WM Grade 3 Goals/Links 10.2018
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Mathematics Grade 3
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Planning Grid (Gantt Chart)
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Links to Materials
Sequence instruction by academic year quarter.
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Click colored cells to download: Worksheet Series / Activities / Related Videos/ LinksIndicate when you are introducing a skill by flagging the appropriate quarter green.
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Worksheet #1
Related Video
Worksheet #2
Related LinkWorksheet #3Worksheet #4Flag the skill red when students will practice the skill on independent assignments (homework).
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Same background color indicates that these resources are related. Precursor skills are in different colors.
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Blue flag: priority skill- perhaps an IEP goal to be assessed on Progress Monitoring TestsInstructional level of skill: flag greenIndependent level of skill: flag red.
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Addition and Subtraction within Base Ten
Sept-OctNov-JanFeb-MarApr -Jun
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Precursor 2.NBT.3Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form.
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Click for Grade 2 Goals/Links
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PrecursorCompare two numbers using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.
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Diagram and compare numbers 1-10
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3.NBT1
Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.
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Round Tens w/ Up Down Triangles and Base ten BlocksRound whole numbers w/up down triangles
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Precursor K.G.1
Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, and drawings.
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📽 Missing Finger Addends to 10📽 Kinesthetic Operators +=-
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Precursor
Fluently add and subtract within 10 ((K.OA.2),
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Click for Kindergarten Goals/Links
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Precursor
Fluently add and subtract within 20 (1.OA.6)
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Click for Grade 1 Goals/Links
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Precursor
Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using manipulatives and drawings
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Regroup +/- Ten Template and worksheetsBase Ten Model 123 Addition and Subtraction Template
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📽 Regrouping Template Video
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Precursor 2.NBT.6
Add up to four two-digit numbers.
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Click for Grade 2 Goals/Links
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3.NBT2Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
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Precursor 2.OA.1Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-stepword problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
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Click for Grade 2 Goals/Links
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2.OA.1Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-stepword problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
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Click for Grade 2 Goals/Links
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Click to order book
Multiplication & Division Facts/Applications to the Area Model
Click for Multiplication Book Resources and AddendumsSept-OctNov-JanFeb-MarApr -Jun
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3.MD.5
Recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand concepts of area measurement.
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3.MD.5aA square with side length 1 unit, called “a unit square,” is said to have “one square unit” of area, and can be used to measure area.
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3.MD.5bA plane figure which can be covered without gaps or overlaps by n unit squares is said to have an area of n square units.
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3.MD.6Measure areas by counting unit squares (square: cm, m, in, ft, and non-standard units).
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3.MD.7aFind the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths by tiling it, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths.
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Precursor
Apply rules of syntax to fabricate multiplication and related division facts
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Diagram Facts Dry Erase
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3.OA.9Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table) and explain them using properties of operations. For example, observe that 4 times a number is always even, and explain why 4 times a number can be decomposed into two equal addends. (DIVISIBILITY RULES AND PATTERNS)
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📽 Divisibility by 2
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Precursor
Establish a Reference Bank of concrete nouns that relate fact-specific quantities
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See Multiplication book
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Precursor
Solve single-step word problems relating to specific fact families using controlled fact-specific vocabulary
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3.OA.7Fluently multiply and divide within 100 2x, 5x, 1x, 10x families, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.
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3.MD.1Tell and write time to the nearest [hour location and 5 minute intervals] minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram.
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Before and After Using Clocks
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3.OA.7Fluently multiply and divide within 100 9x, 3x, 6x families, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of grade 3, know from memory all products of two single-digit numbers and related division facts. For example, the product 4 x 9 = 36 has related division facts 36 ÷ 6 = 4 and 36 ÷ 4 = 9.
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3.OA.7Fluently multiply and divide within 100 4x, 7x, 8x families, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of grade 3, know from memory all products of two single-digit numbers and related division facts. For example, the product 4 x 7 = 28 has related division facts 28 ÷ 7 = 4 and 28 ÷ 4 = 7.
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📽 Woodin Ladder Chart Instructional VideoColor Coded Ladder Chart with Divisibility Rule References
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3.OA.6Understand division as an unknown-factor problem. For example, find 32 ÷ 8 by finding the number that makes 32 when multiplied by 8.
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3.OA.4Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or ÷ equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 × ? = 48, 5 = ? ÷ 3, 6 × 6 = ?.
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3.OA.1Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.
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3.OA.2Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.
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3.OA.5Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide. For example: When multiplying numbers order does not matter. If 6 × 4 = 24 is known, then 4 × 6 = 24 is also known. (Commutative property of multiplication.) 3 × 5 × 2 can be found by 3 × 5 = 15 then 15 × 2 = 30, or by 5 × 2 = 10 then 3 × 10 = 30. (Associative property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 × 5 = 40 and 8 × 2 = 16, one can find
8 × 7 as 8 × (5 + 2) = (8 × 5) + (8 × 2) = 40 + 16 = 56. (Distributive property.) When a number is multiplied by 1 the result is the same number (Identity property of 1 for multiplication). Students need not use formal terms for these properties. Students are not expected to use distributive notation.

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Click to order book
Multiplication & Division Procedures and Applications to Base Ten
Click for Multiplication Book Resources and AddendumsSept-OctNov-JanFeb-MarApr -Jun
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3.NBT.3Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10–90 (e.g., 9 × 80, 5 × 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.
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3.MD.7bMultiply side lengths to find areas of rectangles with whole-number side lengths in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems, and represent whole-number products as rectangular areas in mathematical reasoning.
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single by two digit x problems with matching composite arrays📽 Kinesthetic Area Activity with Graphic OrganizerL-Shape Garden Area
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3.OA.3Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem
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3.OA.8Solve two-step word problems using the four operations for problems posed with whole numbers and
having whole number answers. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the
unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation
strategies, including rounding.
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3.OA.8 footnote Students should know how to perform operations in the conventional order when there are no parentheses to specify a particular order (Order of Operations).
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3.OA.8Solve two-step word problems using the four operations for problems posed with whole numbers and
having whole number answers.
Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the
unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation
strategies, including rounding.
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3.OA.8Solve two-step word problems using the four operations for problems posed with whole numbers and
having whole number answers. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the
unknown quantity.
Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation
strategies, including rounding.
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FractionsFraction Frame Template
Article:
Durable Images Teach FractionsSept-OctNov-JanFeb-MarApr -Jun
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3.NF Develop understanding of fractions as numbers for fractions with denominators 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8.
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3.NF.1Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole (a single unit) is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b.
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Encode Fraction UniverseInitial Fraction Universe Encoding ModelFraction Universe fractions equivalent to 1/2 movie Durable Image Fraction Models
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3.NF.3Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size.
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3.NF.3aUnderstand two fractions as equivalent if they are the same size, or the same point on a number line.
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📽 Kinesthetic Line plot of fractions 1/2 and 4ths internal reference frame📽 Kinesthetic Line plot of fractions within an inch external reference frameSplit Fraction Worksheet
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3.NF.3bRecognize and generate simple equivalent fractions, e.g., 1/2 = 2/4, 4/6 = 2/3. Explain why the fractions are equivalent, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
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