Pears 2014
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Pear scion for 2014Last updated by Nick, March 5, 2014
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TypeScionVarietyFB ResistScab-ResistPerrySeasonStorageTaste SupremePerryCurator's ChoiceHigh yieldSeasonRed fleshN=Nick; GB=George BartonLabel descriptions
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PScionArabitkaLateDeveloped in Hungary. A very late ripe variety, this pear holds more promise than most as a winter keeper.Arabitka. Developed in Hungary. A very late ripe variety, this pear holds more promise than most as a winter keeper.
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PScionArgancheEarlyA small, early ripening pear from Macedonia. Introduced to U.S. from Belgrade, Yugoslavia, in 1960. Fruit: small (about 50 g) like Seckel, skin yellow with red blush and no russet; flesh fine-textured, sweet, juicy, firm; ripe early, about 16 July in western Oregon. Tree: naturally compact due to relatively short internodes, abundant fruiting spurs, consistently productive, resistant to scab. Arganche. A small, early ripening pear from Macedonia. Flesh fine-textured, sweet, juicy, firm; ripe early, about 16 July in western Oregon. Tree consistently productive, resistant to scab.
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PScionAtlantic QueenDeveloped in France, Imported to the US approx. 30 years ago. Excellent fruit, prolific.Yellow-green fruit up to 1.5 lbs. Fine, firm, melting, very juicy, sweet flesh. Distinctive, delicious aroma. Prolific bearer. Skin turns a characteristic yellow when ready to be eaten. Old French pear discovered in a New York garden close to the seashore. Ripens late September. Very vigorous. If you can use a large tree and want large fruit this is one you might like to try. Atlantic Queen. Excellent fruit, prolific. Distinctive, delicious aroma. Prolific bearer.Ripens late September. If you can use a large tree and want large fruit this is one you might like to try.
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PScionAurorayumCurator's Choice. Originated in Geneva, N.Y., by New York State Agriculture Experiment Station. Named and Introduced in 1964. Fruit: large, skin bright yellow, slightly russeted, sometimes blushed, very attractive; flesh melting, smooth, juicy, sweet, aromatic, high quality; ripens with or just after Bartlett. High quality attractive dessert pear which ripens just before Bartlett. The fruit is large and has a regular pear shape. It is bright yellow lightly overlaid with russet, and frequently is slightly blushed. The flesh is smooth, melting, and juicy, and the flavor sweet and aromatic. The fruit will keep well in cold storage until December. The tree is vigorous and upright. Aurora. Curator's Choice. High quality attractive dessert pear which ripens just before Bartlett. The fruit is large and has a regular pear shape. Flesh is smooth, melting, and juicy, and the flavor sweet and aromatic. The fruit will keep well in cold storage until December.
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PScionAyersFBSyumA Garber-Anjou cross originating out of the Tennessee Agriculture Experiment Station in 1954. I first noticed it three years ago. I soon learned the variety is also one of Joseph Postman's favorites. Very attractive fruit on an extremely productive tree. Really impressive taste and texture - similarish to Seckel - and it makes itself readily available for fresh-eating. Scab-free, too. And fire-blight resistant which is a quality I am beginning to look towards as I hear rumblings from various quarters that weather patterns may not continue to keep the disease at bay from these parts. Countless spectacular pear trees come on in mid-August at the Repository, but this home-grown pear is a stand-out. One of the very first of the 'unknowns' I recommend.Ayers. Nick's favorite find at the USDA repository. Very attractive fruit on an extremely productive tree. Really impressive taste and texture - similarish to Seckel - and it makes itself readily available for fresh-eating. Scab-free and fire-blight resistant.
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ScionBa Li XiangFBSVery old Chinese pear from northeast China. Blight resistant rootstock. Yellow-white fleshed pear. Early to mid-September ripening in China. Chinese name Ba li hsiang li meaning Eight li fragrant pear implying that it can be detected by its odor at a distance of about 8 li, about 2 1/2 miles. Mildew resistant. Scab resistant. Fireblight resistant. Very late ripe.Ba Li Xiang. Blight resistant rootstock. Mildew resistant. Scab resistant. Very late ripe.
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PScionBarlandPerryAn early-mid season perry pear with high acids and tannins. Origin: Traditional English cultivar, grown since before 1674. Ripens late September in western Oregon. Barland perry has been reputed since the seventeenth century to have medicinal value in treating kidney disorders. Barland: Traditional English perry pear cultivar, grown since before 1674. Ripens late September in western Oregon. Barland perry reputed to have medicinal value in treating kidney disorders.
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PScionBarnetPerryAn early-mid season scab-resistant perry pear with low acids and tannins. Origin: Grown south of Gloucester, England in the 1800s; propagated and distributed by Long Ashton Research Station, Bristol, England in the early 1900’s. Ripens late September in western Oregon; easily shaken from tree. Barnet. An early-mid season scab-resistant perry pear from England in the 1800s. Ripens late September in western Oregon; easily shaken from tree.
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PScionBartlett - Improved yesRanked in the top 18 pears in the USDA pear repository for fruit quality.AP
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PScionBartlett - Sensation Red yesIntroduced from Australia in 1959. Yellow-skinned like Bartlett but 80% to 95% dark red blush. Flesh creamy white, melting, tender, moderately juicy, sweet, quality good. Tree somewhat less vigorous than Bartlett.Barlett - Sensation Red. Introduced from Australia in 1959. Yellow-skinned like Bartlett but 80% to 95% dark red blush. Flesh creamy white, melting, tender, moderately juicy, sweet, quality good.
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ScionBartlett Nye RussetyumCurator's Choice. While this variety is known locally as Nye Russet Bartlett, its name has not been officially recorded. Fruit similar to Bartlett but spicier, a slightly more intense flavor, and overlaid with a smooth 'cinnamon' russet. Among the very best in dessert quality. Ripens 1 week later than Bartlett. Fully russeted fruit is attractive, less prone to blemishes than green Bartlett. Originated in Talent, Oregon, by Stephen G. Nye of Medford. Bud mutation of Bartlett discovered in 1924 and introduced in 1937. Tree: similar in performance and fire blight susceptibility to Bartlett.Bartlett Nye Russet. Curator's Choice. Fruit similar to Bartlett but spicier, a slightly more intense flavor, and overlaid with a smooth 'cinnamon' russet. Among the very best in dessert quality. Ripens 1 week later than Bartlett. Originated in Talent, Oregon.
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PScionBella di GiugnoHigh YieldingEarlyVery early ripening. July. Developed in Italy. Also known as Mirandino Rosso.Bella di Giugno. Very early ripening. July. Developed in Italy. Also known as Mirandino Rosso.
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ScionBelle LucratifLate19th century Flemish. Fruits small and unattractive but with delectable flavor and luscious flesh. Trees bear enormously and almost annually and are very vigorous. Traditionally regarded as a standard for autumn bears. One of the very best for the home gardener.Belle Lucratif. Flemish. Fruits small and unattractive but with delectable flavor and luscious flesh. Trees bear enormously and almost annually and are very vigorous. Traditionally regarded as a standard for autumn pears. One of the very best for the home gardener..
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ScionBeurré d'AvrilLateFrance. Cultivar originated in 1909. A very late ripe variety which holds strong potential as a key winter keeper in our bioregion.Beurré d'Avril. France. Cultivar originated in 1909. A very late ripe variety which holds strong potential as a key winter keeper in our bioregion.
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ScionBeurre EasterLateFound in the garden of the Capucin Monastery at Louvain, Belgium and brought to attention in 1823. Brought to the United States about 1837. Skin thick and somewhat tough, deep green in color, sometimes slightly russeted, occasionally blushed. Flesh somewhat coarse, gritty, buttery, moderately juicy. Usually fails to ripen unless previously held under refrigeration for several months. Very late in season. Synonym for Doyenne D'Hiver.Beurre Easter. Flesh somewhat coarse, gritty, buttery, moderately juicy. Usually fails to ripen unless previously held under refrigeration for several months. Very late in season. Synonym for Doyenne D'Hiver.
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ScionBeurre Gris d'Hiver NouveauLateOriginated in France about 1830. Fruit medium or larger in size. Flesh fairly fine, some grit in the center, buttery and very juicy. Sweet, aromatic, vinous flavor, good to very good in dessert quality. Fairly late keeper. Tree reasonably vigorous, moderate susceptibility to fire blight.Beurre Gris d'Hiver Nouveau. Originated in France about 1830. Fruit medium or larger in size. Sweet, aromatic, vinous flavor, good to very good in dessert quality. Fairly late keeper.
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ScionBeurré Madame Henre LamyLateLarge fruit with the flavor of Marillat. Ripens late September and October.Beurré Madame Henre Lamy. Large fruit with the flavor of Marillat. Ripens late September and October.
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ScionBeurre SuperfinyumCurator's Choice. Bunyard called it “one of the best half-dozen pears” and Joseph Postman heartily agrees. Originated at Angers, France, by M. Goubalt from open pollinated seed sown in 1837. Introduced to America in 1850. Fruit: medium to large in size, roundish-obovate with pointed neck and fleshy stem. Skin smooth, greenish-yellow in color, occasionally blushed. Flesh very fine extremely juicy, quite free of grit, melting. Sweet with acidulous or vinous spicy flavor rates among the best in dessert quality. Probably too soft in texture to withstand commercial handling. Midseason. Tree: vigorous, spreading in habit, clean, productive. Moderately susceptible to fire blight.Beurre Superfin. Curator's Choice. Bunyard called it “one of the best half-dozen pears”. Introduced to America in 1850. Flesh very fine extremely juicy, quite free of grit, melting. Flavor rates among the best in dessert quality. Too soft in texture to withstand commercial handling. Midseason. Tree: vigorous, spreading in habit, clean, productive.
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PScionBlakeney RedPerryA mid season perry pear with moderate acids and tannins. Traditional English cultivar. During the 19th century this was considered a dual-purpose pear, used for both eating and for perry. Ripens late September in western Oregon. Tree is a heavy and reliable cropper; slow to come into bearing. Blakeney Red. Traditional English perry pear cultivar. During the 19th century this was considered a dual-purpose pear, used for both eating and for perry. Ripens late September in western Oregon. Tree is a heavy and reliable cropper; slow to come into bearing.
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PScionBrandyPerryA mid season perry pear with medium acids and low tannins. Origin: Traditional English cultivar from West Gloucestershire popular during the 1800s. Ripens early September in western Oregon. Heavy producer but tends toward biennial bearingBrandy. Traditional English perry pear cultivar. Ripens early September in western Oregon. Heavy producer but tends toward biennial bearing.
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PScionBurford PearOutstanding flavor, ripening quality, tree stamina and resistance to fireblight and pear psylla. Burford Pear. Outstanding flavor, ripening quality, tree stamina and resistance to fireblight and pear psylla.
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PScionButirra Precoce MorettiniyesHigh YieldingAn early season, high-quality dessert variety developed in Florence, Italy, by A. Morettini. Introduced in 1956. Ripens 20 days before Bartlett; storage 1 to 2 months. Tree: vigorous; productive. Butirra Precoce Morettini. Ranked in top 18 repository pears for fruit quality. Early season, high-quality dessert variety developed in Florence, Italy.Storage 1 to 2 months. Tree: vigorous; productive.
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ScionButirra Rosata MorettiniyumCurator's Choice.A gorgeous early fall pear. Originated in Florence, Italy, by Alessandro Morettini. Selected in 1940. Introduced in the U.S. in 1960. Coscia x Beurre Clairgeau. Fruit: large; skin yellow with bright red blush; flesh white, juicy, flavor excellent; ripens 6 to 7 days before Bartlett. Tree: very vigorous; self-incompatible and considerably parthenocarpic; scarcely compatible with quince rootstock; peduncle thick and short, susceptible to fire blight.Butirra Rosata Morettini. Curator's Choice. A gorgeous early fall pear. Originated in Florence. Introduced in the U.S. in 1960. Fruit: large; skin yellow with bright red blush; flesh white, juicy, flavor excellent; ripens 6 to 7 days before Bartlett. Tree: very vigorous.
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PScionButtPerryTraditional English cultivar. A late season perry pear. Ripens early October in western Oregon; excellent keeping quality prior to milling. Tree: heavy producer but tends toward biennial bearing. Remarkable for the length of time the fruit will lie on the ground without rotting. There is common saying associated with this cultivar: 'Gather your Butts one year, mill them the next and drink the year after'Butt. Traditional English perry pear. Ripens early October in western Oregon; excellent keeping quality prior to milling. Tree: heavy producer but tends toward biennial bearing.
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ScionBuzas KorteEarlyVery early ripe pear from Hungary.Buzas Korte. Very early ripe pear from Hungary.
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PScionCanal yesOriginated in Medford, Oregon, by Frank C. Reimer. Introduced in 1974 by Stark Brothers Nurseries. Discovered about 1955. Fruit: most nearly resembles Comice; skin yellow ground color with bright red blush, attractive; flesh smooth, melting, sweet, quality excellent; a dessert variety. Tree: large; upright vigor good, hardy; productivity moderate, fruit sets well, susceptible to fire blight.Canal. Originated in Medford, Oregon. Flesh smooth, melting, sweet, quality excellent; a dessert variety. Fruit sets well, susceptible to fire blight.
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APScionChian Pa LiFruit quality good. High pear scab incidence.Chian Pa Li. Fruit quality good. High pear scab incidence.
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ScionChin LiHigh pear scab incidence.Chin Li. High pear scab incidence.
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APScionChojuro High YieldingBrown skinned, medium fruits, ovate, juicy, sweet w/ rum/butterscotch flavors. Best eaten soon after picking. Ripens mid fall, not a keeper. Vigorous tree w. drooping branches. productive, may want to thin the fruit for optimal size. GBChojuro. Brown skinned, medium fruits, ovate, juicy, sweet w/ rum/butterscotch flavors. Best eaten soon after picking. Ripens mid fall, not a keeper. Vigorous tree.
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ScionCitron de CarmesEarlyAncient origin, probably from France. Hedrick states that it has been known by no less than 50 different names. In France and England its official name is Citron de Carmes, but in America it has generally been recognized as Madeleine. Origin uncertain. Cultivated by Le Lectier in France as early as 1628. Fairly wide distribution in United States about 1830. Fruit small in size, roundish-obtuse-pyriform. Skin tender, fairly smoth, dull green in color, with numerous small dots. Flesh tinged with yellow, fine, melting, very juicy. Sweet, rich, vinous flavor. Among the earliest in season. Short-lived, subject to core breakdown if left on trees too long. Too tender to withstand shipping. Tree moderately vigorous, spreading in habit, grayish green in foliage, productive. Fairly susceptible to fire blight.Citron de Carmes. Ancient origin, probably from France. In America it has generally been recognized as Madeleine. Fruit small. Flesh tinged with yellow, fine, melting, very juicy. Sweet, rich, vinous flavor. Among the earliest in season.
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ScionClaude BlanchetEarlyA very early ripening pear from France.Claude Blanchet. A very early ripening pear from France.
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ScionComiceVery firm large French butter-type winter pear. Needs a month of storage for ripening; stores well until Christmas. Does well in Western Washington. Season: Early to mid October. Comice. Very firm large French butter-type winter pear. Needs a month of storage for ripening; stores well until Christmas. Does well in Western Oregon. Season: Early to mid October.
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ScionConferenceyesHigh YieldingMedium large, slightly long fruit. Smooth green skin tinted with russet. Excellent keeper, high quality dessert pear, firm and sweet. One of the easiest to store and ripen of the winter pears. Cold storage is not needed to ripen. Pick early to mid October. This is the most popular pear variety in France and England with a sweet juicy flavor and melting buttery texture. Most productive of large, gourd shaped fruit. Fall ripening and a very good keeper. Pollinates with any European Pear except Bosc and Comice. A standard for midseason dessert pears in western Europe. Originated at Sawbridgeworth, England. Exhibited at the National British Pear Conference in 1885, for which it was later named. Fruit: medium to large size; flesh, tender, melting, very juicy, sweet. Season: October and November; good storage life. Cropping early, regular, heavy.Conference. Excellent keeper, high quality dessert pear, firm and sweet. One of the easiest to store and ripen of the winter pears. Pick early to mid October. This is the most popular pear variety in France and England. Cropping early, regular, heavy.
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PScionDabneyFBAnother Brooks Drain variety out of the Tennessee Agriculture Station, released in 1954, and which loves the PNW. A mid-season variety resembling Bartlett in shape and coloring, but the flesh is more melting. Quince compatible. Garber x Seckel. Fire-blight resistant.Dabney. A Tennessee creation which loves the PNW. A mid-season variety resembling Bartlett in shape and coloring, but the flesh is more melting. Fire-blight resistant.
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ScionDana HoveyyumCurator's Choice. A favorite of Joanie Cooper, president of the Home Orchard Society. Developed in Roxbury, MA. Delicious little dessert pear. Introduced about 1854. Fruit resembles that of Seckel in size and form. Much like Seckel in flavor, equal to Seckel in dessert quality. Keeps longer than Seckel in storage and holds up well after ripening. Less susceptible to core breakdown than Seckel. Tree large, vigorous. Fruits come into season mid-November and keep from six weeks to two months. Quality of the best. Less susceptible to core breakdown than Seckel. Tree: large, vigorous, upright-spreading, productive, fairly susceptible to fire blight.Dana Hovey. Curator's Choice. A favorite of Joanie Cooper, president of the Home Orchard Society. Delicious little dessert pear. Fruit resembles that of Seckel in size, form, flavor. Equal to Seckel in dessert quality. Keeps longer than Seckel in storage and holds up well after ripening. Fruits come into season mid-November and keep from six weeks to two months.
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ScionDave's DelightEarlyAn early season, attractive, very high quality pear, which stores well for its season and is relatively free of core breakdown. Originated at Kentville, Nova Scotia in 1986. Flavor aromatic, equal to or better than Bartlett. Early maturing; holds well on or off tree with good resistance to core breakdown. Dave's Delight. An early season, attractive, very high quality pear, which stores well for its season and is relatively free of core breakdown. Holds well on or off tree with good resistance to core breakdown.
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PScionDevoe yesyumCurator's choice. Pretty enough to pose for a still life, creamy flavor with a hint of vanilla.
Originated in Marlboro, New York, by Charles A. Greiner in 1947. Thought to be a seedling of Clapp Favorite. Fruit: elongated shape similar to Bosc, coloring similar to Clapp Favorite; attractive bright red spotted blush. Flesh soft, fine, buttery, tender, melting, white to yellow, subacid; stone cells absent. Harvest in mid-September, about 2 weeks after Bartlett. Tree: vigorous; tolerant to fire blight and pear psylla, susceptible to scab.
Devoe. Curator's Choice. Flesh soft, fine, buttery, tender, melting, white to yellow, creamy flavor with a hint of vanilla. Harvest in mid-September, about 2 weeks after Bartlett.
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ScionDorsetLateIntroduced in Massachussets in 1895. Late keeper, slow in ripening with long shelf life. Sweet with pleasing flavor. Tree very productive. Dorset. Introduced in Massachussets in 1895. Late keeper, slow in ripening with long shelf life. Sweet with pleasing flavor. Tree very productive.
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PScionDoyenne de JuilletHigh YieldingEarlyRaised by the Capucin Monks at Noms probably around 1700. Fruit small, green becoming pale yellow, half flushed with brownish-red-orange. Very early ripening. Flesh white, melting, moderately juicy, sweet with mild flavour.Doyenne de Juillet. Raised by the Capucin Monks at Noms probably around 1700. Very early ripening. Flesh white, melting, moderately juicy, sweet with mild flavour.
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PScionDoyenne du Comice yesyumCurator's choice. A large, juicy, ripe Comice is best eaten with a spoon. Regarded by many as the standard of dessert quality smong pears. Originated as a seedling in the fruit garden of Comice Horticole, Angers, France. First fruited in 1849 and introduced into America in 1850. Fruit: medium to large, sometimes very large. Skin fairly thick, granular, susceptible to blemishes, sometimes russeted, greenish-yellow, often blushed. Flesh very fine, melting, extremely juicy, quite free of grit. Sweet, rich, aromatic, vinous flavor. Midseason. Fruit inclined to bruise easily in the ripe stage. Tree: large, stately, vigorous, but slow in coming into bearing. Semi-dwarf on quince, moderately susceptible to fire blight. A temperamental variety which reaches perfection only under limited conditions of soil, climate, and location.Doyenne du Comice. Curator's choice. A large, juicy, ripe Comice is best eaten with a spoon. Regarded by many as the standard of dessert quality smong pears. A temperamental variety which reaches perfection only under limited conditions of soil, climate, and location.
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PScionDuchesse BronzeeFBSA Duchesse d'Angouleme sport, but fruit is russeted and often displays a red blush. Superior to Duchesse d'Angouleme in dessert quality but appears to be somewhat smaller in size. Tree vigorous, productive, true dwarf on quince. Moderately resistant to fire blight. High scab-resistance. Late-season. Duchesse Bronzee. A Duchesse d'Angouleme sport, but fruit is russeted and often displays a red blush. Superior to Duchesse d'Angouleme in dessert quality but appears to be somewhat smaller in size. Tree vigorous, productive. High scab-resistance. Late-season.
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PScionDuchesse d'AngoulemeFBEarly midseason. Tree vigorous, stately, productive, hardy, and healthy. Moderately resistant to blight. Semi-dwarf on quince. Scab-resistant. H. Hartmann, the dominant Oregon pear researcher of the 20th century, called it 'One of the best of the pear kingdom.'Duchesse d'Angouleme. Tree vigorous, stately, productive, hardy, and healthy. Moderately resistant to blight. Scab-resistant. H. Hartmann, the dominant Oregon pear researcher of the 20th century, called it 'One of the best of the pear kingdom.'
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PScionDuchesse d'Angouleme Bronzee yesFruit large, red, blight resistant. Sport of Duchesse d'Angeloume.Duchesse d'Angouleme Bronzee. Fruit large, red, blight resistant. Ranked in top 18 for fruit quality among a thousand varieties at the pear repository.
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PScionEarly HarvestFBEOriginated in Maryland and brought to Middletown, Kentucky by Captain William Chambers in 1800. Fruit fairly large in size. Skin smooth, greenish-yellow in color, often blushed or striped with dull red. Flesh generally firm, crisp, granular, moderately juicy. Early in season. Tree vigorous, upright-spreading in habit, dark green, abundant foliage, fairly productive. Flesh white; texture, tender, fairly juicy; flavor, aromatic, sweet and pleasant. Fairly resistant to fire blight.Early Harvest. Fruit fairly large in size. Flesh white; texture, tender, fairly juicy; flavor, aromatic, sweet and pleasant. Fairly resistant to fire blight.
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PScionEl DoradoFBKeeperMedium to large fruit, lumpy surface; yellow-green even when ripe. Very long storage life, keeps until January-February. Quality very good to excellent, sweet, smooth, melting. Also good canning. Needs refrigeration before ripening. Pick about mid-October. Originated in Placerville, El Dorado County, California, by Robert Patterson. Introduced in 1945; discovered in 1931; Fruit: large, sometimes larger than Bartlett; skin very smooth, greenish-yellow, not changing to yellow as does Bartlett upon ripening; ripens late, beginning about the third week in September; keeps well in cold storage until May and June; home cans very well; considered as a possible replacement for Anjou. --El Dorado. Long storage life, keeps until January-thru-June depending on quality of cold storage. Quality very good to excellent, sweet, smooth, melting. Also good canning. Pick about mid-October.
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PScionFarmingdaleFBTree is vigorous, well formed, fairly productive, and is the most blight resistant of all the P. communis cultivars tested at the Southern Oregon Branch Experiment Station, hence its place in the OHxF rootstock breeding program. Fruit size medium to large and resembles Beurre d'Anjou in form and coloration.Farmingdale. Fruit size medium to large and resembles Beurre d'Anjou in form and coloration. Flesh white, fairly fine, buttery, moderately juicy, quite free of grit. Extremely blight-resistant.
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PScionFertilityAn English cultivar introduced in 1875. Reliable and heavy cropping of a small pear. One of Nick's faves.Fertility. An English cultivar introduced in 1875. Reliable and heavy cropping of a small pear. One of Nick's faves.
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PnoFondante D'Automne yesP
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PScionGelbmostlerPerryGelbmostler is a perry pear that is common in Austria and northern Switzerland. The fruit is medium to large, globular; greenish-yellow changing to light yellow, often slightly blushed, speckled with russet dots. Its flesh is yellowish-white, coarse-grained, juicy, astringent, and over-ripens quickly. Heirloom known since 18th century.Gelbmostler. A perry pear that is common in Austria and northern Switzerland. Heirloom known since 18th century.
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APScionGolden RussetAlso known as Japanese Golden Russet, Japan Golden, Japan Russet, Canners Japan or Taihe. Fruit fairly large for the type, apple-like in form. Skin pale yellow in color, overspread with smooth russet and conspicuous sand spots. Flesh hard, gritty, moderately juicy. Aromatic but of poor dessert quality. midseason. Tree vigorous, hardy, very productive, moderately susceptible to fire blight.Golden Russet. Fruit fairly large for the type, apple-like in form. Flesh hard, gritty, moderately juicy. Aromatic but of poor dessert quality. Midseason. Tree vigorous, hardy, very productive.
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PScionH.E.S. 25021 yesAttractive pear from the Harrow Experimental Station in Ontario Canada, long regarded as a pear breeding powerhouse.H. E. S. 25021. Attractive pear from the Harrow Experimental Station in Ontario Canada, long regarded as a pear breeding powerhouse.
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PScionHarrow DelightFBBartlett x (Early Sweet x Old Home) originating at the Harrow Research Station in Ontario, Canada in 1982. Flavor as good as that of Bartlett but distinctly different. Ripens 2 weeks before Bartlett. Resistance to fireblight. Originated at Research Station., Harrow, Ontario, Canada by H.A. Quamme, Agr. Canada. Introduced in 1982. Medium sized, slightly smaller than Bartlett. Flesh is high quality and very smooth with no grit cells. Very productive tree even at a young age. Ripens in mid-August.Harrow Delight. Flavor as good as that of Bartlett but distinctly different. Resistat to fireblight. Very productive tree even at a young age. Ripens in mid-August.
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PScionHendre HuffcapPerryA mid season perry pear with medium acids and low tannins. Traditional old English cultivar, related to, but distinct from the Yellow Huffcap. The name ‘Huffcap’ may have come from a potent ale that could ''lift one’s cap'', or possibly from an alternate spelling ‘Huffcup’ referring to “lifting your cup” when making a toast. Ripens late September to early October in western Oregon; easily shaken from tree. Hendre Huffcap. A mid season perry pear. Traditional old English cultivar, related to, but distinct from the Yellow Huffcap. Ripens late September to early October in western Oregon; easily shaken from tree.
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ScionHighlandYellow fruit with carmine blush. Large, flavorful pear that is well suited for home orchards and processing. Good for fresh eating, canning, or drying. Both tree and fruit show some resistance to pear scab. Preferred over Bartlett Ripens in early September. Highland. Yellow fruit with carmine blush. Large, flavorful pear that is well suited for home orchards and processing. Good for fresh eating, canning, or drying. Both tree and fruit show some resistance to pear scab. Preferred over Bartlett Ripens in early September.
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PScionHoneysweetFBDeveloped in Indiana, introduced in 1977. Ripens to golden russet; flesh smooth, buttery, no detectable grit; flavor rich, sweet, resembles Seckel; cultivar sets without pollination, but fruit size is reduced. Resistant to fireblight. A high quality pear with medium size fruit from Indiana, released in 1977. Fruit ripens to golden russet; flesh smooth, buttery, no detectable grit; flavor rich, sweet, resembles Seckel; cultivar sets without pollination, but fruit size is reduced; pollen is fertile.Honeysweet. Introduced in 1977. Resembles Seckel. Resistant to fireblight. A high quality pear. Fruit ripens to golden russet; flesh smooth, buttery.
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APScionHosuiA George Barton favorite and a Curator's Choice. Large fruit, fine brown skin. very sweet and juicy. Nice refreshing flavor. Will keep for several weeks after picking if refrigerated. Vigorous tree, can be a little slow to bear but produces a large crop if conditions in the spring are right. Branches in drooping willowy habit.The russeted skin resists blemishes. Originated at the National Horticulture Research Station, Tsukuba, Japan. Cross of Ri-14 (Kikusui x Yakumo) x Yakumo introduced in 1972. Ripe with Chojuro, mid August to September in Oregon; stores 4 weeks. Hosui. A very popular variety with Asian pear afficionados. Large fruit, fine brown skin. very sweet and juicy. Nice refreshing flavor. Will keep for several weeks after picking if refrigerated. Vigorous tree.
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ScionHudarEarlyIntroduced by St. Lawrence Nurseries, Potsdam, New York. Fruit yellow with sweet, juicy flesh, about the size of Bartlett. Early and productive, Good for fresh eating, canning. Ripe late July to early August. Hudar. About the size of Bartlett. Early and productive, Good for fresh eating, canning. Ripe late July to early August.
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APScionHuhoot LiLateA George Barton favorite. Small to moderate sized green ovate pears w/ firm crunchy flesh, a definite spicy flavor which is very refreshing. Keeps for several months, late ripening. Thin fruit for optimal sizing. Tree is vigorous on OHF 333 prolific bearer.Huhoot Li. A very popular variety with Asian pear afficionados. Small to moderate sized green ovate pears w/ firm crunchy flesh, a definite spicy flavor which is very refreshing. Keeps for several months, late ripening.
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APScionHung LiFBCollected by F.C. Reimer in China in 1917. The name Hung Li means Red Pear. This term, of course, is very indefinite when applied to Chinese varieties of pears. In fact, there are a score of Chinese pears which are known by this name. The writer obtained scionwood of a least three varieties or strains all known as Hung Li. Any pear which possesses a red cheek may pass under the name Hung Li. The term, therefore, is so infefinite that one does not know what variety or type is being obtained unless one actually sees the trees and the fruit on the tree. The most common type of Hung Li produces fruit of medium size, roundish in shape, with a yellow background and a red cheek on the sunny side, and a shiny skin. The calyx is deciduous. The flesh is hard, possesses a sub-acid flavor, and is not of very high quality. It is a remarkable keeper, and the fruit under favorable conditions will shrivel and dry up and seldom rot. The tree is a vigorous grower. The botany of this variety, in fact almost the entire group has been a puzzle. A careful study leads me to the conclusion that this is a hybrid group with P. ussuriensis as one of the parents. One very interesting and apparently very valuable variety was obtained near Malanyu under the name Hung Li. I did not see the fruit on this tree as it had all been picked and shipped when I visited the orchard. The leaves show the typical margins of P. ussuriensis, although the shape of the leaf is somewhat different. The young trees in the nursery are very vigorous growers. This variety has proved a perfect marvel in its ability to resist pear blight. Repeated inoculations on various dates and the virulent cultures have failed entirely in most instances. In some cases these were successful in the very tender and very vigorous growing tips and would blight down for a distance of two or three inches and then stop. No other cultivated variety so far tested in our entire collection has proved as resistant as this one. A splendid stand was also obtained in grafting this variety. Every effort is now being made to force this variety into early bearing, and we shall study with great interest the character of the fruit. -- F.C. Reimer. 1919. Report of trip to the Orient to collect and study Oriental pears.Hung Li. The name Hung Li means Red Pear, producing fruit of medium size, roundish in shape, with a yellow background and a red cheek on the sunny side. It is a remarkable keeper, and the fruit under favorable conditions will shrivel and dry up and seldom rot. The tree is a vigorous grower.
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APScionIchiban NashikeeperThe first ripening asian pear in George Barton's yard. Small to medium sized fruit, sweet and juicy, pleasant flavor, perhaps a hint of butterscotch, but not as pronounced as Chojuro. Very prolific bearer, thin fruit for optimal size. Tree is usually loaded. Best eaten off the tree or within a few days. It will store for couple of weeks w/ refrigeration.One of the first ripening asian pears. Small to medium sized fruit, sweet and juicy, pleasant flavor, perhaps a hint of butterscotch, but not as pronounced as Chojuro. Very prolific bearer. Best eaten off the tree or within a few days. It will store for couple of weeks w/ refrigeration.
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APScionJapanese Golden RussetBrown skinned ovate fruit, crisp and sweet, moderately juicy. Fruit is moderate to large. Tree is vigorous and a moderate bearer. GB.Japanese Golden Russet. Brown skinned ovate fruit, crisp and sweet, moderately juicy. Fruit is moderate to large. Tree is vigorous and a moderate bearer.
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ScionJiugnosEarlyFrom Italy. Fruit ripens in late June or July in Oregon. Has a delicate honeylike flavor. Miniature. May be same as Bella di Giugno.Jiugnos. From Italy. Fruit ripens in late June or July in Oregon. Has a delicate honeylike flavor. Miniature. May be same as Bella di Giugno.
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ScionJoey's Red FleshredOrigin uncertain. This may be the old German 'Blutbirne'. Scions received in 1992 from Clarence Barker, then of Albany, Oregon. Mr. Barker had obtained this cultivar from his nephew Joey. The original tree was in a 100 year old orchard on Joey's Farm in McGraw, New York. The fruit ripens in the fall, unlike other NCGR red flesh pears which all ripen in the summer. Joey's Red Flesh. Origin uncertain. This may be the old German 'Blutbirne'. The fruit ripens in the fall, unlike other NCGR red flesh pears which all ripen in the summer.
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ScionJohantorpyumCurator's Choice. Developed in: Sweden. A very late ripening and cold hardy pear widely grown in Sweden for winter storage. Like Granny Smith or Goldrush apples, the Johantorp pear will hang on the tree late into the winter. In mild winters we can enjoy them directly off the tree in late December. Johantorp. Curator's Choice. Developed in: Sweden. Very late ripening. Like Granny Smith or Goldrush apples, the Johantorp pear will hang on the tree late into the winter. In mild winters we can enjoy them directly off the tree in late December.
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ScionJunsko ZlatoEarlyFrom Yugoslavia. Name means 'June Sugar'. A cross of Precoce de Trevoux x Doyenne de Juillet made in 1963. The breeder is Prof. Dr. Asen Stancevic. Named and released in 1978. Fruits are small to medium, averaging 60 g. 58 mm in length, 50 mm in width, truncate-conical. Calyx is small and half-open. The basin is fairly wide, medium deep and slightly ribbed. Skin is thin, smooth and glossy, golden-yellow with faint blush on the sunny side. Flesh is yellowish, juicy and melting, sweet-acid, witha pleasant aroma, without grit. Soluble solids about 13.7%, 10.1% sugars, 0.3% acids. Core is small. No core breakdown. High-yielding, some parthenocarpic fruit, annual bearing. Compatible with quince, moderate pest resistance. Ripe in late June.Junsko Zlato. From Yugoslavia. Name means 'June Sugar'. Flesh is yellowish, juicy and melting, sweet-acid, witha pleasant aroma, without grit. No core breakdown. High-yielding, annual bearing. Ripe in late June.
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ScionKair AarmundEarlyA very early pear listed as high quality by Joseph Postman, USDKair Aarmund. A very early pear listed as high quality by Joseph Postman, USDA.
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PScionKalleEuropean pear , productive, delicious, large red fruits with melting delicious flesh.Kalle. European pear , productive, delicious, large red fruits with melting delicious flesh.
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PScionKiefferFBLLateGrown from a seed of a Sand Pear by Peter Kieffer of Roxborough, Pennsylvania about 1855. Presumed to be a cross of Sand Pear and Bartlett. First fruited in 1863 and the first Sand Pear hybrid to assume importance. It is the standard by which other varieties of the group are judged. Fruit medium or larger in size, ovate in form, usually pointed at both stem and calyx ends. Skin greenish-yellow in color, often blushed dull red, numerous large russet dots. Flesh gritty, fairly juicy, tender but not fully buttery. Fair in dessert quality, quite satisfactory for culinary purposes. Improves in quality if harvested at the proper time and ripened at a constant tempeature of 65 degrees F. Tree fairly vigorous, moderately productive, somewhat resistant to fire blight. Kieffer. Presumed to be a cross of Sand Pear and Bartlett. First fruited in 1863 and the first Sand Pear hybrid to assume importance. Fair in dessert quality, quite satisfactory for culinary purposes.
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APScionKikusuiModerate-sized yellow-green skinned fruit. Flesh is white, Crisp sweet juicy flesh. Tree is of medium size and vigorous, slightly spreading and very productive. Fruit must be heavily thinned to obtain size. Fruit quality is very good, skin can be tender. Stores well, about 6-7 months. Sometimes mistaken for Nijisseki. Ripens around mid-September. Best eaten fresh within a week after picking. Flesh has a slight hint of anise. Reliable and moderate bearer. Mildew resistant. Scab-resistant. Fire-blight susceptible.Kikusui. Moderate-sized yellow-green skinned fruit. Crisp, white, sweet juicy flesh. Fruit must be heavily thinned to obtain size. Fruit quality is very good, skin can be tender. Stores well, about 6-7 months. Pick it before it is completely yellow, it will
slow down the ripening so that it will last (yellow skinned varieties will not
tend to keep as well as others)

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ScionKlementinkayumEarlyCurator's Choice. A small, crunchy, early season pear (mid July) that ripens on the tree. This Bulgarian variety of unknown parentage is indistinguishable from Turkey’s ‘Mustafabey’, Macedonia’s ‘Arganche’ and Romania’s ‘Zaharoasa de Vara’. Fruit: small like Seckel, pyriform, skin yellow with red blush and no russet; flesh fine-textured, sweet, juicy, firm. Tree: naturally compact, easily managed, consistently productive, resistant to scab.Klementinka. Curator's Choice. A small, early season Bulgarian pear that ripens on the tree (mid July). Indistinguishable from Turkey’s ‘Mustafabey’, Macedonia’s ‘Arganche’ and Romania’s ‘Zaharoasa de Vara’. Fesh fine-textured, sweet, juicy, firm.
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APScionKosui yesVigorous tree moderately productive of medium sized olive skinned fruits which are sweet and juicy, flavor is mild and pleasant. Drooping branch habit. GBKosui. Vigorous tree moderately productive of medium sized olive skinned fruits which are sweet and juicy, flavor is mild and pleasant.
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ScionLaxton's Early MarketEarlyOriginated in Bedford, England, by Laxton Brothers Nursery. A cross of Marie Louise x Doyenne d'Ete introduced in 1927 in England. Brought to the U.S. for trial in 1938. Fruit: size medium; flesh yellow, subacid, dessert flavor fair; harvested first week of August at Wooster, Ohio.Laxton's Early Market. Originated in Bedford, England. Fruit: size medium; flesh yellow, subacid, dessert flavor fair; harvested first week of August at Wooster, Ohio.
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PScionLaxton's Progress yesRanked in the top 18 for quality of the 1000 cultivars in the USDA's pear repository in Corvallis. Introduced in England in 1933; in the U.S. in 1938. Harvested about I week after Bartlett. Tree susceptible to fire blight.Laxton's Progress. Ranked in the top 18 for quality of the 1000 cultivars in the USDA's pear repository in Corvallis. Introduced in England in 1933; in the U.S. in 1938. Harvested about I week after Bartlett. Tree susceptible to fire blight.
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ScionLeopardo MorettiniyumCurator's Choice. Flavor is an important characteristic of any pear released in Italy, and this is no exception. Originated in Florence, by Alessandro Morettini. Released in 1967. Coscia x Decana d'Inverno (Doyenne d'Hiver). Fruit: medium size, interesting net-like russet, fine, buttery texture, flavor similar to Beurré Superfin.Leopardo Morettini. Curator's Choice. Originated in Florence. Released in 1967. Fruit: medium size, interesting net-like russet, fine, buttery texture, flavor similar to Beurré Superfin.
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PScionLusciousFBOriginated in Brookings, South Dakota. Introduced in 1973. Medium-sized fruit; flesh light yellow, firm, fine texture, melting, very juicy, flavor similar to Bartlett, quality good.Luscious. Medium-sized fruit; flesh light yellow, firm, fine texture, melting, very juicy, flavor similar to Bartlett, quality good.
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PScionMagnessFBOriginated in Beltsville, Maryland, by USDA. Released in 1968.Flesh soft, very juicy, almost free of grit cells, flavor sweet, highly perfumed, aromatic.Magness. A popular high-performing variety released by USDA pear breeders in 1968.Flesh soft, very juicy, almost free of grit cells, flavor sweet, highly perfumed, aromatic. Blight resistant.
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PScionMaxineFBFound as a seedling in Preble County, Ohio about 1900. Fruit medium to large in size. Skin lemon-yellow in color, smooth and blemish free, very attractive. Flesh white, fairly fine, quite free of grit, buttery, juicy. Holds up well after ripening. A little later than Bartlett in season.Maxine. Skin lemon-yellow in color, smooth and blemish free, very attractive. Flesh white, fairly fine, quite free of grit, buttery, juicy. A little later than Bartlett in season. Blight resistant.
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PScionMerricourtFBOriginated in Clarksville, Tennessee. Introduced in 1966. Medium size fruit, green to greenish yellow skin blushed with dark red. the flesh is reported to be creamy white, buttery, with an excellent sweet, subacid, sprightly flavor.Merricourt. Introduced in 1966. Flesh creamy white, buttery, with an excellent sweet, subacid, sprightly flavor. Blight-resistant.
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PScionMichurin's Winter BeurrePerryIn 1903, several blossoms of a six-year-old Ussurian pear sapling that had bloomed for the first time werefertilized with pollen taken in the orchard of an amateur gardener... from a pear he had erroneously called Beurre Diel. Its correctname was Beurre Royal, as became evident subsequently. Five seedlings resulted and two were discarded. A seedling with very thick shoots that produced beautiful fruitwith good flavour and kept in storage until January was named 'Tolstobezhka' in 1912. Another seedling with largefruit thickly speckled with red patches on a gree background, of good flavourand autumn ripening was named ' Rakovka' in 1912. The final seedling was named 'Michurin Beurre Zimnaya' and combined good qualities of both the tree and the fruit. "This new variety of real winter pear will undoubtedly be evaluated as first-grade, very good for orchards in the central and partly also in the northern zones of the U.S.S.R.. This high evaluation of this variety is not in the least an exaggeration, if only for the reason that in our parts there has not been up till now a single hardy variety of pear, the fruit of which could keep fresh during the winter. Moreover, of enormous importance is the exceptional hardiness of the tree. During my twenty-two years of observation, not a single branch, not a single twig, was damaged by frost. The tree suffered no particular damage even in the winter of 1926/26 when the temperature went down to minus 36 C, and its stem suffered no damage whatever from sunburn..." -- from I.V. Michurin Selected Works. 1950.Michurin's Winter Beurre. Exceptional cold hardiness in a pear developed in the Russian Federation.
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PScionMoonglowFBOriginated in Beltsville, Maryland, by USDA. Introduced in 1960. Fruit: large; attractive; flesh rather soft, moderately juicy, nearly free of grit cells, flavor mild, subacid, rated good; for processing as well as being of good quality for fresh use.Moonglow. Originated in Beltsville, Maryland, by USDA in 1960. Fruit: large; attractive; flesh rather soft, moderately juicy. For processing as well as being of good quality for fresh use. Blight-resistant.
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ScionMustafabeyEarlyMustafabey. Introduced into U.S. in 1960 from Belgrade, Yugoslavia, as "Mustabey" (PI 264697), from the Instituto di Frutticoltura. in Rome, Italy, in 1967 as "Musta Bey" (PI 324134), collected in Macedonia by T. van der Zwet in 1978 as "Mustabej." The name apparently refers to its origin in the garden of a man named Mustafa. Identical to Arganche from Macedonia, Zaharoasa de Vara from Romania and Klementinka from Bulgaria.llow, subacid, dessert flavor fair; harvested first week of August at Wooster, Ohio.Mustafabey. Very early ripe. Yugoslavian. Name apparently refers to its origin in the garden of a man named Mustafa. Identical to Arganche from Macedonia, Zaharoasa de Vara from Romania and Klementinka from Bulgaria. Harvested first week of August.
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APScionNijiseikiHigh YieldingModerate sized yellow fruits with white sweet juicy flesh, very refreshing. Vigorous tree, ripens mid to late August in George Barton's yard. Fruit can be kept for several weeks under refrigeration.Nijiseiki. Moderate sized yellow fruits with white sweet juicy flesh, very refreshing. Vigorous tree, ripens mid to late August. Fruit can be kept for several weeks under refrigeration.
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PScionNormannischen CiderbirnePerryFrench perry pear. Developed circa 1913. In Normandy, France, and in upper Austria this cultivar grows widely. It is excellent for making perry and for distillation. The fruit is small, turbinate, and greenish-yellow covered with cinnamon-russet and ashy-gray dots. The flesh is yellowish-white, somewhat dry and can be sweet but with some sprightliness.Normannischen Ciderbirne. French perry pear, excellent for making perry and for distillation.
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OkusankichiKeeping variety.
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APScionOlympicAlso known as Korean Giant. Very large (16-32 oz.), attractive orange-brown russet, round pear. Flesh is firm, crisp and sweet, not especially juicy. Tree is very vigorous, large, upright. Long storage life, about 8 to 9 months. It is a Korean pear. One of the best tasting, late ripening varieties. Ripens late October, early November. George Barton picks his off the tree at Halloween.Olympic. Also known as Korean Giant or Dan Bae. Very large (16-32 oz.), attractive orange-brown russet, round pear. Flesh is firm, crisp and sweet, not especially juicy. Tree is very vigorous. Long storage life, about 8 to 9 months. One of the best tasting, late ripening varieties. Ripens late October, early November.. Highly regarded as a keeping variety.
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ScionOnwardyumThe favorite fruit of pear of Harold Bjornstad, one of the key figures involved in establishing the USDA's pear repository in Corvallis, and a Curator's Choice. Nearly as good as its parent, Doyenne de Comice. Raised in 1947 at England's National Fruit Trials, and named in 1967. Tree easier to grow and often more productive than Comice. Flesh creamy white, melting, very fine.Onward. The favorite fruit of pear of Harold Bjornstad, one of the key figures involved in establishing the USDA's pear repository in Corvallis. A Curator's Choice, too. Nearly as good as its parent, Doyenne de Comice. Tree easier to grow and often more productive than Comice. Flesh creamy white, melting, very fine.
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ScionOrcasYellow fruit with carmine blush. Large, flavorful pear that is well suited for home orchards and processing. Good for fresh eating, canning, or drying. Both tree and fruit show some resistance to pear scab. Preferred over Bartlett Ripens in early September. Orcas. Large, flavorful pear that is well suited for home orchards and processing. Good for fresh eating, canning, or drying. Both tree and fruit show some resistance to pear scab. Preferred over Bartlett Ripens in early September.
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PScionPackham's Triumph yesOriginating in New South Wales about 1897. First commercial planting in Oregon in 1950. Flesh white, fine, melting, very juicy, quite free of grit. Sweet, vinous flavor, rates among the best in dessert quality. Season late, keeps as long as Beurre d'Anjou in cold storage. Holds up well after ripening. Tree moderately vigorous, productive. Packham's Triumph. Grown in Oregon since 1950. Rates among the best in dessert quality. Season late, keeps as long as Beurre d'Anjou in cold storage. Holds up well after ripening. Tree moderately vigorous, productive.
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APScionPai LiFBLateAlso known as Beijing White Pear. Late ripe. Fire-blight resistant. Scab and mildew resistant. Pai Li is probably the most popular pear among the Chinese in north China. Medium in size, usually 1.5 to 2 inches, although occasionally 2.5 inches in diameter. It is roundish or slightly oblate in shape. The color is a light lemon yellow, with many small inconspicuous cinnamon dots; and the skin is smooth, shiny and quite thin. At picking time, the flesh is firm, but becomes mellow, tender and is juicy whent ready to eat. The flavor is sweet and very agreeable. In quality, it compares very well with the better European pears. It is an excellent keeper.Pai Li. Late ripe. Fire-blight resistant. Scab and mildew resistant. Pai Li is probably the most popular pear among the Chinese in north China. The flavor is sweet and very agreeable. In quality, it compares very well with the better European pears. It is an excellent keeper.
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PScionPasse ColmarThis is one of the old standard winter pears in England. The fruits are exceedingly sugary and mildly spiced with cinnamon, a flavor so unique, especially when compared with the piquant flavor most common in winter pears, that the variety is worth growing where it succeeds for the sake of diversity. On unsuitable soils and under indifferent care, the pears are unattractive and poor in quality. The variety does not thrive on heavy cold clay but requires a light, warm soil. The trees are very vigorous on heavy soils, with the result that the fruits are many but small and poor; checking vigor by dwarfing on quince or planting on poor soil suits the variety. The trees are hardy and as free as the average pear from blight. Passe Colmar. One of the old standard winter pears in England. The fruits are uniquely flavored - exceedingly sugary and mildly spiced with cinnamon.
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ScionPerazolaEarlyVery early ripening. From Italy. Fruit is small, sweet, yellow-white. Tree is precocious.Perazola. Very early ripening. From Italy. Fruit is small, sweet, yellow-white. Tree is precocious.
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PScionPetit MuscatHigh YieldingEarlyAncient European origin. Jean Mayer, director of the gardens of the Grand Duke of Wurtzburg, Bavaria, in his 'Pomona franconica' published in 1801 showed that the petit-Muscat was the antique pear Superba described by Pliny. Charles Estienne was the first to write of it in France, 1530, and he named it Musquette. Fruit very small, turbinate, pale greenish-yellow, finely dotted and slightly clouded with rose on the side of the sun (in France); flesh yellowish, semi-fine, breaking, not very juicy, sugary, acidulous and with a pleasant musk flavor; Ripe in June.Petit Muscat, the same as antique pear Superba described by Pliny. Fruit very small. Flesh yellowish, semi-fine, breaking, not very juicy, sugary, acidulous and with a pleasant musk flavor. Ripe in June.
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APScionPing LiHigh pear scab incidence.Ping Li. High pear scab incidence.
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PScionPotomacFBA fire blight-resistant mid-season pear with good fruit quality. Released in 1993. Fruit: medium size. Flesh moderately fine, buttery with some small grit under skin; flavor subacid and mild, similar to Anjou. Ripens 2 weeks after Bartlett; stores for 8 weeks or less. Tree: medium size; precocity and productivity similar to Anjou; fire blight resistance greater than Seckel.Potomac. A fire blight-resistant mid-season pear with good fruit quality. Released in 1993. Fruit: medium size, flavor similar to Anjou.
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PScionPresident OsmonvilleHigh YieldingDeveloped in France, 1834. High-yielding heirloom.President Osmonville. Developed in France, 1834. Very high-yielding heirloom.
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PScionProfessor GrosdemageyesLateFruit medium in size, oblong-pyriform, quite regular. Skin greenish-yellow in color, often blushed, reasonably blemish free. Flesh yellowish, medium fine, fairly firm, not very juicy. Sweet, pleasing flavor but not outstanding in dessert quality. Late keeper, slow to ripen, long shelf life. Tree of medium vigor, fine foliage, fairly productive, true dwarf on quince. Moderately susceptible to fire blight. Professor Grosdemage. Late keeper, slow to ripen, long shelf life. Ranked in the top 18 of the 1000 cultivars at the USDA pear repository for fruit quality.
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