Studium Generale SPRING 2019 lecture schedule for audience
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

View only
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST
1
Studium Generale
2
SPRING Semester 2019
3
Evening lectures, 6:30-7:45 pm, for 75 min (60 min talk, 15 min discussion)
4
Lectures venue:
5
All lectures are held in Institute of Liberal Arts and Sciences (全学教育/教養教育院) 1F, room S1X.
6
7
8
Week No.TuesdaysThursdays
9
⬇️
10
May179
11
The big pictureThe big picture
12
discussion sessiondiscussion session
13
For ILAS Official credit COURSE For ILAS Official credit COURSE
14
May21416
15
LecturerKayoko TamuraCheen Aik Ang
16
AffiliationGraduate School of HumanitiesShiseido Co., Ltd.
17
Topic
Classical Chinese Poetry: Wonderland of Chinese
Characters
Things that they do and do not tell you about graduate school
18
Talk summary
We will discuss the structure of both Chinese poetry and Chinese Characters. We will discover that the better we understand Chinese Characters, the more we enjoy the Chinese Classics! The talk will review initital stages of one person's professional career. It will attempt to answer the question: How did the Nagoya University G30 Program prepare students for graduate school and beyond?
19
May32123
20
LecturerNathan HopsonHideyo Kunieda
21
AffiliationGraduate School of HumanitiesEmeritus Professor, School of Science, Department of Physics
22
TopicIngrained Habits: Kitchen Cars, Koppe Pan, and Dietary Transformation in Postwar JapanSeeing the sky through funnels – the challenges of X-ray astronomers
23
Talk summary
This talk explores the history and politics of US-funded food demonstration buses (“kitchen cars”) in Japan 1956-1960. Their express mission was to transform the Japanese national diet. They encapsulate the entanglements and complexities of US-Japanese relations and postwar Japanese domestic politics of postwar economic and social rebuilding. On the one hand, the kitchen cars taught Japanese women how to cook cheap, nutritious, mostly easy fare to improve the health of their families and the nation. On the other hand, many of these dishes were planned specifically to increase consumption of US agricultural products, especially wheat, soy, and corn. For American agricultural and political interests, in addition to supporting the economic recovery and political stability of a Cold War ally, the kitchen cars—along with the school lunch program—were instrumental in teaching Japan to accept and consume American produce. Bureaucrats, politicians, nutritionists, and the medical establishment in Japan welcomed the kitchen cars' rational, efficient, nutritious cooking as a foundation for economic growth and international resurgence. This contributed to profound transformations of nutrition science and the national diet in the context and service of Cold War politics.Life on Earth is protected by the atmosphere, as it absorbs most radiation except optical light. Great for life on Earth, but not so great for X-ray astronomers. To solve this issue we have developed X-ray telescopes to mount onboard satellites to explore the extreme phenomena in the Universe with “funnels”. In this talk the speaker will talk about why we study the Universe with X-rays, and will introduce X-ray stars and black holes.
24
May42830
25
LecturerMatthew LinleyAkihiro Okumura
26
AffiliationInternational Education and Exchange CenterSchool of Economics
27
TopicWhy is there so much bullsh*t in politics?Markets and Incentives: What They Can Do and What They Can't Do
28
Talk summary
Philosopher Harry G. Frankfurt defines bullsh*t as speech intended to persuade without regard for truth. While a person telling a lie is attempting to hide the truth, a bullsh*tter cares only about whether a person is persuaded. In this talk, I will discuss this concept, along with the idea of post-truth, and try to explain why political leaders, the mass media, and the general public are increasingly willing to use it to achieve their goals.Markets are human inventions. They are not omnipotent. Making appropriate rules, however, can improve market performance. I will talk about the virtues and limitations of markets in this talk showing examples of how markets are shaped and when they work well.
29
June546
30
LecturerDavid BarkerDaniel Marszalec
31
AffiliationGifu UniversityUniversity of Tokyo
32
TopicFive things to consider when talking to people from other countriesThe best advice I never got as a student: how to study with less worry, more fun - and how some basic economics can help you along the way
33
Talk summary
In every country and within every culture, people develop unspoken rules that help us to communicate effectively. These may include things like the topics we talk about, the words and phrases we use, and how we negotiate turn-taking. When we talk to people from other countries, it is all too easy to forget that their rule system might be different from ours. Because of this, we can sometimes cause offence without meaning to, or create a bad impression where we had hoped to create a good one. In this lecture, I will talk about some of the issues we need to consider when we think about talking with people from other countries and cultures.Universities are great a producing people with shiny degrees, yet relatively little clue about life beyond the lab or library. We get told a lot about what content to study, but much less about how to study, or how to coordinate the studies with the rest of life that surrounds us. Though everyone’s experience is unique, a lot of time is spent reinventing the wheel. Suppose you just happened to see what a wheel looks like, instead?

This will be a somewhat light-hearted talk about a relatively serious topic, which I hope will make your student days a little less complicated. I will share with you some of the advice I wish I had gotten as a student – about study strategy, life-work balance, self-care, etc. – rather than having to figure out myself. If time permits, I will briefly talk about why studying basic economic theory is useful for students majoring in other subjects also. And if none of this sounds appealing enough yet: the talk will feature a cute picture of a tomato.
34
June61113
35
LecturerTohru Uzawano class
36
AffiliationGraduate School for Mathematics(Nagoya University Festival)
37
TopicWhat is a Chance?
38
Talk summary
It is surprising that "chance" has only become a subject of serious studies in mathematics. We will make a brief tour through the mathematics of chance.
39
June71820
40
LecturerMarc HumbletAyaka Ito
41
AffiliationGraduate School of Earth and Planetary SciencesResearch Institute of Environmental Medicine
42
TopicFossil reefs and sea-level change: diving into the past to predict the future
The fats: friend or enemy?
43
Talk summary
The Quaternary is a geological period spanning the last 2.6 million years. The climate of the Quaternary has been characterized by the periodical advance and retreat of ice sheets during cycles of warm and cold climate coinciding with large variations of global sea level at timescales of 10s of thousands of years. The peak of the last cold period, or ice age, occurred about 20,000 years ago when sea level was 120 m below its present position. Since then sea level has risen in response to the melting of ice sheets and global warming, enhanced today by anthropogenic factors. For millions of people living in coastal areas the pace at which sea-level will rise in the future is a critical issue. In this talk I will explain how fossil coral reefs, particularly those of the Seychelles and the Great Barrier Reef of Australia, can provide crucial information on past sea-level history, information essential to validate models predicting the future trajectory of Earth’s climate and sea-level.Many would think that eating fats is harmful for our body as it could cause obesity or cardiovascular diseases. In fact, dietary fats are important energy source and are used in many ways by the body. Recent studies have shown that fats are important for our health to control body weight, prevent metabolic syndrome and even for the proper work of the immune system. In this lecture, the speaker will show how dietary fats affect our body and discuss what is the best way to consume fats to prevent diseases.
44
June82527
45
LecturerJohn ShillawWRAP-UP SESSION
46
AffiliationNanzan UniversityDiscussion among participants
47
TopicNineteenth-century InstagramOpen to all participants
48
Talk summary
The innovations made by early pioneers in photography were no less dramatic than the revolution that has taken place in digital technology over the past 25 years. In this talk I will describe several of the most significant processes developed by nineteenth-century photographers in their attempts to capture permanent images on a variety of media. I will also present examples of work produced at the time, as well as prints of my own.
49
50
Legend
51
science/technology content
52
social sciences/art content
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
Loading...