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ConceptSkills (where stated)Chapter, Giancoli Subsection, Giancoli Corresponding in College Physics Open StaxUniversity Physics Open Stax Volume 1 QuestionsKhan Academy
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Simplification of ‘real-world’ problemsbuilding conceptual models of simple physical systems1page 2-5
1.1 The Nature of Science
1.2 Physics and its Relation to other Fields
1.3 Models, Theories, and Laws

Page 5- 12
Focus on 8-11
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Appropriate unitschoosing appropriate units for physical quantities;1page 8-11
1.5 Units, Standards, and the SI System
page 13-17
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unit conversions;1page 11-12
1.6 Converting Units
page 17-201.3 Unit Conversion
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Uncertainty associated with measurements.understanding uncertainties1page 5-8
1.4 Measurement and Uncertainty; Significant Figures
page 20-261.6 Sig Figs and Uncertainty
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estimation of orders of magnitude;1page 13-15
1.7 Order of Magnititde: Rapid Estimating
page 15 (not much info)1.4 Unit Estimation
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ability to use dimensional analysis in simple situations.1page 16
Dimensions and Dimensional Analysis
page 17 (not much info)1.4 Dimensions
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Summary, questions, and problemsPage 17-20page 27-31
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Position and discplacement2page 21-23
2.1 Reference Frames and Displacement
page 32-35
3.1 Position, Displacemenet, and Average Velocity
Reference Frames
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Speed and Velocity2page 23-25
2.2 Average Velocity
2.3 Instantaneous Velocity
page 36-403.2 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed
Average Velocity and Average Speed
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Acceleration2page 26-27
2.4 Acceleration
page 40-49
foccus on 40-44
3.3 Average and Instantaneous Acceleration
Acceleration
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Motion at constant accelerationsolve constant acceleration motion problems (such as inclined-plane problems or free-fall problems)2page 27 -38
2.5 Motion at constant acceleration
2.6 Solving Problems
2.7 Freely Falling Objects
page 49-69
3.4 Motion with Constant Acceleration
3.5 Free Fall
Motion with constant acceleration
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Graphical analysis of motionconstruct x-vs-t, v-vs-t, and a-vs-t graphs from descriptions of motion (and vice-versa)2page 39-40
2.8 Graphical Analysis of Linear Motion
page 69-76Velocity and speed from graphsAcceleration vs. Time Graphs
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Summary, questions, and problemspage 40-48page 76-88
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Vectors and vector manipulation (addition, subtraction, multiplication of vector by scalar);
separation of 2-D motion problems into independent axes.
3page 49-57
3.1 Vectors and Scalars
3.2 Addition of Vecotrs-- Graphical Methods
3.3 Subtraction of Vectors, and Multiplication of a Vector by a Scalar
3.4 Adding Vectors by Components
page 35; 90-92 (maybe not so relevant?);
92-106
2.1 & 2.2 Vectors & Scalars and Coordinate Systems
Vectors and Scalars
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analysis of 2-D motion (specifically projectile motion)3page 58-65
3.5 Projectile Motion
3.6 Solving Projectile Motion Problems
3.7 Projectile Motion Is Parabolic
3.8 Relative Velocity
page 106-121
4.5 Relative Motion in 1D and 2D
4.3 Projectile Motion
Projectile Motion
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Summary, questions, and problemspage 66-74page 122-132
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Forces
Contact forces and forces acting at a distance
4page 76; 84-86
4.1 Force
4.6 Weight-- the force of graveity and the normal force
page 135
page 138, 143-145
page 146-149
5.4 Mass and WeightNormal and Contact Force
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Newton's three laws of motion
Inertial refrence frames
Inertia
Mass
4page 77-83
4.2 Newton's First Law of Motion
4.3 Mass
4.4 Newton's Second Law of Motion
4.5 Newton’s Third Law of Motion
page 136- 145
page 153
Inertial reference frames = 151
5.2, 5.3, 5.5 Newton's Laws
6.1 Solving Problems with Newton's Laws
Newton's Laws
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Reaction forcesidentify reaction forces4
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Frictiondraw and analyse free-body diagrams

solve dynamics problems involving multiple forces and multiple bodies (such as weights-and-pulleys problems) moving rectilinearly
44.7 Solving Problems with Newton’s Laws: Free-Body Diagrams
4.8 Problems Involving Friction, Inclines
page147-163;133
174-179
6.2 Friction Inclined Planes + FrictionTension
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Summary, questions, and problemspage 98-108page 165-174
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Uniform circular motion

Centripetal acceleration
analysis of uniform circular motion

identification and analysis of forces providing centripetal acceleration (such as analysis of banked curves)
5page 109-117
5.1 Kinematics of
Uniform Circular Motion
5.2 Dynamics of
Uniform Circular Motion
5.3 Highway Curves:
Banked and Unbanked
page 202; 204-214
4.4 Uniform Circular Motion
6.3 Centripetal Force
Centripetal accelerationCentripetal Force
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Newton’s law of gravitation
5page 119- 122
5.5 Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation
5.6 Gravity Near the Earth’s Surface
page 215-22113.1-13.3 Law of Universal GravitationGravitation
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“Weightlessness”

Newton’s synthesis of Kepler’s laws
5page 122-128
5.7 Satellites and “Weightlessness”
5.8 Planets, Kepler’s Laws, and
Newton’s Synthesis
page 222-229
missing "Sun/Earth Reference Frames"
13.4 Satellitle Orbitals and NRG
13.5 Kepler's Laws of Planetary Motion
OrbitKepler's Laws
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Summary, questions, and problemspage 130-137page 229-239
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.
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Work by a constant force6page 139-142
6.1 Work Done by a Constant Force
6.2 Work Done by a Varying Force
page 240-242
missing "work done by a varying Force)
7.1 WorkIntro to Work
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Kinetic energy

Work-energy principle
6page 142-145
6.3 Kinetic Energy, and
the Work-Energy Principle
page 242-2477.2 Kinetic NRG
7.3 Work-NRG Theorem
Work-Energy PrincipleKinetic NRG
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Potential energy6page 145-148
6.4 Potential Energy
page 247-2528.1 Potential NRG of a SystemPotential NRGHooke's Law
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Conservative and non-conservative forces6page 149-150
6.5 Conservative and Nonconservative Forces
page 252-259Conservative Forces
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Conservation of energy.6page 150-160
6.6 Mechanical Energy and its conservation
6.7 Problem Solving Using conservation Mechanical Energy
6.8 Other Forms of Energy and Energy Transformations;
The Law of Conservation of Energy
6.9 Energy Conservation with Dissipative Forces: Solving Problems
6.10 Power
260-268
8.3 Conservation of NRG
7.4 Power
PowerConservation of NRG
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Summary, questions, and problemspage 161-169page 275-287
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Momentum7page 171-172
7.1 Momentum and Its Relation to Force
page 286-2889.1 Linear MomentumMomentum
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Conserved quantities (momentum and/or energy)recognize which quantities are conserved in collisions7page 173-176
7.2 Conservation of Momentum
290-2939.3 Conservation of MomentumConservation of Momentum
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Isolated system
Collisions in one and two dimensions;
analyze collisions using conservation laws;

recognize when to use impulse in collisions.
7page 176- 177; 182-184
7.3 Collisions and Impulse
7.7 Collisions in Two Dimensions
288-290
300-303
9.2 Impulse and Collision
9.5 Collisions in Multiple Dimensions
2D Momentum Problem & Solution
Impulse Problem & Solution
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Elastic vs. inelastic collisions7page 177-182
7.4 Conservation of Energy and
Momentum in Collisions
7.5 Elastic Collisions in One Dimension
7.6 Inelastic Collisions
294-2999.4 Types of CollisionsTypes of Collisions
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Center of massdescribe center-of-mass motion7page 184-186; 187-189
7.8 Center of Mass (CM)
7.10 CM and Translational Motion
No Corresponding Section9.6 Centre of MassCentre of Mass
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Summary, questions, and problemspage 189-197page 308-316
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Variables used for description of angular motion

Angular displacement, angular velocity, angular acceleration
relate linear motion to angular motion; angular acceleration8page 199-204
8.1 Angular Quantities
8.2 Constant Angular Acceleration
page 346-350
(203-206)
10.1 Rotational Variables
10.3 Relating Angular and Translational Quantities
Rotational Dynamics
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Parallel between linear quantities and angular quantities
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Kinematics of rotation at constant angular acceleration8page 204-205
8.3 Rolling Motion (Without Slipping)
page 350-354
10.2 Rotation with Constant Average Aceleration
Example Solving Rolling Motion Problems
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Rotational dynamics: torque, moment of inertiatorques, net torque8page 206-212
8.4 Torque
8.5 Rotational Dynamics;
Torque and Rotational Inertia
8.6 Solving Problems in
Rotational Dynamics
page 355-359
10.6 Torque
10.5 Calculating Moments of Inertia
10.7 Newton's 2nd Law for Rotation
Torque and Rotational Inertia
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Rotational kinetic energy
analyze rotational motion in situations of constant angular acceleration
8page 212-214
8.7 Rotational Kinetic Energy
page 360-366
10.4 Rotational Kinetic NRG
10.8 Power and Work
Rotational KE
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Angular momentumunderstand when to apply conservation of angular momentum.8page 214 - 218
8.8 Angular Momentum and
Its Conservation
8.9 Vector Nature of
Angular Quantities
page 366-371; 376-377
11.2 Angular Momentm
11.3 Conservation of Momentum
Angular Momentum
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analyze simple mechanical systems
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Summary, questions, and problemspage 219-229page 379-388
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Description of kinematic variables (x, v, a) in SHM1111.1 Simple Harmonic Motion—
Spring Oscillations
page 613-61815.1 Simple Harmonic MotionSimple Harmonic Motion
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Energy in an oscillator1111.2 Energy in Simple Harmonic Motionpage 620-62215.2 Energy in SHM
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Period and frequency of oscillationanalysis of simple mechanical oscillators1111.3 The Period and Sinusoidal Nature of SHMpage 612-61315.3 Comparing SHM to Circular MotionPeriod of Mass on a Spring
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Two classical oscillators (mass on a spring, pendulum);1111.4 The Simple Pendulum
page 618-62015.4 PendulumsPendulum
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Resonance1111.6 Forced Oscillations; Resonancepage 629-63115.6 Forced Oscillations
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Waves; types of waves and their speeds1111.7 Wave Motion
11.8 Types of Waves and Their Speeds:transverse wave and longitudinal wave
pages 631-633
16.1 Travelling Waves
16.3 Wave Speed on String
Transverse & Longitudinal WavesPeriodic Waves
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Wave phenomena: reflection, refraction, and superposition.description of waves, wave motion, and wave behaviour1111.10 Refelction and Transmission of Waves
11.11 Interference; Principle of Superposition
11.12 Standing Waves; Resonance
11.13 Refraction
11.14 Diffraction
pages 634-637
(missing info on refraction and diffraction)
16.5 Interference with Waves
16.6 Standing Waves and Resonance
Wave Interference
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Summary, questions, and problemspage 319-327page 642-649
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Sound as a pressure wave
Characteristics of human-perceived sound
1212.1 Characteristics of Soundpage 652-65717.1 Sound Waves
17.2 Spee of Sound
Intro To Sound
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Loudness, intensity, bels, and decibels
12.2 Intensity of Sound: Decibelspage 657-66117.3 Sound IntensityDecibels
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The human ear and human perception of loudness12
12.3 The Ear and Its Response; Loudness
page 673- 678
too much info
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Vibrating strings
Vibrating air columns
Interference
Beats
1212.4 Sources of Sound: Vibrating Strings and Air Columns
12.6 Interference of Sound Waves; Beats
page 666-672
not enough info on "beats"
17.5 Sources of Muscial Sound
17.6 Beats
Beats
Sound - Open Tubes
Sound - Closed Tubes
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The Doppler effect1212.7 Doppler Effectpage 661-664171.7 Doppler EffectDoppler Effect
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Summary, questions, and problemspage 351-358page 685-692
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Volume 3 of University Physics Open Stax
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Light: particle or wave; Huygen's2424.1 Waves vs. Particles;
Huygens’ Principle and Diffraction
24.2 Huygens’ Principle and the
Law of Refraction
page 1061-10641.6 Huygen's Principle
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Young's Double Slit2424.3 Interference—Young’s
Double-Slit Experiment
page 1064-10683.1 Young's Double Slit
Double-Slit
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Diffraction; Diffraction Grating2424.5 Diffraction by a Single Slit or Disk
24.6 Diffraction Grating
page 1071-1074
page 1068 - 1071
4.1 Single Slit Diffraction
4.4 Diffraction Gratings
Single Slit
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Interference2424.8 Interference in Thin Filmspage 1078- 10833.4 Interference in Thin FilmsThin Film Interference
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Rayleigh's Criterionpage 1074 - 1078Rayleigh's & Diopeters
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Volume 3 of University Physics Open Stax
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The ray model; Wave phenomena as applied to light2323.1 The Ray Model of Lightpage 984 - 985
1.1 Nature of Light
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Planar mirrors 2323.2 Reflection; Image Formation by a Plane Mirrorpage 1015
page 985 - 987
2.1 Images formed by a Plane Mirror
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Curved mirrors; the mirror equation; sign conventions; virtual vs. real images2323.3 Formation of Images by Spherical Mirrorspage 1016 - 10222.2 Spherical MirrorsMirrors
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Total internal reflection2323.6 Total Internal Reflectionpage 992 - 9971.4 Total Internal ReflectionTotal Internal Reflection
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Thin lenses; the lens equation2323.7 Thin Lenses
23.8 Thin Lens Equation
page 1006 - 10142.4 Thin LensesThin LensLenses
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Multilens systems2323.9 Combinations of LensesN/AMultiple Lens
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The human eye; simple corrective lenses; diopters2525.2 The Human Eye and Corrective Lensespage 1032 - 10392.5 The Human EyeDiopters, Human Eye
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