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ʻĀina Aloha Economic Futures
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Assessment Tool for Policies, Projects, and Programs
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ainaalohafutures.com
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Background and Purpose:
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This tool advances the values set forth in the 'Āina Aloha Economic Futures Declaration: 1. ‘Āina Aloha: Our economic strategies prioritize our kuleana to steward our precious natural resources. 2. ‘Ōpū Ali‘i: Our leaders understand that their privilege to lead is directly dependent on those they serve. 3. ‘Imi ‘Oi Kelakela: We are driven by creativity and innovation that enhances our way of life. 4. Ho‘okipa: We manage our resources in a way that allows us to fulfill our roles. This assessment also embodies key ideas in the Huliau Action Agenda, which incorporated comments from over 200 participants who helped to develop it.

The tool is intended to be used by various entities to move Hawaiʻi closer to an ʻĀina Aloha future. The tool can help to: 1. Guide and strengthen the strategic focuses of organizations and enterprises 2. Guide organizations and enterprises in self-assessments of their projects, proposals, policies, procurement, strategic plans, etc. 3. Guide private-sector funders in developing RFPs and assessing proposals received 4. Guide policy makers in developing laws, funding programs, and prioritizing efforts. Weights in Column O reflect AAEF priorities. Entities using this tool for their own internal purposes may want to adjust the weights for their internal focuses.
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Get Started:
1. Make a copy of this template. In the top left corner of this Google sheet, go to File > Make a copy. Edit the name of your copy, then click OK.
2. On your new copy, answer the questions, and fill out the assessment tool.

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Assessment:
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1. Which items from the Huliau Action Agenda are demonstrated in your proposal? (go to Huliau Action Agenda sheet, second tab)
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2. Are there other primary goals addressed in your proposal that are strongly aligned with the aforementioned Declaration and/or Action Agenda? (See bottom of Huliau Action Agenda sheet)
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3. Please check the boxes below to indicate the impact of your proposed work relative to the assessment dimensions. SELECT ONE OPTION PER ROW.
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4. Check your score and reflect on your findings.
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a. Does my proposal make incremental improvements, significant improvements, or does it support positive systems change?
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b. Are there areas where I can improve my proposal to have greater impact?
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c. Are there others I can work with to strengthen the impact of my proposal?
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d. What resources do I need? Or what policy changes are needed to forward my proposal?
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Assessment DimensionNegatively impacts conditions-8Does not impact conditions 0Incrementally improves conditions
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Significantly improves conditions+4Supports positive systems change +8Your comments on your selectionRaw ScoreAction Agenda MultiplierWeighted Score
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(Select one per row)
Supports the vibrancy and integrity of Hawaiʻi environments (land, water, ocean, sky, and native flora and fauna)Produces environmental damageHas no impact, or a net neutral impact, on Hawai'i's environmentsContributes in a demonstrable manner to the vibrancy and integrity of Hawaiʻi environments as a secondary or indirect focus of activitiesFocuses on improving the fertility or integrity of the environment as a core activityFocuses on improving the fertility or integrity of the environment as a core activity and supports others to engage in similar efforts020
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(Select one per row)
Positively impacts community well-being, equity, cohesion, capacity, and empowermentHarms community well-being,
creates community dissension,
or undermines community self-determination
Does not impact, positively or negatively, community well-beingImproves community well-being, especially related to meeting basic needs; and contributes to building community cohesion and the capacity of individuals in the communityImproves community well-being, especially related to meeting basic needs; directly strengthens community cohesion; and builds the capacity of individuals, 'ohana, and organizationsDemonstrates community self-determination and improves long term positive change in community conditions, especially related to meeting basic needs020
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(Select one per row)
Supports Hawaiian cultural vitality and the application of ʻike kūpuna including the use of ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi and symbiotic, ancestral relationships to ʻāinaDiminishes Hawaiian cultural vitality, limits the use of ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi, constrains relationships to ʻāina, fails to recognize the value of ʻike kūpuna, or gives non-cultural practitioners authority to determine the cultural validity of assessments by cultural practitioners Uses Hawaiian cultural symbols and some ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi but does not incorporate Hawaiian values, ʻike kūpuna, or the importance of relationships to ʻāinaApplies Hawaiian cultural values in its operations, engages in periodic mālama ʻāina activities, includes the use of ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi, and recognizes the value of ʻike kūpunaIncorporates ʻike kūpuna in strategies and tactics, demonstrates a close relationship to ʻāina, and creates opportunities that foster Hawaiian cultural vitality, including the use of ʻōlelo HawaiʻiIncorporates ʻike kūpuna and Hawaiian cultural vitality in its core goals, engages ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi as a key component of its work, strengthens community-level symbiotic relationships to ʻāina, and assists other entities to achieve the same020
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(Select one per row)
Increases hiring, career readiness, and leadership opportunities for target groups (in preferential order: Hawaiʻi residents, expatriate Native Hawaiians, and Hawaiʻi-born individuals who wish to return) Hires non-Hawaiʻi residents for a majority of open positions or includes a majority of non-Hawai'i residents in the upper leadership of the organization Does not provide a net gain in employment or career opportunities, or hires individuals in the target group only for lower-end positions but not for management or leadership rolesHires individuals in the target group for 50% of positions, including some management or leadership positions, but does not provide training opportunities to ensure upward career ladders for its employeesHires individuals in the target group for 80% of positions, including upper leadership positions, and provides training opportunities to ensure upward career ladders for its employees; or focuses on career readiness training for Hawaiʻi residents Ensures that individuals in the target group are hired for 100% of positions, including upper leadership positions, and provides training opportunities to ensure upward career ladders for its employees; or focuses on career readiness training for Hawaiʻi residents related to land stewardship, food production, energy self-sufficiency, technology, education, or other sectors that would help to diversify Hawaiʻi's economy010
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(Select one per row)
Contributes to building a circular economy to create regenerative outcomes for ʻāina, natural resources, and communities Takes finite natural resources to make products intended to have a limited lifecycle after which the products become waste that must be disposed, or perpetuates reliance on single-use products and imported itemsDoes not involve the use, creation, demolition, or disposal of items or structures, and does not involve the purchase of single-use items and imported itemsDevelops or provides alternatives to single-use products, or creates programs to help communities reduce their reliance on single-use products and imported items Contributes to "return and renew" practices where products or structures can be disassembled at the end of their useful life cycle and reused, refurbished, or recycled; or scales up programs to help communities reduce their reliance on single-use products and imported itemsOrganizes networks that reuse or recycle each other's "waste" and/or designs products or structures that are long-lasting, easily repaired, and recyclable when no longer usable; or creates programs that shift communities' practices toward adopting circular economy principles, including reducing reliance on single-use products and imported items020
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(Select one per row)
Improves Hawaiʻi's long-term energy sustainability in ways that are supported by impacted communitiesRelies on non-renewable energy sources and does not implement measures to reduce consumption, or generates renewable energy sources that are not supported by the impacted communitiesHas no positive or negative impact on Hawai'i's energy sustainability and does not create issues that affect communities Generates renewable energy to meet at least 75% of its energy needs and does so in ways that does not raise concerns of others in the communityEngages in efforts to assist ʻohana, organizations, or businesses to reduce their energy consumption and generate renewable energy, in ways that are supported by impacted communities, to create a net positive impact on Hawaiʻi's energy self-sufficiency goalsLeads efforts to assist communities or public-sector entities to reduce their energy consumption and to generate renewable energy, in ways that are supported by impacted communities, to create a net positive impact on Hawaiʻi's energy self-sufficiency goals010
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(Select one per row)
Incorporates innovative approaches (involving methods, processes, technologies, relationships, and communications) that improve the well-being of communities and natural environmentsApplies approaches that are inefficient, extractive, or that negatively affect the well-being of communities and natural environmentsDoes not create or apply innovative approaches or applies innovations that have no impact on the well-being of communities or natural environmentsIntroduces innovations that improve the well-being of communities and natural environmentsIntroduces innovations that improve the well-being, sustainability, and resilience of communities and natural environmentsIntroduces innovations that improve the well-being, sustainability, and resilience of communities and natural environments, and assists others to do the same010
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(Select one per row)
Improves Hawaiʻi's long-term food security and builds or sustains vital, self-reliant community food systemsPerpetuates the importation of food from non-Hawaiʻi sources or reduces the vitality of community food systemsHas no impact on Hawaiʻi's food security or community food systemsContributes to collaborations in which producers, retailers, community members, and government partner to create vibrant local food economies, including subsistence systems, that enhance and sustain environmental and community well-being and reduce dependence on imported foodSupports collaborations in which producers, retailers, community members, and government partner to create vibrant local food economies, including subsistence systems, that enhance and sustain environmental and community well-being and reduce dependence on imported foodOrganizes and supports collaborations in which producers, retailers, community members, and government partner to create vibrant local food economies, including subsistence systems, that enhance and sustain environmental and community well-being and reduce dependence on imported food8216
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(Select one per row)
Improves the resilience and diversity of locally owned and resourced small businesses that align with ʻĀina Aloha goalsDiminishes the ability of locally owned and resourced small businesses to achieve long-term economic viability, or creates barriers to opening new businesses for Hawaiʻi entrepreneursMaintains conditions resulting in high closer rates of Hawaiʻi small businesses, engagement in dominant industries and markets, and underrepresentation of various groups in the business sectorProcures a majority of goods and services from locally owned and resourced small businesses that align with ʻĀina Aloha goals where those goods and services are availableCoordinates, promotes, or provides support for locally owned and resourced small businesses that align with ʻĀina Aloha goals to enhance their long-term resilienceExpands markets for locally owned and resourced small businesses, or stimulates the birth and long-term resilience of locally owned and resourced businesses that align with ʻĀina Aloha goals and that diversify the profile of owners and businesses in Hawaiʻi010
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(Select one per row)
Fully commits to and participates in an equitable, pono value chain involved in the production, marketing, distribution, and provisioning of goods and services Engages in opportunistic or exploitative practices that harm ʻāina or communities or that take advantage of employees, business associates in the supply and distribution chains, consumers, or service recipientsDoes not engage in opportunistic or exploitative practices that harm ʻāina or communities or that take advantage of employees, business associates in the supply and distribution chains, consumers, or service recipientsEnsures that employees and others they conduct business with receive a fair portion of the revenue created by their joint efforts Establishes organizational policies to ensure that employees and others they conduct business with receive a fair portion of the revenue created by their joint efforts, and seeks to conduct business with supply markets that uphold fair trade practicesCreates training opportunities and systems to help Hawaiʻi entities ensure that employees and others they conduct business with receive a fair portion of the revenue created by their joint efforts, and seeks to conduct business with supply markets that uphold fair trade practices010
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RAW SCORE:8WEIGHTED SCORE:16
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out of 80
out of 120
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SCALE:-12003060120YOUR SELF ASSESSMENT:16
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Bad for Hawai‘iNo Movement or Not ApplicableMoving toward ʻĀina AlohaPracticing 'Āina AlohaLeading ʻĀina Aloha
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