ABCDEFGH
1
Activity NameGrade
Level
In-person
Professional
Development
Online
Professional
Development
In-person
with
Students
Online
with
Students

Parent
Resources
Online Resources
2
3
KEY

LE = Lower Elementary (grades K-2)

UE = Upper Elementary (grades 3-5)

MS = Middle School (grades 6-8)

HS = High School (grades 9-12)
The purpose of this document is to provide a collection of ideas for conducting or adapting Project WILD activities for 1) increased safety when implemented activities in face-to-face (group) settings and 2) maximizing capabilities of Internet technology when implementing or learining about activities in online instruction, including during Project WILD Professional Development (PD) and during implementation with student learners.

This organization of this document provides suggestions for each activity in four categories by the type of audience (educators or students) and the setting (in-person or online). For each of these audience/setting scenarios, the suggestions below are intended to supplement information provided for that activity in the curriculum guide. A fifth category, "Parent Resources" offers ideas for parents and care givers who may not have access to the Project WILD publication(s). These Parent Resource offer condensed ideas based on the more detailed procedures from the Project WILD activity. The tabs at the bottom of this document group each adaptation or suggestion by the guide in which the activity is published.

Online resources that support distance learning and safe learning that were developed specifically for the designated activity--such as demonstration videos--are also provided in a column on the right. Additional activity resources for each activity are also available at www.projectwild.org.

Recommendations for using this document:
- Read the suggestions from each of the five colums (C-G) for a particular activity since the ideas typically apply to more than one audience/setting category.
- When conducting online Project WILD PD, we recommend the facilitator model use of online instructional strategies, resources, or apps in a manner similar to how an educator would later conduct the activity remotely with students.
- Cells that are blank indicate that no ideas for activity adaptations or suggestions have yet been developed or submitted. If you have ideas to share, please contribute!

Please contribute to this document! Two easy options to comment are:
1) Use the Comment function to share your ideas or links to online resources. Click on a cell, then click "Insert" in the top navigation, and then "Comment." You can also right click on a cell (or CTRL-click on a Mac) for a shortcut to the comment feature, or
2) Complete this short form.
AFWA's Project WILD staff will incorporate ideas from the comments into the document.
4
5
Guidelines for #Responsible Recreation should be followed when implementing Project WILD activities. Staying safe outdoors during the pandemic means:
- Plan ahead; purchase licenses and park passes online, if available.
- Recreate close to home
- Adhere to best practices for avoiding COVID-19
- Follow state and federal guidelines
- Pack out your trash as a courtesy to others and to avoid the appearance of overuse
- Share your adventures in a respectful way on social outlets
6
7
8
Bat BlitzUE
MS
To supplement the printed (book) version of the activity, see the online adpatation on the WILD Learning Lab website. To supplement the printed (book) version of the activity, see the online adpatation on the WILD Learning Lab website.
9
Bird Song SurveyMS
HS
This activity can be conducted in-person with minimal adjustments to the procedures while following best practices for avoiding COVID-19.Facilitator should review in advance the "Inventorying and Monitoring : Birds" section from the Inventory Methods section of the Appendix from the Project WILD guide. Go to www.projectwild.org and search "Guide Resources" or link directly at https://www.fishwildlife.org/projectwild/project-wild. Have training participants access and review during training. What type of point and count method would work well for your online training? Which method would educators use with their students?

Each participant establishes one study site they can safely monitor--such as in yard at home, school grounds, in a park, or another location in their neighborhood. Monitoring and data collection can be conducting individually, while offline, and data then shared and complied as a group (see suggestions in the "Online with Students" column).

Have participants use one or more bird identification apps (see activity resources at www.projectwild.org) .


This activity can be conducted in-person with minimal adjustments to the procedures while following best practices for avoiding COVID-19.Teacher should review the "Inventorying and Monitoring : Birds" section from the Inventory Methods section of the Appendix from the Project WILD guide. Search for "Guide Resources" at www.projectwild.org, or go to https://www.fishwildlife.org/projectwild/project-wild.

Decide with (or for) students what data will be collected--species, date, weather, time of day, location--and how data will be recorded--such as nature journal, online form, data sheet, etc. A generic data collection form is available at https://www.fishwildlife.org/application/files/7715/6780/2393/Data_Collection_Form.pdf

Each student establishes one study site they can safely monitor--such as in a yard, in a park, or another location in their neighborhood.

Students can use bird identification apps, such as Merlin© to help them identify birds by sight and sound (see activity resources at www.projectwild.org)

To help with bird identification and keeping track of the species you observe, try out the Seek by iNaturalist app. See the iNaturalist Teacher's Guide, at https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/teacher's+guide for more information.

Arrange for guest presenter on local bird species and use of field study techniques to present during a class webinar.

Consider how data can be shared, accessed, contributed to online. In addition to use of individual student data sheets, set up a class data collection form online, such as a Google Form, at which each student can enter data collected at their site. Students could also submit data via a fillable online form. (this could be a great template for AFWA/Project WILD to create if we conducted an online training). If data collection includes maps of study sites, students can post their maps as PDFs using a Padlet site or similar online bulletin board-style sharing format.

How do the number and diversity of species identified compare among all of the students study sites? Are there any patterns observed that might help explain differences? Consider, for example, vegetation at each site, presence of predators (such as house cats), use of bird feeders or orther food sources, available water, etc?
What birds species can be found near your home? Conduct an inventory of bird species to find out. Select a location (an observation point) at a window, in a backyard, or at a nearby park to watch and listen for birds. Make observations at the same time each day--such as early in the morning for ten minutes. Record your results by writing and drawing in a nature journal. How many bird species can you identify?

You can download a Project WILD Data Collection Form at https://www.fishwildlife.org/application/files/7715/6780/2393/Data_Collection_Form.pdf

Try out one of many bird identification apps such as Merlin© to identify birds by sight and sound (see activity resources at www.projectwild.org).

To help with bird identification and keeping track of the species you observe, try out the Seek by iNaturalist app.

What types of birds visit your site? Do the types of birds change over time? Are there any obstacles or dangers (such as colliding with windows or predation by domestic cats) for birds visiting your site? Research how your site can be made safer.

To learn about the work of ornithologists (scientist who study birds), go to https://www.fishwildlife.org/projectwild/step-stem-and-wild-work/bird-song-survey.

10
A Home Away from HomeLE
UE
MS
This activity can be conducted in-person with minimal adjustments to the procedures while following best practices for avoiding COVID-19.If possible, provide advance notice to participants of the materials needed to create their zoo enclosure model.

Direct participant's attention to online activity resources at www.projectwild.org. For a direct link to this activity, go to https://www.fishwildlife.org/projectwild/step-stem-and-wild-work/home-away-home. Point out the link to the Association of Zoos & Aquariums’ Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Care Manual, at
https://www.speakcdn.com/assets/2332/polar_bear_care_manualr.pdf (see the In Step with STEM Resources).

Allow time either offline or in break out groups for participants to build their models.

If using break out groups, consider grouping participants by different types of bears for which the enclosures are being designed--black bear, polar bear, or grizzly bear. Participants can critique each others design, with sharing by emailing photos of the model or screen sharing. Then have each group present to the class about similarities and differences among the models in their group.





This activity can be conducted in-person with minimal adjustments to the procedures while following best practices for avoiding COVID-19.
Have students create a zoo enclosure for a bear that has been transferred to a place that is not its native habitat. For instance, have students create an enclosure or 3-D model for a polar bear that has moved to a desert climate. Students can use paper, poster, and other craft materials, an online 3-D model, such as SketchUp, or a video game, like Minecraft, to create an enclosure. In order for the bear to be healthy, consider what the temperature, humidity, amount of water and food, and other elements need to be included in the enclosure.

What are challenges with keeping bears in captivity?

How are the models different than an actual zoo enclosure for polar bears?

See also What Bear Goes Where
Design a zoo enclosure appropriate for the survival of a polar bear in a hot, arid climate. Either draw a 2-dimensional model on paper, build a 3-D model with craft supplies, or create a 3-D computer model using computer software, such as Mindcraft or SketchUp.

Consider everything a polar bear needs to survive: a sleeping place, a hiding place or den for solitude, a pool, a source of drinking water, food, and space for exercise. For the animals’ well-being, there should be opportunities for play, and the enclosure should look as natural as possible. The bear’s enclosure does not need to be entirely refrigerated. Polar bears need only a cool place in which to retreat.

For older children, review the Polar Bear Care Manual from the Association of Zoos & Aquariums to fine tune the design. The manual is accessable at https://www.speakcdn.com/assets/2332/polar_bear_care_manualr.pdf

What are challenges with keeping Polar Bears in captivity?

How is the model different than an actual zoo enclosure for polar bears?

To learn about the work of Zoo Designers, video links are at https://www.fishwildlife.org/projectwild/step-stem-and-wild-work/home-away-home
11
Checks & BalancesMSScenario Cards PowerPoint
12
Color CrazyLE
UE
Hide and Seek Wildlife Photos
13
First ImpressionsLE
UE
Discuss importance of first impressions. Provide a link to an online survey with pictures and ratings (positive, neutral, unsure, negative) and ability to write a word to describe different animals. With Google Forms, you can insert pictures with photos. Show participants results of first round of ratings and discuss some of their reactions. Break participants into groups (using breakout rooms) and provide a Google Slide or other online organizer for each group to research a different animal. Give groups about 10 minutes to research. (Possibly use CURIOUS KIDSS from Ohio for research questions). Have each group present on their animal, and then have participants retake the initial survey. Compare and contrast first survey and second survey. How did their First Impressions change? How could participants adapt this activity to use in their classrooms?
14
Food FootprintHave participants take one item from their dinner and trace it all the way from their plate back to its source, highlighting in a slide presentation all the different places it goes to before their dinner plate. Include the potential impacts on nature along that path. This suggested procedure also applies to the activity "What's for Dinner" (3rd edition). Have students take one item from their dinner and trace it all the way from their plate back to its source, highlighting in a slide presentation all the different places it goes to before their dinner plate. Include the potential impacts on nature along that path. This suggested procedure also applies to the activity "What's for Dinner" (3rd edition).
15
Here Today,
Gone Tomorrow
MS
HS
Suggestions in column F, for "Online with Students," also apply to participants in Online Professional Development training. Have students research (or be provided information if no Internet access) about habitat requirements of food, water, shelter, and space. And information on extinct, endangered, and threatened wildlife for their state. Students can go outside of their own homes and look for wildlife or signs of wildlife (tracks, scat, nest, etc.). Have them record what they see. They can either try to identify the species with online resources or simply note what type of animal it is (mammal, bird, reptile, insect, etc.) Then have students list potential sources of habitat elements that they see on their property (food, water, shelter, space) for the observed wildlife. Emphasize these could be natural or man-made (i.e. birdbath). If no wildlife or signs present, think about what habitat elements they see and what kinds of animals could potentially live there. Have students think about what this area may have been like 200 hundred years ago.Do they think the same or different animals would have lived here then? Why or why not? If technology is available to hold a virtual class meeting, then students can present what they found and discuss. Or they can create a short presentation and email findings to their teacher.
16
Keeping CoolUEThis activity can be conducted in-person with minimal adjustments to the procedures while following best practices for avoiding COVID-19.Advance notice may be needed for any special supplies--such as art & craft supplies or a thermometer.

Time for participants to create their model could happen offline, or in small breakout groups while online.

Participants can either share screen to explain show their model, or images can be uploaded to a common Google doc or shared Word doc.
This activity can be conducted in-person with minimal adjustments to the procedures while following best practices for avoiding COVID-19. (from https://www.fishwildlife.org/projectwild/remote-wild)

Go over thermoregulation and how different organisms survive in a PPT or video.

Have students select a local reptile and research optimal temperature ranges and habitat preferences.

Have students design a model of their reptile. Have them take pictures of their models and provide information about habitat preferences.

Have students create a data sheet to collect at least 3 temperature readings (see sample in text).

Have students go outside and investigate habitat to evaluate if any of the selected sites would meet the needs of their reptile. Use thermometers to measure temperature and have them take photos of their reptile models in the 3 different habitats. Be sure to stress that temps should be taken within 15 min of each other.

Once back inside, have students determine if any of the locations they selected may support their reptile. Why or why not. Have them write up observations and conclusions to share with the class.
17
Limiting Factors: How Many Bears?UE MS
Students play a board game (via Flippity) online in small groups.
Video explaining online adaptation
18
Monarch MarathonUE
MS
Have participants review the procedures prior to practicing the activity. Expain the activity has been modified for safety.

Rather than tagging one another to signify the start of a new generation of Monarchs, have students stand on or touch their foot on the a peice of yarn that represents a milkweed plant. For example, students in Zone 2 waiting to be tagged each stand on one end of a six foot yarn segment, leaving the other end available for the incoming monarchs from Zone 1. In the same way that "tagging" is used in the procedures, the arrival of a monarch from Zone 1 to the other end of the yarn (the milkweed plant) then reprents the first generation monarch completing their migration, laying their egg, and coming to the end of their lifecycle. The begining of the life cycle for the second genertation then begins.

Make each zone large enough so that participants have space to maintain a safe distance. Spread out the yarn segments so each end is at least 6 feet from other yarn segments.

Rather than using tokens to represent energy, explain the yarn segments that represent milkweed will provide the food and energy needed to complete migration. To represent loss of habitat in later rounds, remove some of the yarn segments. Differnect colors of yarn, or some other means to color code each yarn segment--such as placing consturction paper of various colors next to the yarn segments--can be used to identify which milkweed plants contain pesticides.

When modeling the movements of the arms and hands to represent metamorphosis as a larva or eating as a pupa (see proceedure 5-b), be careful to keep your arms and hands away from your face. The eating motions with the hands can be done with the hands far from the mouth. Discuss this saftey precaution.


Discuss safety adaptations with training participants.

Use a whiteboard to illustrate the movement of students in through the four zones (such as the whiteboard screen share in the Zoom app).




See adaptations described in Column C (In-person Professional Development)

Model for students prior to the simulation the movement from one zone to another, reminding students to keep a safe distance, to walk (not run) to avoid bumping into one another, and that only one student should land on one end of a yarn segment.
(Activity not recommended for online implementation). For young learners, try the "Life Cycle Story Dance" which has students physically act out the life cycle stages of the monarch butterfly. Students gegin rolled up in a ball (egg), "hatch" and stretch out (caterpillar), curl up and hold still for a count of 10 (chrysalis), and lastly "emerge" and shake out their "wings" (butterfly).
19
Nature in ArtUE
M
This activity can be conducted in-person with minimal adjustments to the procedures while following best practices for avoiding COVID-19.Since participants in this activity have time alone to observe and record information about wildlife near their home or study site, it is ideal for assigning to workshop participants as independant work following, or in between online training sessions. This activity can be conducted in-person with minimal adjustments to the procedures while following best practices for avoiding COVID-19.Encourage students to find an outdoor spot they can visit regularly, perhaps once a day, to sit quietly and observe signs of wildlife around them. Sitting by and looking out a window is another option, and may allow for closer viewing of birds and other wildlife. For practice sketching, go to https://www.fishwildlife.org/projectwild/step-stem-and-wild-work/nature-art for links on Basic Steps for Sketching and career connections. Student sketches can be recorded in a nature journal or science notebook in which they record other observations about nature near their homes or study sites. Go to https://www.fishwildlife.org/projectwild/step-stem-and-wild-work/nature-art for links on Basic Steps for Sketching and career connections. See How to Teach Nature Jounraling curriulum and videos at https://johnmuirlaws.com/journaling-curriculum/ & https://www.youtube.com/user/JohnMuirLaws
20
Seed NeedLE
UE
(from https://www.fishwildlife.org/projectwild/remote-wild)

Create a background PPT or video to talk about plant dispersal . Here is a potential video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06sbmWAzoys.

Have students go outside and collect seeds from different plants. They can use the sock method, masking tape, collect by hand, or use materials like felt that is swept through brush.

Have them sort the seeds using the investigation sheet. Have them take photos of their sheet and describe some of their reasoning for sorting seeds in those categories. Have the class share photos online with descriptions on where they collected seeds.

After viewing the class photos, have students identify the most common type of dispersal and explain why they think that is.

As a STEM extension, challenge students to design a dispersal mechanism that can disperse a lima bean. Options can include: by wind, by water, by animals, etc. See who can make the best design and have them measure how far it will travel. Have them share methods and results online.
See suggestions for "Online with Students"
21
Sustainability: Then, Now, LaterMS
This activity can be conducted in-person, preferably outdoors, or indoors in which partricipants are at a safe distance. In Part A, the educator can circulate around to students to provide the requiested number of tokens rather than stduents sitting together in close proximity.Part A can be conducted using virtual tokens as part of the Google slide presentation, Sustainability: Then, Now, Later. See column F for "Online with Studetns.See the "in person Professional Development" column. Use the Google Slide presentation at https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1qeG_7LFwkUayB4CRw4OVRPj0qc9mv1S40I8J-6CZrA0/edit?usp=sharing. Be sure to make a copy of the presentation for your own use. You can have students manipulate the virtual tokens by allowing them editing access to the shared slide. For better security and control, allow only viewing privledge when sharing to students, in which case you will need to manipulate the virtual tokens for each student.
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1qeG_7LFwkUayB4CRw4OVRPj0qc9mv1S40I8J-6CZrA0/edit?usp=sharing
22
Thicket GameLE
UE
Have participants take pictures of animals or signs of animals in their yards or local natural spaces that highlight camouflage. For educators of younger students, have them make their own critter, go out and hide it and take a picture that shows it is camouflaged in its surroundings. See the "Online with Students" column. Have students take pictures of animals or signs of animals in their yards or local natural spaces that highlight camouflage For younger students, have them make their own critter, go out and hide it and take a picture that shows it is camouflaged in its surroundings.Hide and Seek Wildlife Photos
23
Urban Nature SearchUE
MS
Photos associated with task cards
24
What's for Dinner
(from 3rd edition of guide)
UE
MS
Have participants take one item from their dinner and trace it all the way from their plate back to its source, highlighting in a slide presentation all the different places it goes to before their dinner plate. Include the potential impacts on nature along that path. This suggested procedure also applies to the activity Food Footprint (4th edition). Have students take one item from their dinner and trace it all the way from their plate back to its source, highlighting in a slide presentation all the different places it goes to before their dinner plate. Include the potential impacts on nature along that path. This suggested procedure also applies to the activity Food Footprint (4th edition).
25
What Bear Goes WhereLE
UE
MS
(from https://www.fishwildlife.org/projectwild/remote-wild)

See also: A Home Away from Home

Watch a video about bears. See these videos All about Bears for Kids or Bears 101 – Nat Geo Wild.

Discuss where each bear lives, the differences in each place, and bears adaptation to their environment. Use DEEP Wildlife Fact Sheets on black bear.

Have students create a poster or presentation of the habitat of the black bear or a bear of their choice. Students can use paper, poster, and other craft supplies, an online tool, such as SketchUp, or a video game, such as Minecraft.

Discuss the posters, the bear, and their habitat and adaptations.


Design a zoo enclosure appropriate for the survival of a polar bear in a hot, arid climate. Either draw a 2-dimensional model on paper, build a 3-D model with craft supplies, or create a 3-D computer model using computer software, such as Mindcraft or SketchUp.

Start by watching a video about bears. See these videos All about Bears for Kids or Bears 101 – Nat Geo Wild.

Discuss where each bear lives, the differences in each place, and bears adaptation to their environment. Use DEEP Wildlife Fact Sheets on black bear.

Consider everything a polar bear needs to survive: a sleeping place, a hiding place or den for solitude, a pool, a source of drinking water, food, and space for exercise. For the animals’ well-being, there should be opportunities for play, and the enclosure should look as natural as possible. The bear’s enclosure does not need to be entirely refrigerated. Polar bears need only a cool place in which to retreat.

26
Wildlife and the Environment: Community SurveyMS
HS
Suggestions in column F, "Online with Students" also apply for In-person with students.This lesson can be done very close to how it is written in the guide. Students can be assigned articles/local media to identify environmental issues in their community. Students can form small groups to meet via online video conferencing OR work from a shared document (such as Google doc) to group edit to formulate survey questions. Use the In Step with STEM portion of the lesson to post the survey online and invite community members they know to participate. This encourages reaching out using technological means. Results can be analyzed and summary reports created to share electronically with the teacher and other students