Summer 2013 Undergraduate English Courses (ALWAYS CHECK BANNER FOR THE MOST UP-TO-DATE LISTINGS)
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SubjCrseSecCRNInstructorTitleDaysTimeDescriptionTexts
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SUMMER SESSION I
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ENGL100060140713John Hoppenthaler Appreciating Literature - DEonlineThis summer, ENGL 1000 surveys literary monsters! This course is designed to meet GC humanities requirements; it’s a basic class in reading, analyzing, enjoying, and appreciating imaginative literary texts. This summer, we’ll explore the literary concept of the monster through the classic novels Frankenstein (or the Modern Prometheus) by Mary Shelly, Dracula by Bram Stoker, and Grendel by John Gardner. Frankenstein
Dracula
Grendel
selections from Beowulf
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ENGL100060240749Liza A. Wieland Appreciating Literature - DEonline
The ECU course guide will tell you the following: “Introduces past and present readings to enhance student’s enjoyment and understanding of literature." You can already see from the schedule of assignments that a study of the four literary genres (modules) is what you'll get from me. More specifically, you'll receive the tools that will enable you to first discover how a piece of literature works and then begin to get at its meaning. I am also interested in raising, as they become relevant, the questions associated with the role and social usefulness of literature. In other words, why should you learn to appreciate novels, stories, poetry and plays? What does literature have to do with the world we live in now?
F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby
Short stories and poems (see below) made available on Blackboard
Wendy Wasserstein, The Heidi Chronicles
Beth Henley, Crimes of the Heart
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ENGL200060140722Julie Fay Interpreting Literature(WI) DEonline
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ENGL200060240751Robert J. Siegel Interpreting Literature (WI)online
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ENGL210060140723Marc Petersen Major British Writers (WI)onlineMagical realms, uncharted lands, and distant futures represent some of the imaginary worlds that populate English literature, and this course will explore writers' use of such devices for different effects, including adventure, romance, satire, and social commentary. We will examine texts representing a range of time periods and genres, including medieval poetry, Renaissance drama, Victorian prose, and modern comics.Marie de France's "Lanval," Sir Thomas More's _Utopia_, William Shakespeare's _A Midsummer Night's Dream_, H. G. Wells' _The Time Machine_, Angela Carter's _Fireworks: Nine Profane Tales_, Alan Moore's _V for Vendetta_.
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ENGL2710140725Michael J. Aceto English GrammaronlineThis course is designed to give students an overview of the grammar (i.e. structure or syntax) of English, primarily standard written American English as well as related vernacular dialects. We will examine the “naturalness” of the standard and how it deviates from the everyday English that native speakers learned without instruction as children.
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ENGL2740140726Michael J. Aceto Language in the USAonlineThis course presents a linguistic perspective on the emergence of American English in North America, specifically within the context of the many languages heard in what is today called the United States as spoken by those persons involved in and affected by colonialism and immigration, both past and present. This course also discusses several varieties or dialects of American English. It also presents issues related to language usage, language variation, linguistic pluralism and its implications in the United States and its territories.
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ENGL2900140727Amanda A. Klein Introduction to Film StudiesMW06:00 pm-10:00 pmThe goal of this course, as its title suggests, is to “introduce” you to the broad field of film studies, including formal analysis, genre studies, film history and theory. By the end of the semester you will have the basic critical tools necessary for understanding and analyzing the language of motion pictures. Ideally, this course will enable you to not only gain a richer understanding of the films you watch but also the television shows, You Tube videos, commercials, and other media you encounter on a daily basis. This course is an excellent introduction to the humanities and a great choice for one of your required Foundations courses!Casablanca (1942, Michael Curtiz), Touch of Evil (1958, Orson Welles), Breathless (1960, Jean-Luc Godard), The Virgin Suicides (1999, Sofia Coppola), The Bicycle Thieves (1948, Vittorio De Sica), Walk Hard (2007, Jake Kasdan)
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ENGL326060140728Gera S. Miles African American Literature-WIonlineThis course focuses on African American literature from different historical periods, emphasizing the twentieth century. It traces the development of African American literature from slavery to present and it includes works by male and female writers. We will study their use of literary conventions and discuss American history, sociology, and politics. Why? In order to examine the role of African-Americans and their literature in the United States, you have to see the forces that have influenced their works and understand the particular role the African-American writer serves in his or her community.Black No More
The Bluest Eye
Middle Passage
Dutchman & The Slave
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ENGL330060140752Julie Fay Women and Literature (WI)online
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ENGL3570140729James W. Kirkland American Folklore (WI)MTWR01:15 pm-03:15 pm
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ENGL381060140730Nicole I. Caswell Advanced Composition (WI)onlineThis course will explore what video games can teach us about literacy. Video games do more than entertain us, and we will figure out together what that ‘more’ is. We will play and analyze video games, critique game playing strategies and understand if and how playing video games prepares students for college work. James Paul Gee: What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy. Second Edition: Revised and Updated Edition

Other articles posted in blackboard
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ENGL381560140731Robert J. Siegel Introduction to Creative Writingonline
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ENGL385060140732Liza A. Wieland Introduction to Fiction WritingonlineThis course is designed to introduce you to the short story form. Because it is a five-week summer course, we will be moving very quickly from readings to exercises to workshopping short stories of 1000-2000 words. You should expect to do at least three hours of work every day (including weekends).

IMPORTANT: The stories you turn in for this class MUST be what is loosely called "realistic” or “literary” fiction: stories about characters who are real human beings, set somewhere that human beings have actually been, and with characters who can only do what real human beings can actually do. No genre fiction: horror, fantasy, westerns, romance, science fiction, no super heroes, no vampires or witches or spells-and-wands magic, no talking animals or plants. I will make exception for stories set in the not-too-distant future and stories in the tradition of magic realism, as exemplified by work like “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez (which is on the reading list).

Alice LaPlante, Method and Madness: The Making of a Story WW Norton 2009, 2007
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ENGL3880340754Joanne P. Dunn Writing for Business and IndustryMTWR03:30 pm-05:30 pm
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ENGL3880440755Joseph P. Campbell Writing for Business and IndustryMTWR01:15 pm-03:15 pm
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ENGL388060140735Joseph C. Horst Writing for Business and Industryonline
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ENGL388060240736Matthew B. Cox Writing for Business and IndustryonlineThis is a writing intensive course to help you develop professional writing and communication design skills. We will read about, write about, use, and design various types of communications in various professional and business contexts. Throughout the course, you'll be encouraged to think about rhetorical, aesthetic, and practical aspects of communication. We will also explore the relationships among different types of professional activities, communication design, ethics, technology, and information. • The Business Writer’s Handbook, Alred, Brusaw, & Oliu. Bedford St. Martin’s. New York, 2009. 9th ed.
• Various online/pdf texts provided through Blackboard or via email.
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ENGL388060340737Matthew B. Cox Writing for Business and IndustryonlineThis is a writing intensive course to help you develop professional writing and communication design skills. We will read about, write about, use, and design various types of communications in various professional and business contexts. Throughout the course, you'll be encouraged to think about rhetorical, aesthetic, and practical aspects of communication. We will also explore the relationships among different types of professional activities, communication design, ethics, technology, and information. • The Business Writer’s Handbook, Alred, Brusaw, & Oliu. Bedford St. Martin’s. New York, 2009. 9th ed.
• Various online/pdf texts provided through Blackboard or via email.
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ENGL4360140739Marame Gueye World Literature in EnglishonlineThis class will be a survey of works from around the world excluding the US and many major European literary traditions. The focus will be on colonization, decolonization, resistance, and globalization. We will critically study various genres and literary traditions and analyze how writers infuse their political, social, religious, and many beliefs into the literary works they produce. The content of this class will make references to slavery, colonization, imperialism, racism, feminism, and many other terminologies. Students who might feel offended by such words and concepts should consider taking another class.The Bedford Anthology of World Literature: The Twentieth Century, 1900-The Present, Book 6
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ENGL495060140740Timothy S. Hackett Literature for Children (WPE)online
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ENGL495060240741Sheryll E. Wood Literature for Childrenonline
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ENGL495060340756Sheryll E. Wood Literature for Childrenonline
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ETHN2001Carla PastorIntroduction to Ethnic Studies: HumanitiesMTWRF9:45am-11:15am
In this course we will explore ethnicity and race in the United States by examining our own experiences as well as literary and scholarly explorations of the concepts. Our goal will be to develop a critical framework that will help us better understand our multicultural society. Questions we will consider include: What is race? What is ethnicity? How does ethnicity relate to race? What is Ethnic Studies? How are ethnicity and race perceived in America? What constitutes membership in an ethnic group? How have concepts of, policies toward, and treatment of ethnic groups changed over time? How do authors explore, express, extend and resist notions of ethnicity and race in literary, scholarly, and documentary works? How can considering these works help us understand better America’s past, present, and future? Our class will focus on ethnic representations such as African American, Asian American, Native American, Latino American and European. Our readings will examine and complicate the ethnic experiences of race, whiteness, immigration, gender, nationality and language in the United States.

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SUMMER SESSION II
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ENGL100060160547Helena M. Feder Appreciating Literature - DEonlineWhat does it mean to “appreciate literature”? Understand? Enjoy? Interpret? And what counts as “literature”? Love poetry? Horror Fiction? Fairy tales? What is the difference between art and entertainment? This introductory course will explore these and other questions as we read poetry, fiction, and a play over the course of the semester.
Glengarry Glen Ross, by David Mamet. Grove Press
Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry vol.1
fiction scanned to Blackboard
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ENGL1100160548Cheryl Dudasik-Wiggs CompositionMTWRF09:45 am-11:15 am
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ENGL1100260549Kimberly D. Thompson CompositionMTWR01:15 pm-03:15 pm
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ENGL1200160550Corinee W. Guy CompositionMTWRF09:45 am-11:15 am
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ENGL1200260551Therese I. Pennell CompositionMTWRF11:30 am-01:00 pm
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ENGL120060160552Angela D. Raper Composition (WI) - DEonline
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ENGL200060160554Randall T. Martoccia Interpreting Literature (WI)online
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ENGL220060160555Helena M. Feder Major American Writersonline
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ENGL270060160556Solveig J. Bosse Introduction to Language StudiesonlineStudents will be introduced to the basic elements of language (sounds, words, sentences). We will discuss different areas of study to which language is central. These include: language variation in society, language and culture, language acquisition, multilingualism, the history of English, language families and language and computers.
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ENGL2900160557James C. Holte Introduction to Film StudiesMTWR01:15 pm-03:15 pm
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ENGL3260160558Reginald W. Watson African American Lit (WI)online
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ENGL326060160559Seodial Deena African American Lit (WI)online
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ENGL3880160561Jennifer L. Sisk Writing for Business and IndustryMTWRF09:45 am-11:15 am
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ENGL3880260562Zachary F. Perkinson Writing for Business and IndustryMTWRF11:30 am-01:00 pmSCENARIO-BASED LESSON PLAN THAT TAKES STUDENTS THROUGH HYPOTHETICAL EVOLVING SITUATIONS IN THE BUSINESS WORLD. STUDENTS WILL LEARN HOW TO WRITE IN APPROPRIATE FORMATS, EMPLOY CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS AND CONCEPT-DRIVEN APPLICATIONS TO SUCCESSFULLY NAVIGATE THE SCENARIO. RHETORIC AND CONTEXT AWARENESS ARE STRESSED.COURSE PACK PROVIDED BY INSTRUCTOR
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ENGL388060160563Guy D. Solomon Writing for Business and Industryonline
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ENGL388060260564Barri S. Piner Writing for Business and Industryonline
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ENGL388060360565Christy A. Hallberg Writing for Business and Industryonline
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ENGL471060260567Ludmila Cope TESOL: Theories & Princ (WPE)onlineWhat do teachers need to know about how languages are learned? Why is such knowledge important? How does such knowledge translate into day-to-day teaching practice? This course provides an introduction to the theories of second language acquisition (SLA) and their implications for second language teaching. Throughout the course, we will compare first and second language acquisition, and study the many factors (psychological, linguistic, and social) that influence the process of learning another language. ENGL 4710 provides meaningful knowledge of the multifaceted process of language learning for teachers in today’s multicultural classrooms, for language learners themselves, and for those interested in how we come to acquire languages. This course is appropriate for both pre-service and in-service teachers and is helpful to teachers seeking the add-on licensure in ESL.
Further information: email copel@ecu.edu.
Required:
Brown, H. D. (2007). Principles of language learning and teaching. 5th ed. White Plains, NY: Pearson/Longman.

Recommended:
Ariza, E. N. Whelan (2006). Not for ESOL teachers. 2nd ed. Allyn & Bacon.

Tarone, E., & Swierzbin, B. (2009). Exploring learner language. Oxford University Press.
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ENGL473060160568Solveig J. Bosse Language and SocietyonlineWe will look at variations of language found within a society. These include variation by place, social status, time, ethnicity, gender, and style. We will investigate how the variants differ from each other and which attitudes and identities are associated with the variations.
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ENGL4890160569Brent R. Henze Practicum: Careers in Writ(WI)online
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ENGL4891160570Brent R. Henze Practicum: Careers in Writ(WI)online
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ENGL4950160571Mellisa D. Tetterton Literature for Childrenonline
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ENGL4950260589Diane A. Rodman Literature for Childrenonline
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ENGL495060160572Melissa M. Parsons Literature for Children (WPE)online
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ENGL495060260573Diane A. Rodman Literature for Childrenonline
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