Healthy Food Policies Common Terms & Definitions
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TermDefinitionTopic Area
Food Systems Component/Stage
Defined byLaw/Source
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accessory food items
Non-staple food items, such as coffee, tea, cocoa, carbonated and un-carbonated drinks, candy, condiments, and spices.
Food Access / GroceryGetMinneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 203.10 (2018)
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accessory use grocery
A retail establishment that sells staple foods as an accessory use to its primary business, or sells only specialized types or classes of staple foods and accessory foods, including, but not limited to, such establishments as imported food stores and gift shops. The definition of accessory use grocery does not include stores that accept government supplemental nutrition programs.
Food Access / GroceryGetMinneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 203.10 (2018)
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apiaryThe assembly of one (1) or more colonies of honeybees at a single location.BeekeepingGrowMinneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 520.160 (2017)
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aquaculture
The cultivation of aquatic animals in a recirculating environment to produce whole fish that are distributed to retailers, restaurants and consumers.
AquacultureGrowBostonBoston, MA, Article 89 (2013)
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aquaculture
The cultivation of marine or freshwater food fish, shellfish, or plants under controlled conditions.
AquacultureGrowDetroit
City of Detroit Urban Agriculture Ordinance (2013)
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aquacultureThe cultivation, maintenance, and harvesting of aquatic species.AquacultureGrowMinneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 520.160 (2017)
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aquacultureRaising aquatic plants or animals for sale to customers.AquacultureGrowNew Rochelle, NY
New Rochelle, N.Y., Code § 331-175.04 (2017)
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aquacultureRaising aquatic plants or animals for sale.AquacultureGrowSouthampton, NY
Town of Southampton, N.Y., Code 330-403 (2017)
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aquaponics
The cultivation of fish and plants together in a constructed, re-circulating system utilizing natural bacterial cycles to convert fish wastes to plant nutrients, for distribution to retailers, restaurants and consumers.
AquacultureGrowBostonBoston, MA, Article 89 (2013)
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aquaponics
The integration of aquaculture with hydroponics, in which the waste products from fish are treated and then used to fertilize hydroponically growing plants.
AquacultureGrowDetroit
City of Detroit Urban Agriculture Ordinance (2013)
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aquaponics
The combination of aquaculture (farming of aquatic species) and hydroponics (plants) to grow food crops or ornamental crops and aquatic species together in a recirculation system without discharge or exchange of water.
AquacultureGrowFort Worth
Fort Worth, Tex, Zoning Ordinances Ch. 9
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aquaponics
The combination of aquaculture and hydroponics to grow food or ornamental crops and aquatic species together in a recirculating system without any discharge or exchange of water.
AquacultureGrowMinneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 520.160 (2017)
14
at-risk population
At-risk populations include infants, children, seniors, persons with low-income, low-income households, persons with food-related health issues (Such as chronic diseases like diabetes, obesity, heart disease, etc.).
Community ValuesWashington, D.C.
Sustainable Dc Mayor’s Order: Food Access and Security Report (2014)
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beekeeperA person or persons managing and maintaining Honey Bees in a Hive or Hives.BeekeepingGrowBostonBoston, MA, Article 89 (2013)
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beekeeperA person who owns or has charge of one (1) or more colonies of honeybees.BeekeepingGrowMinneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 62.20 (2017)
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beekeepingNo definition found in local laws surveyed.BeekeepingGrow
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caloric sweetener
Any Caloric Substance suitable for human consumption that humans perceive as sweet and includes, but is not limited to, sucrose, fructose, high fructose corn sugar, glucose, and other sugars.
Food Access / GroceryGetSan Francisco
San Francisco, Cal., Health Code § 4202, (2017)
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chickA chicken under the age of fourteen (14) weeks.Animal HusbandryGrowBostonBoston, MA, Article 89 (2013)
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cold frame
A temporary, unheated outdoor structure, no higher than thirty-six (36”) inches, used for protecting seedlings and plants from the cold.
Urban AgricultureGrowBostonBoston, MA, Article 89 (2013)
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cold frame
An unheated outdoor structure consisting of a wooden or concrete frame and a top of glass or clear plastic, used for protecting seedlings and plants from the cold.
Urban AgricultureGrowCleveland
Cleveland, Ohio, Code Sections 336.02 (2017)
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cold frame
An unheated outdoor structure built close to the ground, typically consisting of, but not limited to, a wooden or concrete frame and a top of glass or clear plastic, used for protecting seedlings and plants from cold weather.
Urban AgricultureGrowMinneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 520.160 (2017)
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colonyA natural group of Honey Bees having a queen or queens.BeekeepingGrowBostonBoston, MA, Article 89 (2013)
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colony
An aggregate of honeybees consisting principally of workers but having, when perfect, one (1) queen and at times drones, brood, combs, and honey.
BeekeepingGrowMinneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 62.20 (2017)
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community center
A building or structure used as a place of meeting, recreation or social activity and not operated for profit and where alcoholic beverages are prohibited, except as approved by the Town.
OtherFuquay-Varina, NC
Fuquay-Varina, North Carolina, Code § 9-1901 (2018)
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community driven
The community of residents and businesses is driving process, often organizing meetings, developing priorities, timelines, budgets, and project management details. This is distinct from community informed where stakeholders are gathered and provide input and direction, but are not responsible for implementation.
Community ValuesDenverDenver Food Vision
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community food business
A Local Food Business that primarily serves the needs of neighborhood residents instead of national or global markets.
OtherGetDenverDenver Food Vision
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community food security
The condition which exists when all of the members of a community have access, in close proximity, to adequate amounts of nutritious, culturally appropriate food at all times, from sources that are environmentally sound and just.
Community ValuesDetroit Food Policy Council
Creating a Food Secure Detroit: Policy Review and Update (2016)
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community garden
A single piece of land that is typically gardened by a group of people. Community gardens utilize either individual or shared plots on private or public land while producing fruit, vegetables, and/or ornamental plants.
Urban AgricultureGrow, Get, Make
Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future
Baltimore City’s Food Environment Report: 2018 Report
30
community garden
An area of land managed and maintained by a group of individuals to grow and harvest food crops and/or non-food, ornamental crops, such as flowers, for personal or group use, consumption or donation. Community gardens may be divided into separate plots for cultivation by one (1) or more individuals or may be farmed collectively by members of the group and may include common areas maintained and used by group members.
Urban AgricultureGrow, Get, MakeCleveland
Cleveland, Ohio, Code Sections 336.02 (2017)
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community garden
Community gardens promote the local production of food for use or consumption by the individuals directly involved in the food production. Community gardens may be divided into separates plots for cultivation by one (1) or more individuals or may be farmed collective.
Urban AgricultureGrow, Get, MakeFort Lauderdale, FL
Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Land Development Code § 47-18.41 (2017)
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community garden
A shared garden space managed by a public or nonprofit organization, a neighborhood association, person or group of individuals in the community, to grow plants and harvest food or ornamental crops for use by those cultivating the land and their households.
Urban AgricultureGrow, Get, MakeFort Worth
Fort Worth, Tex, Zoning Ordinances Ch. 9
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community garden
A use in which land managed by a group of individuals is used to grow food or ornamental crops for donation or for use by those cultivating the land and their households. Community gardens may be divided into separate plots for cultivation by one (1) or more individuals or may be farmed collectively by members of the group and may include common areas maintained and used by group members.
Urban AgricultureGrow, Get, MakeMinneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 520.160 (2017)
34
community garden
[Nashville specifies between commerical and non-commerical community gardens.] "Commercial Community Gardens" means an individual or group growing and harvesting food crops and or non-food crop, ornamental crops, such as flowers for commercial sale. "Non-Commercial Community Gardens" means a group of individuals growing and harvesting food crops and or non-food crop, ornamental crops, such as flowers for personal or group use, consumption or donation.
Urban AgricultureGrow, Get, MakeNashville
Nashville, Tenn. Title 17 of the Metropolitan Code, Zoning Regulations
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community garden
Land managed by a public or not-for profit organization or association and used to grow plants or ornamental crops for household use, sale, or donation.
Urban AgricultureGrow, Get, MakeNew Rochelle, NY
New Rochelle, N.Y., Code § 331-175.04 (2017)
36
community garden
An area managed and maintained by a group of individuals to grow and harvest food crops or non-food crops (e.g., flowers) for personal or group consumption, for donation, or for sale that is incidental in nature. A community garden area may be divided into separate garden plots or orchard areas for cultivation by one or more individuals or may be farmed collectively by members of the group. A community garden may include common areas (e.g., hand tool storage sheds) maintained and used by the group. Community gardens may be principal or accessory uses and may be located on a roof or within a building.
Urban AgricultureGrow, Get, MakePhiladelphia
Philadelphia Code, Title 14 (§ 14-601(11)) (2018)
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community garden
Land used for the cultivation of fruits, vegetables, plants, flowers and herbs by multiple users. The land shall be served by a water supply sufficient to support the cultivation practice used on the site. Such land may include available public land to provide open space, recreation, education, social connections, economic development opportunities and a local food source.
Urban AgricultureGrowSilver City, NMSilver City, N.M., Code § 2.2 (2018)
38
community garden
Land managed by a public or not-for profit organization or association and used to grow plants or ornamental crops for household use, sale, or donation.
Urban AgricultureGrowSouthampton, NY
Town of Southampton, N.Y., Code 330-403 (2017)
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community garden
Use in which land managed by a public or nonprofit organization, or a group of individuals, is used to grow plants and harvest food or ornamental crops from them for donation or for use by those cultivating the land and their households.
Urban AgricultureGrow, Get, MakeSeattle
Urban Agriculture: A Sixteen City Survey Of Urban Agriculture Practices Across The Country
40
community garden
A site where any kind of plant, including flowers, is grown, and several individuals or households cultivate the site. The site may be divided into individual allotments, or gardeners may work together to cultivate the entire property. The land may be publicly or privately owned. The plants are grown for personal use by the gardeners, or for donation, and only limited sales are allowed.
Urban AgricultureGrow, Get, MakePortland, OR
Urban Food Zoning Code Update: Enhancing Portlanders’ Connection to Their Food and Community
41
community kitchen
An approved facility licensed as a Food Manufacturer that may be used by licensed businesses for commercial purpose. A Community Kitchen may also be an unlicensed kitchen that is used by community members for cooking non-commercial or exempt foods or for cooking classes and/or other related activities.
OtherMakeMinneapolis
Amending Title 10, Chapter 186, of the Minneapolis Code of Ordinances (2010)
42
community supported agriculture
No definition found in local laws surveyed.Urban AgricultureGrow
43
complete food environment
A community-defined set of food amenities and infrastructure (that could include grocery stores, food pantries, farmers’ markets, school gardens, etc) that together provide for the food needs of all community members. Importantly, Complete Food Environments are designed by the community at the neighborhood-level, most often as part of a neighborhood or small area plan. Neighborhoods' Complete Food Environments enable equitable access to affordable, healthy, fresh, and often local food for all. They integrate the unique cultures and values of each neighborhood and make it easy to shop for and buy nutritious and healthy foods regardless of age, ability, income, or other personal factors.
Community ValuesDenverDenver Food Vision
44
compost
The humus-like product of the process of composting organic waste. which may be used as a soil conditioner.
Composting
Surplus/Waste Management
ChicagoChicago, Ill., Ord. No. 92607 (2007)
45
composting
A process of accelerated biodegradation and stabilization of organic material under controlled conditions yielding a product which can safely be used as fertilizer
Composting
Surplus/Waste Management
BostonBoston, MA, Article 89 (2013)
46
composting
A controlled biological treatment process by which microorganisms decompose the organic fraction of waste, producing compost.
Composting
Surplus/Waste Management
ChicagoChicago, Ill., Ord. No. 92607 (2007)
47
composting
Relatively stable decomposed organic matter for use in agricultural and other growing practices, usually consisting of materials such as grass, leaves, yard waste, worms, and also including raw and uncooked kitchen food wastes, but specifically excluding bones, meat, fat, grease, oil, raw manure, and milk products.
Composting
Surplus/Waste Management
Detroit
City of Detroit Urban Agriculture Ordinance (2013)
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compostingThe natural degradation of organic material, such as yard and food waste, into soil.Composting
Surplus/Waste Management
Minneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 520.160 (2017)
49
composting operation
All composting activities conducted on a site, including all composting material, stored landscape waste, and end-product compost located on any site at any one time.
Composting
Surplus/Waste Management
ChicagoChicago, Ill., Ord. No. 92607 (2007)
50
convenience store
A variety of stores that sell food products but place a significant focus on non-food items. The majority of sales may be made up from prepared foods, cigarettes, pharmacy items, home goods, etc. This retail category includes chain convenience stores, drug stores or pharmacies, and discount/dollar stores. [Chain convenience stores that have a gas station attached, such as a 7-Eleven or Royal Farms, are included in this category but stand-alone gas stations are not.]
Food Access / GroceryGet
Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future
Baltimore City’s Food Environment Report: 2018 Report
51
convenience store
Sells mostly convenience food items (including prepared and ready-to-eat foods, bread, milk, snacks, and soda). No fresh meat and limited or no fresh produce and other staple food items. May sell alcohol, tobacco, and gas. May be independently owned or part of a chain. Two or fewer cash registers. 2,000–3,000 square feet. Sometimes referred to as “food marts,” “minimarts,” “mom and pops,” “bodegas,” and “corner stores.”
Food Access / GroceryGetChangeLab Solutions
Health on the Shelf: A Guide to Healthy Small Food Retailer Certification Programs
52
convenience store
Any retail grocery store that has all of the following characteristics: Is under 4,000 square feet in area; Requires a package store liquor license; and Is open more than 15 hours a day.
Food Access / GroceryGetPortland, OR
Portland, Ore. Title 33, Planning and Zoning, Chapter 33.910 Definitions (2018)
53
coopAn enclosed shelter in which a chicken lives.Animal HusbandryGrowBostonBoston, MA, Article 89 (2013)
54
coop
A closed structure which provides protections from the elements of nature including heat and cold and protects fowl from predators. A coop shall provide for nesting, feeding and watering space for each fowl.
Animal HusbandryGrowMinneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 62.20 (2017)
55
corner store
Small format grocery stores that are typically independently owned and operated. They typically have annual food sales of less than $2 million, and have limited to no food departments.
Food Access / GroceryGet
Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future
Baltimore City’s Food Environment Report: 2018 Report
56
corner store
A retail establishment that: (A) Sells grocery products; (B) Has less than 5,000 square feet of selling area; (C) Does not have an off-premises retailer’s license, Class A, established by D.C. Official Code § 25-112(d)(1); and (D) Meets the eligibility requirements for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, established by the Food Stamp Act of 1964, approved August 31, 1964 (78 Stat. 703; 7 U.S.C. § 2011 et seq.).
Food Access / GroceryGetWashington, D.C.
Food, Environmental, and Economic Development in the District of Columbia Act of 2010, DC Law 18-353 (2011)
57
corner store
A single small-scale retail business, standalone or part of a mixed-used building, typically supplying a limited selection of food and other services and sundries.
Food Access / GroceryGetFuquay-Varina, NC
Fuquay-Varina, North Carolina, Code § 9-1902 (2018)
58
corner store
An urban convenience store that is independently owned and often sells alcohol and tobacco products. Sometimes referred to as “convenience stores” but are usually associated with a specifically urban environment.
Food Access / GroceryGetChangeLab Solutions
Health on the Shelf: A Guide to Healthy Small Food Retailer Certification Programs
59
culturally appropriate
Culturally appropriate [activites or actions] are defined as meeting each of the following characteristics: (a) The [activity or action] is based on the cultural values of the group, (b) the strategies that make up the [activity or action] reflect the subjective culture (attitudes, expectancies, norms) of the group, and (c) the components that make up the strategies reflect the behavioral preferences and expectations of the group's members.
Community ValuesDenverDenver Food Vision
60
economic mobility
The ability to move up or down the economic ladder within a lifetime or from one generation to the next.
Community Values
Pew Charitable Trust & Federal Reserve Bank of SF
Denver Food Vision
61
enclosure
A set of walls or fences designed to confine animals or birds to a space that is large enough to permit the animals and birds to roam relatively freely in an open yard area.
Animal HusbandryGrowCleveland
Cleveland, Oh., Ord. No. 347.02 (2009)
62
farm animal
“Farm animal” means any domestic species of animal that is kept and raised for use as food or in the production of food or in the operation of a farm and is not an “exotic animal” as defined in Section 603A.02 and is not a house pet such as a dog, cat or similar animal.
Animal HusbandryGrowCleveland
Cleveland, Oh., Ord. No. 347.02 (2009)
63
farm animal
Any of the various species of animals domesticated as to live and breed in a tame condition and kept for agricultural purposes such as but not limited to horses, cattle, goats, sheep, llamas, potbellied pigs, pigs, and bees. Farm animals do not include domestic or wild animals.
Animal HusbandryGrowMinneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 62.20 (2017)
64
farm areaThe area of a Lot designated for activities and uses defined as Urban Agriculture.Urban AgricultureGrowBostonBoston, MA, Article 89 (2013)
65
farm products
Fruits, vegetables (including soy-based), mushrooms, herbs, grains, legumes, nuts, shell eggs, honey or other bee products, flowers, nursery stock, livestock food products (including meat, milk, yogurt, cheese, and other dairy products), and seafood.
Farmers' MarketsGrowAtlanta
Atlanta, Ga., Ordinance 10-O-1773 (2011)
66
farm products
Fruits, vegetables, mushrooms, herbs, nuts, shell eggs, honey or other bee products, flowers, nursery stock, livestock food products (including meat, milk, cheese and other dairy products), and fish.
Farmers' MarketsGrowSilver City, NMSilver City, N.M., Code § 2.2 (2018)
67
farm stand
A Farm Structure such as a table, stall or tent, in use during that Urban Farm’s growing season, and operated by a sole vendor for the sale of agricultural or horticultural products
Farmers' MarketsGetBostonBoston, MA, Article 89 (2013)
68
farm stand
A temporary structure, accessory to an urban garden or urban farm for the display and sale of vegetables or produce, flowers, orchard products, locally-produced packaged food products and similar non-animal agricultural products grown or produced on the general property of the urban garden or urban farm upon which the stand is located.
Farmers' MarketsGetDetroit
City of Detroit Urban Agriculture Ordinance (2013)
69
farm stand
A temporary structure for the display and sale of food or ornamental crops grown at a community garden, market garden or urban farm.
Farmers' MarketsGetMinneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 520.160 (2017)
70
farm stand
A location at or near the point of production of a community or urban garden where their fresh produce, shell eggs and non-potentially hazardous processed agricultural products made with ingredients produced on or near the community or urban garden are sold.
Farmers' MarketsGetSan Francisco
San Francisco, Cal., Health Code art. 8, sect. 440 (2018)
71
farmers' market
A market whereby vending activity is conducted outdoors in an open-air environment and accessible to the general public and which meets the set standards for participating vendors and percentage of Farm Products and Value-Added Farm Products in displayed inventory.
Farmers' MarketsGetAtlanta
Atlanta, Ga., Ordinance 10-O-1773 (2011)
72
farmers' market
A recurring event on designated dates and times consisting primarily of agricultural producers selling their products directly to the public. At least 50 percent of vendors must sell agricultural or food products as designated by the State of Maryland’s definition for ‘Farmers Market.’
Farmers' MarketsGetBaltimore
Baltimore City’s Food Environment Report: 2018 Report
73
farmers' market
A public market administered by a market manager and held multiple times per year to connect and mutually benefit Local farmers, communities and shoppers. Vendors may include Local farmers, farmers’ cooperatives and producers selling any of the following: whole produce; value-added agricultural products such as jams, jellies, and pickles; prepared food; all agricultural, horticultural and aquacultural products including but not limited to whole produce; plants; flowers; meats; dairy products; shellfish and finfish; and other food-related products.
Farmers' MarketsGetBostonBoston, MA, Article 89 (2013)
74
farmers' market
A site where outdoor stalls, booths, tables and/or the like are used by one or more vendors for the display and/or sale of locally produced fruits, vegetables, plants, flowers, plant products, and/or animal products such as eggs, milk, butter, cheese and honey. A farmers' market shall not include the display and/or sale of animals.
Farmers' MarketsGetChristiansburg, VA
Christiansburg, Virginia, Code § 42-1 (2017)
75
farmers' market
A pre-designated non-municipally owned or operated area, with or without temporary structures, where vendors and individuals who have raised the vegetables or produce or have taken the same on consignment for retail sale, sell vegetables or produce, flowers, orchard products, locally-produced packaged food products and/or animal agricultural products.
Farmers' MarketsGetDetroit
City of Detroit Urban Agriculture Ordinance (2013)
76
farmers' market
A temporary food market at which local farmers and producers sell products such as fruit and vegetables, meat, cheese, and bakery products directly to consumers.
Farmers' MarketsGetLawrence, KS
Code of the City of Lawrence, Kansas - 20-1777
77
farmers' market
A public market, as defined by section 2(2) of the Vending Regulation Act of 2009, effective October 22, 2009 (D.C. Law 18-71; D.C. Official Code § 37-131.01(2)), at which farmers and other producers sell fresh produce and healthy foods.
Farmers' MarketsGetWashington, D.C.
Food, Environmental, and Economic Development in the District of Columbia Act of 2010, DC Law 18-353 (2011)
78
farmers' market
An outdoor marketplace for the distribution and sale of food products directly to consumers that are grown, made and offered for sale by the producing farmers and including unique products and goods created and sold by local artisans, not to include mass produced products.
Farmers' MarketsGetFort Worth
Fort Worth, Tex, Zoning Ordinances Ch. 9
79
farmers' market
A primarily outdoor recurring event, created for public benefit, where on designated days and times, a group of market vendors consisting principally of product of the farm (growers/farmers) vendors and that may include persons holding one (1) of the following: Minneapolis seasonal food permit, Minneapolis mobile food vehicle vendor license, Minneapolis limited mobile vendor license, MDA cottage food vendor registration, MDA poultry processor registration, or food sampling and demonstrations exemption craft producers, and vendors of services organized for the purpose of selling their products directly to the public.
Farmers' MarketsGetMinneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 201.10 (2018)
80
farmers' market
An outdoor market open to the public, operated by a governmental agency, a nonprofit corporation, or one or more producers, at which (a) at least 50 percent of the products sold are farm products or value-added farm products and (b) at least 50 percent of the vendors regularly participating during the market's hours of operation are producers, or family members or employees of producers.
Farmers' MarketsGetSilver City, NMSilver City, N.M., Code § 2.2 (2018)
81
farmers' market
A multi-stall market at which farmer-producers sell agricultural products directly to the general public at a central or fixed location, particularly fresh fruit and vegetables (but also meat products, dairy products, and/or grains).
Farmers' MarketsGetWashington, D.C.
Sustainable Dc Mayor’s Order: Food Access and Security Report (2014)
82
farmers' market
Events where farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural producers sell food, plants, flowers, and added-value products, such as jams and jellies, they have grown, raised, or produced from products they have grown or raised. In addition, some vendors sell food that is available for immediate consumption on site, and some may be community groups, services, or other vendors or organizations. Farmers Markets occur on a regular basis in the same location. They are free and open to the public. Some markets are seasonal, while others occur year-round.
Farmers' MarketsGetPortland, OR
Urban Food Zoning Code Update: Enhancing Portlanders’ Connection to Their Food and Community
83
food culture
Food culture refers to the ways in which people grow, shop for, prepare, and consume food that is culturally meaningful.
Community ValuesDenverDenver Food Vision
84
food desert
An area where the distance to a supermarket is more than ¼ mile, the median household income is at or below 185% of the Federal Poverty Level, over 40% of households have no vehicle available, and the average Healthy Food Availability Index score for supermarkets, convenience and corner stores is low (measured using the Nutrition Environment Measurement Survey).
Food Access / Grocery
Baltimore, Office of Sustainability
Baltimore Food Policy Initiative & John Hopkins Ctr. for a Livable Future, 2012, Baltimore City Food Environment Map Methodology
85
food desert
An area where an individual cannot obtain a wide selection of fresh produce and other nutritious foods at a full-service grocery store within a one-half mile of the individual’s residence, and highlights areas in which limited access overlaps with relatively high poverty.
Food Access / GroceryWashington, D.C.
Sustainable Dc Mayor’s Order: Food Access and Security Report (2014)
86
food insecurity
The state of being without reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious food.
Community ValuesUSDADenver Food Vision
87
food system
The process of how food gets from a farm or ranch to an individual and their family. The food system begins with the land, water, seeds, and tools that farmers and ranchers convert into food. The food system also encompasses the cleaning, moving, processing, repacking, packaging, distributing, selling, and cooking that happens between the farm and the plate.
OtherDenverDenver Food Vision
88
food system
All the growing, processing, distributing, retailing, consumption and waste disposal activities associated with food.
OtherHendrickson & Porth
Urban Agriculture - Best Practices and Possibilities
89
food waste
The source-separated organic portion of the waste resulting from the handling, processing, preparation, cooking, and consumption of food and the wastes from the handling, processing, storage and sale of produce. "Food waste" does not include packaging, utensils, or containers from the handling, processing, preparation, cooking and consumption of food.
Other
Surplus/Waste Management
ChicagoChicago, Ill., Ord. No. 92607 (2007)
90
freight container
A standardized reusable steel box previously used for the storage and movement of materials and products within an intermodal freight transport system and repurposed for a Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) use, such as Hydroponics and/or Aquaponics
Urban AgricultureGrowBostonBoston, MA, Article 89 (2013)
91
full-service grocery store
Business establishments with a minimum of 5,000 square feet primarily engaged in retailing food for home consumption and preparation.
Food Access / GroceryGetWashington, D.C.
Sustainable Dc Mayor’s Order: Food Access and Security Report (2014)
92
garden center
Garden centers, which may include a nursery or greenhouse as an accessory use, import most of the items sold-items such as plants, potting soil, and garden equipment. Garden centers shall be considered “stores of a generally recognized retail nature” for regulatory purposes.
Urban AgricultureGetDetroit
City of Detroit Urban Agriculture Ordinance (2013)
93
greenhouse
A permanent structure made of glass, plastic, or fiberglass in which plants are cultivated year round under controlled temperature and humidity settings.
Urban AgricultureGrowBostonBoston, MA, Article 89 (2013)
94
greenhouse
A building or structure whose roof and sides are made largely of glass or other transparent or translucent material and in which the temperature and humidity can be regulated for the cultivation of plants for personal use and/or for subsequent sale. A greenhouse may or may not be a permanent structure. Garden centers are not greenhouses.
Urban AgricultureGrowDetroit
City of Detroit Urban Agriculture Ordinance (2013)
95
greenhouseA building made of glass, plastic, or fiberglass in which plants are cultivated.Urban AgricultureGrowCleveland
Cleveland, Ohio, Code Sections 336.02 (2017)
96
greenhouse
A structure that is constructed primarily of glass, glass-like or translucent material which is devoted to the protection or cultivation of food or ornamental crops.
Urban AgricultureGrowMinneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 520.160 (2017)
97
grocery store
A retail establishment that: (A) Has a primary business of selling grocery products; (B) Has at least 5,000 square feet of selling area that is used for a general line of food and nonfood grocery products; and (C) Meets the eligibility requirements for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, established by the Food Stamp Act of 1964, approved August 31, 1964 (78 Stat. 703; 7 U.S.C. § 2011 et seq.).
Food Access / GroceryGetWashington, D.C.
Food, Environmental, and Economic Development in the District of Columbia Act of 2010, DC Law 18-353 (2011)
98
grocery store
A retail establishment that sells such products as staple foods, accessory food items, and household goods.
Food Access / GroceryGetMinneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., Code § 203.10 (2018)
99
health disparity
A particular type of health difference that is closely linked with social, economic, and/or environmental disadvantage. Health disparities adversely affect groups of people who have systematically experienced greater obstacles to health based on their racial or ethnic group; religion; socioeconomic status; gender; age; mental health; cognitive, sensory, or physical disability; sexual orientation or gender identity; geographic location; or other characteristics historically linked to discrimination or exclusion.
Community ValuesHealthy People 2020
https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/about/foundation-health-measures/Disparities
100
health equity
The “attainment of the highest level of health for all people. Achieving health equity requires valuing everyone equally with focused and ongoing societal efforts to address avoidable inequalities, historical and contemporary injustices, and the elimination of health and health care disparities.
Community ValuesHealthy People 2020
https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/about/foundation-health-measures/Disparities
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