BA Member Grants, Foundations and Organizations
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FOR BRIDGE ALLIANCE MEMBER AND AFFILIATE USE ONLY
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An important part of being a member of a coalition is supporting other member organizations. The constant amplification of one another's work as well as the sharing of useful resources is what keeps our community so strong. With that being said, foundation and organization recommendations for either funding or collaboration are welcomed from all that have access to this list. Feel free to input any useful information following the format. If you have any trouble doing so, email shakira@bridgealliance.us with the name of the foundation or org that you are trying to input and the information will be placed for you. Thank you so much for your support as a member and pioneer in the Healthy Self-Governance Movement.
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INTRODUCTION
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The Bridge Alliance Grants, Foundations, and Organizations list was created in recognition of the importance of funding. This list consists of a master list and categorized lists based on common funding areas within the democracy field. We created this spreadsheet to be a one-stop shop, with links to org and foundation websites, email addresses, and areas of focus in order to save you time when looking for funding or organizations to collaborate with. If you have any questions regarding this list. please email shakira@bridgealliance.us.
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MASTER LIST
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The master list consists of all foundations, grants, and organizations researched by Bridge Alliance staff.
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a.The first column labeled "Type" tells you whether the contact is a foundation that invests long term or an organization with focus areas that match up with Bridge Alliance member org missions
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b.Some email addresses are listed, others are labeled with "All email address are on website." If it's the latter, click the link connected to the name of the foundation/organization to be taken to the homepage of their website
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c.The "Function" column tells you whether a foundation or organization provides general support (funding for daily operations), a grant for a specific project, or is listed for collaboration
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d.The "Category" column tells you of the specific focus areas of that foundation or organization. If a contact is listed as "multiple," visit their website to see what they focus on
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e.The "Specifics" column lets you know if the foundation or organization is based in a specific region, state, or city
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Categorized Sheets
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The sheets following the Master List are foundations and organizations that work in that sector of the field or fund projects in that sector of the field. If you do not see a category that best suits your work, email shakira@bridgealliance.us to be given specialized funding reccommendations.
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Best Practices for the Grants, Foundations, and Orgarnizations Sheet
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If you are looking for general staff support, stay on the master list and use columns D,E, and F to best detemine if a contact suits your work.
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If you are looking for project specific work, determine the category your project best fits into and go to that sheet. We do, however, still encourage you to visit the Master List for general support contacts. Foundations that provide general support may also support specific projects.
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BEST PRACTICES FOR CONTACTING FOUNDATIONS/ORGANIZATIONS
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Applying for grants, at its most basic level, means connecting with humans. Therefore, there are simple, but pointed, strategies you can implement to help increase your chances of ultimately receiving a grant. A note on federal funding: These grants are highly competitive and often require a lot of pre-existing infrastructure. If your organization is small or cannot demonstrate a history of managing large-scale funding, applying for such grants is not likely to be the best use of your time and resources.
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1Before communicating with potential funders, it is important to collect relevant information about them, as well as your own organization.
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2When sending an email, remember to be compelling, but concise. A detailed and long-winded email may be overlooked, so get to the point. This introductory email should include a short sentence or two about your organization, as well as the grant initiative you are interested in discussing. If after a week you receive no response, send a follow-up email asking to schedule a call.
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3An introductory phonecall to a funder should consist of the following: A. Compliment the funder on their work. B. Introduce your organization and your accomplishments. C. Demonstrate the mission alignment between your organizations. D. Articulate the future positive impacts of your work in the relevant community.
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4Avoid asking about anything that is readily available on their website — this is absolutely crucial!
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Best Practices for Searching For Grants
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Basics of Writing a Proposal
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Specifics of Proposal Writing
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