MARAC Spring 2019 Unofficial Program Suggestions and Connections
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Name: Session ProposerContact InformationTopic PresentationldeaName(s) of interested partiesContact Information
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Tiffany Cole; Kate Morris
coletw@jmu.edu; morriskn@jmu.edu
Invisible labor in the archives"Discovery" of archival collections by patrons; promoting work of volunteers, interns, students, project/contract archivists; etc.Nicholas Webb; Rebecca Pattillonicholas.webb@mssm.edu; rebecca.pattillo@louisville.edu
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Karolina Lewandowska
karolina.lewandowska@navy.mil
Working in archives: project descriptions; workflows; systems, etc.A Labor of Love - Don't just data dump 'stuff' - Archivists working with records creators, who do not understand the value, importance, or seriousness of the records they createSesily Reschsesily.resch@navy.mil
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Sheridan Sayles
sheridan.l.sayles@rutgers.edu
Contract work for archivistsDiscussion of the ethics behind contract labor--from the job searcher, new archivists, and job creators perspectives--and best practices in project positions
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Karolina Lewandowska
karolina.lewandowska@navy.mil
Working in archives - what library school didn't prepare me for.In library school, we are taught about 'ideal settings' but the reality is that archivists are wearing multiple hats. At times it feels like you are doing everything but being an archivist: from being the outreach coordinator to social media person to a teacher of 'archival' stuff to being the defaco records manager, etc. We also need to know how to code. Sometimes, there is no support to get training for these skills and so you are forced to learn on the fly. On top of that, why haven't we scanned everything already. Oh and you have to go to conferences, keep up with the latest and greatest technology, etc. What does this mean for the profession as a whole? Is archival education keeping up with the all demands of being an archivist? What are some best practices? Ideally panel would include at least one member who has recently entered the profession.Michelle Smithmwsmith@colgate.edu
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Vakil Smallensmallen@gwu.eduProfessional Women: The Gender Politics of the National Education Association's Century of Non-UnionismBefore the sexual revolution, teaching was one of the few professions where women were the majority. The National Education Association (NEA) represented many of these teachers as members. From its founding in 1857 until the late 1960s, the NEA rejected the label of 'union' preferring to call itself a professional association. In tandem with rejecting the label, it rejected the tactics of unionism, as well. Advocating for respect by 'professionalizing the profession' were favored over strikes, collective bargaining, and adversarial relationships with adminstrators. Complicating this relationship was the role of the (mostly male) school administrators, who had authority over the members as employees while also playing an outsized role in directing the agenda of the NEA itself. Only when the teachers, as members, were able to throw out the old model in favor of a more directly democratic organization did the NEA begin to strongly advocate for members' rights.
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Matt Testamtesta3@jhu.eduWhen your boss isn't an archivistPanel discussion about the challenges of reporting to supervisors who do not have a background in archival work. Possible areas to explore: communication about resources necessary for processing; gifts policies; appraisal; articulating needs for digital preservation; professional development. Ideally panel would include at least one member who is not at an academic institution.Kay Lewandowska, Colleen McFarland Rademaker, Alexanda Plante, Cara Howe, Kieran McGheekarolina.lewandowska@navy.mil, rademakecm@cmog.org, aplante@hccc.edu, howec@upstate.edu, kieran.mcghee@wilson.edu
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Edith Sandler and Chelsea Fairley
edsa@loc.gov, chfa@loc.gov
Making the Move: Managing large-scale collection movesCollaboration between reference, collections management, and movers during a large-scale collections move. Maintaining open and consistent communication to ensure uninterrupted service to researchers. Goals of presentation: Outline project & workflows, offer insight/ perspective from different participants, discuss what worked/ what didn’t/ Lessons learned.
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Amanda Peters and Abby Shirer
acp47@psu.edu; aks5994@psu.edu
Mining the Backlog: Uncovering Collections to Enrich Labor Community Heritage and MemoryWe will discuss the challenges of processing large backlogged collections covering topics such as: history of accession, processing, learning curve, and how we plan to use the collection to enhance and rebuild the story of the mining community in the region, while also improving accessibility and diversity.
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Alex Toner alexjtoner@pitt.edu Records Management Topics; Labor & Lifecycles; etc...As MARAC is usually thin on sessions specfically focused on, or blending with, records management topics, I simply want to bait the hook and see if any kindred spirits want to discuss a potential collaboration. Happy to chair, panel, or not be involved at all! #RIM Andrea Belair, belaira@union.eduGeof Huth, ghuth@nycourts.gov
Alex, if you're still putting this together, RM is my life (along with archives), so I'd have ideas.
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Brittney Falterbfalter@gmu.eduSocial MediaSocial media as a form of outreach and making collections accessible is often not looked at as a serious component of our jobs. Only a few institutions have a dedicated social media person. I would like to discuss what we do at GMU and how I have made social media a huge (though unofficial) part of my job using small moments throughout my day.Rebecca Fitzsimmons, Kathleen Donahoerfitz12@vt.edu, kmd106@pitt.edu
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Anna Robinson-Sweet
robinsa1@newschool.edu
"The Workflow of the Workflow": Documenting processesLooking for collaborators on either panel or roundtable proposal that will investigate the process of creating workflow documentation. How do you separate technical processes versus narrative description? Inter-departmental communication? When does documentation go public? And when is it time to consider documentation "done?". Amanda adds: To what level are you writing documentation? What happens when the workflows evolve but the documentation can't keep up? Are people reading your documentation? Do you want your workflows to be public, and what are the pros and cons of sharing? John adds: Building on the question of when is documentation "done," when do workflows need to be reviewed/updated to meet changing roles, priorities and tools? How is oversight of workflows/workflow revision done (depending if its internal to a single deparment or is a cross-departmental or institution-wide procedure)?John Caldwell, Amanda Mayjcald@udel.edu; amandakossmay@gmail.com
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Rebecca Fitzsimmons rfitz12@vt.eduLabor: topics and or/collections dealing with labor, history of labor, unions, etc.Women entering the field of architecture during the 20th century often faced an especially high barrier to entry and once engaged in the profession frequently experienced discrimination and a lack of professional networks. The International Archive of Women in Architecture holds many collections that showcase the labor issues embedded in their professional lives. Professional identity and networks are a major and recurring theme across collections, as is the concept of women overcoming barriers to entering and working within the field. Several women rose to significant positions within the American Institute of Architects, such as serving on the AIA Task Force on Women in Architecture, writing the controversial AIA Affirmative Action Plan, and starting organizations such as the Organization of Women Architects. It would be great to put together a panel with other archivists who work with collections related to women and labor issues.
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Eric Stoykovichestoyko@umd.eduReconceptualizing the Archive as Social InfrastructureAre archives part of the American social infrastructure? Although the public continues to view archives very differently from libraries, how might archives be reconceptualized as places of local community development, personal discovery and growth, and social interaction? What programs in libraries which house special collections or archives (e.g. genealogical training, local history, community archiving) could be harnessed to augment or consolidate the importance of archives to particular places? Through an examination of case studies, and other research data, this presentation will investigate the ways archival repositories serve as nodes of community.
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Melissa Wertheimer
melissa.wertheimer@gmail.com
Appraisal and Collection Development with Web ArchivingAn in-progress case study of web archiving projects in the Library of Congress Music Division. Includes discussion of past division efforts, the incurred technical debt, and refocusing efforts with a new appraisal and collection development plan
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Matthew Belandmbeland@drew.eduDrawing the Circle Wider: Employing Individuals with Special Needs in the ArchivesI'm considering presenting on autistic or special needs individuals working in an archives - how that might be best handled by archival administrators. I gather there is a literature on workers in archives and a literature on special needs individuals in the workplace. I'm interested in learning about and sharing the nexus between the two. I imagine this presentation could appear in a panel that discusses employing individuals with a variety of special needs. Speakers could share their experience in this area and share lessons learned and recommendations with the audience.
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Amanda May
amandakossmay@gmail.com
PublishingHow do you get started with getting published: calls for proposals, writing your proposal, blind submissions, where does your article idea fit, how to write the article, the editing process, yay you got published now what? Ethical issues around publishing: paywalls, did you get paid to write that article?, talking about donors in your article (likeness permission?), peer review vs. not, bias in publishing. Why get published: resume builder, documentation of a new process, professional and academic contribution.
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Ilhan Citakilc4@lehigh.eduInfluenza Epidemic of 1918; working class; What are the socio-economic implications of the 1918 Influenza Epidemic in the Mid-Atlantic region and how have the archives recorded this?
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Ilhan Citakilc4@lehigh.eduUrban Renewal, Housing SegregationWhat do the archival collections reveal about the urban renewal and houing segretation in the metro areas of the Mid-Atlantic region?
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Dara Baker
dabaker.research@gmail.com
The Art of Re-processingArchival education teaches us the concepts of how to process a collection, but speaks little about the increasing need in the profession for reprocessing collections. This session would address the various ways in which reprocessing is of increasing importance in relation to MPLP, legacy collections, and born-digital collections. Concepts include the need to learn to process/reprocess collections where the archivist may not be able to ever work with the entire collection, limited time frames, revisions of finding aids that may be historically accurate but inappropriate in a modern era, introducing access for new communities, and collections where original order may have been lost--or never known. Wesley Chenaultwjchenault@vcu.edu
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