[TEMPLATE] Open Data Survey - Config SiteName
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titleGlobal Open Data Index: SiteName
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approve_first_submissionFALSE
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reviewers
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submission_discussion_urlhttps://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index/global-open-data-index-2016
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datasetshttps://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1jFEjhAaY2e8hcORnBqYroYy5zKoq6nQWBNXjUYLKbYk/edit#gid=2
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placeshttps://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1jFEjhAaY2e8hcORnBqYroYy5zKoq6nQWBNXjUYLKbYk/edit#gid=1
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question_set_urlhttps://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1jFEjhAaY2e8hcORnBqYroYy5zKoq6nQWBNXjUYLKbYk/edit#gid=1999457872
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overview_pageWelcome to the Global Open Data Index survey website! <b>Submissions for the 2016 edition of the Index are now open</b>. If you have any questions about the survey or the Index, please join the discussions at https://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index.
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submit_pagePlease ensure there is relevant evidence to back up responses. For example, if data is public and online the URL field should not be empty, or, if the data is openly licensed there should be information (e.g. link) for relevant license of terms-of-use in the details.

Questions should be answered on the basis of the situation as of the current assessment point (November 2016). Do not answer based on what may happen in the future (or the situation previously). So, for example, if data will be online soon but is not online now the answer to the 'online' question should be 'No' (though please mention that it will be available in the details and comments section).
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about_page# Global Open Data Index - Measuring open data around the world

Each year, governments make more data available in an open format. The Global Open Data Index tracks whether this data is actually released in a way that is accessible to citizens, media and civil society and is unique in crowd-sourcing its survey of open data releases around the world. Each year the open data community and the Open Knowledge Network produces an annual ranking of countries, peer reviewed by local open data experts.

Crowd-sourcing this data provides a tool for communities around the world to learn more about the open data available locally and by country, and ensures that the results reflect the experience of civil society in finding open information, rather than government claims of openness. It also ensures that those who actually collect the information that builds the Index are the very people who use the data and are in a strong position to advocate for more and higher quality open data.

The Global Open Data Index measures and benchmarks the openness of data around the world, and then presents this information in a way that is easy to understand and use. This increases its usefulness as an advocacy tool and broadens its impact.

See the blog launching the 2016 Index [here](http://blog.core.okfn.org/2016/11/10/the-global-open-data-index-2016-is-here/)
For more information, please see the [FAQ](http://global.survey.okfn.org/faq/) and the [methodology](http://global.survey.okfn.org/methodology/) section.

Join the conversation in the [Open Data Index forum](https://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index/global-open-data-index-2016).
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faq_page# FAQ
## What is the Global Open Data Index?
The Global Open Data Index measures and benchmarks the openness of government data around the world, and then presents this information in a way that is easy to understand and use. Each year Open Knowledge International collaborates with the open data community to produce an annual ranking of countries, peer reviewed by our network of local open data experts. Launched in 2013, the first edition of the Index reviewed the state of open government data in 70 countries, with over 1,300 submissions and over 60 volunteer country editors analysing over 700 government data sets. It has only grown since, with 122 countries assessed in 2015. The Index focuses on 15 key datasets (see question below for a complete list) that are essential for transparency and accountability (such as election results and government spending data), and those vital for providing critical services to citizens (such as maps and water quality).

## How is the Global Open Data Index different from other surveys and trackers?

Each year, governments are making more data available in open formats. The Global Open Data Index tracks whether this data is actually released in a way that is accessible to citizens, media and civil society, and is unique in crowdsourcing its survey results of open data releases around the world.
Crowdsourcing this data provides a tool for communities around the world to learn more about the open data available in their respective countries, and ensures that the results reflect the experience of civil society in finding open information, rather than accepting government claims of openness. It also ensures that those who actually collect and review the information that builds the Index are representative of the very people who use the data and are themselves in a strong position to advocate for more and higher quality open data.

The Global Open Data Index is also uniquely easy to read — anyone can read and understand the results. The Global Open Data Index is not only a benchmarking tool, it also plays a foundational role in sustaining the open government data community around the world. If, for example, the government of a country does publish a dataset, but this is not clear to the public and it cannot be found through a simple search, then the data can easily be overlooked. Governments and open data practitioners can review the Index results to locate the data, see how accessible the data appears to citizens, and, where improvements are necessary, advocate for making the data truly open. This increases its usefulness and broadens its impact.

## Why is this needed?
An increasing number of governments have made commitments to open up their data. But it’s not clear that these commitments are actually being fulfilled. We want to know :
_How much data is actually being released?_
_What kind of data is it, and in what format is it published?_
_Which countries, regions and cities are the most advanced and which countries are lagging behind in terms of open data publication?_

The Global Open Data Index allows people to compare the state of open data internationally. This encourages governments, local administrations, and citizens, media and civil society to work towards improving the quality and increasing the quantity of open data. Since the Global Open Data Index launched in 2013, a number of governments — including Russia, Indonesia, Germany and France — have used the Index as a yardstick for their progress (or lack thereof).

The Index also acts to establish global norms for open government data, and provides guidance to civil society and policy makers about where new opportunities may lie to advance the open government agenda.

## What is Open Data according to the Open Definition?
The Open Definition stipulates that data is open if anyone is free to access, use, modify, and share it — subject, at most, to measures that preserve provenance and openness. Read the full text of the [Open Definition](http://opendefinition.org/).

## Please explain the questions and the scoring.
Each dataset in each place is evaluated using a set of questions that examine the openness of the datasets based to the open definition and the Open Data Charter.
In 2016, we introduced the new survey of the Global Open Data Index (GODI). The new scoring follows two major ideas:
_We assume that each question of our survey measures a crucial characteristic of either the legal, technical and practical ‘openness’ of data. Our scoring follows an assessment of the weighting (see below) in which we describe why a question is important for open data and how a scoring can reflects this importance. We also explain cases why we should not score a question. With this approach we aim to reduce the potential bias towards single aspects of openness._
_The new scoring gives in total 40 points to open licences/public domain status and machine readable and open file formats. These technical and legal aspects of openness are the core of the Open Definition 2.1 and we seek maintaining a strong emphasis on them. _
However, aspects like timely publication, data availability and accessibility are equally important to access and use open data. Questions around data accessibility receive a score of in total 60 points._
For more information on the questions and their respective score, please see the [methodology](http://global.survey.okfn.org/methodology/) section.

## Why is the Open Data Index Community contributor driven?
We want to understand how civil society is able to find open data in each country. We are looking at a range of datasets that cut across interests and activities and there is no reason to assume one person is well placed to assess all of them. By working with a broad group of contributors, those people in each country most interested in a particular dataset can contribute their expertise and knowledge, raising the overall quality of the Global Open Data Index and creating a valuable resource that is useful for activists and journalists seeking out datasets as well. Open is built by the power of global community everywhere. We are building on our strengths.

More generally, the Global Open Data Index is a powerful tool to raise awareness of open data with new groups, and to build capacity and understanding. Getting involved in contributing to the Index in your country is a great way to start out in open data.

## What about providing an tool to measure open data in cities?
Good question! In fact, if you want a city based or even a regional local Index, you can build it. We encourage you to request a city Index for your area. Learn more about this [here](http://blog.okfn.org/2014/02/04/announcing-the-local-open-data-census/).
We have had a huge amount of interest in this work and encourage your engagement on the local level as well. Or, feel free to suggest this with your local networks, and see if you can team up with other city censuses to work on these together.
If you’re ready to start up a city census in your area you can get started [here](http://blog.okfn.org/2014/02/04/announcing-the-local-open-data-census/#form).

## What organisations are involved in the Global Open Data Index?
The Global Open Data Index was initiated by Open Knowledge International in 2013. It is maintained, coordinated and hosted by Open Knowledge and with contributions from many members of the wider community around the globe. Join the discussions through the Open Data Index [forum](https://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index) . It is supported by The Open Data for Development and the Hewlett Foundation.

## What datasets are included in the Global Open Data Index?
There are 15 datasets included in the Global Open Data Index. We have aimed to keep datasets simple, clear and easy to understand, and as applicable as possible to most countries worldwide. We encourage your participation in debates around dataset definitions and refinements.
_Government budget_
_Government spending_
_Government Procurement_
_Election results_
_Company register_
_National map_
_National statistics_
_National Laws_
_Draft Legislation _
_Postcodes _
_Administrative Boundaries _
_Emissions of pollutants_
_Water quality_
_Land ownership_
_Weather forecast_

For more details on these datasets, please see our [methodology](http://global.survey.okfn.org/methodology/) section.

## What is the "Changes" Tab?
This page shows the most recent submissions to and activity on the Index. Check here to follow the progress of this year’s survey.

## How reliable is the Global Open Data Index?
The information in the Index is collected by open data enthusiasts and experts around the world. The Index data undergoes a process of expert review before being published, to ensure high quality results.
For more information, please see the [methodology](http://global.survey.okfn.org/methodology/) section..

## How can I view previous Indexes?
Right now we're focused on the 2016 Index and so the information live on the site is revolves around it but you can find the results of the 2013, 2014 and 2015 Indexes at www.global.survey.okfn.org

## What's the Open Data Index data collection and review process?
Once a year we open the Index for a contribution period of a month. Experienced practitioners and experts from around our network get approached and asked to make contributions for their country.
You can make a submission in the Global Open Data Index by going to global.survey.okfn.org, where the submission is queued up for review. These will remain queued up for the full duration of the sprints.

After the contribution period, expert reviewers will go in and review all submissions and push the correct ones to the Census league table.The final, reviewed results will be transferred to the non-editable Global Open Data Index and press release will be produced.

For more details, please refer to [methodology](http://global.survey.okfn.org/methodology/) section.

## How can I improve the Index information for a given country?
If you've got information about a dataset that isn't in the Index yet you can add it! Anyone can submit new information to the Index by following these steps:

_Select your country in the list and click on it._
_You are now on the Country overview page for that country_
_Click the blue “Submit Information" button on the right next to the appropriate dataset category._
_Login to the system by using your Gmail or Facebook account. _
_Fill the form based on the dataset you have found (there are detailed instructions on the page)._
_Click Submit. Your submission is now waiting for review, and will be visible in the table as 'awaiting review' after a few minutes._

Please see further details in the Index [tutorial](http://global.survey.okfn.org/tutorial/).

## How can I correct an existing entry in the Index?
One a submission has been made, no other submission can be added to that dataset until it will be reviewed. However, you can comment on a submission that is awaiting review and flag important information to the reviewer.
Please see further details, including more information about contributing and commenting on each particular dataset, in the [tutorial](http://global.survey.okfn.org/tutorial/).

## I want to help but I'm not sure where to start!
It’s easy to make a contribution to the Index! Learn how to get started in the tutorial. This year’s contribution period opens on November 10th, 2016 and close on December 10th, 2016. We would love for you to be involved. Follow #GODI6 on Twitter for more updates.

## Where can I discuss the Global Open Data Index with others?
Join the discussion on the Open Data Index [forum](https://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index)

## I'm confused! How can I get help?
There are lots of people who can help on the [forum](https://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index) and there are no silly questions, so we encourage you to post there.
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contribute_page
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tutorial_page# Tutorial - Global Open Data Index 2015
(traducción en Español seguirá el inglés)

## Introduction
Thank you for contributing to the Global Open Data Index, a joint community effort undertaken by contributors around the world, just like you.

Now in its third year, the Global Open Data Index helps quantify and compare the openness of government data around the world. It is both an advocacy tool to promote open data and a research tool to evaluate it. It is important, therefore, that the data submitted to the Index is as accurate as possible.

The following tutorial will help you make your first contributions to the Open Data Index.

**Do not be afraid to make mistakes; a global community of contributors past and present are are here to help you out every step of the way in the [Open Data index forum](https://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index) :-)**

## How does the Index work?

The index is built on two units — places, that represent national governments or other official jurisdictions, and datasets. In this year’s Index we have 15 datasets representing different governmental themes. Each datasets has a description followed by a list characteristics. These characteristics describes the dataset and suppose to assist you in finding the right dataset to evaluate. For more information about each dataset, please refer to our methodology page. If you are struggling to find the most suitable dataset in your country, drop a note in the [Open Data index forum](https://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index) which is monitored by the Index community, who can often offer you guidance and help. You will also find the Index staff in the forum, so don’t be shy.

Each of these datasets are first evaluated by the contributor with nine different questions. After this process the data is sent for review. This year we have an expert reviewer for each dataset. This means that reviewers will check the submissions from all countries that were submitted under a given dataset (e.g. transport, government spending, elections, etc.).

After the review stage, we plan to send the Index to governments for commenting. This is done to check for errors that might have come up. The final decision regarding a datasets will be in the reviewer hands. After all of the reviews are completed and the datasets are evaluated by their respective governments, a country’s final score will be shown publicly on the Index website.

## Contributing a new submission to the Index

In the current Index you can contribute in 3 different ways:

**Enter a new submission for 2015**: you’ll see an ‘Add’ button under the dataset
**Update a past submission with new information for 2015**: You'll see a colored block that reflects the last year that there has been a recorded score for the place's dataset. Click the block and you'll see options to view or update the data, choose 'Update".
**Leave a comment**: you’ll see a ‘Review’ button under the dataset (we will explain about this later)

Add a new submission when there is no data on a specific dataset in a country or, if there is already data in a category where you have more updated information, you can propose an revision for 2015 (see further down in this tutorial).

The survey website of the 2015 index is -[ http://global.census.okfn.org/](http://global.census.okfn.org/)

1. _Select a place and a dataset from the homepage_.

2. _Login either with your Google account or Facebook account_. (You don’t need to log in to leave a comment.)

3. _Start answering the questions about the dataset_.

You’ll be asked a series of questions about the dataset you have located to help determine how it is scored. There is a help text prompt next to each question in the “information” column. A new feature for 2015 is that we’ve built some of the questionnaire logic directly into the interface, which should give you more confidence in your responses.

Below, you will find further tips for each specific question.

**Does the data exist?**
If you choose “yes”, you will be asked to enter the data publisher, a title and a brief description and then you will be guided through the remainder of the questions.

If you choose “no”, your submission will be recorded as such. It is very important to know the data does not exist, so please be sure to indicate so rather than leave the entry blank if you have made an honest effort to look for it but can not locate the dataset.

_How do I know if the data exist?_

Most governmental data can be found on the national government data portal (such as data.gov.uk). Try to search these portals first.
If a country doesn’t have a data portal or the data is not on their portal, look for the data on specific government departmental websites. For example, look for budget data on your national treasury website.
If you can’t find the data on a website, email the relevant department and ask them about the dataset and whether it’s online.
If email isn’t an option, call the relevant department; sometimes you can get a better response on the phone than on email.
Still can’t find the data or you didn’t get an answer from the government? Try one last time by using your favourite search engine.

**Is the data in digital form?**
Choose ‘yes’ if the data exists in any digital format, even if it can’t be accessed on the Internet. Data can be digital, but not accessible online.

If you choose “no” you’ll notice a couple questions greyed out because if the data isn’t digital, by default it is not online, it is not machine readable, nor is it available in bulk. Move on to the next question.

_How do I know if the data is in digital format?_

If the data exists, but only on paper, it’s not digital!
If you found the data on the Internet, it’s definitely digital, even if it’s just scanned versions of paper documents.
Some data might be in digital format on a private government network, but not available publicly on the Internet. If you are aware that the data is digital somewhere (for instance, if a government official tells you so), then mark this one “yes” and add a note about how you acquired that information and any relevant contact details or links.

**Is the data publicly available?**

Choose “yes” if the data is made available to the public in any format without restrictions.

If you choose “no” you’ll notice a couple questions will ‘disappear’ because that implies that the data is not available for free, is not online, is not openly licensed, nor available in bulk.

_How do I know if the data is publicly available?_

If you need a password or some other form of permissions to access the data it’s not publicly available.
If the data is only available in paper form without any restrictions on the number of copies you can make, it’s publicly available. If there are limits on photocopying, it’s not considered publicly available.
If you need to make a freedom of information (FOIA) request to access the data, it is not publicly available.
If the data is only available to government officials and not citizens, it is not publicly available.

**Is the data available for free?**

Choose “yes” if the data is available without any cost.

Choose “no” if there is any cost involved in accessing the data. You’ll notice that the openly licensed question is greyed out because being available at no cost is a key provision of the Open Definition and open licensing.

**Is the data available online?**

Choose “yes” if the data is available on the Internet and you will be prompted to add the url that links to it.

Choose “no” if the data is not available anywhere on the Internet.

_How do I know if the data is available online?_

If the data is publicly available (see above) and can be freely accessed on the Internet, it is available online. If the data is available in digital format, but not available on a public website, it is not considered to be available online.

**Is the data machine readable?**

Choose “yes” if the data is in a format that can be easily processed by a computer.

Choose “no” if the file format can not be easily processed by a computer.

_How do I know if the data is in a machine readable format?_

The easiest way to answer this question is to look at the dataset’s file type.

As a rule of thumb the following file types are machine readable: .XLS .CSV .JSON .XML
The following formats are NOT machine readable: .HTML .PDF .DOC .GIF .JPEG .PPT
If your dataset is a different file type and you don’t know if it’s machine readable or not, ask in the Open Data Census forum thread.


**Is the data available in bulk?**

Choose “yes” if the entire dataset can be downloaded at once.

Choose “no” if you can not access the database in its entirety.

_How do I know if the data is available in bulk?_

If you aren’t able to download a single file that contains the entirety of the dataset you are looking for, it is not available in bulk.
Often times governments will provide access to their data through an online interface. If access is restricted to querying a web form and retrieving a only a subset of results at a time from a very large database, the data is considered to not be available in bulk.

**Is the data openly licensed?**

Choose “yes” if the data is licensed in a way that conforms to the Open Definition.

Choose “no” if the data is protected under a license that does not conform to the Open Definition.

_How can I find the licensing information?_

Usually, a license or Terms & Conditions can be found at the bottom of the website (in the footer) or under the site’s “About” section.
If the site has a search function or a sitemap, those are good places to look as well.
If there is no visible license or the license is simply under the country's name (for example — “Copyrighted under the state of Lebanon”) and there are no terms and condition or any other information on the site, the data is not open and you should answer “no”.

_How do I know if the data is openly licensed?_

In order for data to be openly licensed, it needs to be free to use, reuse, and free to redistribute.
The Open Definition website lists the licenses that are certified open.
If Creative Commons (CC) licences are used then the data is generally openly licensed. If the non-commercial CC licenses (the ones with “NC” or “ND” in their names) are used, then the data is NOT considered openly licensed. These are partially open, but not fully open according to The Open Definition.
Sometimes countries do not make use of Creative Commons licensing, but the terms and conditions do allow use, re-use and distribution. In that case we suggest you write to the Open Data Census forum thread and get feedback from the community about how to answer this question.


**Is the data provided on a timely and up to date?**

Choose “yes” if the data is relevant and complete for the year or time period that it claims to represent.

Choose “no” if the data is outdated or otherwise not representative of the stated or a reasonable time period.

_How do I know if the data is timely and up to date?_

Check the date-stamp on the data (see below if that’s not obvious). It’s 2015, if the data doesn’t seem relevant for the current year, mark a “no”.
It’s important to remember that not all datasets need to be updated with the same frequency. Transportation data can be updated on a daily basis while postal codes might not change for many years. Do your best to determine what is reasonable for a given dataset.
Does the data align with how your country’s government works in a particular area? If national budgets are determined yearly, there should be yearly data, if they’re determined every two years, then a two year period for the data would be considered timely and up to date.

_How to find when the data was published?_

If the dataset was found on a government portal, there will most often be a timestamp attached to it.
If the data was found on a government site, sometimes the date will be written next to the dataset link or a release date might be listed in some related content (like a press release or news clip).
Sometimes the date stamp is within the dataset itself. For example, a tab in a spreadsheet that is named for the date it represents.
You can also download the data and find the creation date of the file. This might not represent the right date but give you some useful clues. Use your best judgement and leave thorough comments about your assessment.
Lastly, sometimes there are no timestamps at all. In that case, it might be most fair to mark it not timely or up-to-date.

Please join the conversation in the [Open Data Index forum](https://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index) if you have any questions or need some help.

## Commenting on a submission

The Index allows only one submission per one dataset. However, you can still help by commenting on a current submission and propose changes. Leaving detailed notes in the comment field goes a long way in supporting work on the Index during the review process.

Here’s some tips for leaving good comments:

If you’ve determined that a particular dataset does not exist, let us know where you did look and what factors led you to believe that it doesn’t.
If the dataset is available in digital form but not available online, let us know what format the data is available in and provide contact information or further instructions on how one could get a hold of the data.
If the dataset is not publicly available, let us know how one could get a hold of the data, if at all. If the data is only available through a freedom of information request (FOIA), give us an indication of what is involved in making that request.
If you are unsure whether or not a file type is machine readable or not, mark ‘no’ as an answer and explain your rationale in the comment section.
If the dataset is not available in bulk, describe what is available and how to access it, including links.
If you are unsure as to whether a license is open or not, answer ‘no’ and indicate why in the comments field. Include information and/or links to licenses or terms of use pages so the reviewer can quickly make a second assessment.
Let us know why you think the data is either made available in a timely manner or not. Different places have different legislative and governmental spending cycles so it’s important for us to understand the local context as much as possible before making a judgement.

# Tutorial 2015 - Índice Global de Datos Abiertos
## Introducción
Gracias por contribuir con el Índice Global de Datos Abiertos, una comunidad de esfuerzos conjuntos, asumidos por contribuidores/ alrededor del mundo, como tú.

Ahora en este tercer año, el Índice Global de Datos Abiertos ayuda a cuantificar y comparar el nivel de apertura de los datos de gobierno alrededor del mundo. Es al mismo tiempo una herramienta de incidencia para promover datos abiertos y una herramienta de investigación para evaluarla. Es importante, por lo tanto, que los datos presentados en el Índice sean lo más exactos posible.

El siguiente tutorial te ayudará a realizar tu primer contribución al Índice de Datos Abiertos.

**No tengas miedo de cometer errores; hay una comunidad global de contribuidores, anteriores y actuales, para ayudarte en cada paso del proceso en el [Foro del Índice Global de Datos Abiertos](https://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index) :-)**

## Cómo funciona el Índice?
El índice está construído sobre dos unidades - lugares, que representan gobiernos nacionales u otras jurisdicciones oficiales, y sets de datos. En el Índice de esta año tenemos 15 sets de datos representando diferentes temáticas gubernamentales. Cada set de datos tiene una descripción seguida de una lista de características. Estas características describen los sets de datos y buscan ayudarte a encontrar el set de datos correcto para evaluar. Para más información acerca de cada set de datos, por favor dirígete a nuestra página sobre la metodología. Si tenés problemas para encontrar el set de datos más adecuado en tu país, puedes dejarnos un comentario en el [Foro del Índice de Datos Abiertos](https://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index), el cual es monitoreado por la comunidad del Índice, la cual puede ofrecerte una guía y ayuda. También vas a encontrar al equipo del Índice en el foro, así que no seas tímido.

Cada uno de estos sets de datos son primero evaluado por el contribuidor con 9 preguntas. Luego de este proceso los datos son enviados a revisión. Este año tenemos un evaluador experto para cada set de datos. Esto quiere decir que los evaluadores van a revisar las presentaciones de todos los países que fueron registrados en relación a cierto set de datos (por ejemplo: transporte, gastos de gobierno, elecciones, etc.)

Luego de la etapa de revisión, planeamos enviarle el Índice a los gobiernos para sus comentarios. Esto se realiza para verificar errores que pudieran haber surgido. La decisión final sobre los sets de datos quedará en manos del evaluador. Luego de que todos los evaluadores terminaron y los sets de datos fueron todos revisados por sus respectivos gobiernos, se publicará un puntaje final por país en el sitio web del Índice.


## Contribuyendo al Índice con una una nueva presentación

En el Índice actual tú puedes contribuir de tres diferentes maneras:


**Ingresar una nueva publicación para 2015**: Verás el botón “Add” debajo del set de datos.
**Actualiza la publicación anterior con la información nueva del 2015**: Verás un recuadro de color que indica el último año en el que hubo un puntaje registrado para el lugar del set de datos. Haz click en el recuadro y verás opciones para ver o actualizar los datos, elige “Update” (actualizar).
**Deja un comentario**: Debajo del set de datos verás un botón que dice “Review” (revisar - (explicaremos este punto más adelante).

Agrega una nueva presentación cuando no haya información acerca de un set de datos específico sobre un país o, si ya hay información en una categoría sobre la cual tienes información actualizada, puedes proponer una revisión para 2015 (puedes ver cómo hacerlo más abajo en el tutorial)

1. _Selecciona un lugar y un set de datos desde la página de inicio_.

2. _Regístrate con tu cuenta de Google o Facebook (no necesitas registrarte para dejar un comentario_)

3. _Comienza a responder las preguntas acerca del set de datos._

Deberás responder una serie de preguntas acerca de los sets de datos que hayas ubicado para así determinar su puntaje. Hay un texto de ayuda que aparece al lado de cada pregunta en la columna “Information” (“Información”). Una nueva función para 2015 es que desarrollamos la lógica del cuestionario directamente en la interfaz, la cual debería darte más confianza a la hora de responder.

A continuación encontrarás más consejos específicos para cada pregunta.

**Existe la información?**
Si eliges “si”, se te pedirá que ingreses los datos de quien haya publicado los datos, un título y una breve descripción; luego serás guiado a lo largo de las demás preguntas.

Si eliges “no”, tu presentación quedará registrada como tal. Es muy importante saber si la datos no existen; por lo tanto asegúrate de indicarlo en vez de dejar el registro vacío, si has hecho honestamente el esfuerzo por buscarlo pero no has encontrado el set de datos.

_Cómo sabe si la información existe?_


La mayoría de los datos gubernamentales pueden ser encontrados en los sitios o portales nacionales de datos (como por ejemplo: data.gov.uk). Intenta primero buscar este tipo de sitios.
Si un país no tiene un portal de datos o los datos no se encuentran en dichos portales, intenta buscarlos en los sitios web de las áreas específicas de los gobiernos. Por ejemplo: busca los datos presupuestarios en el sitio web del Tesoro Nacional.
Si no puedes encontrar datos en un sitio web, envía un email al área correspondiente y pregúntales acerca de los sets de datos y si es que están disponibles en línea.
Si no hay opciones para mandar email, puedes llamar telefónicamente al área correspondiente; a veces puedes encontrar una mejor respuesta por teléfono que por email.
Si aún así no puedes encontrar datos, o no has recibido ningún tipo de respuesta del gobierno, intenta una última vez más usando tu buscador de internet favorito.


**Está la información en formato digital?**
Elige “si” en caso que existan datos en formato digital, aunque no sean accesibles a través de internet. Los datos pueden estar en formato digital pero no accesibles en internet.

Si eliges “no” te darás cuenta que hay unas preguntas en color gris, ya que por defecto, si la información no está en formato digital, tampoco está en internet. Procede a la siguiente pregunta.

_Cómo sé si los datos están en formato digital?_

Si los datos existen, pero en paper, eso no es digital!
Si encuentras los datos en Internet, eso es definitivamente digital, incluso si se trata de una versión escaneada de documentos en papel.
Algunos datos pueden estar en formato digital en redes privadas de gobierno, pero no disponibles públicamente en Internet. Si tienes conocimiento que hay datos en formato digital (por ejemplo, te informa un agente de gobierno al respecto), entonces marca esta pregunta con un “si” y agrega un comentario acerca de cómo obtuviste dicha información y cualquier contacto relevante o enlace.

**Están los datos disponibles públicamente?**

Elige “si” si los datos se encuentran disponibles sin importar el tipo de formato.

Si eliges “no” notarás que ciertas preguntas “desaparecerán” por que eso quiere decir que si los datos no están disponibles en forma gratuita, no están en internet, no tiene licencia abierta, ni disponibles en conjunto.

_Cómo sé si los datos están disponibles públicamente?_

Si necesitas una contraseña o algún otro tipo de permiso para acceder a los datos, entonces éstos no están disponibles públicamente.
Si los datos sólo están disponibles en papel sin ninguna restricción en el número de copias que desees hacer, están disponibles públicamente. Si hay límites para fotocopiar entonces no se consideran disponibles públicamente.
Si necesitas realizar un pedido de acceso a la información pública (FOIA) para obtener los datos, entonces no se consideran disponibles públicamente.
Si los datos sólo se encuentran disponibles a agentes de gobierno y no a los ciudadanos, entonces no se consideran disponibles públicamente.

**Están los datos disponibles en forma gratuita?**

Elige “si” en caso que los datos se encuentren disponibles sin costo.

Elige “no” si hay algún costo asociado para obtener los datos. Notarás que la pregunta de licencias abiertas se torna de color gris, ya que estar disponible sin costo es un suministro clave de la definición “Abierto” y de licencias abiertas.

**Están los datos abiertos en línea?**

Elige “si” en caso que los datos se encuentren disponibles en internet y te será solicitado que ingreses el enlace para acceder.

Elige “no” en caso que los datos no se encuentren disponibles en ningún lugar de internet.

_Cómo sé si los datos están disponibles en línea?_

Si los datos se encuentran disponible públicamente (ver arriba) y es accesible en forma gratuita, entonces es disponible en línea. Si los datos están disponibles en formato digital pero no disponible en un sitio web público, entonces no es considerada como accesible en línea.

**Se pueden leer los datos mediante una computadora?**

Elige “si” en caso que los datos se encuentren en un formato el cual pueda procesarse fácilmente con una computadora.

Elige “no” en caso que los datos no si el formato no puede procesarse fácilmente con una computadora.

_Cómo sé que los datos están en una formato legible a través de una computadora?_

La forma más sencilla para responder esto es mirando al tipo de archivo del set de datos.

Como regla, los siguientes tipos de archivo son legibles con computadora: .XLS .CSV .JSON .XML.
Los siguientes formatos NO son legibles con computadora: .HTML .PDF .DOC .GIF .JPEG .PPT
Si tu set de datos tiene un formato diferente y no sabes si es legible con computadora consulta en el Foro del Censo de Datos Abiertos [Open Data Census forum thread](https://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index).

**Están los datos en disponibles en conjunto?**

Elige “si” en caso que el set de datos entero puedan descargarse de una sola vez.
Elige “no” en caso que no puedas descargar el el set de datos en su totalidad.

_Cómo sé si los datos están disponibles en conjunto?_

Si no puedes descargarlo en un sólo archivo que contenga todo el set de datos que estás buscando, entonces no está disponible en conjunto.
Muchas veces los gobiernos proveen acceso a sus datos a través de una interfaz en línea. Si el acceso se restringe a una búsqueda mediante un formulario en línea y se obtienen resultados pormenorizados de una gran base de datos, entonces se considera que los datos no se están disponibles en conjunto.

**Tienen los datos licencia abierta?**

Elige “si” en caso que los datos tengan una licencia dentro de las concebias en la “Definición de Abierto” [Open Definition](http://opendefinition.org/).

Elige “no” en caso que los datos se encuentren protegidos bajo una licencia que no esté concebida dentro de la “Definición de Abierto” (Open Definition).

_Cómo puedo encontrar la información sobre el licenciamiento?_

Usualmente una licencia o los Términos y Condiciones pueden ser encontrados en el pie del sitio web o en la sección de “Acerca de”.
Si el sitio tiene un buscador o un mapa del sitio, éstos son buenos lugares para buscar también.
Si no hay una licencia visible o la licencia está bajo el nombre del país (por ejemplo: Derechos de Autor del Estado del Lïbano) y no hay Términos y Condiciones u otra información en el sitio, los datos no son abiertos y debe responderse “no”.

_Cómo sé si los datos tienen licencia abierta?_

Para saber si los datos tienen licencia abierta, éstos deben ser libres de uso, re-uso y redistribución.
El sitio web de “Definición de Abierto” (Open Definition) enumera las [licencias abiertas certificadas](http://opendefinition.org/licenses/).
Si se utilizan las licencias Creative Commons (CC) los datos son generalmente de licencia abierta. Si se utilizan las licencias no-comerciales de CC (aquellas con “NC” or “ND” en sus nombres), entonces los datos no son considerados abiertos. Éstos son abiertos parcialmente, pero no en forma completa de acuerdo a la “Definición de Abierto” (Open Definition).
A veces los países no utilizan las licencias de CC, pero en los términos y condiciones si permiten el uso, re-uso y redistribución de sus datos. En ese caso sugerimos que dejes un comentario en el Foro del Censo de Datos Abiertos [Open Data Census forum thread](https://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index) y tomes las respuesta de la comunidad al respecto.


**Los datos se proveen en forma oportuna y actualizada?**

Elige “si” en caso que los datos sean relevantes y completos para el año y el período que pretenden describir.

Elige “no” en caso que los datos estén desactualizados o que no sean representativos de lo que lo que enuncian o del período de tiempo correspondiente.

_Cómo sé si los datos se proveen en forma oportuna y actualizada?_

Verifica la fecha de generación de los datos (ve más abajo si no resulta obvio). Es 2015, si los datos no parece relevantes para el año actual, entonces responde “no”.
Es importante recordar que no todos los sets de datos necesitan ser actualizados con la misma frecuencia. Datos acerca de Transporte pueden ser actualizados en forma diaria, mientras que los códigos postales pueden no variar por muchos años. Haz tu mejor esfuerzo para determinar que es razonable por cierto tipo de datos.
Están los datos alineados respecto a cómo el gobierno de un país funciona en un área en particular? Si el presupuesto nacional es determinado anualmente debería haber por lo tanto datos anuales; si se determinan cada 2 años, entonces un período bi-anual debería ser considerado como “oportuno y actualizado”

_Cómo encontrar cuándo los datos fueron publicados?_

Si los sets de datos fueron encontrados en un portal de gobierno, seguramente habrá una fecha registrada adjunta.
Si los datos fueron encontrados en un sitio web de gobierno, las fechas suelen estar escritas al lado del enlace al set de datos; o una fecha de emisión es enunciada en el contenido relacionado (como una gacetilla de prensa o nota periodística).
A veces la fecha de publicación está dentro del mismo set de datos. Por ejemplo, una pestaña en una hoja de cálculo tiene el nombre del período que representa.
También puedes descargar los datos y encontrar la fecha de creación en el mismo archivo. Esto puede no representar la fecha correcta pero proveer algo de información útil. Utiliza tu mejor juicio y deja el comentario acerca de tu valoración
Por último, a veces no hay fecha de publicación en absoluto. En este caso lo más apropiado sería responder que los datos no son acordes ni actualizados.

Por favor únete a la conversación en el [Foro del Índice de Datos Abiertos](https://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index) si tienes alguna pregunta o necesitas ayuda.
Comentando una presentación

El Índice permite sólo una presentación por cada set de datos. Sin embargo puedes ayudar comentando una presentación actual y proponiendo cambios. Dejar notas detalladas en la sección de comentarios ayuda profundamente al trabajo del Índice durante el proceso de revisión.

## Aquí tienes unos consejos para dejar buenos comentarios:

S has determinado que un set de datos particular no existe, déjanos saber donde has buscado y que factores que te llevaron a determinar que no existe.
Si el set de datos está disponible en formato digital pero no disponible en línea, déjanos saber en que formato se encuentra el set de datos y provee la información de contacto o instrucciones de cómo podría una persona acceder a la información.
Si el set de datos no está disponible públicamente, déjanos saber cómo podría una persona acceder a los datos, si eso es posible. Si los datos sólo pueden obtenerse mediante un pedido de acceso a la información pública (FOIA), indícanos que se requiere para realizar tal pedido.
Si no tienes certeza si el archivo es legible mediante una computadora o no, responde “no” y explica luego cuáles fueron tus consideraciones en la sección de comentarios.
Si el set de datos no está disponible en conjunto, describe que es lo que está disponible y cómo acceder a eso, incluyendo los enlaces.
Si no tienes certeza si el archivo tiene licencia abierta o no, responde “no” y explica luego por qué en la sección de comentarios. Incluye información y/o enlaces a las licencias o páginas de Términos y Condiciones de uso, para que luego el evaluador pueda rápidamente hacer una segunda revisión.
Déjanos saber por que consideras que los datos están disponibles en forma oportuna y actualizada o no. Diferentes lugares tienen diferentes ciclos de gasto legislativos y de gobierno, por lo tanto es importante para nosotros entender el contexto local de la mejor forma posible antes de emitir un juicio.

























17
methodology_pageThe Global Open Data Index collects and presents information on the current state of open data release around the world. The Global Open Data Index is run by [Open Knowledge International](http://index.okfn.org/www.okfn.org) with the assistance of volunteers from the Open Knowledge Network around the world. The first Open Data Index was released on October 28, 2013. This page explains the methodology behind the Global Open Data Index. If you have any further questions or comments about our methodology please reach out to the staff, community of volunteers, and Index reviewers on the [Open Data Index forum](https://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index/global-open-data-index-2016).


The Global Open Data Index is not an official government representation of the open data offering in each country, but an independent assessment from a citizen’s perspective. It is a civil society audit of open data enabling citizens and governments to measure government’s progress on open data. The Index gives both parties a measurement tool and a baseline for discussion and analysis of the open data ecosystem in their country and internationally. The datasets that are taken into account seek to represent civil society’s preferences and therefore measure open data publication from a key user’s perspective (further details, see datasets section below).


The Global Open Data Index is not only a benchmarking tool, it also plays a powerful role in sustaining momentum for open data around the world - and in convening civil society networks to use and collaborate around this data. If, for example, the government of a country does publish an open dataset, but this is not clear to the public and cannot be found through a simple search, then the data can easily be overlooked and not put to good use. Governments and open data practitioners can review the Index results to see how accessible the open data they publish actually appears to their citizens, see where improvements are necessary to make open data truly open and useful, and track their progress year to year.
## The research question
Like any other benchmarking tool, the Global Open Data Index tries to answer a question. In our case, the question is as follows:


“What is the state open data around the world?”


From this question, other important questions emerge, such as:
* “Which country ranks best on open data? Who is the least/most open country?”
* “What is the most open dataset? What is the least open dataset?”
* “Are some data more readily published as open data than others?”

Open data has two key aspects: legal and technical openness. Which of these two — and which specific requirements e.g. an open license, machine readability, bulk access — is the most challenging for data publishers? For example, do governments find it easy to publish machine-readable data but struggle to apply an open license?_

According to [the common open data assessment framework](http://opendataresearch.org/sites/default/files/posts/Common%20Assessment%20Workshop%20Report.pdf), there are four different ways to evaluate data openness — context, data, use and impact. The Global Open Data Index is intentionally limiting its inquiry to the publication of datasets by national governments. It does not look at the broader societal context — for example, the legal or policy framework, (FOI, etc.) — and it also does not seek to assess use or impact in a systematic way.

In contrast to past editions, the Index now also seeks to capture information on practical openness, i.e. data findability and usability. These questions are not currently scored but this information will provide valuable information for both governments and users.

The scored Open Data Index questions do not assess the quality of the data. This narrow focus of data publication enables it to provide a standardized, robust, comparable assessment of the state of the publication of key data by governments around the world. We are nevertheless aware that data quality is a key concern of the open data community and a significant barrier to reuse.
## Research assumptions
Different countries have different governance structures (Federal vs. National government, etc.) and different policies regarding open data. We set out here our key assumptions that inform our approach and that were taken into consideration while collecting and assessing the data.


Assumption 1: Open Data is defined by the Open Definition We define open data according to the ‘Open Definition’— The open definition is a set of principles that define openness in relation to data and content. It is the original, “gold-standard” definition for open data. It is also simple and easy to operationalise.
We note one small deviation from the current v2.1 of the Open Definition. The only part of our methodology that is not aligned with the open definition is “Open Machine readable” format. We give a full score to machine-readable formats whose source code is not open, but who are usable with at least one free and open source software in order to emphasise practical openness.


Assumption 2: The role of government in publishing data
In the past, there have been questions in the index community about the role of the government in ensuring the publication of a specific dataset. In many fields, some of government services are privatised, which means the data is owned and produced by a company and not the state. Our assumption is that for the key datasets we survey, the government has a responsibility to ensure the availability of such data even if is it held and managed by a third-party.


Assumption 3: The Global Open Data Index is a national indicator
Recognise that not all countries have the same governance structure and that data indicators assessed through the index might not necessarily be produced by the national government due to decentralisation of power. Furthermore, it is possible that not all of the sub-national governments produce the same data as they are potentially subject to different laws and/or procedures. Nevertheless, the Global Open Data Index assesses national governments by measuring the publication of open data at the country-level. Country-level data assessed here may take three forms:
“National” publication of open data can take two forms
* The data describes national government processes or procedures
* The data is collected or produced by national government or a national government agency
* The data describes national parameters and public services for the entire national territory, but is collected by sub-national governments.

## Data Categories
Dataset definitions are crucial in enabling respondents to accurately assess datasets and to do in a way that is comparable across countries. Each year we refine our definitions to reflect learnings from experts in the field. The data definitions do the following:

* Describe the dataset by at least 3 key data characteristics it must have.
* Include a time interval for how often the dataset needs to be updated. We use the “Is this timely” question in the Index survey to assess whether data is published in a timely fashion. However, different datasets reasonably have different times in which they are updated. Adding this characteristic to the dataset definition can help users answering this question.
* Aggregation. Mention which aggregation level the data needs to be in. Some datasets can be in more than one aggregation level and mentioning the aggregation level can help to avoid confusion between datasets.


### Data Categories

National Statistics: Key national statistics such as demographic and economic indicators (GDP, unemployment, population, etc). To satisfy this category, the following minimum criteria must be met:
* _GDP for the whole country updated at least quarterly_
* _Unemployment statistics updated at least monthly_
* _Population updated at least once a year_


Government Budget National government budget at a high level. This category is looking at budgets, or the planned government expenditure for the upcoming year, and not the actual expenditure. To satisfy this category, the following minimum criteria must be met:
* _Planned budget divided by government department and sub-department_
* _Updated once a year._
* _The budget should include descriptions regarding the different budget sections._


Government Spending: Records of actual (past) national government spending at a detailed transactional level. A database of contracts awarded or similar will *not* be considered sufficient. This data category refers to detailed ongoing data on actual expenditure. Data submitted in this category should meet the following minimum criteria:
* _Individual record of transactions_
* _Date of the transactions_
* _Government office that made the transaction_
* _Name of vendor_
* _Amount of the transaction_
* _Updated on a monthly basis_


Draft Legislation: Data about the bills discussed within national parliament as well as votings on bills (not to be confused with passed national law). Data on bills must be available for the current legislation period.
* _Content of bill_
* _Author of bill_
* _Votes on bill per member of parliament_
* _Transcripts of debates on bill_
* _Status of the bill_


National Laws: This data category requires all national laws and statutes available to be available online, although it is not a requirement that information on legislative behaviour e.g. voting records is available. To satisfy this category, the following minimum criteria must be met:
* _Content of the law / statutes_
* _If applicable, all relevant amendments to the law_
* _Date of last amendments_
* _Data should be updated at least quarterly_


Election Results: This data category requires results by constituency / district for all major national electoral contests. To satisfy this category, the following minimum criteria must be met:
* _Result for all major electoral contests_
* _Number of registered votes_
* _Number of invalid votes_
* _Number of spoiled ballots_
* _All data should be reported at the level of the polling station_


National Map: This data category requires a high level national map. To satisfy this category, the following minimum criteria must be met:
* _Scale of 1:250,000 (1 cm = 2.5km)._
* _Markings of national traffic routes_
* _Markings of water stretches_
* _Markings of relief/heights_
* _National borders_
* _Updated at least once a year._


Pollutant Emissions: Data about the daily mean concentration of air pollutants, especially those potentially harmful to human health. Data should be available for all air monitoring stations or air monitoring zones in a country.In order to satisfy the minimum requirements for this category, data must be available for the following pollutants and meet the following minimum criteria:
* _Particulate matter (PM) Levels_
* _Sulfur oxides (SOx)_
* _Nitrogen oxides (NOx)_
* _Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)_
* _Carbon monoxide (CO)_
* _Ozone._
* _Available per air monitoring station/zone_


Company Register: List of registered (limited liability) companies. The submissions in this data category do not need to include detailed financial data such as balance sheet, etc. To satisfy this category, the following minimum criteria must be met:
* _Name of company_
* _Unique identifier of the company_
* _Company address_
* _Updated at least once a month_


Location datasets: A database of postcodes/zipcodes and the corresponding spatial locations in terms of a latitude and a longitude (or similar coordinates in an openly published coordinate system). The data has to be available for the entire country. Data submitted in this category must satisfy the following minimum conditions:
* _Zipcodes_
* _Address_
* _Coordinate (latitude & longitude)_
* _Data available for entire country_


Administrative boundaries: Data on administrative units or areas defined for the purpose of administration by a (local) government.
* _Boundary level 1_
* _Boundary level 2_
* _Coordinates (latitude& longitude)_
* _Name of polygons (department, region, city)_
* _Borders of polygons _


Procurement : All tenders and awards of the national/federal government aggregated by office. Monitoring tenders can help new groups to participate in tenders and increase government compliance. Data submitted in this category must be aggregated by office, updated at least monthly & satisfy the following minimum criteria:
* _Tenders per government office_
* _Awards per government office_
* _Tender name_
* _Tender description_
* _Tender status_
* _Award title_
* _Award description_
* _Value of the award_
* _Supplier's name_


Water Quality : Data, measured at the water source, on the quality of water is essential for both the delivery of services and the prevention of diseases. In order to satisfy the minimum requirements for this category, data should be available on level of the following chemicals by water source and be updated at least weekly:
* _Fecal coliform_
* _Arsenic_
* _Fluoride levels_
* _Nitrates_
* _TDS (Total dissolved solids)_


Weather Forecast: 5 day-forecasts of temperature, precipitation and wind. Forecasts have to be provided for several regions in the country. In order to satisfy the minimum requirements for this category, data submitted should meet the following criteria:
* _Temperature extremes_
* _Temperature average_
* _Wind speed_
* _Wind direction_
* _Precipitation Amount_
* _Precipitation Probability_
* _Forecast for current day and four following days_


Land Ownership: Data should include maps of lands with parcel layer that displays boundaries in addition to a land registry with information on registered parcels of land. The following characteristics must be included in cadastral and registry information submitted
* _Parcel Boundaries_
* _Parcel ID_
* _Property Value_
* _Tenure Type_


## Place
In a few cases, we have received submissions for places that are not officially recognised as independent countries; we have included these if they are complete and accurate submissions. Therefore, the Global Open Data Index 2016 ranks ‘Places’ and not ‘Countries’. Generally, we seek to survey jurisdictions with sufficient autonomy to be responsible for data management and publication. Usually these are countries; however, there are cases where country jurisdiction is disputed and we generally seek to be flexible and inclusive where we can.
## Scoring
Each dataset in each place is evaluated using a set of questions that examine the openness of the datasets based to the open definition and the Open Data Charter.


In 2016, we introduced the new survey of the Global Open Data Index (GODI). The new scoring follows two major ideas:


* We assume that each question of our survey measures a crucial characteristic of either the legal, technical and practical ‘openness’ of data. Our scoring follows an assessment of the weighting (see below) in which we describe why a question is important for open data and how a scoring can reflects this importance. We also explain cases why we should not score a question. With this approach, we aim to reduce the potential bias towards single aspects of openness.

* The new scoring gives in total 40 points to open licenses/public domain status and machine-readable and open file formats. These technical and legal aspects of openness are the core of the Open Definition 2.1 and we seek to maintain a strong emphasis on them. However, aspects such timely publication, data availability and accessibility are equally important to access and use open data. Questions around data accessibility receive a score of in total 60 points.

### Questions & Scoring


Section A: Background Information (Not Scored)


* Rate your knowledge of the data category
* Rate your knowledge of the principles of open data


Section B: About the Data (Scored)

Question | Description | Scoring
------------ | ------------- | -------------
Are the data available online without the need to register or request access to the data? | Answer “Yes”, if the data are made available by the government on a public website. Answer “No” if the data are *NOT* available online or are available online only after registering, requesting the data from a civil servant via email, completing a contact form or another similar administrative process. | Score: 15
| Is the data available free of charge? | The data is free if you don’t have to pay for it. | Score: 15 |
| Is the data downloadable all at once? | Answer “Yes”, if you can download all data at once from the URL at which you found them. In case that downloadable data files are very large, their downloads may also be organised by month or year or broken down into sub-files. Answer “No” if if you have to do many manual steps to download the data, or if you can only retrieve very few parts of a large dataset at a time (for instance through a search interface). | Score: 15 |
| Data should be updated every [Time Interval]: Is the data up-to-date? | Please base your answer on the date at which you answer this question. Answer “No” if you cannot determine a date, or if the data are outdated.| Score: 15 |
| Is the data openly licensed/in public domain? | This question measures if anyone is legally allowed to use, modify and redistribute data for any purpose. Only then data is considered truly "open" (see Open Definition). Answer ”Yes” if the data are openly licensed. The Open Definition provides a list of conformant licenses. Answer also “Yes” if there is no open licence, but a statement that the dataset is in “public domain”. To count as public domain the dataset must not be protected by copyright, patents or similar restrictions. If you are not sure whether an open licence or public domain disclaimer is compliant with the Open Definition 2.1, seek feedback on the Open Data Index discussion forum. | Score: 20 |
| In which formats are the data? | Tell us the file formats of the data. We automatically compare them against a list of file formats that are considered machine-readable and open. A file format is called machine-readable if your computer can process, access, and modify single elements in a data file. The Index considers formats to be “open” if they can be fully processed with at least one free and open-source software tool. The source code of these format does not have to be open. Potentially these formats allow more people to use the data, because people do not need to buy specific software to open it. | Score: 20 |

Section B: About the Data (Not Scored)


## Sample methodology
The Index uses a [non-probability sampling technique](http://sociology.about.com/od/Research/a/sampling-designs.htm) — also known as a “snowball sample”. A snowball sample attempts to locate the subject of studies in areas that are hard to locate. In our case, we work with contributors who are interested in open government data activity who can assess the availability and quality of open datasets in their respective locations. We do so not only by using referrals, but also by reaching out on social media, through regular communications our Open Government Data and [Open Data Index forums](https://discuss.okfn.org/c/open-data-index/global-open-data-index-2015), and by actively networking at conferences and events. This year, we also hired local coordinators, that outreached to their networks and assist in soliciting new submissions. This means that anyone from any place can participate and contribute to the Global Open Data Index as a contributor and make submissions, which are then reviewed. We do not have a quota on the number of places that can participate. Rather, we aim to sample as many places around the world as we can. This also has an impact on the quality of the data we collected in the first stage of the Global Open Data Index. Contributors have diverse knowledge and backgrounds in open data and therefore they sometimes need help finding the data we are looking for. The following section explains how we tried to deal with this problem.
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