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ISTE Standards
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Empowered LearnerDigital CitizenKnowledge ConstructorInnovative DesignerComputational ThinkerCreative CommunicatorGlobal Collaborator
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Students leverage technology to take an active role
in choosing, achieving and demonstrating competency
in their learning goals, informed by the learning sciences.
Students recognize the rights, responsibilities and
opportunities of living, learning and working in an interconnected
digital world, and they act and model in ways that are safe,
legal and ethical.
Students critically curate a variety of resources using
digital tools to construct knowledge, produce creative
artifacts and make meaningful learning experiences
for themselves and others.
Students use a variety of technologies within a
design process to identify and solve problems
by creating new, useful or imaginative solutions.
Students develop and employ strategies for
understanding and solving problems in ways
that leverage the power of technological
methods to develop and test solutions.
Students communicate clearly and express
themselves creatively for a variety of
purposes using the platforms, tools, styles,
formats and digital media appropriate to
their goals.
Students use digital tools to broaden their
perspectives and enrich their learning by
collaborating with others and working
effectively in teams locally and globally.
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1a Students articulate and set personal learning goals, develop
strategies leveraging technology to achieve them and reflect
on the learning process itself to improve learning outcomes.

1b Students build networks and customize their learning
environments in ways that support the learning process.

1c Students use technology to seek feedback that informs
and improves their practice and to demonstrate their learning
in a variety of ways.

1d Students understand the fundamental concepts of
technology operations, demonstrate the ability to choose,
use and troubleshoot current technologies and are able to
transfer their knowledge to explore emerging technologies.
2a Students cultivate and manage their digital identity and
reputation and are aware of the permanence of their actions in
the digital world.

2b Students engage in positive, safe, legal and ethical behavior
when using technology, including social interactions online or
when using networked devices.

2c Students demonstrate an understanding of and respect for
the rights and obligations of using and sharing intellectual property.

2d Students manage their personal data to maintain digital privacy
and security and are aware of data-collection technology used to
track their navigation online.
3a Students plan and employ effective research
strategies to locate information and other resources
for their intellectual or creative pursuits.

3b Students evaluate the accuracy, perspective,
credibility and relevance of information, media, data
or other resources.

3c Students curate information from digital resources
using a variety of tools and methods to create
collections of artifacts that demonstrate meaningful
connections or conclusions.

3d Students build knowledge by actively exploring
real-world issues and problems, developing ideas
and theories and pursuing answers and solutions.
4a Students know and use a deliberate design
process for generating ideas, testing theories,
creating innovative artifacts or solving authentic
problems.

4b Students select and use digital tools to plan
and manage a design process that considers
design constraints and calculated risks.

4c Students develop, test and refine prototypes
as part of a cyclical design process.

4d Students exhibit a tolerance for ambiguity,
perseverance and the capacity to work with
open-ended problems.
5a Students formulate problem definitions
suited for technology-assisted methods such
as data analysis, abstract models and
algorithmic thinking in exploring and finding
solutions.

5b Students collect data or identify relevant
data sets, use digital tools to analyze them,
and represent data in various ways to
facilitate problem-solving and
decision-making.

5c Students break problems into component
parts, extract key information, and develop
descriptive models to understand complex
systems or facilitate problem-solving.

5d Students understand how automation
works and use algorithmic thinking to develop
a sequence of steps to create and test
automated solutions.
6a Students choose the appropriate
platforms and tools for meeting the
desired objectives of their creation or
communication.

6b Students create original works or
responsibly repurpose or remix digital
resources into new creations.

6c Students communicate complex ideas
clearly and effectively by creating or using
a variety of digital objects such as
visualizations, models or simulations.

6d Students publish or present content that
customizes the message and medium for
their intended audiences.
7a Students use digital tools to connect with learners from
a variety of backgrounds and cultures, engaging with them
in ways that broaden mutual understanding and learning.

7b Students use collaborative technologies to work with
others, including peers, experts or community members,
to examine issues and problems from multiple viewpoints.

7c Students contribute constructively to project teams,
assuming various roles and responsibilities to work
effectively toward a common goal.

7d Students explore local and global issues and use
collaborative technologies to work with others to investigate solutions.
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Activities
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U1: Dive into the research: Research questions
Research questions narrow our focus to what
we really want or need to know about an issue.
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U2: Uncover assumptions: Personal assumptions chart
A Personal Assumptions Chart is a document of your assumptions.
Recording assumptions reveals thoughts and opinions about the
problem and the people experiencing the problem that may be incorrect, or invalid.
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U3: Empathize: Create an interview script
Interviewing is having a conversation and asking for stories.
For people to open up to us, we first have to build a relationship with them,
then we can ease into asking more sensitive questions.
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U4: Empathize: Conduct interviews
Interviewing can feel a little awkward because you are
getting to know someone you’ve never met. Be prepared so you
properly collect the information you need.
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U5: Empathize: Conduct observations
Observational research involves closely watching and recording what people do
in their environments so you can capture trends in their behaviors
and characteristics.
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U6: Organize your findings: Affinity clusters
Affinity clustering is the process of grouping information into related
themes or topics. Put order to the information so you can gain insight
into the problem.
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U7: Organize your findings: Empathy map
An Empathy Map allows us to sum up our learnings from interviews/observations.
The map provides four major areas in which to focus our attention
(Said, Did, Thought, Felt) to give us an overview of a person’s experience.
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U8: Organize your findings: Journey map
Journey maps are timelines of how your interviewee goes through their day.
What do they do? What emotions do they feel? Why do they do the things they do?
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I1. Frame the problem: Ask “How might we?” How you frame a question can
drastically change what sort of solutions you come up with. “How Might We” (HMW)
questions transform a need/problem into an actionable question to guide your project.
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I2. Go broad: Braindump
Braindumping is an individual brainstorm session. This helps you get all your
ideas out, before you're influenced by other's ideas. Then, you'll share your
ideas with the team.
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I3. Go broad: Brainwrite
Build on ideas by writing your ideas down and then passing them on to the
next person for additions/elaborations. There’s no pressure to come up with
a great idea all by yourself, instead ideas immediately become collaborative.
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I4. Go broad: Worst possible idea
Instead of going for good ideas, call for the worst, yes, the worst possible ideas.
This takes the pressure off and allows everyone to be more adventurous, since
they know their ideas aren’t going to be criticized.
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I5. Go narrow: Sticker dot voting: At some point, you’ll reach a critical
mass of ideas, and it will become unproductive to keep pushing for more ideas.
This is a good point to stop and focus on narrowing. Voting helps you compare
and evaluate ideas to pull out a few great ones to act on.
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I6. Go narrow: Four categories method
The fantastic four of idea selection! Divide your ideas up into four categories:
Rational Choice, Most Likely to Delight, Darling, and Long Shot. This method
ensures that your team covers all grounds, from the most practical ideas to
the most impactful ideas.
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I7. Go narrow: Sanity check
Have you all gone crazy?!? Sanity Check charts give your team lots of good
questions to think about when evaluating whether an idea will be a good one
to pursue.
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P1. Design it: 2D Model
Use pen and paper or digital graphic drawing software to create a 2D sketch of
your design. Don’t worry about your drawing skills; the most important part is to
include all the features your user needs in the design. Concept maps, flow charts
& diagrams are also forms of 2D models that can be used. Photographs of your
completed model can also be used in this activity.
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P2. Design it: 3D Model Get your idea off paper and into 3D. A 3D model is
an image or object with length, height, and depth (a 2D model only has length
and height). You can make 3D models with any kind of materials. Use what’s
available and start creating.
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P3.Build it: Prototyping to test
Prototyping is different than model building, but they are often confused because
they both involve building something. Prototyping is different because you are
building one small part of your idea and trying to make it work.
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P4. Build it: Prototyping for empathy
Put yourselves in the user's shoes. What's their mindset around the problem?
How would they feel using your product? Then, build a prototype focusing
on the user and their needs.
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P5. Build it: Prototyping another idea
Build onto an existing prototype. What features could you add?
How would you make it better?
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P6. Test it: I like, I wish, what if
You can iterate, or revise, your prototype several times based on feedback
from testers. The “I Like, I Wish, What If” method frames the testers’ feedback
in a constructive manner, enabling an open discussion that leads to
thoughtful iteration.
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P7. Test it: Feedback capture grid
A feedback capture grid is another way to structure feedback so you can gather
the most constructive and useful information from the tester.
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P8. Test it: Story Share and Capture
After doing several rounds of tests, it might be useful to get together as a team
and share inspiring stories with one another. Capture what resonates with you
as a team to steer your thinking on which improvements you want to tackle.
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PI-1. Craft your story: Story arc
Tell your story using the classic storytelling structure. First, set up the problem
and describe currently what is. Build up the suspense to the climax, the grand
reveal of your solution. Then, describe the resolution and illustrate what could
be in a world with your solution.
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PI-2. Craft your story: Solution slogan
Every good story needs an emotional ending. Come up with a slogan that will
wrap up the story and leave people believing that the world is going to be
better because of your solution.
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PI-3. Craft your story: Solution name
Now that you have crafted your story, you can give your solution a good name.
The name of your solution is like the title of your story. It quickly catches people’s
interest while succinctly describing what your solution is about.
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PI-4. Craft your story: Competitor matrix
Convince your audience that your solution is innovative. Research your
competitors to see what people might be doing or using instead of your solution.
Then, visually display what makes your solution stand out.
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PI-5. Craft your story: Value proposition
Make the audience care about and see value in your solution. The value
proposition helps you identify what is unique about your solution and what
specific benefits it brings to others or the world.
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PI-6. Share your story: Create your presentation
Create a slide deck that is a visual aid to your presentation. It should help your
presentation stay on track rather than distract. Great slide decks make complex
information more clear.
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PI-7. Share your story: Pitch event
It's time to tell your story. The class pitch event is an opportunity to see everyone’s
hard work and share your innovative solutions.
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