UCCI Agriculture Series Courses: Standards Map
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Course 1: Sustainable Agriculture - A Biological Approach to Industry Practices
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UnitAg StandardNGSS StandardScience and Engineering PracticesCrosscutting Concept
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1. Agriculture and Agricultural Research Skills C1.0 Evaluate the role of agriculture in the California economy.HS-ETS1-1: Analyze a major global challenge to specify qualitative and quantitative criteria and constraints for solutions that account for societal needs and wants.Planning and Carrying Out Investigations: Planning and carrying out in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to include investigations that provide evidence for and test conceptual, mathematical, physical, and empirical models.Systems and System Models: Models (e.g., physical, mathematical, computer models) can be used to simulate systems and interactions—including energy, matter, and information flows—within and between systems at different scales. (HS-LS1-2)
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C1.1 Understand the history of the agricultural industry in California.HS-ETS1-2: Design a solution to a complex real-world problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.
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C1.2 Describe how California agriculture affects the quality of life.HS-ETS1-3: Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and trade-offs that account for a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics as well as possible social, cultural, and environmental impacts.Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions: Plan and conduct an investigation individually and collaboratively to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence, and in the design: decide on types, how much, and accuracy of data needed to produce reliable measurements and consider limitations on the precision of the data (e.g., number of trials, cost, risk, time), and refine the design accordingly. (HS-LS1-3)
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C1.3 Analyze the interrelationship of California agriculture and society at the local, state, national, and international levels.
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C1.4 Research the economic impact of leading California agricultural commodities.
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C1.5 Assess the economic impact of major natural resources in California.
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C1.6 Distinguish between the economic importance of major agricultural exports and imports.
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C1.7 Explore factors that affect food safety and producers’ responsibilities to consumers.
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C3.1 Describe how technology affects the logistics of moving an agricultural commodity from producer to consumer.
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C3.2 Understand how technology influences factors such as labor, efficiency, diversity, availability, mechanization, and communication.
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C3.5 Integrate the use of technology when collecting and analyzing data.
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C13.1 State the steps of the scientific method.
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C13.2 Analyze an agricultural problem and devise a solution based on the scientific method.
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2. Environment, Energy and AgricultureC2.1 Identify important agricultural environmental impacts on soil, water, and air.HS-LS1-5: Use a model to illustrate how photosynthesis transforms light energy into stored chemical energy. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on illustrating inputs and outputs of matter and the transfer and transformation of energy in photosynthesis by plants and other photosynthesizing organisms. Examples of models could include diagrams, chemical equations, and conceptual models.Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking: Mathematical and computational thinking in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to using algebraic thinking and analysis, a range of linear and nonlinear functions including trigonometric functions, exponentials and logarithms, and computational tools for statistical analysis to analyze, represent, and model data. Simple computational simulations are created and used based on mathematical models of basic assumptions.  Use mathematical and/or computational representations of phenomena or design solutions to support explanations. (HS-LS2-1)  Use mathematical representations of phenomena or design solutions to support and revise explanations. (HS-LS2-2)  Create or revise a simulation of a phenomenon, designed device, process, or system. (HS-LS4-6)
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C2.2 Explain current environmental challenges related to agriculture.
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C2.3 Summarize how natural resources are used in agriculture.
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C2.4 Compare and contrast practices for conserving renewable and nonrenewable resources.HS-LS1-6: Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence for how carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen from sugar molecules may combine with other elements to form amino acids and/or other large carbon-based molecules. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on using evidence from models and simulations to support explanations.]
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C2.5 Research how new energy sources are developed from agricultural products (e.g., gascogeneration and ethanol).
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C4.3 Compile the modern-day uses of animals and animal by-products.
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C3.5 Integrate the use of technology when collecting and analyzing data.HS-LS1-7: Use a model to illustrate that cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and the bonds in new compounds are formed resulting in a net transfer of energy.
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C3.1 Describe how technology affects the logistics of moving an agricultural commodity from producer to consumer.Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions: Constructing explanations and designing solutions in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to explanations and designs that are supported by multiple and independent student-generated sources of evidence consistent with scientific ideas, principles, and theories.
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C3.2 Understand how technology influences factors such as labor, efficiency, diversity, availability, mechanization, and communication.HS-LS2-3:Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence for the cycling of matter and flow of energy in aerobic and anaerobic conditions.
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C2.1 Identify important agricultural environmental impacts on soil, water, and air.HS-LS2-4: Use mathematical representations to support claims for the cycling of matter and flow of energy among organisms in an ecosystem.Engaging in Argument from Evidence: Engaging in argument from evidence in 9–12 builds from K–8 experiences and progresses to using appropriate and sufficient evidence and scientific reasoning to defend and critique claims and explanations about the natural and designed world(s). Arguments may also come from current scientific or historical episodes in science.
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C2.2 Explain current environmental challenges related to agriculture.
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C2.3 Summarize how natural resources are used in agriculture.HS-LS2-5: Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere.
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C2.4 Compare and contrast practices for conserving renewable and nonrenewable resources.
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C2.5 Research how new energy sources are developed from agricultural products (e.g., gascogeneration and ethanol).HS-LS2-1: Use mathematical and/or computational representations to support explanations of factors that affect carrying capacity of ecosystems at different scales.
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C11.1 Understand the anatomy and functions of plant systems and structures.HS-LS2-7. Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.*
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C11.2 Identify plant growth requirements.HS-LS4-6. Create or revise a simulation to test a solution to mitigate adverse impacts of human activity on biodiversity.
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C11.3 Discern between annual, biennial, and perennial life cycles.
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C11.4 Examine sexual and asexual reproduction in plants.
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C11.5 Understand photosynthesis and the roles of the sun, chlorophyll, sugar, oxygen, carbon
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dioxide, and water in the process.
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C11.6 Summarize the respiration process in the breakdown of food and organic matter.
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C5.1 Identify the function of cells.
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C5.2 Analyze the anatomy and physiology of cells.
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3.Molecular Biology and AgricultureC5.3 Understand various cell actions, such as osmosis and cell division.HS-LS1-1: Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the structure of DNA determines the structure of proteins which carry out the essential functions of life through systems of specialized cells.Asking Questions and Defining Problems: Asking questions and defining problems in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to formulating, refining, and evaluating empirically testable questions and design problems using models and simulations.Systems and System Models: Models (e.g., physical, mathematical, computer models) can be used to simulate systems and interactions—including energy, matter, and information flows—within and between systems at different scales. (HS-LS2-5)
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C5.4 Compare and contrast plant and animal cells, bacteria, and viruses.
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C7.1 Differentiate between genotype and phenotype and describe how dominant and recessive genes function.HS-LS1-2: Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems that provide specific functions within multicellular organisms.
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C7.2 Compare genetic characteristics among cattle, sheep, swine, and horse breeds.HS-LS1-3. Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis.Developing and Using Models: Modeling in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to using, synthesizing, and developing models to predict and show relationships among variables between systems and their components in the natural and designed worlds.
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C7.3 Predict phenotype and genotype ratios by using a Punnett Square.HS-LS1-4. Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex organisms.
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C7.4 Explain the fertilization process.
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C7.5 Distinguish between the purpose and processes of mitosis and meiosis.HS-LS3-1: Ask questions to clarify relationships about the role of DNA and chromosomes in coding the instructions for characteristic traits passed from parents to offspring.Analyzing and Interpreting Data: Analyzing data in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to introducing more detailed statistical analysis, the comparison of data sets for consistency, and the use of models to generate and analyze data.
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C8.1 Identify types of nutrients required by farm animals (e.g., proteins, minerals, vitamins, carbohydrates, fats/oils, water).
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C8.2 Analyze suitable common feed ingredients, including forages, roughages, concentrates, and supplements for ruminant, monogastric, equine, and avian digestive systems.HS-LS3-2: Make and defend a claim based on evidence that inheritable genetic variations may result from: (1) new genetic combinations through meiosis, (2) viable errors occurring during replication, and/or (3) mutations caused by environmental factors.Engaging in Argument from Evidence: Engaging in argument from evidence in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to using appropriate and sufficient evidence and scientific reasoning to defend and critique claims and explanations about the natural and designed world(s). Arguments may also come from current scientific or historical episodes in science.
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C8.3 Understand basic animal feeding guidelines and evaluate sample feeding programs for various species, including space requirements and economic considerations.HS-LS3-3: Apply concepts of statistics and probability to explain the variation and distribution of expressed traits in a population.
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HS-LS4-3: Apply concepts of statistics and probability to support explanations that organisms with an advantageous heritable trait tend to increase in proportion to organisms lacking this trait.
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HS-LS4-1: Communicate scientific information that common ancestry and biological evolution are supported by multiple lines of empirical evidence.
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4. Agriculture’s relationship with technology and the natural worldC9.1 Assess the appearance and behavior of a normal, healthy animal.HS-LS2-6: Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking: Mathematical and computational thinking in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to using algebraic thinking and analysis, a range of linear and nonlinear functions including trigonometric functions, exponentials and logarithms, and computational tools for statistical analysis to analyze, represent, and model data. Simple computational simulations are created and used based on mathematical models of basic assumptions.  Use mathematical and/or computational representations of phenomena or design solutions to support explanations. (HS-LS2-1)  Use mathematical representations of phenomena or design solutions to support and revise explanations. (HS-LS2-2)  Create or revise a simulation of a phenomenon, designed device, process, or system. (HS-LS4-6)
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C9.2 Explain the ways in which housing, sanitation, and nutrition influence animal health and behavior.
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C9.3 Analyze the causes and controls of common animal diseases.HS-ETS1-1: Analyze a major global challenge to specify qualitative and quantitative criteria and constraints for solutions that account for societal needs and wants.
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C9.4 Summarize effective techniques for controlling parasites and explain why controlling parasites is important.HS-ETS1-2: Design a solution to a complex real-world problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.
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C9.5 Research the legal requirements for the procurement, storage, methods of application, and withdrawal times of animal medications, and know proper equipment handling and disposal techniques.HS-ETS1-3: Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and trade-offs that account for a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics as well as possible social, cultural, and environmental impacts.
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C11.1 Understand the anatomy and functions of plant systems and structures.
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C11.2 Identify plant growth requirements.
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C11.3 Discern between annual, biennial, and perennial life cycles.Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions: Constructing explanations and designing solutions in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to explanations and designs that are supported by multiple and independent student-generated sources of evidence consistent with scientific ideas, principles, and theories.
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C11.4 Examine sexual and asexual reproduction in plants.
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C11.5 Understand photosynthesis and the roles of the sun, chlorophyll, sugar, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water in the process.Engaging in Argument from Evidence: Engaging in argument from evidence in 9–12 builds from K–8 experiences and progresses to using appropriate and sufficient evidence and scientific reasoning to defend and critique claims and explanations about the natural and designed world(s). Arguments may also come from current scientific or historical episodes in science.
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C11.6 Summarize the respiration process in the breakdown of food and organic matter.
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F5.1 Explain how basic soil science and water principles affect plant growth.
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F5.2 Illustrate basic irrigation design and installation methods.
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F5.3 Prepare and amend soils, implement soil conservation methods, and compare results.
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F5.4 Research major issues related to water sources and water quality.
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F5.5 Explain the components of soilless media and test the use of those media in various types of containers.
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F9.1 Use different types of containers and demonstrate how to maintain growing containers in controlled environments.
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F9.2 Operate and maintain selected hand and power equipment safely and appropriately.
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F9.3 Select proper tools for specific horticultural jobs.
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F9.4 Install landscape components and electrical, land, and water features.
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F10.1 Utilize terms associated with landscape and design in appropriate context.
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F10.2 Produce a residential design, including how to render design to scale using design technology and principles.
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F10.3 Use proper landscape planting and maintenance practices.
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F10.4 Prune ornamental shrubs, trees, and fruit trees.
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