ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
1
ActionTotal WeightingIndicatorsIndicator weightingNT Government scoreNT Government PerformanceNTG Feedback/Further informationSource of / justification for criteriaOther comments
2
1. Commitment to achieving 50% reduction in green house gas emissions by 203051.1 Public commitment to 50% reduction in green house gas emissions by 20302.50No such commitment from NTG. The NTG target of 50% renewable electricity by 2030 will do little to reduce total green house gas emissions.NTG invited to provide further information than that on the public record on 30 October 2021. No further information received as of 30 January 2022.Based on 45% reduction required based on modelling for emission Pathways and System Transitions Consistent with 1.5°C Global Warming see: IPCC, 2018: Summary for Policymakers, p. 12.
3
1.2 Developed a roadmap, including interim targets, for achieving 50% reduction in green house gas emissions by 2030. This may include legislated targets.2.50No NT roadmap/climate change strategy published that sets out a reduction pathway with interim targets.NTG invited to provide further information than that on the public record on 30 October 2021. No further information received as of 30 January 2022.
4
2. Commitment to net zero green house gas emissions by 205052.1 Public commitment to net zero green house gas emissions by 20502.52.5NTG states: Our objective is to progressively reduce net GHG emissions in the Territory, with the goal of achieving net zero emissions by 2050' see Northern Territory Climate Change Response: Towards 2050 (July 2020, Nothern Territory Government) available at: <https://depws.nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/904775/northern-territory-climate-change-response-towards-2050.pdf> p. 8.NTG invited to provide further information than that on the public record on 30 October 2021. No further information received as of 30 January 2022.Minimum reduction required for emission Pathways and System Transitions Consistent with 1.5°C
Global Warming see: IPCC, 2018 Summary for Policymakers, p. 12.
5
2.2 Developed a roadmap, including interim targets, for achieving net zero emissions by 2050. This may include legislated targets.2.50No roadmap/climate change strategy published that sets out a reduction pathway with interim targets.NTG invited to provide further information than that on the public record on 30 October 2021. No further information received as of 30 January 2022.
6
3. Net reduction in green house gas emissions on track to meet 2030 and 2050 targets503.1 Achieved net reduction in green house gas emissions in year for which most recent data is available(over past financial year) in accordance with, or in excess of, interim targets set out in roadmap (or, where no interim targets have been adopted, at a per annum reduction rate of 5%)5002020-2021 emissions data for the Northern Territory has not been released. In the most recent year for which data is available (2019), NT emissions rose by 25%. https://www.industry.gov.au/data-and-publications/national-greenhouse-accounts-2019/state-and-territory-greenhouse-gas-inventories-annual-emissionsNTG invited to provide further information than that on the public record on 31 October 2021. No further information received as of 30 January 2022.As above. Note that in rating out of 5 the following methodology will apply: 5 points for reduction ≥ target, 4 points for 80-99% target, 3 points for 60-79% of target. 2 points for 40-59% of target, 1 point for 20-39% target, 0 points for 1-19% of target, -1 point for 0 reductions or increase in emissions. The data source will the that reported to the UNFCC: https://www.industry.gov.au/data-and-publications/state-and-territory-greenhouse-gas-inventoriesIn lieu of NTG setting its own interim targets we have had to apply the 5% reduction per annum rate. In 2016 NT emitted 16.5 million tonnes (see Northern Territory Government, Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Opportunities in the Northern Territory (Discussion Paper, 2018) p 12 available at <https://cmc.nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/654851/climate-change-discussion-paper.pdf>. In 2019 NT emissions amounted to 20.65 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent. As such a reasonable figure for a 5% reduction would be 1.03 million tonnes.
7
4. Phase out financial investment in green house gas emmitting projects and activities104.1 No new government investments, including subsidies, in fossil fuels. Note: where immediate withdrawal of investment would adversely impact disadvantaged groups (eg cutting subsidies to remote communities currently reliant on diesel generators) the NT Government must, at a minimum, implement a plan to phase out reliance on fossil fuels, including investing in fossil fuel replacement infastructure.50NTG continues to subsidise and invest in fossil fuel projects. See fiscal strategy statement p. 44: https://budget.nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/1000172/2021-22-BP2-book.pdf and industry outlook, pp. 7-9. 12-16: https://budget.nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0017/1000385/2021-22-Industry-Outlook-book.pdf.NTG invited to provide further information than that on the public record on 31 October 2021. No further information received as of 30 January 2022.See Rogelj et al, Mitigation Pathways Compatible with 1.5°C in the Context of Sustainable Development, p. 154. <https://www.ipcc.ch/site/assets/uploads/sites/2/2019/02/SR15_Chapter2_Low_Res.pdf>. Note that the UN Secretary General has called for countries to end all new fossil fuel exploration and production, and shift fossil fuel subsidies into renewable energy.By 2030, solar and wind capacity should quadruple and renewable energy investments should triple to maintain a net zero trajectory by mid-century. (United Nations, Secretary-General's statement on the IPCC Working Group 1 Report on the Physical Science Basis of the Sixth Assessment, (Press Release, 9 August 2021) <https://www.un.org/sg/en/content/secretary-generals-statement-the-ipcc-working-group-1-report-the-physical-science-basis-of-the-sixth-assessment>.According to the Australia Institute 2020-2021 NT subsidisation of the fossil fuel industry was valued at $107,034,000. See Rod Campbell et al, Fossil fuel subsidies in Australia Federal and state government assistance to fossil fuel producers and major users 2020-21 (The Australia Institute, April 2021).
8
4.2 Reduce all existing government investment, including subsidies, in large-scale green house gas emmiting projects and activities (> 100,000 tonnes per annum) in accordance with roadmap, or where roadmap is not adopted or does not specify targets, at a minimum per annum reduction rate of 5% as compared to the lower of 1) FY 19-20 investment levels or average annual investment between FY 90-10 and FY 19-20).50As above, NTG, including via its statutory corporations, continues to subsidise and invest in large-scale green house gas emitting projects.NTG invited to provide further information than that on the public record on 30 October 2021. No further information received as of 30 January 2022.100,000 tonne definition is based on the Australian Clean Energy Regulator's threshold for large emmitters under the framework of the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme, see: http://www.cleanenergyregulator.gov.au/ERF/About-the-Emissions-Reduction-Fund/the-safeguard-mechanism. The threshold is a conservative one and it may be appropriate to revisit this definition overtime in light of the 2050 net zero target.
9
5. Increase financial investment in low/no carbon economy and climate change adaptation105.1 Direct financial investment and/or harnessing Commonwealth funds in low-carbon/no carbon infastructure projects that are proven to curb or replace emmission generating projects or activities. As a guide, investment rate should increase approx 600% (range 400-800%) by 2050 (20% per annum, although we do not anticipate an annual increase to be even).100Ony minor renewable energy projects in the 2020-21 NT infastructure budget, eg. $1.28 million to upgrade and replace hybrid solar power systems at park ranger stations and $4 million for the Renewable Remote Power Program, see Budget Paper No. 4, Infrastructure Program available at: <https://budget.nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/999986/2021-22-BP4-book.pdf>NTG invited to provide further information than that on the public record on 30 October 2021. No further information received as of 30 January 2022.A 1.5 degree trajectory envisages annual investments in low-carbon energy technologies and energy efficiency are upscaled by roughly a factor of six (range of factor of 4 to 10) by 2050 compared to 2015. See IPCC, 2018: Summary for Policymakers, 16.
10
6. Financial investment in adaptation strategies that are evidence based and equitable (target most vulnerable groups).106.1 Direct financial investment and/or harnessing Commonwealth funds to invest in adaptation strategies that are evidence based and equitable (target most vulnerable groups).100Climate adaptation is not mentioned in the 2020-2021 budget strategy. Deliverable 2.5.2 of the NTG Climate Response Three Year Action Plan commits the government to work with the community sector to develop response and action frameworks, though no financial investment is flagged.NTG invited to provide further information than that on the public record on 30 October 2021. No further information received as of 30 January 2022."Adaptation options that reduce the vulnerability of human and natural systems have many synergies with sustainable development....such as ensuring food and water security, reducing disaster risks, improving health conditions, maintaining ecosystem services and reducing poverty and inequality...Increasing investment in physical and social infrastructure is a key enabling condition to enhance the resilience and the adaptive capacities
of societies." See IPCC, 2018: Summary for Policymakers,19.
11
7. Public accountability on climate strategy and performance107.1 Publishes net emissions data (including previous years' data since at least 2020) on an annual basis.50Awaiting NTG consultants to provide a NT emission profile. 50% complete and overdue according to NTG as at 30 January 2022.NTG invited to provide further information than that on the public record on 30 October 2021. No further information received as of 30 January 2022.The need for accountability, civil society participation and transparency to support the implementation of ambitious climate change action is highlighted in the IPCC Summary of Policymakers report, see p 23.
12
7.2 Publishes climate change strategy and roadmap to net zero emmissions, including interim (eg. annual or triennial) emmission reduction targets.2.50Strategy published but no clear emissions pathway with interim targets.NTG invited to provide further information than that on the public record on 30 October 2021. No further information received as of 30 January 2022.
13
7.3 Publishes progress updates on implementation of climate change Response.2.52.5The NTG has stated that 'the Territory Government will be accountable for its delivery of the objectives of this Climate Change Response by reporting annually to the Legislative Assembly', see Northern Territory Climate Change Response: Towards 2050 (July 2020, Nothern Territory Government) available at: <https://depws.nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/904775/northern-territory-climate-change-response-towards-2050.pdf>. The NTG is also reporting publicly on its performance on its website: https://climatechange.nt.gov.au/nt-climate-change-response/action-itemsNTG invited to provide further information than that on the public record on 30 October 2021. No further information received as of 30 January 2022.
14
Total1001005
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100