucu, NaimIndividual Paper PresentationCommunity resilience and sustainability through decentralized decision making on the urban food-water-energy (FEW) nexusThe study seeks to examine how growing demands on the food-energy-water nexus can be met in dense urban areas. This is a part of a larger study with focus on the regions that have been identified: Miami, Florida; Marseille, France; Amsterdam, Netherlands. This study aims to develop a unique Decentralized Decision Support System (DDSS) that enables advanced systems analyses modelling through coupled engineering and policy dimensions in urban food-water-energy nexuses. The DDSS allows for synergistic integration of technology hubs for trade-offs among cost-benefit and social equity factors. It helps produce sustainable development action plans with the aid of adaptive clustering of technologies, leading to the minimization of water, carbon, and ecosystem footprints for three metropolitan regions across Europe and America.

The presentation will highlight how network analysis and social equity concerns can improve decision-making at different scales; and evaluate community resilience with the aid of stakeholders’ involvement. This particular presentation will focus on the Miami region and we have identified two existing small-scale operations that currently incorporate technologies on the food-energy-water nexus. The operations consist of a small community garden in Dania Beach and the Baptist Hospital of Miami. Based on the cases identified, we will review core polices and governance structures in making sustainability decisions. The study will contribute effective decision-making for local government officials related to resilience and sustainability with a specific focus on food, energy, and water nexuses.
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Community Organizing and Sustainablity6/27/19 16:00Using digital tools for community disaster response: Social media and the 2018 Kīlauea Volcano eruption , Measuring Community Sustainability: Applying Life Cycle Assessment to Three Ecovillages , Community resilience and sustainability through decentralized decision making on the urban food-water-energy (FEW) nexus , Moving a Community from Awareness to Action: The Borough of Forest Hills Net Zero Energy Project Sherry, JesseIndividual Paper PresentationMeasuring Community Sustainability: Applying Life Cycle Assessment to Three EcovillagesLife Cycle Assessment (LCA) provides a way to determine the environmental impact of a product or process for a wide variety of metrics. While it is generally used to examine specific products, I applied this methodology to the members of three ecovillages. Ecovillages are small, intentional communities which focus on reducing environmental impact while creating a community that incorporates the natural world. The results of this analysis provide insight into the effect of different communities and lifestyles on an individual's environmental impact. The use of LCA methodology also provides a way to quantify the effect of an array of technological and social adaptations present in these communities. Applying this methodology to individuals and communities requires different approaches compared to the typical mass-produced product.
Looking forward, I plan to use these techniques to assess other types of environmental and mainstream communities in order to determine which aspects of a community have the greatest effect on an their environmental impact.
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Community Organizing and Sustainablity6/27/19 16:00Using digital tools for community disaster response: Social media and the 2018 Kīlauea Volcano eruption , Measuring Community Sustainability: Applying Life Cycle Assessment to Three Ecovillages , Community resilience and sustainability through decentralized decision making on the urban food-water-energy (FEW) nexus , Moving a Community from Awareness to Action: The Borough of Forest Hills Net Zero Energy Project Stephens, SoniaIndividual Paper PresentationUsing digital tools for community disaster response: Social media and the 2018 Kīlauea Volcano eruptionThis presentation will describe and give theoretical context to the ways that people used digital tools to share information about the 2018 Lower Puna eruption of Hawai’iʻs Kīlauea Volcano. While Kīlauea has been erupting continuously since 1983, in 2018 the eruption location shifted to an inhabited part of Hawai’i Island. As has become common in community response to natural or social disasters (Potts, 2014), area residents and other interested individuals used social media to communicate in response to the eruption.

In contrast to disasters of shorter initial duration, such as hurricanes, earthquakes, or terror attacks, the active phase of the Lower Puna eruption lasted nearly five months. Therefore, people were concerned with where the lava flows might go next and finding out what specific locations or significant areas had been affected, as well as exchanging daily information about current eruption conditions. As the eruption continued, people also began to use digital tools to make sense of the event and to collectively mourn the significant locations and personal property that were lost (no people died directly from the eruption).

This presentation will focus on two specific digital spaces that were created or modified to share eruption information: a newly-created interactive Google Map and a preexisting public Facebook group that had previously been dedicated to disseminating community news. I will use concepts from two theoretical frameworks- social media in disaster response and community-based mapping or “deep mapping”- to analyze the differences in how these sites were used, as well as situate this event within current participatory mapping research. I will also address how community-based communications differed from official government information sources in terms of information content, richness, and intended purposes.
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Community Organizing and SustainablityCommunity and state colleges occupy a unique space in the higher education landscape, offering a mix of targeted baccalaureate degrees, baccalaureate transfer courses, and workforce pathways of study. The diverse combination of degree programs, along with a non-traditional student body, allow these colleges to provide a variety of opportunities to students that wouldn’t otherwise be available to them. In addition to traditional course material, the incorporation of sustainability and resilience principles within the curriculum is happening across many disciplines. While the sciences remain crucial at introducing and reinforcing concepts surrounding the environment, sustainability, and resilience, they alone will not prepare students for their productive futures. Creating a sustainable environment means making the effort to expand these principles into all areas of society, including the social, economic, and political arenas in which we live. Such efforts can often take advantage of the ability of state/community colleges to nimbly respond to workforce needs and act as a living laboratory for cutting edge technologies, pedagogy, and sustainability principles across the curriculum. Creating a sustainable future means preparing students and future citizens for a broad range of challenges which will require solutions that are both practical and sustainable. In this panel discussion several faculty and staff members from community/state colleges will share best practices and examples of applied learning that are occurring within the sustainability space at their respective institutions in disciplines ranging from business, to communications, to public policy, to engineering, and the traditional sciences.6/28/19 12:30Community/State Colleges as Living Laboratories for Sustainability and Applied Learning Beehner, ChristopherFull Panel SessionAn ever-increasing number of business schools include sustainability as an elective or required curriculum component. This increased focus on sustainability is partially in response to the increasing number of businesses that are implementing sustainability initiatives and programs. However, the success of this “top-down” approach to sustainable business education may be limited by a lack of sustainability awareness among entry-level workers and supervisors. Therefore, sustainable business education should occur at multiple academic levels, specifically community and technical colleges, wherein students prepare for entry-level trade, supervisory, and professional positions at businesses and organizations which have implemented or will implement sustainability programs. In this panel, I will discuss the role and importance of teaching sustainable business at community and technical colleges, and the pedagogy and curriculum that I am currently using to teach courses in sustainable business at Seminole State College of Florida. This “bottom-up” approach to sustainable business education will be presented as complementary to the “top-down” approach of traditional business schools. Relevant content from a paper presented at the International Academy of Business and Public Administration Discipline entitled “Teaching sustainability to a traditional business audience”, and a chapter in the Springer Handbook of Engaged Sustainability entitled “Expanding Sustainable Business Education beyond Business Schools” will be included.
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Community Organizing and SustainablityCommunity and state colleges occupy a unique space in the higher education landscape, offering a mix of targeted baccalaureate degrees, baccalaureate transfer courses, and workforce pathways of study. The diverse combination of degree programs, along with a non-traditional student body, allow these colleges to provide a variety of opportunities to students that wouldn’t otherwise be available to them. In addition to traditional course material, the incorporation of sustainability and resilience principles within the curriculum is happening across many disciplines. While the sciences remain crucial at introducing and reinforcing concepts surrounding the environment, sustainability, and resilience, they alone will not prepare students for their productive futures. Creating a sustainable environment means making the effort to expand these principles into all areas of society, including the social, economic, and political arenas in which we live. Such efforts can often take advantage of the ability of state/community colleges to nimbly respond to workforce needs and act as a living laboratory for cutting edge technologies, pedagogy, and sustainability principles across the curriculum. Creating a sustainable future means preparing students and future citizens for a broad range of challenges which will require solutions that are both practical and sustainable. In this panel discussion several faculty and staff members from community/state colleges will share best practices and examples of applied learning that are occurring within the sustainability space at their respective institutions in disciplines ranging from business, to communications, to public policy, to engineering, and the traditional sciences.6/28/19 12:30Community/State Colleges as Living Laboratories for Sustainability and Applied Learning Boccalandro, MariaFull Panel SessionPANELIST ABSTRACT: MARIA BOCCALANDRO The Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD) consists of seven individual community colleges throughout the Dallas area. Through the years, the DCCCD has worked to become an environmental leader in the community continually advocating the wise use of natural, financial and human resources through mindful education and action. The sustainability team includes representatives from all campuses as well as the district office.
After hearing Dr. Paul Lussier speak about his theory of values-based humanistic communications, which posits that compelling emotional stories that speak to peoples' core values have more impact than rational scientific data, Dr. Maria Boccalandro, director of the Sustainable Communities Institute at Cedar Valley College, created a partnership between students of the CVC Phi Theta Kappa chapter and Dr. Lussier's bachelor and graduate students from Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.
In this panel discussion Dr. Boccalandro will describe the partnership between Cedar Valley College and Yale University which led to a number of exciting initiatives, including Cedar Valley College’s Phi Theta Kappa students creating a database of stakeholders (political, economic, social, technological, environmental and legal) from the southern Dallas County and northern Ellis County region. A team of Dr. Lussier’s 2016 fall and 2017 spring graduate and undergraduate students undertook a research program to determine what is valued by neighboring communities, and student exchanges between the College and University subsequently took place. The research results created a narrative that will help Cedar Valley College’s Sustainable Communities Institute advocate and promote sustainable economic development for the under-served communities of the region, reducing the income disparity throughout the community and increasing quality of life.

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Community Organizing and SustainablityCommunity and state colleges occupy a unique space in the higher education landscape, offering a mix of targeted baccalaureate degrees, baccalaureate transfer courses, and workforce pathways of study. The diverse combination of degree programs, along with a non-traditional student body, allow these colleges to provide a variety of opportunities to students that wouldn’t otherwise be available to them. In addition to traditional course material, the incorporation of sustainability and resilience principles within the curriculum is happening across many disciplines. While the sciences remain crucial at introducing and reinforcing concepts surrounding the environment, sustainability, and resilience, they alone will not prepare students for their productive futures. Creating a sustainable environment means making the effort to expand these principles into all areas of society, including the social, economic, and political arenas in which we live. Such efforts can often take advantage of the ability of state/community colleges to nimbly respond to workforce needs and act as a living laboratory for cutting edge technologies, pedagogy, and sustainability principles across the curriculum. Creating a sustainable future means preparing students and future citizens for a broad range of challenges which will require solutions that are both practical and sustainable. In this panel discussion several faculty and staff members from community/state colleges will share best practices and examples of applied learning that are occurring within the sustainability space at their respective institutions in disciplines ranging from business, to communications, to public policy, to engineering, and the traditional sciences.6/28/19 12:30Community/State Colleges as Living Laboratories for Sustainability and Applied Learning Miller, JamesFull Panel SessionJAMES MILLER Seminole State College is concluding a four-year grant program through the National Science Foundation’s Advanced Technological Education (ATE) initiative. The grant, entitled EMERGE (Establishing a Means for Effective Renewable/Green Energy), centered around the production of a Sustainability Certificate program with a focus on solar power and solar installation. In addition to the core courses in the certificate, efforts were made to generally increase sustainability education across multiple disciplines and in both our career education programs and in our traditional Arts & Sciences departments. Several new courses emerged, including Sustainable Business, Green Building and Energy Efficiency, and Sustainability: Concepts and Issues. In this panel discussion, we will present the certificate program, the courses that were created, interest and enrollment trends, and ways by which sustainability has been incorporated across the curriculum.
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Community Organizing and SustainablityCommunity and state colleges occupy a unique space in the higher education landscape, offering a mix of targeted baccalaureate degrees, baccalaureate transfer courses, and workforce pathways of study. The diverse combination of degree programs, along with a non-traditional student body, allow these colleges to provide a variety of opportunities to students that wouldn’t otherwise be available to them. In addition to traditional course material, the incorporation of sustainability and resilience principles within the curriculum is happening across many disciplines. While the sciences remain crucial at introducing and reinforcing concepts surrounding the environment, sustainability, and resilience, they alone will not prepare students for their productive futures. Creating a sustainable environment means making the effort to expand these principles into all areas of society, including the social, economic, and political arenas in which we live. Such efforts can often take advantage of the ability of state/community colleges to nimbly respond to workforce needs and act as a living laboratory for cutting edge technologies, pedagogy, and sustainability principles across the curriculum. Creating a sustainable future means preparing students and future citizens for a broad range of challenges which will require solutions that are both practical and sustainable. In this panel discussion several faculty and staff members from community/state colleges will share best practices and examples of applied learning that are occurring within the sustainability space at their respective institutions in disciplines ranging from business, to communications, to public policy, to engineering, and the traditional sciences.6/28/19 12:30Community/State Colleges as Living Laboratories for Sustainability and Applied Learning Staley, MichaelFull Panel SessionPANELIST MICHAEL STALEY: We strongly believe that students should, from Day 1, begin learning how to create design solutions to increasingly complex problems. Typically, students are not exposed to cross-disciplinary design solution exercises until the end of their academic career in a single capstone course. We strive to incorporate these exercises throughout our programs, with one design/build/test project of increasing complexity each year. Many of these cross-disciplinary projects include sustainability principles, and one such project is the annual Design-Build student competition. In this panel discussion we will describe how our faculty-led student teams prepared a construction proposal for a Midwest liberal arts college residence hall. A truly multidisciplinary collaboration unfolded that included not just the science and technology aspects of the design-build process, but also the artistic eye needed to create an aesthetically pleasing living environment. From site selection to exterior materials to the interior fixtures and surrounding natural environments, sustainability was central to the design. Factors that were considered in the development of the proposal included access to mass transit, bike storage, use of light-colored materials, and the preservation of the surrounding natural environment. A biophilic design approach was utilized to design the indoor environment and incorporate natural materials, natural light, vegetation, and nature views to create an inviting space in the building, along with high performance building technologies that included bathroom fixtures, graywater reuse, a maximizing of natural and LED lighting, and an advanced HVAC system. All specifications reflected the owner’s desire for a LEED certified facility and the end result was a built environment thoughtfully designed to promote highest resident satisfaction and well-being. These cross-disciplinary, project-based learning opportunities require that students integrate knowledge across multiple disciplines to solve real-world problems. In addition to enhanced learning outcome achievement, we have seen an increase in recruitment, retention and completion of our students.
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Community Organizing and SustainablityCommunity and state colleges occupy a unique space in the higher education landscape, offering a mix of targeted baccalaureate degrees, baccalaureate transfer courses, and workforce pathways of study. The diverse combination of degree programs, along with a non-traditional student body, allow these colleges to provide a variety of opportunities to students that wouldn’t otherwise be available to them. In addition to traditional course material, the incorporation of sustainability and resilience principles within the curriculum is happening across many disciplines. While the sciences remain crucial at introducing and reinforcing concepts surrounding the environment, sustainability, and resilience, they alone will not prepare students for their productive futures. Creating a sustainable environment means making the effort to expand these principles into all areas of society, including the social, economic, and political arenas in which we live. Such efforts can often take advantage of the ability of state/community colleges to nimbly respond to workforce needs and act as a living laboratory for cutting edge technologies, pedagogy, and sustainability principles across the curriculum. Creating a sustainable future means preparing students and future citizens for a broad range of challenges which will require solutions that are both practical and sustainable. In this panel discussion several faculty and staff members from community/state colleges will share best practices and examples of applied learning that are occurring within the sustainability space at their respective institutions in disciplines ranging from business, to communications, to public policy, to engineering, and the traditional sciences.6/28/19 12:30Community/State Colleges as Living Laboratories for Sustainability and Applied Learning Summers, StephenFull Panel SessionCommunity and state colleges occupy a unique space in the higher education landscape, offering a mix of targeted baccalaureate degrees, baccalaureate transfer courses, and workforce pathways of study. The diverse combination of degree programs, along with a non-traditional student body, allow these colleges to provide a variety of opportunities to students that wouldn’t otherwise be available to them. In addition to traditional course material, the incorporation of sustainability and resilience principles within the curriculum is happening across many disciplines. While the sciences remain crucial at introducing and reinforcing concepts surrounding the environment, sustainability, and resilience, they alone will not prepare students for their productive futures. Creating a sustainable environment means making the effort to expand these principles into all areas of society, including the social, economic, and political arenas in which we live. Such efforts can often take advantage of the ability of state/community colleges to nimbly respond to workforce needs and act as a living laboratory for cutting edge technologies, pedagogy, and sustainability principles across the curriculum. Creating a sustainable future means preparing students and future citizens for a broad range of challenges which will require solutions that are both practical and sustainable. In this panel discussion several faculty and staff members from community/state colleges will share best practices and examples of applied learning that are occurring within the sustainability space at their respective institutions in disciplines ranging from business, to communications, to public policy, to engineering, and the traditional sciences.
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Developing Effective and Sustaining Partnerships for Community-Based Research with StudentsDoing fair, equitable, and relevant community-based research with students provides several layers of challenges. Students must not only be trained with a specific skill set, but they must also develop particular dispositions to effectively engage in real-world settings where social, environmental, and ecological injustices are laid bare. Further, community partnerships have to be cultivated and sustained, which requires a great deal of effort and time on behalf of faculty who are often overburdened by the demands of research, service, and teaching—and a matching effort from community partners who are similarly encumbered with high workloads. This discussion symposium thus draws on the expertise of educators and researchers who do community-based research with students in diverse contexts to explore some of the questions listed below. To begin, each discussant will briefly (3-5 minutes) share their experiences. Following these initial introductions, session participants will be able to pose questions to discussants, as well as to each other in a community dialogue format. To ensure equitable distribution of time for all participants and to encourage underrepresented groups (Black, Indigenous, or people of color, women, low-income, undergraduate/graduate students) to participate, participants will be asked at the beginning of the session to keep their comments/questions to no more than 3 minutes of time.

Key questions to consider include: How do we prepare students to work empathically, critically, and effectively with marginalized or vulnerable populations (i.e., Black, Indigenous, or People of Color, children, low-income, etc)?

How do we ensure our students and community partners acquire tangible benefits? That is, what does reciprocity mean and entail in these contexts?

How do we navigate the workload demands of doing community-based research with students?

What kinds of course assignments (e.g., journals, reflective essays, ethnographic work, photo exhibits) assist students in valuing community-based research?
6/28/19 10:00Developing Effective and Sustaining Partnerships for Community-Based Research with Students Amster, RandallDiscussion Symposia
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Developing Effective and Sustaining Partnerships for Community-Based Research with StudentsDoing fair, equitable, and relevant community-based research with students provides several layers of challenges. Students must not only be trained with a specific skill set, but they must also develop particular dispositions to effectively engage in real-world settings where social, environmental, and ecological injustices are laid bare. Further, community partnerships have to be cultivated and sustained, which requires a great deal of effort and time on behalf of faculty who are often overburdened by the demands of research, service, and teaching—and a matching effort from community partners who are similarly encumbered with high workloads. This discussion symposium thus draws on the expertise of educators and researchers who do community-based research with students in diverse contexts to explore some of the questions listed below. To begin, each discussant will briefly (3-5 minutes) share their experiences. Following these initial introductions, session participants will be able to pose questions to discussants, as well as to each other in a community dialogue format. To ensure equitable distribution of time for all participants and to encourage underrepresented groups (Black, Indigenous, or people of color, women, low-income, undergraduate/graduate students) to participate, participants will be asked at the beginning of the session to keep their comments/questions to no more than 3 minutes of time.

Key questions to consider include: How do we prepare students to work empathically, critically, and effectively with marginalized or vulnerable populations (i.e., Black, Indigenous, or People of Color, children, low-income, etc)?

How do we ensure our students and community partners acquire tangible benefits? That is, what does reciprocity mean and entail in these contexts?

How do we navigate the workload demands of doing community-based research with students?

What kinds of course assignments (e.g., journals, reflective essays, ethnographic work, photo exhibits) assist students in valuing community-based research?
6/28/19 10:00Developing Effective and Sustaining Partnerships for Community-Based Research with Students Goralnik, LissyDiscussion Symposia
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Developing Effective and Sustaining Partnerships for Community-Based Research with StudentsDoing fair, equitable, and relevant community-based research with students provides several layers of challenges. Students must not only be trained with a specific skill set, but they must also develop particular dispositions to effectively engage in real-world settings where social, environmental, and ecological injustices are laid bare. Further, community partnerships have to be cultivated and sustained, which requires a great deal of effort and time on behalf of faculty who are often overburdened by the demands of research, service, and teaching—and a matching effort from community partners who are similarly encumbered with high workloads. This discussion symposium thus draws on the expertise of educators and researchers who do community-based research with students in diverse contexts to explore some of the questions listed below. To begin, each discussant will briefly (3-5 minutes) share their experiences. Following these initial introductions, session participants will be able to pose questions to discussants, as well as to each other in a community dialogue format. To ensure equitable distribution of time for all participants and to encourage underrepresented groups (Black, Indigenous, or people of color, women, low-income, undergraduate/graduate students) to participate, participants will be asked at the beginning of the session to keep their comments/questions to no more than 3 minutes of time.

Key questions to consider include: How do we prepare students to work empathically, critically, and effectively with marginalized or vulnerable populations (i.e., Black, Indigenous, or People of Color, children, low-income, etc)?

How do we ensure our students and community partners acquire tangible benefits? That is, what does reciprocity mean and entail in these contexts?

How do we navigate the workload demands of doing community-based research with students?

What kinds of course assignments (e.g., journals, reflective essays, ethnographic work, photo exhibits) assist students in valuing community-based research?
6/28/19 10:00Developing Effective and Sustaining Partnerships for Community-Based Research with Students Gosselin, DaveDiscussion Symposia
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Developing Effective and Sustaining Partnerships for Community-Based Research with StudentsDoing fair, equitable, and relevant community-based research with students provides several layers of challenges. Students must not only be trained with a specific skill set, but they must also develop particular dispositions to effectively engage in real-world settings where social, environmental, and ecological injustices are laid bare. Further, community partnerships have to be cultivated and sustained, which requires a great deal of effort and time on behalf of faculty who are often overburdened by the demands of research, service, and teaching—and a matching effort from community partners who are similarly encumbered with high workloads. This discussion symposium thus draws on the expertise of educators and researchers who do community-based research with students in diverse contexts to explore some of the questions listed below. To begin, each discussant will briefly (3-5 minutes) share their experiences. Following these initial introductions, session participants will be able to pose questions to discussants, as well as to each other in a community dialogue format. To ensure equitable distribution of time for all participants and to encourage underrepresented groups (Black, Indigenous, or people of color, women, low-income, undergraduate/graduate students) to participate, participants will be asked at the beginning of the session to keep their comments/questions to no more than 3 minutes of time.

Key questions to consider include: How do we prepare students to work empathically, critically, and effectively with marginalized or vulnerable populations (i.e., Black, Indigenous, or People of Color, children, low-income, etc)?

How do we ensure our students and community partners acquire tangible benefits? That is, what does reciprocity mean and entail in these contexts?

How do we navigate the workload demands of doing community-based research with students?

What kinds of course assignments (e.g., journals, reflective essays, ethnographic work, photo exhibits) assist students in valuing community-based research?
6/28/19 10:00Developing Effective and Sustaining Partnerships for Community-Based Research with Students Larkins, MichelleDiscussion Symposia
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Developing Effective and Sustaining Partnerships for Community-Based Research with StudentsDoing fair, equitable, and relevant community-based research with students provides several layers of challenges. Students must not only be trained with a specific skill set, but they must also develop particular dispositions to effectively engage in real-world settings where social, environmental, and ecological injustices are laid bare. Further, community partnerships have to be cultivated and sustained, which requires a great deal of effort and time on behalf of faculty who are often overburdened by the demands of research, service, and teaching—and a matching effort from community partners who are similarly encumbered with high workloads. This discussion symposium thus draws on the expertise of educators and researchers who do community-based research with students in diverse contexts to explore some of the questions listed below. To begin, each discussant will briefly (3-5 minutes) share their experiences. Following these initial introductions, session participants will be able to pose questions to discussants, as well as to each other in a community dialogue format. To ensure equitable distribution of time for all participants and to encourage underrepresented groups (Black, Indigenous, or people of color, women, low-income, undergraduate/graduate students) to participate, participants will be asked at the beginning of the session to keep their comments/questions to no more than 3 minutes of time.

Key questions to consider include: How do we prepare students to work empathically, critically, and effectively with marginalized or vulnerable populations (i.e., Black, Indigenous, or People of Color, children, low-income, etc)?

How do we ensure our students and community partners acquire tangible benefits? That is, what does reciprocity mean and entail in these contexts?

How do we navigate the workload demands of doing community-based research with students?

What kinds of course assignments (e.g., journals, reflective essays, ethnographic work, photo exhibits) assist students in valuing community-based research?
6/28/19 10:00Developing Effective and Sustaining Partnerships for Community-Based Research with Students Lashley, SarahDiscussion Symposia
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Developing Effective and Sustaining Partnerships for Community-Based Research with StudentsDoing fair, equitable, and relevant community-based research with students provides several layers of challenges. Students must not only be trained with a specific skill set, but they must also develop particular dispositions to effectively engage in real-world settings where social, environmental, and ecological injustices are laid bare. Further, community partnerships have to be cultivated and sustained, which requires a great deal of effort and time on behalf of faculty who are often overburdened by the demands of research, service, and teaching—and a matching effort from community partners who are similarly encumbered with high workloads. This discussion symposium thus draws on the expertise of educators and researchers who do community-based research with students in diverse contexts to explore some of the questions listed below. To begin, each discussant will briefly (3-5 minutes) share their experiences. Following these initial introductions, session participants will be able to pose questions to discussants, as well as to each other in a community dialogue format. To ensure equitable distribution of time for all participants and to encourage underrepresented groups (Black, Indigenous, or people of color, women, low-income, undergraduate/graduate students) to participate, participants will be asked at the beginning of the session to keep their comments/questions to no more than 3 minutes of time.

Key questions to consider include: How do we prepare students to work empathically, critically, and effectively with marginalized or vulnerable populations (i.e., Black, Indigenous, or People of Color, children, low-income, etc)?

How do we ensure our students and community partners acquire tangible benefits? That is, what does reciprocity mean and entail in these contexts?

How do we navigate the workload demands of doing community-based research with students?

What kinds of course assignments (e.g., journals, reflective essays, ethnographic work, photo exhibits) assist students in valuing community-based research?
6/28/19 10:00Developing Effective and Sustaining Partnerships for Community-Based Research with Students Lloro-Bidart, TeresaDiscussion Symposia
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Developing Effective and Sustaining Partnerships for Community-Based Research with StudentsDoing fair, equitable, and relevant community-based research with students provides several layers of challenges. Students must not only be trained with a specific skill set, but they must also develop particular dispositions to effectively engage in real-world settings where social, environmental, and ecological injustices are laid bare. Further, community partnerships have to be cultivated and sustained, which requires a great deal of effort and time on behalf of faculty who are often overburdened by the demands of research, service, and teaching—and a matching effort from community partners who are similarly encumbered with high workloads. This discussion symposium thus draws on the expertise of educators and researchers who do community-based research with students in diverse contexts to explore some of the questions listed below. To begin, each discussant will briefly (3-5 minutes) share their experiences. Following these initial introductions, session participants will be able to pose questions to discussants, as well as to each other in a community dialogue format. To ensure equitable distribution of time for all participants and to encourage underrepresented groups (Black, Indigenous, or people of color, women, low-income, undergraduate/graduate students) to participate, participants will be asked at the beginning of the session to keep their comments/questions to no more than 3 minutes of time.

Key questions to consider include: How do we prepare students to work empathically, critically, and effectively with marginalized or vulnerable populations (i.e., Black, Indigenous, or People of Color, children, low-income, etc)?

How do we ensure our students and community partners acquire tangible benefits? That is, what does reciprocity mean and entail in these contexts?

How do we navigate the workload demands of doing community-based research with students?

What kinds of course assignments (e.g., journals, reflective essays, ethnographic work, photo exhibits) assist students in valuing community-based research?
6/28/19 10:00Developing Effective and Sustaining Partnerships for Community-Based Research with Students Madosky, JessaDiscussion Symposia
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Differing Responses and Perspectives to Environmental Justice: Lessons from Lake Apopka, FLSince Rachel Carson’s warning about environmental contamination in Silent Spring in 1962, researchers have been analyzing the impacts of contaminants on both the environment and human health. We know that the negative externalities stemming from environmental contaminants are not distributed equally in society. Current research has documented innumerable cases of contamination in low-income, minority and other vulnerable communities. In some cases, the people living in these communities mobilize to form grassroots social movement organizations in order to challenge the industries responsible for localized contamination. These movements rally against state and corporate actors despite a lack of resources, ability to participate in the political sphere, and the power differentials between challengers and elite targets. However, there is more to be understood about the structural inequalities and challenges grassroots environmental movements face and tactical choices made by activists when battling contamination and environmental illnesses, particularly for those who are working in industries associated with high levels of environmental risk such as the agricultural industry. The Lake Apopka area used to be an agricultural hub until the farms were bought out by the water management district in 1996. The lake was (and still is) heavily contaminated by agricultural chemicals and nutrient runoff that heavily impaired the quality and species of the lake. In this panel, we use the case of Lake Apopka, Florida to further understand the development of environmental injustice cases, legal and scientific responses to EJ claims, and community perceptions to activism from the victims of environmental injustice. 6/27/19 10:30Differing Responses and Perspectives to Environmental Justice: Lessons from Lake Apopka, FL Economos, JeannieFull Panel SessionJeannie Economos. EJ Activism and Public Perception Embodied health movements (EHMs) challenge the science on etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention for diseases, illnesses, and disabilities. People who share an embodied illness can organize to challenge the dominant understandings of their illness experience. Activists view science through a personal lens of their firsthand knowledge and illness experiences. Participants of EHMs work towards patient empowerment and becoming more involved in the healthcare system. EHMs generally focus on contested illnesses that are unexplained by current medical knowledge or have environmental explanations that are disputed. Contested illnesses being the core of an EHM is primarily true in cases of environmental health outcomes where the disease is caused by toxic substances in people’s surrounding environment (Brown, Kroll, and Smith 2000; Brown 2007). A salient component of social movements such as embodied health movements are the tactics that movement organizations use to accomplish their goals. As a member of the Farmworker Association of Florida, I have worked very closely with the Lake Apopka farmworkers. I detail the activism conducted by the farmworkers including the Lake Apopka Farmworker Memorial Quilt they created to memorialize those who passed in the community, where the quilt was displayed, and responses to the quilt and other tactics utilized to raise awareness of the farmworkers’ grievances. This includes participation in the Permanent People’s Tribunal
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Differing Responses and Perspectives to Environmental Justice: Lessons from Lake Apopka, FLSince Rachel Carson’s warning about environmental contamination in Silent Spring in 1962, researchers have been analyzing the impacts of contaminants on both the environment and human health. We know that the negative externalities stemming from environmental contaminants are not distributed equally in society. Current research has documented innumerable cases of contamination in low-income, minority and other vulnerable communities. In some cases, the people living in these communities mobilize to form grassroots social movement organizations in order to challenge the industries responsible for localized contamination. These movements rally against state and corporate actors despite a lack of resources, ability to participate in the political sphere, and the power differentials between challengers and elite targets. However, there is more to be understood about the structural inequalities and challenges grassroots environmental movements face and tactical choices made by activists when battling contamination and environmental illnesses, particularly for those who are working in industries associated with high levels of environmental risk such as the agricultural industry. The Lake Apopka area used to be an agricultural hub until the farms were bought out by the water management district in 1996. The lake was (and still is) heavily contaminated by agricultural chemicals and nutrient runoff that heavily impaired the quality and species of the lake. In this panel, we use the case of Lake Apopka, Florida to further understand the development of environmental injustice cases, legal and scientific responses to EJ claims, and community perceptions to activism from the victims of environmental injustice. 6/27/19 10:30Differing Responses and Perspectives to Environmental Justice: Lessons from Lake Apopka, FL Flocks, JoanFull Panel SessionJoan Flocks: EJ, Science, and Negative Responses. In the years preceding and up to the Lake Apopka farmland buyout in 1998, much data had accumulated about the adverse health impact of environmental contamination on the area’s wildlife. Thus, after the state purchased the land, displaced farmworkers and other Apopka community members questioned why local and state public health officials had not taken more action to address human health concerns, specifically the long-term and multigenerational effects of exposure to chemicals that could affect endocrine, reproductive, and neurological health. Yet, subsequent official response was sporadic and limited, and to date there has never been fully funded, formal research on how the environmental hazards that have affected alligators, fish, birds, and other species have potentially affected humans exposed to the same contaminants. Political and legal responses have, likewise, been inconsistent. In 2011, a $500,000 appropriation for specialized health care focused on the former farmworkers was included in the state budget, but was later vetoed by then-governor Rick Scott. On several occasions, law firms have approached community members about potential environmental health related lawsuits, only to ultimately decline to take on a case. The only successful studies on the issue have been small, informal, community-driven, and occasionally self-funded. This presentation will summarize the timeline of official and informal responses to the environmental injustice faced by former Lake Apopka farmworkers and contextualize these responses within a larger framework of the complexity of scientific research on and political and legal resolution of environmental health inequities
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Differing Responses and Perspectives to Environmental Justice: Lessons from Lake Apopka, FLSince Rachel Carson’s warning about environmental contamination in Silent Spring in 1962, researchers have been analyzing the impacts of contaminants on both the environment and human health. We know that the negative externalities stemming from environmental contaminants are not distributed equally in society. Current research has documented innumerable cases of contamination in low-income, minority and other vulnerable communities. In some cases, the people living in these communities mobilize to form grassroots social movement organizations in order to challenge the industries responsible for localized contamination. These movements rally against state and corporate actors despite a lack of resources, ability to participate in the political sphere, and the power differentials between challengers and elite targets. However, there is more to be understood about the structural inequalities and challenges grassroots environmental movements face and tactical choices made by activists when battling contamination and environmental illnesses, particularly for those who are working in industries associated with high levels of environmental risk such as the agricultural industry. The Lake Apopka area used to be an agricultural hub until the farms were bought out by the water management district in 1996. The lake was (and still is) heavily contaminated by agricultural chemicals and nutrient runoff that heavily impaired the quality and species of the lake. In this panel, we use the case of Lake Apopka, Florida to further understand the development of environmental injustice cases, legal and scientific responses to EJ claims, and community perceptions to activism from the victims of environmental injustice. 6/27/19 10:30Differing Responses and Perspectives to Environmental Justice: Lessons from Lake Apopka, FL Saville, AnneFull Panel SessionAnne Saville. EJ and Intersectional Inequalities.We know that the negative externalities stemming from environmental contaminants are not distributed equally in society. In the U.S., farmworkers and their families are disproportionately exposed to a variety of chemicals and hazards. Relatively few researchers have examined longitudinal or historical studies of farmworkers in the context of environmental illness. There is more to be understood about the structural inequalities and challenges grassroots environmental movements face and tactical choices made by activists when battling contamination and environmental illnesses, particularly for those who are working in industries associated with high levels of environmental risk such as the agricultural industry. I use the case of Lake Apopka, Florida to better understand how intersectional inequalities shape the experiences of farmworkers in the American South. The data for this project draws from extensive sources of archival materials, as well as retrospective narrative accounts of working on the farms in the Lake Apopka areas, the 1996-98 government buyout of these farms, and the illness experiences of workers and residents of Apopka. I argue that looking at the intersectional experiences in marginalized groups facing environmental injustices exposes the unique oppression these group face from the macro to the micro level.
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Diversity and Equity in Higher Education AdvancementWhile institutions of higher education work to increase diversity and support inclusive environments among student populations, it is also necessary to address issues of diversity and equity within the evaluation and promotion processes within colleges and universities. Bias and discrimination can occur at multiple levels and within various areas of these processes, and this can vary depending on whether an institution is teaching or research focused. For teaching focused institutions the main evidence of evaluation for faculty is student ratings of instructors, yet research has shown that student evaluations are biased against women, people of color and other intersectional identities (AAUW, 2016; Graves, Hoshino-Browne, & Lui, 2017; Lampman et al., 2016; Smith & Hawkins, 2011). At research intensive institutions minority faculty experience having their scholarship devalued (often research on marginalized communities) and a lack of recognition for their accomplishments, often a reflection of unconscious bias (Dotson, 2014; Settles, Buchanan, & Dotson, 2018). In all types of institutions, structures and cultures work independently and jointly to create a workplace that can be discriminatory, inequitable, hostile, and even silencing (De Welde & Stepnick, 2015). Without addressing issues of bias and discrimination in evaluation and promotion, faculty may be wrongfully denied tenure or feel no other option but to voluntarily leave the institution. The discussants will present examples from experiences at their institutions and open a discussion on ways in which the system can become more equitable for all faculty, regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, etc.6/27/19 14:00Diversity and Equity in Higher Education Advancement Banschbach, ValerieDiscussion Symposia
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Diversity and Equity in Higher Education AdvancementWhile institutions of higher education work to increase diversity and support inclusive environments among student populations, it is also necessary to address issues of diversity and equity within the evaluation and promotion processes within colleges and universities. Bias and discrimination can occur at multiple levels and within various areas of these processes, and this can vary depending on whether an institution is teaching or research focused. For teaching focused institutions the main evidence of evaluation for faculty is student ratings of instructors, yet research has shown that student evaluations are biased against women, people of color and other intersectional identities (AAUW, 2016; Graves, Hoshino-Browne, & Lui, 2017; Lampman et al., 2016; Smith & Hawkins, 2011). At research intensive institutions minority faculty experience having their scholarship devalued (often research on marginalized communities) and a lack of recognition for their accomplishments, often a reflection of unconscious bias (Dotson, 2014; Settles, Buchanan, & Dotson, 2018). In all types of institutions, structures and cultures work independently and jointly to create a workplace that can be discriminatory, inequitable, hostile, and even silencing (De Welde & Stepnick, 2015). Without addressing issues of bias and discrimination in evaluation and promotion, faculty may be wrongfully denied tenure or feel no other option but to voluntarily leave the institution. The discussants will present examples from experiences at their institutions and open a discussion on ways in which the system can become more equitable for all faculty, regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, etc.6/27/19 14:00Diversity and Equity in Higher Education Advancement Davis, BrittanyDiscussion Symposia
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Diversity and Equity in Higher Education AdvancementWhile institutions of higher education work to increase diversity and support inclusive environments among student populations, it is also necessary to address issues of diversity and equity within the evaluation and promotion processes within colleges and universities. Bias and discrimination can occur at multiple levels and within various areas of these processes, and this can vary depending on whether an institution is teaching or research focused. For teaching focused institutions the main evidence of evaluation for faculty is student ratings of instructors, yet research has shown that student evaluations are biased against women, people of color and other intersectional identities (AAUW, 2016; Graves, Hoshino-Browne, & Lui, 2017; Lampman et al., 2016; Smith & Hawkins, 2011). At research intensive institutions minority faculty experience having their scholarship devalued (often research on marginalized communities) and a lack of recognition for their accomplishments, often a reflection of unconscious bias (Dotson, 2014; Settles, Buchanan, & Dotson, 2018). In all types of institutions, structures and cultures work independently and jointly to create a workplace that can be discriminatory, inequitable, hostile, and even silencing (De Welde & Stepnick, 2015). Without addressing issues of bias and discrimination in evaluation and promotion, faculty may be wrongfully denied tenure or feel no other option but to voluntarily leave the institution. The discussants will present examples from experiences at their institutions and open a discussion on ways in which the system can become more equitable for all faculty, regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, etc.6/27/19 14:00Diversity and Equity in Higher Education Advancement Rinkus, MarisaDiscussion Symposia
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EcoTypes: Theory and PedagogyEcoTypes (jimproctor.us/ecotypes) is intended primarily for undergraduate students in environment-related courses to learn more about the fundamental ideas that shape how they and others approach environmental issues. Over 2500 participants have completed the EcoTypes survey in the last two years, including roughly 50 U.S. institutions of higher education. The workshop offers instructors a theoretical background to EcoTypes and pedagogical guidance for use in their courses. Participants will get a general background on environmental ideas and typologies, then we will delve into EcoTypes axes (fifteen total), three aggregate themes derived from these axes, and six topics designed to provide concrete applications of EcoTypes. Participants will learn how the EcoTypes survey was constructed and how they may analyze student data, including EcoTypes axis and theme scores, and grid-group survey results, and compare with overall results. We will then share with participants what instructors have learned over the last two years in bringing EcoTypes into their classes, with a variety of workable instructional approaches tailored to the amount of time available. By the end of the workshop, participants will have a concrete plan for teaching with EcoTypes, and sufficient theoretical background to feel comfortable doing so. 6/26/19 13:00EcoTypes: Theory and Pedagogy Proctor, JimWorkshop
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Energy, Earth and Env Education--reflections on the workshop with NAGTThis discussion symposium will reflect on the Energy and Environmental Education Workshop held in collaboration with the North American Geoscience Teachers on Wednesday at AESS.6/27/19 16:00Energy, Earth and Env Education--reflections on the workshop with NAGT Blockstein, DavidDiscussion Symposia
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Energy, Earth and Env Education--reflections on the workshop with NAGTThis discussion symposium will reflect on the Energy and Environmental Education Workshop held in collaboration with the North American Geoscience Teachers on Wednesday at AESS.6/27/19 16:00Energy, Earth and Env Education--reflections on the workshop with NAGT Perkins, JohnDiscussion Symposia
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Energy, Earth and Environmental Education - a community-building workshopEnergy, Earth and environmental educators will share best practices and develop new partnerships to strengthen the connections between energy, earth and environmental education. The agenda will include classroom issues (content, curriculum and pedagogy) and programs (degree and sub-degree programs) to be explored in presentations and small group discussion. There will be discussion of career opportunities in energy and environment. There will be invited speakers and additional speakers are invited to propose talks through the AESS conference call for presentations.
This workshop will be organized by the National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT) in collaboration with AESS. It builds on workshops previously held at AESS conferences and at 3 National Energy Education Summits, organized by the National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE), one of which was held at the 2016 AESS conference.
6/26/19 9:00Energy, Earth and Environmental Education - a community-building workshop Blockstein, DavidWorkshop
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Energy, Earth and Environmental Education - a community-building workshopEnergy, Earth and environmental educators will share best practices and develop new partnerships to strengthen the connections between energy, earth and environmental education. The agenda will include classroom issues (content, curriculum and pedagogy) and programs (degree and sub-degree programs) to be explored in presentations and small group discussion. There will be discussion of career opportunities in energy and environment. There will be invited speakers and additional speakers are invited to propose talks through the AESS conference call for presentations.
This workshop will be organized by the National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT) in collaboration with AESS. It builds on workshops previously held at AESS conferences and at 3 National Energy Education Summits, organized by the National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE), one of which was held at the 2016 AESS conference.
6/26/19 9:00Energy, Earth and Environmental Education - a community-building workshop Perkins, JohnWorkshop
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Ensuring a Sustainable Future by Protecting Water Resources: Case Studies from the PhilippinesThis hybrid full – discussion panel is a collection of case studies from three (3) different projects all focusing on water resources. The three case studies illustrate the problem of mismanagement and its consequences. Furthermore, the three case studies will serve as take-off points for a discussion on what Information, Education and Communications (IEC) campaigns can be undertaken to ensure future sustainability. At the same time, the discussion can lead to possible policy recommendations appropriate in each situation.6/28/19 16:00Ensuring a Sustainable Future by Protecting Water Resources: Case Studies from the Philippines Dumo, Joan RubyFull Panel SessionManaging the waters of Boracay Island, is limiting tourism the key to its future sustainability? Jude Estiva, Joan Dumo (presenters) In 2018, the island paradise of Boracay, located in Malay, Aklan in the Philippines was hurled into the headlines as an area that needs immediate rehabilitation resulting from years of abuse as one of the top tourists’ destinations in the world. Immediately, the island was closed for tourism and the massive rehabilitation took place. After 6 months of closure, the island re-opened but now a daily cap on the number of tourists has been set in place. Several questions come to mind such as is the rehabilitation effort including the closure enough, is the cap on the number of tourists that visit the island enough, and what else can be done to ensure the future sustainability of this island paradise?
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Ensuring a Sustainable Future by Protecting Water Resources: Case Studies from the PhilippinesThis hybrid full – discussion panel is a collection of case studies from three (3) different projects all focusing on water resources. The three case studies illustrate the problem of mismanagement and its consequences. Furthermore, the three case studies will serve as take-off points for a discussion on what Information, Education and Communications (IEC) campaigns can be undertaken to ensure future sustainability. At the same time, the discussion can lead to possible policy recommendations appropriate in each situation.6/28/19 16:00Ensuring a Sustainable Future by Protecting Water Resources: Case Studies from the Philippines Estiva, Jude AnthonyFull Panel Session1)Managing the waters of Boracay Island, is limiting tourism the key to its future sustainability? Jude Estiva, Joan Dumo (presenters) In 2018, the island paradise of Boracay, located in Malay, Aklan in the Philippines was hurled into the headlines as an area that needs immediate rehabilitation resulting from years of abuse as one of the top tourists’ destinations in the world. Immediately, the island was closed for tourism and the massive rehabilitation took place. After 6 months of closure, the island re-opened but now a daily cap on the number of tourists has been set in place. Several questions come to mind such as is the rehabilitation effort including the closure enough, is the cap on the number of tourists that visit the island enough, and what else can be done to ensure the future sustainability of this island paradise?
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Ensuring a Sustainable Future by Protecting Water Resources: Case Studies from the PhilippinesThis hybrid full – discussion panel is a collection of case studies from three (3) different projects all focusing on water resources. The three case studies illustrate the problem of mismanagement and its consequences. Furthermore, the three case studies will serve as take-off points for a discussion on what Information, Education and Communications (IEC) campaigns can be undertaken to ensure future sustainability. At the same time, the discussion can lead to possible policy recommendations appropriate in each situation.6/28/19 16:00Ensuring a Sustainable Future by Protecting Water Resources: Case Studies from the Philippines Guzman, Maria Aileen LeahFull Panel Session2)The Disappearing Sinarap (Mistichthys luzonensis), a case of mismanaging Lake Buhi in Camarines Sur? Maria Aileen Leah G. Guzman (presenter) Lake Buhi, Camarines Sur is famous as the home of the world’s smallest commercially available fish, the sinarapan (Mistichthys luzonensis). However, years of overfishing, introduction of other species such as tilapia and pollution in the lake due to increasing anthropogenic activities has wreaked havoc on the population of sinarap. Efforts to re-introduce populations of sinarap in the lake has failed. What management strategies are appropriate to restore healthy populations of sinarapan in the lake? What lessons can we learn and how can these lessons be applied to prevent another catastrophe such as this from occurring?
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Ensuring a Sustainable Future by Protecting Water Resources: Case Studies from the PhilippinesThis hybrid full – discussion panel is a collection of case studies from three (3) different projects all focusing on water resources. The three case studies illustrate the problem of mismanagement and its consequences. Furthermore, the three case studies will serve as take-off points for a discussion on what Information, Education and Communications (IEC) campaigns can be undertaken to ensure future sustainability. At the same time, the discussion can lead to possible policy recommendations appropriate in each situation.6/28/19 16:00Ensuring a Sustainable Future by Protecting Water Resources: Case Studies from the Philippines Udtojan, May AnnFull Panel Session3)How to sustain the water needs of highly urbanized cities in the Philippines: the case of Angeles City, Pampanga and Iloilo City, Iloilo? May Ann Udtojan (presenter) The Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) defines highly urbanized cities (HUC) as areas with a minimum population of two hundred thousand (200,000) and with at least fifty million pesos income based on 1991 constant prices. Aside from the cities that comprise Metro Manila, Angeles City and Iloilo City, are classified as HUCs. Given increasing population, land use change and intensified economic activities in these areas the demand for water has increased; putting strain on limited resources. What management strategies are currently in place to ensure the sustainability of HUCs? What other efforts must be put in place to ensure future sustainability? What lessons can we learn?
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Environmental Citizenship and Education6/28/19 10:00Perspectives on Ecosystem Earth: The interaction of human well-being, sustaining biodiversity and human resilience in the age of Anthropocene , In and out of green: exploring narratives of agency, capacity, and the environment , Environmental Citizenship in Kuwait: Finding Meaning and Mobility , Carbon neutral at a commuter campus? A look at undergraduate sustainability knowledge and behaviors , Education for Sustainability after the Sh*t Hits the Fan , A Short Interdisciplinary Course on Energy Sustainability at the Nexus of Climate/Environment and Food/Water Alawadhi, ReemIndividual Paper PresentationEnvironmental Citizenship in Kuwait: Finding Meaning and Mobility This research paper discusses the theoretical framework of what constitutes environmental citizenship from the perspective of the Environment Public Authority (KEPA) and environmental leaders in Kuwait. The concept of environmental citizenship has evolved in western literature and it was never examined in the context of Arabian Gulf States particularly Kuwait. Using participant observation, and semi-structured interviews conceptualized within the social theory of symbolic interaction, and the constructivist grounded theory method I generated a theoretical framework that explains what this concept looks like in Kuwait. Consequently, this study will contribute substantively to the existing literature as it examines environmental citizenship in a unique socio-political atmosphere and in an semi-authoritarian State which heavily depends on fossil fuels.

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Environmental Citizenship and Education6/28/19 10:00Perspectives on Ecosystem Earth: The interaction of human well-being, sustaining biodiversity and human resilience in the age of Anthropocene , In and out of green: exploring narratives of agency, capacity, and the environment , Environmental Citizenship in Kuwait: Finding Meaning and Mobility , Carbon neutral at a commuter campus? A look at undergraduate sustainability knowledge and behaviors , Education for Sustainability after the Sh*t Hits the Fan , A Short Interdisciplinary Course on Energy Sustainability at the Nexus of Climate/Environment and Food/Water Holloman, DiamondIndividual Paper PresentationIn and out of green: exploring narratives of agency, capacity, and the environmentThis paper looks to explore the concepts of agency and place-making amongst Black and Latinx students in two afterschool programs in the United States, and how these themes force a critical engagement with non-green spaces within environmental sociology literature. Much focus on environmental attitudes is centered around the experiences that people have in greenspaces, but don't take a critical stance on the ways in which we can connect non-"green" spaces and activities to the ways in which people act and understand the environment. This project takes a critical approach to addressing how neighborhoods and groups that are typically deemed socially vulnerable to environmental burdens in fact actively resist this term (and its connotations) in the messages they intentionally send to their youths. "Socially vulnerable," many times synonymous with low-income, urban neighborhoods are choice sites to be considered in need of help and being acted upon. We were interested in the messages these communities tell their youths about themselves and the places they inhabit, along with what these interpretations might tell researchers about the dominant narratives associated with "socially vulnerable" neighborhoods. Place meanings, in and outside of greenspaces, play crucial roles in addressing key issues such as urban sustainability and the future of the environmental equity movement.
Findings: In reclaiming and challenging connotations of "socially vulnerable" these afterschool programs recondition the use of capital. In other words, instead of understanding their neighborhoods as lacking capital, these programs understand them as having capital in different ways that we had not considered before.
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Environmental Citizenship and Education6/28/19 10:00Perspectives on Ecosystem Earth: The interaction of human well-being, sustaining biodiversity and human resilience in the age of Anthropocene , In and out of green: exploring narratives of agency, capacity, and the environment , Environmental Citizenship in Kuwait: Finding Meaning and Mobility , Carbon neutral at a commuter campus? A look at undergraduate sustainability knowledge and behaviors , Education for Sustainability after the Sh*t Hits the Fan , A Short Interdisciplinary Course on Energy Sustainability at the Nexus of Climate/Environment and Food/Water Morgan, PaulIndividual Paper PresentationEducation for Sustainability after the Sh*t Hits the FanThis is a theoretical contribution building on previous presentations and publications. The purpose of this presentation is to argue against satisfaction with institutionalization of environmental and sustainability studies programs and for viewing these fields as bases from which to begin articulating and enacting a competing vision for higher education. Based on evidence presented in recent reports (IPCC, National Assessment, etc.) there are good reasons to believe that in the near future there will be an incident or series of events that make it clear to leaders of major institutional sectors that our climate and sustainability challenges are not only real, but urgent and existential. The sh*t will have hit the fan. The result will be an opportunity not simply to add or enhance environmental and sustainability studies programs, but to completely redefine the purpose and practice of higher education. This presentation aims to encourage at least some members of the AESS community to see their work as creating a higher education-in-waiting. When the call comes, what will scholars have ready to go? Ultimately, there may be no future for environmental and sustainability studies as separate fields. Either the whole of civilization becomes oriented toward sustainability and survival, or it does not, and we don’t. In this view, sustainability is not a field. It is fundamentally a competing civilizational vision. Indeed, future historians may wonder why people of our time believed that relatively marginal programs in environmental and sustainability studies were considered an appropriate response to an existential challenge. After making the case for a more ambitious agenda for environmental and sustainability studies, the balance of presentation will outline how to begin shifting from margin to center, and how to begin imagining what higher education would look like if its primary mission were education for a sustainable future.
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Environmental Citizenship and Education6/28/19 10:00Perspectives on Ecosystem Earth: The interaction of human well-being, sustaining biodiversity and human resilience in the age of Anthropocene , In and out of green: exploring narratives of agency, capacity, and the environment , Environmental Citizenship in Kuwait: Finding Meaning and Mobility , Carbon neutral at a commuter campus? A look at undergraduate sustainability knowledge and behaviors , Education for Sustainability after the Sh*t Hits the Fan , A Short Interdisciplinary Course on Energy Sustainability at the Nexus of Climate/Environment and Food/Water RABBI, MOHAMMEDIndividual Paper PresentationPerspectives on Ecosystem Earth: The interaction of human well-being, sustaining biodiversity and human resilience in the age of AnthropoceneEarth consists of many ecosystems; but human societies recognize much less that Earth itself is an “ecosystem” with finite resources and dependent on its interacting species.
With the increasing human population and diminishing trend of available life-sustaining resources, “Ecosystem Earth” is increasingly showing signs of stress and desperation.
In this paper, some insights on our sustainable future, current pace of the growth of human population and well-being, our increasing consumptions of the diminishing vital resources of the natural world and policies to sustaining biodiversity and healthier planetary ecosystem will be discussed.
These approaches to save the “Ecosystem Earth” are based on pursuing policies of raising public awareness and the appreciation of importance of the preservation of other species, ecosystem conservation responses and resilience of people.
As a case study, recent approaches of the coastal people in flood prone southern Bangladesh facing adversity and their struggle in protecting their land against the rising sea-level and stronger storms due to climate change will be discussed.
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Environmental Citizenship and Education6/28/19 10:00Perspectives on Ecosystem Earth: The interaction of human well-being, sustaining biodiversity and human resilience in the age of Anthropocene , In and out of green: exploring narratives of agency, capacity, and the environment , Environmental Citizenship in Kuwait: Finding Meaning and Mobility , Carbon neutral at a commuter campus? A look at undergraduate sustainability knowledge and behaviors , Education for Sustainability after the Sh*t Hits the Fan , A Short Interdisciplinary Course on Energy Sustainability at the Nexus of Climate/Environment and Food/Water Sharma, PankajIndividual Paper Presentation
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Environmental Citizenship and Education6/28/19 10:00Perspectives on Ecosystem Earth: The interaction of human well-being, sustaining biodiversity and human resilience in the age of Anthropocene , In and out of green: exploring narratives of agency, capacity, and the environment , Environmental Citizenship in Kuwait: Finding Meaning and Mobility , Carbon neutral at a commuter campus? A look at undergraduate sustainability knowledge and behaviors , Education for Sustainability after the Sh*t Hits the Fan , A Short Interdisciplinary Course on Energy Sustainability at the Nexus of Climate/Environment and Food/Water Singh, AjayIndividual Paper PresentationCarbon neutral at a commuter campus? A look at undergraduate sustainability knowledge and behaviorsCSU, Sacramento is a large regional comprehensive university focused on serving first generation college students. Because of the socio-economic demographics of the student body, most commute to campus. In 2017, the university president pledged to become a carbon neutral campus after the US pulled out of the Paris Accords. Since then the Office of Sustainability has assessed the institutional contributions of greenhouse gases however, there are challenges to understanding and assessing student contributions. In 2017, the Environmental Studies department surveyed a representative sample of undergraduate students to better understand their sustainability knowledge and behaviors, including transportation behaviors. This presentation will present empirical results and propose solutions to incentivize sustainability behaviors.
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Environmental Justice, Gender and Climate ChangeThree of the top five global risks to social stability relate to climate change’s direct dangers and our failure to mitigate and adapt (World Economic Forum 2018). Climate change affects people around the world, but not equally. Climate change risks are not simple natural facts - they intersect with, challenge and reinforce social differences and inequalities. Yet many of the proposed solutions perpetuate such disparities at multiple scales of response by institutions, through infrastructure, in information modeling, communication and realms of behavior change.
In this panel, we examine this intersection of socio-material risk and the lived experiences of climate change by bringing into closer conversation two key conceptual lenses: environmental justice and gender. We build on emerging environmental justice approaches which call for much more sustained engagement with intersectional relations of race, class, and other social differences. Despite stark social inequities related to gender, climate change scholarship and activism has engaged very little with intersectional, queer, anti- and post-colonial, and ecofeminist approaches to climate justice. This panel examines en-gendered climate disparities as a mechanism for developing intersectional environmental justice. This approach destabilizes monolithic approaches to climate risk mitigation, pointing towards more sustainable futures through inclusivity and negotiating difference.
6/28/19 10:00Environmental Justice, Gender and Climate Change Lang, UrsulaFull Panel SessionPresenter: Lang. Sharing home grounds: Urban environmental care and adaptation. Around the world, local and regional planners and water management experts increasingly incorporate green infrastructure into urban re/development plans. Landscape features such as permeable paving, rain gardens, bioswales, and drainage ponds are one way cities are trying to rethink storm water management. This paper examines how people cultivate, experience, and adapt urban landscapes through practices of care. Across differences in property arrangements, as well as architectural and neighborhood forms, residential landscapes offer one lens into these issues. In particular, the paper focuses on gendered experiences of environmental care in relation to housing, and within broader racialized urban geographies of dis/investment. The paper draws on fieldwork with residents and environmental planners and managers in Minneapolis, MN and Glasgow, UK to understand diverse experiences adapting to and living with green infrastructure features. Here, environmental care entails affects of relation and becoming in common with others (Singh 2017). I argue experiences with environmental care must be accounted for in relation to social differences across urban areas, and in particular the ongoing and contested struggles of urban disinvestment/redevelopment. Often from expert perspectives, adaptations through green infrastructure are understood to be about best practices, behavior changes, and technical solutions. However in the ongoing ways people live with and care for their surroundings, this perspective further marginalizes those most affected by the socio-material hazards of not only climate change, but also deindustrialization and urban redevelopment.
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Environmental Justice, Gender and Climate ChangeThree of the top five global risks to social stability relate to climate change’s direct dangers and our failure to mitigate and adapt (World Economic Forum 2018). Climate change affects people around the world, but not equally. Climate change risks are not simple natural facts - they intersect with, challenge and reinforce social differences and inequalities. Yet many of the proposed solutions perpetuate such disparities at multiple scales of response by institutions, through infrastructure, in information modeling, communication and realms of behavior change.
In this panel, we examine this intersection of socio-material risk and the lived experiences of climate change by bringing into closer conversation two key conceptual lenses: environmental justice and gender. We build on emerging environmental justice approaches which call for much more sustained engagement with intersectional relations of race, class, and other social differences. Despite stark social inequities related to gender, climate change scholarship and activism has engaged very little with intersectional, queer, anti- and post-colonial, and ecofeminist approaches to climate justice. This panel examines en-gendered climate disparities as a mechanism for developing intersectional environmental justice. This approach destabilizes monolithic approaches to climate risk mitigation, pointing towards more sustainable futures through inclusivity and negotiating difference.
6/28/19 10:00Environmental Justice, Gender and Climate Change Mark, BrigidFull Panel SessionHydropower in Guatemala: Gender, Vulnerability, and Resistance In Guatemala, a history of colonization and conquest manifests in indigenous dispossession, genocide, poverty, and structural racism. Hydropower development represents a microcosm of these inequities. The Xalalá dam, a project which would be the second largest hydropower facility in the country, would again displace indigenous people, while simultaneously jeopardizing food security, denigrating sacred sites, and facilitating psychological damage. Through a content analysis of the websites of three organizations engaged in resistance against the dam, this research: (1) describes women’s leadership and participation in Xalalá dam resistance efforts and (2) illuminates obstacles preventing the actualization of these organizations’ goals. The implication of this research is far-reaching; indigenous exploitation by resource extraction projects exists across the globe and themes from this case study are applicable to other environmental sustainability efforts. I find that, despite their lack of economic and political power, indigenous peoples in Ixcán demonstrate agency in the face of these injustices; they fight for human rights and the protection of the natural environment. Within these communities, women are particularly attuned to the threat posed by the hydroelectric project and lead resistance efforts. This analysis reveals that local organizations tend to explicitly center gender equity as an essential step in resisting the Xalalá dam whereas international organizations, distanced from the cause, tend to recognize, but not emphasize, women’s leadership. Obstacles to the Xalalá dam resistance efforts include scare tactics facilitated through the deployment of the military, a lack of transparency and consultation during the dam approval process, and structural racism towards indigenous people. In order to ensure the success of movements against environmental degradation, it is important to center the voices of those directly affected. Organizations must prioritize local voices, center gender equity and work to dismantle corruption in government and corporations. Presenter Brigid Mark. TItle: Hydropower in Guatemala: Gender, Vulnerability, and Resistance. Abstract: In Guatemala, a history of colonization and conquest manifests in indigenous dispossession, genocide, poverty, and structural racism. Hydropower development represents a microcosm of these inequities. The Xalalá dam, a project which would be the second largest hydropower facility in the country, would again displace indigenous people, while simultaneously jeopardizing food security, denigrating sacred sites, and facilitating psychological damage. Through a content analysis of the websites of three organizations engaged in resistance against the dam, this research: (1) describes women’s leadership and participation in Xalalá dam resistance efforts and (2) illuminates obstacles preventing the actualization of these organizations’ goals. The implication of this research is far-reaching; indigenous exploitation by resource extraction projects exists across the globe and themes from this case study are applicable to other environmental sustainability efforts. I find that, despite their lack of economic and political power, indigenous peoples in Ixcán demonstrate agency in the face of these injustices; they fight for human rights and the protection of the natural environment. Within these communities, women are particularly attuned to the threat posed by the hydroelectric project and lead resistance efforts. This analysis reveals that local organizations tend to explicitly center gender equity as an essential step in resisting the Xalalá dam whereas international organizations, distanced from the cause, tend to recognize, but not emphasize, women’s leadership. Obstacles to the Xalalá dam resistance efforts include scare tactics facilitated through the deployment of the military, a lack of transparency and consultation during the dam approval process, and structural racism towards indigenous people. In order to ensure the success of movements against environmental degradation, it is important to center the voices of those directly affected. Organizations must prioritize local voices, center gender equity and work to dismantle corruption in government and corporations.
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Environmental Justice, Gender and Climate ChangeThree of the top five global risks to social stability relate to climate change’s direct dangers and our failure to mitigate and adapt (World Economic Forum 2018). Climate change affects people around the world, but not equally. Climate change risks are not simple natural facts - they intersect with, challenge and reinforce social differences and inequalities. Yet many of the proposed solutions perpetuate such disparities at multiple scales of response by institutions, through infrastructure, in information modeling, communication and realms of behavior change.
In this panel, we examine this intersection of socio-material risk and the lived experiences of climate change by bringing into closer conversation two key conceptual lenses: environmental justice and gender. We build on emerging environmental justice approaches which call for much more sustained engagement with intersectional relations of race, class, and other social differences. Despite stark social inequities related to gender, climate change scholarship and activism has engaged very little with intersectional, queer, anti- and post-colonial, and ecofeminist approaches to climate justice. This panel examines en-gendered climate disparities as a mechanism for developing intersectional environmental justice. This approach destabilizes monolithic approaches to climate risk mitigation, pointing towards more sustainable futures through inclusivity and negotiating difference.
6/28/19 10:00Environmental Justice, Gender and Climate Change OLeary, HeatherFull Panel SessionDisrupting Futurity: Engendering Climate Risk in Sustainable Development Presenter: O'Leary. The United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals champion the interconnected steps of increasing gender equality (SDG 5) and eradicating poverty (SDG 1) as means toward mitigating climate risks and increasing resilience. But is “interconnectedness” enough? Institutions and experts addressing climate change set precedents for discourse and methods which ultimately reinforce social differences and inequalities. This paper examines how these dominant discourses both naturalizes and disowns poor women, making them just as much casualties of discriminatory risk mitigation as physical climate change. It uses the lens of engendered subaltern environmentalism to demonstrate that sustainable futures rely on much more than “interconnection”. Specifically, it explores concepts of intersectionality in urban flooding discourse about coastal cities. Climate change related flooding amplifies disruptions and displacements. By 2050, 70% of the human population is predicted to live in cities, with most of the absolute growth in Asia, where many urbanites already face climate change disruptions (OECD 2014). Highly unequal relations only promise to grow more unstable as today’s systems struggle to keep up with growing risk and displacement due to climate change. Climate change discourse remains a vital site for explicit and covert contestations of present and future agency and authority. This research suggests that the next wave of intersectional environmental justice must draw from decentered language and approaches. It destabilizes monolithic approaches to climate risk mitigation, pointing towards more universally sustainable futures
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Environmental Justice, Gender and Climate ChangeThree of the top five global risks to social stability relate to climate change’s direct dangers and our failure to mitigate and adapt (World Economic Forum 2018). Climate change affects people around the world, but not equally. Climate change risks are not simple natural facts - they intersect with, challenge and reinforce social differences and inequalities. Yet many of the proposed solutions perpetuate such disparities at multiple scales of response by institutions, through infrastructure, in information modeling, communication and realms of behavior change.
In this panel, we examine this intersection of socio-material risk and the lived experiences of climate change by bringing into closer conversation two key conceptual lenses: environmental justice and gender. We build on emerging environmental justice approaches which call for much more sustained engagement with intersectional relations of race, class, and other social differences. Despite stark social inequities related to gender, climate change scholarship and activism has engaged very little with intersectional, queer, anti- and post-colonial, and ecofeminist approaches to climate justice. This panel examines en-gendered climate disparities as a mechanism for developing intersectional environmental justice. This approach destabilizes monolithic approaches to climate risk mitigation, pointing towards more sustainable futures through inclusivity and negotiating difference.
6/28/19 10:00Environmental Justice, Gender and Climate Change Roberts-Gregory, FrancesFull Panel SessionClimate Justice and Youth Engagement in Gulf Coast LouisianaWhat is climate justice and why is it important? What does climate justice look like in practice? Who does the work of climate justice during the Anthropocene? How can we engage urban youth in climate change discussions? Critical environmental justice (EJ) scholars, ecofeminists and anthropologists of climate change encourage inquiry into these questions and more since social science studies of climate change document that the persons least responsible for greenhouse gas emissions bear the brunt of harm during climate disaster. Feminist climate researchers moreover encourage research into the role(s) of Indigenous communities, women, youth and people of color in resisting state-corporate crime and necropolitics that ultimately result in premature death. My research consequently aims to identify how environmentalists of color engage youth of color around climate justice and lean into teaching as activism in Gulf Coast Louisiana. I employ Black feminist autoethnography to document my experience as an educator of color and climate activist who directly engages youth via civic engagement curricula and creates opportunities for youth to consider environmental careers. This reflexive personal experience complements ongoing dissertation research on how women of color organize around climate justice while navigating contradictory relationships with energy and petrochemical industries. Through my autoethnography, I hope to ultimately inspire future generations of youth and women of color (WOC) to lead the environmental movement. I also hope to encourage environmental professionals and academics to think more critically on the practicality of engaging urban youth in climate change discussions via scholar-activism, digital media, mapping technologies and sound science communication. PRESENTER: Frances Roberts-Gregory Title: Climate Justice and Youth Engagement in Gulf Coast Louisiana. What is climate justice and why is it important? What does climate justice look like in practice? Who does the work of climate justice during the Anthropocene? How can we engage urban youth in climate change discussions? Critical environmental justice (EJ) scholars, ecofeminists and anthropologists of climate change encourage inquiry into these questions and more since social science studies of climate change document that the persons least responsible for greenhouse gas emissions bear the brunt of harm during climate disaster. Feminist climate researchers moreover encourage research into the role(s) of Indigenous communities, women, youth and people of color in resisting state-corporate crime and necropolitics that ultimately result in premature death. My research consequently aims to identify how environmentalists of color engage youth of color around climate justice and lean into teaching as activism in Gulf Coast Louisiana. I employ Black feminist autoethnography to document my experience as an educator of color and climate activist who directly engages youth via civic engagement curricula and creates opportunities for youth to consider environmental careers. This reflexive personal experience complements ongoing dissertation research on how women of color organize around climate justice while navigating contradictory relationships with energy and petrochemical industries. Through my autoethnography, I hope to ultimately inspire future generations of youth and women of color (WOC) to lead the environmental movement. I also hope to encourage environmental professionals and academics to think more critically on the practicality of engaging urban youth in climate change discussions via scholar-activism, digital media, mapping technologies and sound science communication.
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Environmental Law, Legal disputes and Policy Strategy6/28/19 12:30ADVANCING GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORKS CASE STUDY: BASEL ACTION NETWORK , Reserved Rights: The Collision of Environmental Law and Policy in Indian Country , “Litigation is our last Resort” Addressing uncertainty, undone science, and bias of the stakeholders in court to assert indigenous rights Panikkar, BinduIndividual Paper Presentation“Litigation is our last Resort” Addressing uncertainty, undone science, and bias of the stakeholders in court to assert indigenous rightsObtaining permits for industrial activities such as large scale mines involve contested discussions on land use designations, acceptable exploration practices, and the functionalities and risks of procuring the available resources. Legal actions can be useful in these cases for allies in environmental justice movements to transform and reconstitute social relations and power on scientific, regulatory, and policy decisions. This empirical research examines three legal cases resulting from the early permitting debates of the Pebble Mine in southwestern Alaska. These cases explore the entanglements between science, society, and law and explores the following questions 1) How are environmental conflicts debated and contested in court? 2) How were issues of concern to indigenous rights, subsistence rights, and the rights of nature addressed by indigenous groups and their allies? and 3) How are claims to objectivity and rationality debated in resolving environmental conflicts under conditions of uncertainty, undone science, and bias of the stakeholders? This analysis includes exploring the relationship between official legal systems (the state) and other forms of orderings (the mining company, indigenous groups, and environmental NGOs); the power differentials between these orderings; how actors challenge and negotiate complex normative systems; the dynamics of resistance and restructuring by indigenous and environmental groups; and the effect of democratic practices on legal outcomes. This research shows that representation of pluralistic legal orders, norms, and values may help in asserting and protecting indigenous rights.
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Environmental Law, Legal disputes and Policy Strategy6/28/19 12:30ADVANCING GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORKS CASE STUDY: BASEL ACTION NETWORK , Reserved Rights: The Collision of Environmental Law and Policy in Indian Country , “Litigation is our last Resort” Addressing uncertainty, undone science, and bias of the stakeholders in court to assert indigenous rights SAVASAN, ZERRINIndividual Paper PresentationADVANCING GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORKS CASE STUDY: BASEL ACTION NETWORK This article aims to study on this environmental justice paradigm arising as a new priority subject in the field of environmental studies. While doing that, it particularly focuses on environmental networks and their impact on advancing environmental justice. This is because, networks are becoming more important in the current period with their more dynamic, flexible, adaptable qualifications, informal (or may be called semi-formal) structures and capabilities for cooperation at higher levels.
While doing its analysis, the study is based on Basel Action Network (BAN) as a case study of the research, as it raises as a good example of a network aiming to provide everyone’s right to a lean environment with its activities to end toxic trade and catalyze a toxic free future.
In this respect, it scrutinizes the relationship between environmental justice and networks in the first section. Next, it makes an analysis on Basel Action Network (BAN) based on two main dimensions: its organizational structure (legal basis, legal personality, financial sources, responsibility/accountability/transparency) and the practical outcomes that it has achived in practice. Thirdly, it studies its strengths and weaknesses particularly on providing and sustaining environmental justice. Finally, it discusses the lessons that should be learnt/ and also the potential ways for promoting environmental justice in response to the current/possible challenges benefiting from environmental networks.
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Environmental Law, Legal disputes and Policy Strategy6/28/19 12:30ADVANCING GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORKS CASE STUDY: BASEL ACTION NETWORK , Reserved Rights: The Collision of Environmental Law and Policy in Indian Country , “Litigation is our last Resort” Addressing uncertainty, undone science, and bias of the stakeholders in court to assert indigenous rights Wolf Tice, JacqlineIndividual Paper PresentationReserved Rights: The Collision of Environmental Law and Policy in Indian CountryNatural Resource policy and law is an inherent ethical and political issue in Indian Country. As the third Sovereign in the U.S., mechanisms exist by which Indian tribes have the power to address the acquisition, use and termination of land and water rights executed by treaty, executive order, congressional statute and judicial review. Analysis of details addressing how these rights are created, their scope and characteristics, how they are enforced, and when and how they are terminated (Helton, 2015) instruct courts to apply ethical and specific legal considerations to each claim.
The doctrines of reserved rights and implied reserved rights are common law principles expressed either explicitly or implicitly by treaties, and are, therefore, persuasive in natural resource rulings. These findings introduce significant jurisdictional complexities impacting environmental and political outcomes relevant to scholars and students who research and make natural resource policy within or in cooperation with tribal stakeholders. Understanding the concept of reserved rights broadens and deepens perceptions of land and other resources in Indian Country as an important component of just policy.
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Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving InstitutionsGrassroots, collective, and cooperative food justice initiatives taking place in diverse locations such as community gardens, urban farms, and farmers markets have proliferated in number across the U.S. in last decade. Those explicitly developed with critical frameworks in mind aim to effectuate positive change across multiple scales, not only by giving underserved communities greater access to the means of food production at the local level, but also by challenging oppressive social structures like classism, racism, and sexism that mediate access to fresh, healthy food (Alkon & Agyeman, 2011; Alkon & Guthman, 2017; Gotleib & Joshi, 2010). Further, recognizing the embedded connectedness of food insecurity to other systemic injustices like poverty, chronic illness, and toxic waste exposure, some of these initiatives embrace a holistic approach to ameliorating multiple inequities, working to incorporate health, wellness, and environmental justice and sustainability into their goals. Yet, critical scholarship has revealed that though such initiatives may be enacted with “good intentions,” underserved communities do not necessarily benefit from them in expected ways (e.g., Alkon & Guthman, 2017; Guthman, 2008; Kato, 2013; Larimore, 2018)—and in some cases may experience harm, as in the case of ecological gentrification (Martinez, 2010; Reynolds & Cohen, 2016). Thus, this session broadly aims to explore the questions below, drawing on Agatha Herman’s, Michael Goodman’s, and Colin Sage’s (2018) recent commentary, “Six Questions for Food Justice”:

1.Is it possible to ensure fair provisioning with equitable access in food systems?
2.In what ways can we promote and enhance connections within food systems?
3.To what extent can existing collaborations and connections be built across scales?
4.How does food justice fit within wider drives towards social, economic, and environmental justice?
5.How do we develop an effective critique of food production strategies?
6.Can food justice challenge the status quo of neoliberal capitalism?
6/27/19 14:00Exploring “Six Questions for Food Justice” Abatemarco, TatianaFull Panel Session“Digital Storytelling for Rural Food Justice in the Adirondack North Country, New York” - - Tatiana Abatemarco How do you create a sense of community across a vast, rural region? This is the question that I am trying to answer through a mapping project with the North Country Food Justice Working Group. Starting at the organization’s first food justice summit in 2018, people put post-it notes on a physical map, showing their organizations, as well as regional dream projects. This group effort was digitized to create an interactive story map, which was unveiled at the 2019 summit. The goal of the map is to tell the story of food justice across the Adirondack region and create a living document for connection and movement growth. In this presentation, I will describe preliminary findings from this Participant Action Research Project in the Adirondack North Country of New York. I will speak about the power of Participant Action Research to contribute to progressive food justice movements and my preliminary findings based on the digital mapping project. I will address the particular challenges and opportunities of food justice work this rural region. The Adirondack North Country of NY is home to a small, sustainable farming resurgence, but is also a location with both extreme wealth and extreme poverty.
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Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving InstitutionsGrassroots, collective, and cooperative food justice initiatives taking place in diverse locations such as community gardens, urban farms, and farmers markets have proliferated in number across the U.S. in last decade. Those explicitly developed with critical frameworks in mind aim to effectuate positive change across multiple scales, not only by giving underserved communities greater access to the means of food production at the local level, but also by challenging oppressive social structures like classism, racism, and sexism that mediate access to fresh, healthy food (Alkon & Agyeman, 2011; Alkon & Guthman, 2017; Gotleib & Joshi, 2010). Further, recognizing the embedded connectedness of food insecurity to other systemic injustices like poverty, chronic illness, and toxic waste exposure, some of these initiatives embrace a holistic approach to ameliorating multiple inequities, working to incorporate health, wellness, and environmental justice and sustainability into their goals. Yet, critical scholarship has revealed that though such initiatives may be enacted with “good intentions,” underserved communities do not necessarily benefit from them in expected ways (e.g., Alkon & Guthman, 2017; Guthman, 2008; Kato, 2013; Larimore, 2018)—and in some cases may experience harm, as in the case of ecological gentrification (Martinez, 2010; Reynolds & Cohen, 2016). Thus, this session broadly aims to explore the questions below, drawing on Agatha Herman’s, Michael Goodman’s, and Colin Sage’s (2018) recent commentary, “Six Questions for Food Justice”:

1.Is it possible to ensure fair provisioning with equitable access in food systems?
2.In what ways can we promote and enhance connections within food systems?
3.To what extent can existing collaborations and connections be built across scales?
4.How does food justice fit within wider drives towards social, economic, and environmental justice?
5.How do we develop an effective critique of food production strategies?
6.Can food justice challenge the status quo of neoliberal capitalism?
6/27/19 14:00Exploring “Six Questions for Food Justice” Engle, EllyFull Panel Session“Food Justice, Community Food Security, and Community Gardening Programs in the Appalachian Coalfields” - - Elyzabeth W. Engle Community gardening programs have long been celebrated for their beneficial contributions to urban food justice by addressing environmental, social, and economic dimensions of inequality. Yet research on similar programs in rural environments is nearly non-existent, despite the persistence of similar environmental, social, and economic challenges and opportunities among rural people and places. To better understand how community gardening support community food security and economic justice in rural places, I will share a brief overview of the history, strategies, and key outcomes of the Grow Appalachia initiative, a community food security organization headquartered in Berea, Kentucky. Grow Appalachia provides financial, technical, and educational assistance to select community-based organizations to establish community gardening programs and other food system assets. I will discuss both the development of Grow Appalachia’s mission through its near decade of community food security work, and, drawing upon a collaborative program evaluation conducted between 2016-2018, how Grow Appalachia’s evolution and strategies have produced positive outcomes for its gardener participants, organizational partners, and the communities in which they all reside. In response to Herman, Goodman, and Sage’s (2018) “Six Questions for Food Justice,” I will offer a re-definition of what “community gardening” can mean in the context of food justice scholarship and practice. Specifically, I will use the case of Grow Appalachia and the everyday experiences of organizers and participants to demonstrate how community gardening can (and does) fit into “the wider drives towards social, economic, and environmental justice” (pg. 1076), especially in rural settings.
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Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving InstitutionsGrassroots, collective, and cooperative food justice initiatives taking place in diverse locations such as community gardens, urban farms, and farmers markets have proliferated in number across the U.S. in last decade. Those explicitly developed with critical frameworks in mind aim to effectuate positive change across multiple scales, not only by giving underserved communities greater access to the means of food production at the local level, but also by challenging oppressive social structures like classism, racism, and sexism that mediate access to fresh, healthy food (Alkon & Agyeman, 2011; Alkon & Guthman, 2017; Gotleib & Joshi, 2010). Further, recognizing the embedded connectedness of food insecurity to other systemic injustices like poverty, chronic illness, and toxic waste exposure, some of these initiatives embrace a holistic approach to ameliorating multiple inequities, working to incorporate health, wellness, and environmental justice and sustainability into their goals. Yet, critical scholarship has revealed that though such initiatives may be enacted with “good intentions,” underserved communities do not necessarily benefit from them in expected ways (e.g., Alkon & Guthman, 2017; Guthman, 2008; Kato, 2013; Larimore, 2018)—and in some cases may experience harm, as in the case of ecological gentrification (Martinez, 2010; Reynolds & Cohen, 2016). Thus, this session broadly aims to explore the questions below, drawing on Agatha Herman’s, Michael Goodman’s, and Colin Sage’s (2018) recent commentary, “Six Questions for Food Justice”:

1.Is it possible to ensure fair provisioning with equitable access in food systems?
2.In what ways can we promote and enhance connections within food systems?
3.To what extent can existing collaborations and connections be built across scales?
4.How does food justice fit within wider drives towards social, economic, and environmental justice?
5.How do we develop an effective critique of food production strategies?
6.Can food justice challenge the status quo of neoliberal capitalism?
6/27/19 14:00Exploring “Six Questions for Food Justice” Larkins, MichelleFull Panel SessionFood Insecurity among Farmworkers: thinking about agency, cultural competency, and race/ethnicity in community health partnerships - - Michele Larkins The food justice movement (Bradley and Herrera, 2016) has important distinctions from environmental justice, namely a focused critique on neoliberal globalized food systems and conditions of food security. However, from a framework perspective, scholars argue that greater concentration on issues of community identities, institutionalized racism, and gender that help to construct place based inequalities (Slocum and Cadieux, 2015) are required. Moreover, there is a case for a theoretical bridge between environmental and food justice, such that the former embraces its sociality and foregrounds nutritional health as an environmental benefit (Alkon and Norgaard, 2009), and the latter draws on the scholarship of institutionalized racism to analyze food systems. For both fields, it is necessary to make plain that neat separations between “environmental” and “food” based inequities in the daily lives of community members are unlikely to exist. In this paper, I draw on a project formed in 2018 between the student organic farm at Pacific University, graduate residents at our College of Health Professions, and two free clinics in a nearby rural community that serves primarily low-income, monolingual Spanish speakers—many of whom are seasonal agricultural workers—to discuss connections in food systems, and the relationships between food insecurity, food heritage, health and access from a framework of environmental justice within this community. In the present case, and specific to questions four- six, is the interplay between food sovereignty, production systems, and the institutionalized racism faced by Latinx agricultural workers that informs local food and environmental justice conversations.
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Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving InstitutionsGrassroots, collective, and cooperative food justice initiatives taking place in diverse locations such as community gardens, urban farms, and farmers markets have proliferated in number across the U.S. in last decade. Those explicitly developed with critical frameworks in mind aim to effectuate positive change across multiple scales, not only by giving underserved communities greater access to the means of food production at the local level, but also by challenging oppressive social structures like classism, racism, and sexism that mediate access to fresh, healthy food (Alkon & Agyeman, 2011; Alkon & Guthman, 2017; Gotleib & Joshi, 2010). Further, recognizing the embedded connectedness of food insecurity to other systemic injustices like poverty, chronic illness, and toxic waste exposure, some of these initiatives embrace a holistic approach to ameliorating multiple inequities, working to incorporate health, wellness, and environmental justice and sustainability into their goals. Yet, critical scholarship has revealed that though such initiatives may be enacted with “good intentions,” underserved communities do not necessarily benefit from them in expected ways (e.g., Alkon & Guthman, 2017; Guthman, 2008; Kato, 2013; Larimore, 2018)—and in some cases may experience harm, as in the case of ecological gentrification (Martinez, 2010; Reynolds & Cohen, 2016). Thus, this session broadly aims to explore the questions below, drawing on Agatha Herman’s, Michael Goodman’s, and Colin Sage’s (2018) recent commentary, “Six Questions for Food Justice”:

1.Is it possible to ensure fair provisioning with equitable access in food systems?
2.In what ways can we promote and enhance connections within food systems?
3.To what extent can existing collaborations and connections be built across scales?
4.How does food justice fit within wider drives towards social, economic, and environmental justice?
5.How do we develop an effective critique of food production strategies?
6.Can food justice challenge the status quo of neoliberal capitalism?
6/27/19 14:00Exploring “Six Questions for Food Justice” Lloro-Bidart, TeresaFull Panel SessionMeet Me at a Farm or Gas Station: Cooperative Volunteering as Feminist Resistance to Neoliberalism in Food Systems - - Teresa Lloro-Bidart Critical food studies scholars have highlighted the significant ways in which local food initiatives are infused with neoliberal ideologies through an emphasis on consumer choice, localism, enterpreneurialism, and self-improvement (e.g., Guthman, 2008; Herman, Goodman, & Sage, 2019). However as Alison Hope Alkon and Julie Guthman illustrate, activist organizations are beginning to shift away from a strict focus on the politics of consumption to “change not only the way we eat, but the ways we live, work, and govern ourselves” (2016, p. 2). Framed by theories of feminist food activism (e.g., Steager, 2013) and feminist food justice (e.g., Sachs & Patel-Campillo, 2014), this paper draws on nine months of participatory ethnographic fieldwork in California within an urban food justice organization and at an urban farmers market and its associated “chemical-free” farms. I explore how the discourses and practices of a politics of consumption continue to frame some activist work, but that moments of resistance to neoliberalism also emerge. A volunteer activist cooperative comprised primarily of culturally and ethnically diverse womxn, for example, has embraced a “gathering space” model at the farmers market, making care and reciprocity central to its success. By picking up produce at chemical-free farms and sometimes even gas stations, which can serve as convenient places to meet growers traveling to other markets, activists support farmers who wish to employ practices gentle to people and the environment, but cannot afford or wish to resist USDA organic certification (Guthman, 2014). By mobilizing a cadre of volunteers to sell these goods on behalf of chemical-free farmers at the market, the disproportionately toxic waste burdened urban community benefits from greater access to high-quality, chemical-free food. Since farmers incur no transportation or labor expenses associated with the market, they therefore willingly set lower prices. To conclude, I briefly discuss some of the tensions of this cooperative volunteer structure, including how it employs the unpaid labor of womxn to thrive.
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Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving InstitutionsEnvironmental Studies and Sciences programs have become a staple of academic institutions over the past five decades. That same time period has seen an increase in the percentage of Americans who participate in higher education, and in many places shifting demographics. In this session, we will explore strategies to ensure that environmental studies and sciences are relevant to the range of students in our institutions. The session will begin with perspectives from several minority-serving institutions who will discuss the importance of cultural relevance and incorporating community and societal impacts to increase value for students across the academy. The session will then proceed with a conversation about implementing strategies, practices, and research opportunities to enhance inclusion and fuller participation.6/28/19 14:15Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving Institutions Davis, FeliciaDiscussion Symposia
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Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving InstitutionsEnvironmental Studies and Sciences programs have become a staple of academic institutions over the past five decades. That same time period has seen an increase in the percentage of Americans who participate in higher education, and in many places shifting demographics. In this session, we will explore strategies to ensure that environmental studies and sciences are relevant to the range of students in our institutions. The session will begin with perspectives from several minority-serving institutions who will discuss the importance of cultural relevance and incorporating community and societal impacts to increase value for students across the academy. The session will then proceed with a conversation about implementing strategies, practices, and research opportunities to enhance inclusion and fuller participation.6/28/19 14:15Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving Institutions Gragg, RichardDiscussion Symposia
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Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving InstitutionsEnvironmental Studies and Sciences programs have become a staple of academic institutions over the past five decades. That same time period has seen an increase in the percentage of Americans who participate in higher education, and in many places shifting demographics. In this session, we will explore strategies to ensure that environmental studies and sciences are relevant to the range of students in our institutions. The session will begin with perspectives from several minority-serving institutions who will discuss the importance of cultural relevance and incorporating community and societal impacts to increase value for students across the academy. The session will then proceed with a conversation about implementing strategies, practices, and research opportunities to enhance inclusion and fuller participation.6/28/19 14:15Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving Institutions Hassenzahl, DavidDiscussion Symposia
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Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving InstitutionsEnvironmental Studies and Sciences programs have become a staple of academic institutions over the past five decades. That same time period has seen an increase in the percentage of Americans who participate in higher education, and in many places shifting demographics. In this session, we will explore strategies to ensure that environmental studies and sciences are relevant to the range of students in our institutions. The session will begin with perspectives from several minority-serving institutions who will discuss the importance of cultural relevance and incorporating community and societal impacts to increase value for students across the academy. The session will then proceed with a conversation about implementing strategies, practices, and research opportunities to enhance inclusion and fuller participation.6/28/19 14:15Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving Institutions Singh, AjayDiscussion Symposia
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Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving InstitutionsEnvironmental Studies and Sciences programs have become a staple of academic institutions over the past five decades. That same time period has seen an increase in the percentage of Americans who participate in higher education, and in many places shifting demographics. In this session, we will explore strategies to ensure that environmental studies and sciences are relevant to the range of students in our institutions. The session will begin with perspectives from several minority-serving institutions who will discuss the importance of cultural relevance and incorporating community and societal impacts to increase value for students across the academy. The session will then proceed with a conversation about implementing strategies, practices, and research opportunities to enhance inclusion and fuller participation.6/28/19 14:15Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving Institutions Strouble, BruceDiscussion Symposia
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Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving InstitutionsEnvironmental Studies and Sciences programs have become a staple of academic institutions over the past five decades. That same time period has seen an increase in the percentage of Americans who participate in higher education, and in many places shifting demographics. In this session, we will explore strategies to ensure that environmental studies and sciences are relevant to the range of students in our institutions. The session will begin with perspectives from several minority-serving institutions who will discuss the importance of cultural relevance and incorporating community and societal impacts to increase value for students across the academy. The session will then proceed with a conversation about implementing strategies, practices, and research opportunities to enhance inclusion and fuller participation.6/28/19 14:15Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving Institutions Whitehead, SamDiscussion Symposia
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Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving InstitutionsEnvironmental Studies and Sciences programs have become a staple of academic institutions over the past five decades. That same time period has seen an increase in the percentage of Americans who participate in higher education, and in many places shifting demographics. In this session, we will explore strategies to ensure that environmental studies and sciences are relevant to the range of students in our institutions. The session will begin with perspectives from several minority-serving institutions who will discuss the importance of cultural relevance and incorporating community and societal impacts to increase value for students across the academy. The session will then proceed with a conversation about implementing strategies, practices, and research opportunities to enhance inclusion and fuller participation.6/28/19 14:15Environmental Studies and Sciences at Minority-Serving Institutions Ziewitz, KathrynDiscussion Symposia
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Feminist Teaching and Scholarship in Environmental StudiesAll gender identities are welcome to this conversation inspired by the Athena Learning Collective “Femifesto”(2018), which calls for a politics of knowledge production that generates collective solidarity, engages in co-learning praxis, and enacts ideas through real world politics. Environmental work has a rich history that includes both liberatory practice (environmental justice, ecofeminism), and oppressive frameworks (eco-colonialism, fortress conservation).

How do we practice feminist pedagogy and feminist research in environmental studies? In what ways, as scholars and teachers, do we reinforce hegemonic practices in the classroom, department meetings, and other university activities? How can we use intersectionality to emphasize “the interdependence of human health, ecological integrity, and social justice”(Di Chiro, 2006)? How do our practices contribute to or disrupt the capitalist hegemony dominant in academic environmental studies/science discourse? Topics of discussion will be generated collectively at the start of the session, with the goal of creating solidarity around feminist research and teaching, speaking across difference, and building networks to nurture our collective teaching and research efforts.

Di Chiro, G. (2006). Teaching Urban Ecology: Environmental Studies and the Pedagogy of Intersectionality. Feminist Teacher, 16(2), 98–109.

Intervention – “A Femifesto for Teaching and Learning Radical Geography.” (2018, November 27). Retrieved January 29, 2019, from https://antipodefoundation.org/2018/11/27/a-femifesto-for-teaching-and-learning-radical-geography/

6/27/19 16:00Feminist Teaching and Scholarship in Environmental Studies Abatemarco, TatianaDiscussion Symposia
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Feminist Teaching and Scholarship in Environmental StudiesAll gender identities are welcome to this conversation inspired by the Athena Learning Collective “Femifesto”(2018), which calls for a politics of knowledge production that generates collective solidarity, engages in co-learning praxis, and enacts ideas through real world politics. Environmental work has a rich history that includes both liberatory practice (environmental justice, ecofeminism), and oppressive frameworks (eco-colonialism, fortress conservation).

How do we practice feminist pedagogy and feminist research in environmental studies? In what ways, as scholars and teachers, do we reinforce hegemonic practices in the classroom, department meetings, and other university activities? How can we use intersectionality to emphasize “the interdependence of human health, ecological integrity, and social justice”(Di Chiro, 2006)? How do our practices contribute to or disrupt the capitalist hegemony dominant in academic environmental studies/science discourse? Topics of discussion will be generated collectively at the start of the session, with the goal of creating solidarity around feminist research and teaching, speaking across difference, and building networks to nurture our collective teaching and research efforts.

Di Chiro, G. (2006). Teaching Urban Ecology: Environmental Studies and the Pedagogy of Intersectionality. Feminist Teacher, 16(2), 98–109.

Intervention – “A Femifesto for Teaching and Learning Radical Geography.” (2018, November 27). Retrieved January 29, 2019, from https://antipodefoundation.org/2018/11/27/a-femifesto-for-teaching-and-learning-radical-geography/

6/27/19 16:00Feminist Teaching and Scholarship in Environmental Studies Lloro-Bidart, TeresaDiscussion Symposia
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Feminist Teaching and Scholarship in Environmental StudiesAll gender identities are welcome to this conversation inspired by the Athena Learning Collective “Femifesto”(2018), which calls for a politics of knowledge production that generates collective solidarity, engages in co-learning praxis, and enacts ideas through real world politics. Environmental work has a rich history that includes both liberatory practice (environmental justice, ecofeminism), and oppressive frameworks (eco-colonialism, fortress conservation).

How do we practice feminist pedagogy and feminist research in environmental studies? In what ways, as scholars and teachers, do we reinforce hegemonic practices in the classroom, department meetings, and other university activities? How can we use intersectionality to emphasize “the interdependence of human health, ecological integrity, and social justice”(Di Chiro, 2006)? How do our practices contribute to or disrupt the capitalist hegemony dominant in academic environmental studies/science discourse? Topics of discussion will be generated collectively at the start of the session, with the goal of creating solidarity around feminist research and teaching, speaking across difference, and building networks to nurture our collective teaching and research efforts.

Di Chiro, G. (2006). Teaching Urban Ecology: Environmental Studies and the Pedagogy of Intersectionality. Feminist Teacher, 16(2), 98–109.

Intervention – “A Femifesto for Teaching and Learning Radical Geography.” (2018, November 27). Retrieved January 29, 2019, from https://antipodefoundation.org/2018/11/27/a-femifesto-for-teaching-and-learning-radical-geography/

6/27/19 16:00Feminist Teaching and Scholarship in Environmental Studies Rinkus, MarisaDiscussion Symposia
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Forest and park conservation and management6/27/19 16:00Wild stewarded or forest-farmed? The politics of nontimber forest product policy and discourse in Appalachia , Brokering multi-level narratives and knowledge of environmental change for reforestation sustainability in rural China. , Bridging the divide between rural and urban community-based forest management: A review of differences and opportunities for improved research and management , The importance of nonrecreational benefits in national park management Kruger, SteveIndividual Paper PresentationWild stewarded or forest-farmed? The politics of nontimber forest product policy and discourse in AppalachiaNon-timber forest products (NTFPs) have the potential to provide livelihood and income from forests with less environmental impact than logging, mining or other extractive industry. However, NTFP species can also be over-exploited, and formalizing or commercializing production may increase pressure on wild populations. The complexity of this situation leads to conflicting narratives about the NTFP trade and the state of the species involved, and the development of competing supply chains and stakeholder groups. Public and private institutions who are increasingly supporting NTFP production in the name of sustainability are shaping discourse about the trade and the species involved, and must navigate this tricky terrain. During a project to measure NTFP harvests in the Appalachian region, researchers at Virginia Tech conducted qualitative interviews with buyers of medicinal plants such as American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) about what motivated or discouraged participation. Harvesting these plants is traditionally an informal, seasonal, and supplemental source of income in a region suffering disproportionate economic distress. Currently, much of the effort to utilize NTFPs for sustainable development initiatives in region has focused on building a more formalized supply chain for NTFPs cultivated in agroforestry systems, which are then presented as more sustainable than "wild-crafted" material. Incentivizing this kind of production was not seen as necessarily beneficial or desirable for traditional harvesters, who often harvest on de facto commons and have limited access to capital. The approach is more applicable for small farmers and other landowners. For NGOs, universities and other supportive institutions, creating certification or training for informal economic actors without legal land tenure presents unique challenges. This paper discusses the need for, and difficulty of working with multiple constituencies who share an interest in these plants and fungi, and potential strategies that can benefit both traditional and emergent NTFP user groups.
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Forest and park conservation and management6/27/19 16:00Wild stewarded or forest-farmed? The politics of nontimber forest product policy and discourse in Appalachia , Brokering multi-level narratives and knowledge of environmental change for reforestation sustainability in rural China. , Bridging the divide between rural and urban community-based forest management: A review of differences and opportunities for improved research and management , The importance of nonrecreational benefits in national park management Liu, Yu-RongIndividual Paper PresentationBrokering multi-level narratives and knowledge of environmental change for reforestation sustainability in rural China. If the purpose of reforestation is to sustain and protect the environment from being degraded, it is crucial to examine what kinds of environmental narrative and knowledge these practices are based on, and whether it could deliver the green future they promise. Reforestation has been considered a solution for environmental degradation at both international and national level in China, especially regarding its role in prevention of soil erosion. However, local knowledge regarding reforestation are embedded with regional environmental and development history that may not aligned with the cause and effect narrative responsible for formulating the reforestation policy. Scientific knowledge of reforestation is also changing its definition of what is the “best” way for planting trees. Moreover, uncertainty surrounding the sustainability of reforestation is increasing due to global social and environmental change. This study uses a case study approach to understand reforestation narratives and knowledge used by members of a rural community and of an environmental non-governmental organization (eNGO) that work in the same rural county in Shanxi province, China. Interviews and participant observation with key participants of reforestation, review of documents of reforestation policy were the data collection method. The study argue that reforestation is not incorporated into local livelihood regimes due to larger institutional changes and different strategic uses of environment narratives and knowledge by participants. The local community used the narrative created by the Chinese state government to legitimize reforestation and to support local economic development goals, while the eNGO used local environmental knowledge to support the environmental knowledge and narratives created from global popular conceptions of land degradation that drives their conservation efforts. The knowledge and narratives underpinning reforestation are not aligned and may be counter-productive to the sustainability of reforestation.
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Forest and park conservation and management6/27/19 16:00Wild stewarded or forest-farmed? The politics of nontimber forest product policy and discourse in Appalachia , Brokering multi-level narratives and knowledge of environmental change for reforestation sustainability in rural China. , Bridging the divide between rural and urban community-based forest management: A review of differences and opportunities for improved research and management , The importance of nonrecreational benefits in national park management Sullivan, AbigailIndividual Paper PresentationBridging the divide between rural and urban community-based forest management: A review of differences and opportunities for improved research and management Community-based forest management has many monikers, including community forestry, urban and community forestry, and joint forest management. These terms all indicate an effort to include communities (to varying degrees) in forest management, but distinctions are often made between rural versus urban focused research and management. Such distinctions are often arbitrary, as rural and urban communities exist on a continuum. Given the myriad benefits of community-based forest management in diverse contexts, and the declining health of many forests globally, efforts to maximize the success of community-based management efforts are important. The separation between urban and rural community-based forest research represents an opportunity to explore where researchers and practitioners typically isolated in rural or urban research may learn from each other. Through a systematic literature review, we first assess whether there is a measurable divide between the scholars studying community-based forest management in rural and urban focused contexts (e.g., do rural and urban focused articles cite each other?). We then analyze whether any separation between rural and urban studies leads to the emergence of different research questions and management approaches, and explore differences in studies focused on the rural-urban interface. We comment on learning opportunities for rural and urban-focused community-based forest management research, and suggest that a social-ecological systems approach may help researchers integrate findings for holistic “rural-urban” management.
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Forest and park conservation and management6/27/19 16:00Wild stewarded or forest-farmed? The politics of nontimber forest product policy and discourse in Appalachia , Brokering multi-level narratives and knowledge of environmental change for reforestation sustainability in rural China. , Bridging the divide between rural and urban community-based forest management: A review of differences and opportunities for improved research and management , The importance of nonrecreational benefits in national park management Turner, RobertIndividual Paper PresentationThe importance of nonrecreational benefits in national park managementThe dual mandate of the U.S. National Park Service, to promote conservation but also enjoyment by visitors, is well known. But even the conservation part of the mandate focuses on visitor enjoyment: Congress authorized the National Park Service to "promote and regulate the use of the Federal areas known as national parks, monuments, and reservations…by such means and measures as conform to the fundamental purpose to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wildlife therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations." The conservation aspect is motivated by the prospect of the enjoyment of future generations.

Turner (2002) shows, however, that visitor enjoyment is not the primary justification for national parks, at least from the point of view of mainstream economics. This paper lays out the argument for the primacy of nonrecreational benefits in terms of the justification of national parks. It then explores the implications for national park management decisions, which typically focus on visitor enjoyment. It also provides evidence of the existence of nonrecreational benefits as measured by survey respondents’ willingness to pay for what economists call nonuse (or passive use) benefits: option value and bequest value, both of which do relate to future visitation, and existence value, which doesn’t. New survey evidence is used to examine the relative importance of existence values versus other (current and future recreational) values.

The paper combines theoretical discussion with the presentation of empirical evidence bearing on the importance of nonrecreational benefits created by national parks. A policy implication is that the National Park Service should deemphasize recreational benefits and pay more attention to nonrecreational benefits.
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Fossil Fuel Industry6/28/19 16:00Climate Justice and the Carbon Ask: Characteristics of the U.S. Fossil Fuel Workforce , Analysis of the Impact of Renewables in Electricity Production and Fossil Fuels Consumption on CO2 Emissions for 40 Countries between 1990 and 2017 , The Impact of a Revenue Neutral Carbon Tax on Substitution of Natural Gas for Coal in the Electricity Sector , Does Carbon Capture Deter or Facilitate a Sustainable Future?: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Framing of Post-combustion Technology Gunderson, RyanIndividual Paper PresentationDoes Carbon Capture Deter or Facilitate a Sustainable Future?: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Framing of Post-combustion TechnologyCarbon capture and storage (CCS) is a climate change mitigation strategy based on the removal of carbon from the atmosphere and is increasingly considered an essential tool for limiting global temperature rise below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. “Post-combustion” CCS refers to capturing CO2 at sources of fossil fuel combustion, such as coal or gas-fired power plants. CCS policy discussion has primarily focused on the potential economic and environmental costs and benefits. The clearest potential environmental benefit is carbon emission abatement. Others have expressed concerns about the potential environmental and climate-political impacts of CCS. We examine the potential role of CCS in transitioning to a sustainable society by examining the fossil fuel industry’s interest in using post-combustion CCS to sustain society’s reliance on fossil fuels.Drawing from the critical theory of Herbert Marcuse, we expect that the fossil fuel industry will support CCS because it can further and prolong profitability in the industry. Through a qualitative analysis of fossil fuel company and trade organization framings of CCS, three frames are identified: (1) faith in innovation, or, the belief that any barrier that fetters technological solutions to environmental problems can be overcome; (2) value instrumentalization, or, the predominance of instrumental values when justifying or explaining the benefits of technological solutions; and (3) status quo maintenance, or, the application or anticipated application of technological solutions in order to reproduce the most fundamental processes and social structures that characterize modern societies. Frames tend to omit the following issues and concerns relevant to CCS: (4) potential social and environmental risks (risk minimization); (5) non-instrumental values (value restriction); and (6) possible future scenarios that are qualitatively different than a growing economy powered by increased energy throughput (alternative omitting). The climate policy implications of these frames are analyzed and assessed.
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Fossil Fuel Industry6/28/19 16:00Climate Justice and the Carbon Ask: Characteristics of the U.S. Fossil Fuel Workforce , Analysis of the Impact of Renewables in Electricity Production and Fossil Fuels Consumption on CO2 Emissions for 40 Countries between 1990 and 2017 , The Impact of a Revenue Neutral Carbon Tax on Substitution of Natural Gas for Coal in the Electricity Sector , Does Carbon Capture Deter or Facilitate a Sustainable Future?: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Framing of Post-combustion Technology Hao, FengIndividual Paper PresentationAnalysis of the Impact of Renewables in Electricity Production and Fossil Fuels Consumption on CO2 Emissions for 40 Countries between 1990 and 2017The production and burning of fossil fuels is the primary contributor to CO2 emissions. In order to mitigate the emissions, decarbonizing electricity by promoting renewable energy is a key strategy. In this study, I analyze the latest data for 40 countries worldwide from 1990 to 2017. I compare and examine the changes in the share of renewables in electricity production and fossil fuels consumption over years and to assess the magnitude of their year-to-year impact on CO2 emissions. The findings show that even though the use of renewables for electricity production has increased, the consumption of coal, oil, and natural gas has increased more substantially. The use of renewables has a negative association with CO2 emissions while the fossil fuels consumption has a positive association, and such relationships are time-variant. Hence, the reduced emissions from transforming energy composition to renewables might have been outstripped by the growing emissions led by more consumption of fossil fuels. I discuss these findings in the context of current energy policies and then provide directions for future research.
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Fossil Fuel Industry6/28/19 16:00Climate Justice and the Carbon Ask: Characteristics of the U.S. Fossil Fuel Workforce , Analysis of the Impact of Renewables in Electricity Production and Fossil Fuels Consumption on CO2 Emissions for 40 Countries between 1990 and 2017 , The Impact of a Revenue Neutral Carbon Tax on Substitution of Natural Gas for Coal in the Electricity Sector , Does Carbon Capture Deter or Facilitate a Sustainable Future?: The Fossil Fuel Industry’s Framing of Post-combustion Technology Linquiti, PeterIndividual Paper PresentationClimate Justice and the Carbon Ask: Characteristics of the U.S. Fossil Fuel WorkforceOver 50 countries at the 2018 Katowice climate conference signed the Silesia Declaration, which recognized “the importance [of ensuring] a decent future for workers impacted by the transition … to low greenhouse gas emission and climate resilient development.” Motivated by the Silesia Declaration, this paper characterizes these “impacted workers” by answering several questions: (1) How will production in the oil, natural gas, coal, and related sectors (the fossil fuel enterprise) change as the result of strong climate policy? (2) How many workers in the fossil fuel enterprise will have their livelihoods threatened by climate policy? (3) In which sectors and countries do they work? (4) How big a share of their national workforce do they represent? While these questions have global import, I will first address them in a U.S. context, later extending the analyses to a global scale. The paper uses a 4-step methodology. First, I will replicate the approach used in 2016 to compute the Carbon Ask – the reduction in wealth experienced by participants in the global fossil fuel enterprise – but update it to reflect new 2018 projections from International Energy Agency (Linquiti & Cogswell, The Carbon Ask: Effects of Climate Policy on the Value of Fossil Fuel Resources and the Implications for Tech Innovation, J.E.S.S.) The result will be changes in oil, gas, and coal production as a result of climate policy. Second, I will create a list of specific industries affected by these policy-driven production changes based on the North American Industry Classification System. Third, I will obtain Bureau of Labor Statistics data on the number of employees, and wages and salaries, on an industry-by-industry basis. I will then take the production reductions by fuel type estimated in Step 1 and apply them to the employment data. Doing so will approximate employment impacts by sector. Finally, I will calibrate impacts by comparing jobs lost to the Carbon Ask to the size of each sector. The result will be a deeper understanding of what it will take to live up to the Sliesia Declaration.
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