Playgroup/Storytime
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DateSkill to be discussedBook TitleOpeningSocial FocusIntroduction to SkillBook Title/ AsideSong or fingerplayBook Title/ AsideSong or fingerplayBook title/AsideClosingLiteracy ActivityCraft or other activities
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Our storytime has a "flexible" start time. We have parents that work the night shift and sometimes get off late, so we may hold the beginning until they are here. This warm up time allows us to work on the social focus for the week!The introduction to both the literacy and the social skill focus comes during group time. Our playgroup facilitator opens with songs and explains to the parents what we focused on during the "opening" segment. The literacy focus is explained just prior to reading the first book.This is a point in the morning where we can review our social and literacy focus. Often it is a pointed discussion asking kids to share what they talked about today, or the new friends they made. Sometimes, it may also be a review of the book we read, or the literacy activities we created.
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9/10/2010Print Awareness"The Hello Goodbye Window" by Justin NortonTable Activities with Social Focus: Potato Head, Blocks, Erector Set Starters, Coloring Starters, Making Name CardsGreeting a new (or old) friendPrint Awareness if the term that researchers use to explain begin aware of books, how they work, and how we follow the words on the page. Today we practiced holding a book the right way.Welcome Songs: Baa Baa... Twinkle Twinkle... ABC We work in substituting funny words for the well loved chorus along the way..."Twinkle Twinkle little PICKLE", etcClosing CircleUse the "magnifying glass" (a cardstock cut out laminated to create a clear lens) to examine the Title, Author and Illustrator of the book. Participants worked in groups examining other books to see if they could "find " the title and author. We primarily focused on the location of these items - the title at the top and author at the bottom. It helped up decide which was the right way to hold a book!
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9/17/2010Print Awareness"Henny Penny" (Big Book)Table Activities with Social Focus: Potato Head, Blocks, Erector Set Starters, Coloring Starters, Making Name CardsInviting a friend to playRunning your finger under the words as we say them helps children understand that we are reading text, not pictures. We do this with titles or repeated phrases so it doesn't get in the way of reading and enjoying the story.Welcome Songs: Baa Baa... Twinkle Twinkle... ABC We work in substituting funny words for the well loved chorus along the way..."Twinkle Twinkle little PICKLE", etcClosing CircleUsing popsicle sticks, we make our own personalized pointer. We then practice "reading" with our pointer from left to right. Some practice distinguishing between print and pictures.
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9/24/2010Print Awareness"Diary of a Fly" by Doreen CroninTable Activities with Social Focus: Potato Head, Blocks, Erector Set Starters, Coloring Starters, Making Name CardsInviting a friend to playWriting can be very motivating. It helps kids make the connection between the spoken and the written word. Encourage your child to write. You can begin by making lists together!Welcome Songs: Baa Baa... Twinkle Twinkle... ABC We work in substituting funny words for the well loved chorus along the way..."Twinkle Twinkle little PICKLE", etcClosing CircleIn a small group, we practiced writing a diary entry about our day. Children dictated and I wrote on a large sheet. Verbally note how we can tall about our day with the words we speak ad the words we write! Participants we then each given and small memo book and pencil to write their own entry. Parents were reminded that scribble is one of the first steps in writing too!
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10/1/2010Vocabulary: "Secret Birthday Message" by Eric CarleTable Activities with Social Focus: Potato Head, Blocks, Kiva Block, Puppet ShowSharingWhen you read with your child, don't just read the words. Talk about the pictures and describe the unfamiliar words. Today we will work on acting out specific words after we read the story.Welcome Songs: Baa Baa... Twinkle Twinkle... ABC We work in substituting funny words for the well loved chorus along the way..."Twinkle Twinkle little PICKLE", etcClosing CircleMovement! Using floor spots, children practice going OVER, ON and TO THE SIDE of the spots. We talk about JUMPING, TOUCHING, and MOVING the SPOT. Great activity to understand directional words.
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10/8/2120Vocabulary"Max's Words" by Kate BankTable Activities with Social Focus: Potato Head, Blocks, Kiva Block, Puppet ShowSharingThe more words kids know, the better off they will be when they learn to read. Research tells us that it is easier to read a word that is know to you. You can use books to expand your child's vocabulary.Welcome Songs: Baa Baa... Twinkle Twinkle... ABC We work in substituting funny words for the well loved chorus along the way..."Twinkle Twinkle little PICKLE", etcClosing CircleKids will create a word jar and then "find" words to fill it. Some will cut words out of newspapers, others will "find" words on the table. For some, the emphasis is that a word is a group of letters, for others it may be sight words, and for others still, it may be extra special ("fancy") words!
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10/15/2010Vocabulary"Chowder" by Peter BrownTable Activities with Social Focus: Potato Head, Blocks, Playdoh, PuzzlesSharingWhen we talk about a story after we read it with a child, we are helping him or her remember what they heard, and to review it. It helps to reinforce new vocabulary words because they have the opportunity to use the words again!The Name GameClosing CircleAfter reading the story, we gathered on our bellies to examine copies of some of the pictures in the book. The illustrations were used as story starters and children were encouraged to tell me what they remember about the story. We reinforced new vocabulary and practiced early sequencing.We took digital pictures of the group today and printed them out - participants could choose to make a picture frame! "Say Chowder, Everyone!"
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10/22/2010Vocabulary"Big Words for Little People" by Jamie Lee CurtisTable Activities with Social Focus: Looking at our friends when we talk to themWhat happens when you don't know the word either? What a great chance to show your child what we do when we don't know something! There's the dictionary...but there are also other clues from the picture or what may be happening in the story. You can always call the library!The Name GameClosing CircleDuring the reading of our book, if we stumbled across a word we didn't know, we modeled looking up the word in the dictionary. It was a great time to learn about picture dictionaries too! We also can learn about new words based on their context (lots of examples in this book) We also learned to go back and reread the page once we learned the meaning or pronunciation of a word!
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10/29/2010Vocabulary"The Legend of Spookley the Square Pumpkin" by Joe TroianoTable Activities: Coloring face pieces for Pin the Faces on the JackoLantern, Puzzles (big and small, floor and table), Lincoln Logs, PlaydohLoving our differences!We just went through the book from start to finish, feeling the rhythm of the text. Many of our kids helped fill in the blank because they intuitively noticed the rhyme! Let's go through it again and we will wait inviting our children to The Name GameWe "rolled" our pumpkins out the door!After reading the second time, I asked the children to help retell the story. I turned the pages and one by one, they each took a turn telling me what happened on the pages. ti was great to hear the rhyming words in their retell!Examining the end of the book, we cut our own multi colored, multi shaped pumpkins...then added polka dots and facial features for the jack o lantern!
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11/5/2010Phonological Awareness
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11/18/2010Phonological AwarenessMax Found Two SticksTable ActivitiesNotice the ways that your child communicates when not using words....The Name Game followed by clapping out each child's nameClapping the names helps children hear words divided into parts. This helps develop phonological awareness which is when you can break words down into parts.Welcome SongsYou may not realize it, but singing songs with your baby or toddler can help them hear words being broken up into smaller sounds. This skill is part of phonological awareness which later helps with reading.My Many Colored Days by Dr Suess..It doesn't look like Dr. Seuss. But from the moment readers open the book, the familiar, bouncy rhyming prose sets in and children are wrapped up once more in Seuss's accessible lingo. The text is big and small, there is the unusual presentation of words such as "kick" and "buzzy" which help improve print awareness, and other words like "Wheeeeeee!" which phonological awareness, as children learn the connection between the sounds and letters.making musical instruments!!!
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12/4/2010Narrative SkillsArt and Max by David WeisnerOpen, Shut ThemTalking with your friendsToday we are sharing books and songs. Please participate as much as you can and feel free to leave with your child and come back when they are ready. Today I will be pointing out some areas that support early literacy, speficifially narrative skills. Narrative skills are begin able to describe and tell stories.Today our story is Art & Max. The whole story is a conversation between two friends. Have you ever talked to one person about something special? Have you ever told your mom or dad how to do something? These are conversations! TO THE ADULTS: When you ask your child a question, give them extra to think. Talking back and forth uses four different parts of the brain, so it takes time for them for form a response - adults have had a lot of practice!Not a box! Wish we had the book! A ginat c=box that transforms into somtehing else!
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