DePauw Courses with Ethics Components
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
ABCD
1
Subject#Course TitleDescription
2
ANTH252Anthropology of Power and ViolenceAre humans by nature violent? If so, then how do we explain cooperation in human communities? If cooperation is the norm, then how do we account for warfare? What are the foundations of power and inequalities in societies? In this course we explore many of these classical topics from an interdisciplinary perspective that encompasses biology, philosophy, history, and ethics. But all of this is informed by anthropology's cross-cultural and cross-temporal perspective.
3
ANTH255The Anthropology of GenderThis class explores anthropological theories of gender differences and inequalities in cross-cultural contexts. The course examines the role of kinship, reproduction, politics and economic systems in the shifting determinations of gender in various contexts. It also questions the meanings of masculinity, transsexual/transgender issues and the roles of women in global contexts. In this course, the various ways that anthropology has theorized and understood questions of gender are explored and made relevant to contemporary societies. <I>Prerequisite: ANTH 151, sophomore standing or permission of instructor.</I>
4
ANTH256Anthropology of FoodThis course explores aspects of the cultural uses and symbolic meanings we attach to food and eating. Students explore such questions as: How do we use food? What is changing in our food consumption patterns? What is the relationship between food consumption and the environment? What are some of the politics and the ethics involved in food consumption? What is the significance of eating out, of "ethnic" restaurants? And how do we analyze the smell and taste of food cross-culturally? <i>Prerequisite ANTH 151, sophomore standing or permission of instructor.</i>
5
ANTH260Wars and MilitarismThis seminar is on wars and militarism and how these effect and shape human lives. We discuss whether or not wars and the concomitant militarization of human societies are inevitable aspects of our existence. Do wars and militarism reflect primordial human biological and psychological instincts and are therefore inevitable features of human existence? Or can these be traced to certain social, political, and economic contingencies and processes? Can wars be conceptualized only in terms of armed conflicts between nation-states or do wars encompass much more than is usually accepted or understood? This course is intended to blur several boundaries: normative understandings of wars and peace; differences between legitimate and unjust wars; and wars waged by nation-states and by insurgent and terrorist groups. Through an interdisciplinary lens that brings together insights from anthropology, security-studies, cultural-studies, feminist theory, political-science and history, we will define, identify, and understand the different kinds of wars that are being fought in contemporary times. The focus of the course will be to highlight the lived experience of wars and militarism, the strategies of survival that people employ in sometimes extremely adverse situations; the underlying assumptions of wars and militarism that are reflected in social institutions seemingly little connected to them; and most importantly, the power differences that underpin and drive contemporary wars.
6
ANTH355Anthropology of DevelopmentDevelopment is often considered synonymous with progress and economic growth. This course seeks to challenge the framework within which development policies and practices have been conceptualized since the 1940s. How do discourses and practices of development reflect struggles over power, history, and culture? Why has development often been understood as a "neocolonial" endeavor that seeks to maintain the global hegemony of the first world over the third world? How has the trajectory of development shifted in the past five decades to encompass divergent agendas, practices, and meanings? How have these "macro" agendas shaped the lives of millions of men and women living across the globe? Can development be understood as a monolithic category or is it experienced differently by men and women cross-culturally? This course will also highlight some of the most pressing concerns over the merits and limitations of globalization thereby engaging students with ongoing social, political and economic debates. Using anthropological insights, we will explore the connections between colonialism, development, capitalism, and globalization to analyze how "development" is embedded in social inequities, and whether or not a more equitable form of development can be envisioned.
7
ARTH332Representation in Japanese Visual CultureThis course examines the concept of "representation" in Japanese visual culture, engaging with subject matter from contemporary times, as well as from Japan's modern and pre-modern periods (12th through the early 20th centuries). We will proceed along thematic lines. Balancing theoretical readings with scholarly articles and a sprinkling of translated primary sources, the class will address issues relating to the representation (or re-presentation) of landscape and the environment, the body and gender roles, canonical narratives as performance, and national identity at three crucial periods in Japan's history. At times we will reference Japanese monuments and works of art produced prior to the early modern era, as well as the Chinese sources that influenced some of the Japanese topics at the locus of our investigation. What lies at the heart of representation--subjectivity, political aims, societal concerns, emotional responses--and the complexity this question reveals are the central concerns of this course.
8
ARTH334Women and East Asian ArtThis course examines the role of women in the arts in pre-modern East Asia and the negotiation of women's concerns, by female artists, in modern and contemporary East Asian art. Did women have no sense of empowerment at all in pre-modern China, Korea, and Japan? What about Chinese, Korean, and Japanese women artists today? What are their interests and agendas? Students will engage with historical works of art and artists, while concurrently gaining an understanding of gendered female roles as determined by religious, philosophical, and societal conceptualizations of the past. Then, students will study feminist discourses originating from the West in their analysis of modern and contemporary East Asian art by and about women. Ultimately, the aim of this course is to demystify and to complicate understandings about women as the subject of art, as well as women as the producers of art, in East Asia.
9
ARTH350Race and Difference in Medieval ArtThis course seeks to uncover and analyze strategies of difference in the pre-modern years of 1000-1550. Our modern categories of difference and conflict involve race, class and gender: what categories did medieval culture use to mark difference, and what can we learn from them? Starting in northern Europe with the warrior Beowulf's battle against Grendel the monster, moving to Spain and its geopolitics of Convivencia, continuing to the Middle East with the Crusades, and ending in the fantastic maps and travel writings and images of the kingdoms of India, Africa, and China we will study categories of ethnicity, dynastic loyalty, religion, and language, among others, as they constructed difference in medieval textual and visual culture. At stake in this class is a critical understanding of the historical construction of difference, and the lessons it can give us for understanding strategies of difference in our own culture.
10
COMM215Theatre, Culture and SocietyTheatre, Culture and Society explores representations of social identity, culture, and ideology in live performance and film with special emphasis on issues of race, gender, class, and sexual identity. Live performances and historical performance descriptions are considered as texts to be 'read' within cultural contexts, alongside mediated events, such as film, television, or novels, with special focus on performance traditions of non-dominant social groups from cultural, critical, historical, and theoretical perspectives. The course also explores the role of the audience, historical performance, and strategies for recognizing, reinforcing, or subverting conventional depictions of power and ideology.
11
COMM233Media, Culture, and SocietyA basic orientation to the history, theory and process of media. Particular emphasis is given to the relationships among the various media and their audiences,free speech and ethics, media law and other regulatory controls, news and information, media effects, emerging communication technologies and future trends.
12
COMM235Electronic JournalismCritical analysis of the role of electronic news gathering and dissemination in modern society, including ethics and responsibilities. Study and practice in preparation, reporting and disseminating of news emphasizing documentary production, news analysis and public affairs reporting.
13
COMM327Communication and Cultural IdentityThis course examines the ways in which communication shapes, and is shaped by culture, ethnicity, gender, class and/or race. Topics include how language empowers and oppresses, how social institutions and media influence issues of cultural identity and the ways various social identities are constructed through communication.
14
COMM328Topics in Conflict CommunicationWhile refining students' analytical and critical skills, this course offers intensive examination of specificissues related to conflict and communication at interpersonal, social, and cultural levels. Possible topicsmay include environmental communication, alternative dispute resolution, civil rights and communication,and political communication. Repeatable for credit with different topics.
15
COMM334Media CriticismJustification and application of various approaches to critiquing and analyzing media messages. Insight into the ethical burdens, social and moral, of the media and its institutions. Topics may vary. <I>Prerequisite: COMM 233 or permission of instructor. </I>
16
COMM335Media LawInquiry into media law, including responsibility and free speech issues, libel, privacy, fair trial, copyright, obscenity, the FCC, shield laws, censorship, management and operating regulations, newsperson privileges, political communication and advertising regulation. An analysis of the political and economic forces affecting the development of media law. <I>Prerequisite: COMM 233 or 237 or permission of instructor.</i>
17
COMM337International MediaAnalysis of structures and content of international media (newspapers, TV, film, and Internet) and the role of culture in globalization, in order to increase understanding of the politics and economics of media systems in specific regions of the world and the societies in which they function. This course aims to explore key developments in information technologies, international relations, the free flow of information, interpretations of free expression and intellectual property, aggregated regional networks, and the influence of Western media and consequent forms of resistance located in historical and cultural perspectives of different genres of media programs including news, entertainment, advertising and PR.
18
CSC430Computer SecurityThis course examines and discusses computer security, how to protect our computing infrastructure from illegal access, tempering, denial of access, etc. We will first define terms such as security and secure computing, then we'll talk about cryptography including symmetric and public key cryptographic techniques and their applications. Other topics covered include secure software, cyber security, database security,system security and hardware security. <i>Prerequisites: CSC231, CSC232, and CSC233.</i>
19
EDUC311Critical MulticulturalismExplores the cultural foundations of American education and examines the challenge to the schooling process, presented by cultural diversity. Focuses on the existing definitions of knowledge, learning, cultural assimilation, the distribution of power and academic achievement. Particular attention is paid to school policy and the system as a site of political and cultural contestation. <I>Prerequisite: EDUC 223 highly recommended. May not be taken pass/fail.</I>
20
EDUC350Women in EducationWomen in Education is an interdisciplinary discussion of how girls and women have affected and been influenced by K-12 schooling and post-secondary education over the last 125 years. Drawing on the fields of education studies, sociology, women's studies, and history, we will examine areas such as the rise of co-education, the feminization of teaching, 'feminine' learning styles, and the impact of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and social class on women's aspirations, interactions, and experiences within learning institutions. <i>Prerequisite: W S 140 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with W S 355.</i>
21
EDUC360The Political Economy of SchoolsThe term 'political economy' refers to the fusion of the interests of political and economic elites. The course establishes an economic context for the analysis of current reform initiatives and investigates claims in the literature and in policy about the performance of schools and the privileging of training over education. Examines the claim that economic imperatives have shaped and re-named the world, including the school, and have turned education into a production process. <i>May not be taken pass/fail.</i>
22
EDUC415American Public School LawExplores the legal framework and governance of public education in the United States and court decisions and legal issues affecting the schools, school personnel, parents and students. Current and historical legal issues are examined including those involving the instructional program; student rights involving speech, expression, and privacy; students with disabilities; discrimination; the rights of parents; and teacher rights and freedoms. <i>May not be taken pass/fail.</i>
23
EDUC540Leadership and Reflective Teaching ALeadership and reflective teaching is a two-semester long, theoretically-based, interactive, and experiential exploration of educators as moral and change agents. While the first semester is largely drawn from theory and examples of leadership and reflective teaching, the second focuses on the practice of such teaching and its implications. Drawing on literatures in leadership studies, culturally and politically responsive pedagogies, feminist studies, and institutional change, the course provides pre-service teachers with an in-depth examination of the responsibilities and concrete actions of citizen educators.
24
ENG181Reading Literature: Ethics and SocietyThis course explores literature as a form of social engagement, with the potential to influence our thinking about aesthetic, ethical, or political questions. It considers imaginative writing as a motive force in history through studies of specific works intervening in specific contexts or, more generally, through an analysis of the strategies that writers use to articulate, clarify, and sometimes resolve social or ethical problems.
25
FILM260African American CinemaReading African American cinema as a pivotal archive in African American cultural production, this course explores the diverse black aesthetic traditions that African American film has and continues to develop, explore, and shape. Specifically, the course will track how films produced, written, and/or directed by African Americans are situated in larger debates about the politics of race and representation.
26
FILM311Topics in Gender, Sexuality and Cinema(may be cross-listed with ENG 390 or COMM 401) Introduces students to the importance of gender as a category of film scholarship. Issues covered may include: women in film, masculinity and film, feminist filmmaking and film scholarship, women filmmakers. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.
27
HIST342Europe of DictatorsAn examination of the social, economic, political and ideological conditions and processes that led to the establishment of single-party dictatorships in Italy, Germany and the Soviet Union. <i>Counts toward European Studies minor.</i>
28
HIST350The Samurai in Feudal JapanAn exploration of feudal Japanese society (1185-1800) through an in-depth study of its major actors - the samurai. The topics that are explored in this course include the mores, ethos and valor of the samurai, on the one hand, and the changing as well as enduring social, economic and political structure of this period on the other hand.
29
HIST356African SlaveryA review of the processes of incorporation into slavery; slaves in production and exchange; the resistance history of slavery; the gender implications of the slave state; slaves and social mobility, interdependence and the manipulations of class; and the dynamics of manumission and abolition.
30
HIST358Gender and Sexuality in the Middle EastThis course seeks to explore the evolution of gendered and sexual identities in the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the present. We shall explore ways in which people in the Middle East have shaped and redefined gender and sexual identities from the earliest days of Islam to the present. Although the primary focus of the course will be the Muslim populations in the Middle East, the course will also examine conceptions of gender and sexuality amongst non-Muslim populations in the Middle East, before and after the rise of Islam.
31
HONR122Rethinking the EnvironmentWhat constitutes an 'environmental' problem? Which environmental problems are most urgent? Urgent for whom, and who decides? Environmental issues, it turns out, are always about more than the natural world. In order to understand environmental problems, we also need to understand human societies and the diverse ways that people cause, are affected by, and seek to solve these problems. Using case studies, students will learn to recognize the complex ways that environmental issues such as pollution, climatechange, and biodiversity loss intersect with social justice issues such as poverty, racism, and gender inequality. This course aims to develop students' cultural competence, information literacy, and critical thinking skills in preparation for more advanced environmental coursework across a range of academicdisciplines. Open only to students in the Environmental Fellows Program or by instructor permission. May not be taken pass/fail.
32
HONR171Media Fellows Colloquium IAn introduction to interdisciplinary issues raised by an analysis of media's role in politics, entertainment, journalism, the arts, advertising and public relations. Study of media and attendant legal and ethical issues. Analysis of media's societal role in shaping cultural values and in the dissemination of information. <i>Open only to students in the Media Fellows Program. May not be taken pass/fail.</I>
33
HONR422Environmental Fellows Senior SeminarAn interdisciplinary capstone course for Environmental Fellows. Students draw on field experience, leadership projects, and coursework in the program , across the curriculum and in their majors as they analyze environmental issues from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Students are expected to demonstrate their understanding of environmental complexity by discussion of, for example, ethics, science, art, culture, economics and policy.
34
HONR491Science Research Fellows Senior SeminarCapstone course for Science Research Fellows Program. Students read and discuss articles about things that impact science. Among the topics covered are ethics, government prioritization and funding, technology and education. Students are expected to bring their own internship experiences into the weekly discussions.
35
KINS269
Concepts & Perspectives Bridging Allied Medicine
This writing intensive course provides an opportunity for students interested in fields of allied medicine to investigate ethical and philosophical considerations for medical care, the development and regulation of allied medical professions through national organizations and the government for the protection of society, and the effect of health insurance--from its infancy to today's current practices--on how care is managed and provided. <i>Prerequisite: At least one from KINS 100, BIO 135, BIO 145, CHEM 120, CHEM 130. Not open to students with credit in KINS 369.</I>
36
KINS406Administration and Risk ManagementAdministrative process is applied to sports science and athletic training. Includes program philosophy, program development, facility and fiscal management, management of supplies and equipment, office procedures and public relations. Students learn to implement safety measures to ensure participants in physical activity and sport programs of a safe environment and to safeguard institutions and their employees from court lawsuits. The two emphases, sports medicine and sports science, divide into specialized learning groups for the second half of the semester.
37
PHIL102God, Evil and the Meaning of LifeReadings from philosophical, religious and literary authors on such questions as the meaning of God, arguments for the existence of God, the problem of evil, the meaning of human life, the relation of morality and religious belief. <I>Open to first-year students and sophomores; open to others only by permission of instructor.</I>
38
PHIL220ExistentialismIntroductory course in Existentialism. Major writers from both 19th and 20th centuries, including Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre and Camus. Issues to be discussed: the meaning of life, value of morality, absurdity of life, relation between being and nothingness. <i>Counts toward European Studies Minor.</i>
39
PHIL230Ethical TheoryHistorical and contemporary answers to some of the main problems of ethics, including the standard of right and wrong, the criteria of goodness, the possibility of ethical knowledge and the place of reason in ethics.
40
PHIL232Environmental EthicsAn examination of the extent of, limits to, and grounds for individual and collective moral obligations with respect to the 'more-than-human world.' Discusses anthropocentric, zoocentric, biocentric and ecocentric value theories; ecofeminist, deep ecology, and environmental justice perspectives; and/or such topics as biodiversity, climate change, sustainable agriculture, and/or ethics of consumption. This course may include a community engagement/service learning project and required field trips.
41
PHIL233Ethics and BusinessAn examination of ethical questions relating to business activity. Topics include: economic justice, the moral responsibilities of corporations, rights and responsibilities of employers and employees, business and consumers, regulation of business.
42
PHIL234Biomedical EthicsPerplexing moral issues arising in contemporary biomedical practice, research and medical care. Readings from a variety of sources.
43
PHIL340Classical Political PhilosophyWith an emphasis on classic texts from writers such as Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hobbes, Locke, Mill and Marx, this course pursues fundamental questions in political philosophy. Why have government at all? What is the nature and extent of our obligation to obey government? What obligations does the government have toward us? What right do we have to disobey? Our first goal will be to understand our authors' answers to such questions, but our most important task will be the critical appraisal of their answers. <i>Prerequisite: one course in philosophy of permission of instructor. Counts toward European Studies Minor.</i>
44
PHIL342Philosophy of LawAn inquiry into topics, such as, the nature of law, the relation of law to morality, the notion of responsibility in the law, punishment and the import for law of liberty of expression. Readings from classical and recent philosophers of law.
45
POLS110American National GovernmentThis course will serves as an introduction to the American political system. The three branches of the national government and the roles of political parties, elections, public opinion, interest groups, and other political actors will be addressed. Each version of the course will use a different lens to study American National Government: POLS 110A American National Government; POLS 110B American National Government: The Political System Today; POLS 110C American National Government: Race and Privilege; POLS 110D American National Government: The Data; POLS 110E American National Government: The Power of Individuals. <i>Only one POLS 110 course may be counted toward degree and major requirements. POLS 110C may count toward the Privilege, Power and Diversity requirement.</i>
46
POLS130Elements of Political TheoryThis course offers an introduction to selected topics in Political Theory. It covers a range of thinkers, from the ancient Greeks to the Enlightenment thinkers of Europe and closes on a contemporary note that asks us to reflect on the theoretical underpinnings of our time. It explores the political implications and limits of texts by Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau, Mill, Burke, Marx, and Arendt, reading them in chronological order with an eye toward changes in concerns and concepts across time. <i>May count towards European Studies minor.</i>
47
POLS150Comparative Politics and GovernmentAn examination of major theories of comparative politics applicable to liberal democratic, communist and developing Third World systems. Theories of modernization and development, functionalism, systems analysis, dependency and underdevelopment, political economy, state-society relations, corporatism and neo-corporatism in both Western and non-Western settings. <i>May count towards European Studies minor.</i>
48
POLS156Advanced Placement in Political ScienceAdvanced placement credit for entering first-year students. A. U.S. Government. B. Comparative Politics. <i>POLS 156 cannot be counted as credit toward a POLS major.</i>
49
POLS170International Politics (formerly POLS 270)An analysis of continuity and change in world politics, focusing on the units of analysis; patterns of conflict and competition, cooperation and order, and constraint; the structure of the international system; the international agenda and emerging trends and issues such as globalization and terrorism; and the current state of world order and its future.
50
POLS210Political Parties (formerly POLS 310)Parties, public opinion, elections, and voting behavior in the context of the American political system.
51
POLS220African American PoliticsThis course focuses on how the continuing struggle for Black political empowerment has helped influence and shape the current African American political community. An interdisciplinary approach incorporating economics, history and sociology will be used to gain an overall understanding of the African American community and its critical influence upon the American political system.
52
POLS235Equality and JusticeThis course investigates multiple dimensions of the principle of equality, such as equality in nature, equality among the sexes, equality among classes and equality before the law. It puts them in the context of broader discussions of justice and interrogates the relationship between the two through a close reading of texts by Cicero, Locke, Goldman, Fanon, Nietzsche and Wendy Brown. Some of the questions raised by this course include, does an embrace of equality lead to a tolerant and socially just polity where resources and opportunity are available to all? Or does an uncritical adoption of equality lead to a stunted and conformist politics that is reluctant to accept change and restricts individual freedom?
53
POLS240Contemporary Political IdeologiesA survey of contemporary worldviews based on value and belief systems that generate sets of attitudes and behaviors toward political institutions and processes. Ideologies such as enthno-nationalism, religious fundamentalism, terrorism, feminism, liberation theology, globalism and environmentalism are treated.
54
POLS316The PresidencySeeks first to develop students' understanding of the powers and imperatives of the American presidency, as well as an understanding of the president's role in the American political order. Primary attention also given to examination of presidential success in office: what makes a good president, what citizens look for in a president, what strategies and/or behaviors are more or less likely to result in successful presidencies.
55
POLS323The Politics of RaceThis course explores the centrality and significance of race in the modern American political system. The course covers, but is not limited to, the role of race in electoral politics, urban politics, the political and social attitudes of Americans and the debates about the scope and function of the federal government.
56
POLS330Governments and Politics of the Middle EastThis course focuses on the Middle East in international politics as well as the internal politics of the region. Special attention is given to the rise of the state system, the dynamics of modernization, major political movements, ideologies, religions and social and economic change.
57
POLS335Muslim Political ThoughtThis course is an exploration of the resurgent tradition of Muslim political thought. It begins with an examination of the canonical thinkers Al-Farabi and Ibn Khaldun and then proceeds to Hourani's account of the confrontation and engagement of Arab theorists with a largely European liberalism. Their readings, critiques, adaptations, challenges to, and expansions of liberalism remain powerful in the shaping of contemporary Muslim political thought. It then turns to an exploration of key texts of political Islam, including controversial works by Qutb and Maududi. It closes with an examination of Women and Islam through an exploration of contemporary debates surrounding the issue of veiling.
58
POLS341American Political ThoughtAn introduction to American political thought that concentrates on important debates and controversies that have contributed to shaping American political life.
59
POLS351Government and Politics of Russia and the CISExamines the origins and nature of Bolshevik movement and the 1917 revolution; the ideological and institutional sources of the Soviet state and party structures; Stalinism as totalitarian experiment; the erosion of the Soviet system; its economic decline and crisis; the reasons for the failure of the Gorbachev reform effort; the Moscow coup and implosion of the system; subsequent Russian political and economic reforms; selected events in some CIS republics. <i>May count towards European Studies minor.</i>
60
POLS352Politics of Developing NationsAn introduction to the similarities and unifying characteristics of heterogeneous developing nations. Emphasis on diversities to be found in different regions of the Third World. The focus is on issues and problems and not countries and regions, though case studies are used for illustrative purposes. The course covers theories and approaches to the study of the Third World; changes in the Third World (political, economic, governmental and regime); contemporary issues (hunger and famine, multinationals, foreign debt and the New International Economic Order); and Third World ideologies and movements (nonalignment, developmental socialism, anti-Americanism and Islamic revivalism).
61
POLS360African PoliticsThis course surveys issues in and approaches to the study of African politics. Special emphasis is placed on the African development crisis through an accounting of varying levels of success and failure across the continent. Specific concerns include: governance, civil and interstate war, international political economy and the development of the state system.
62
POLS382Global IssuesAn analytical survey of global issues: their essence, management and political implications. The course starts with a theoretical framework for the study of leading global issues, such as global security, population growth, global political economy, food, ethno-nationalism, terrorism, human rights, consumption of non-renewable resources and the integrity of the environment. Institutions, values and policies are emphasized in the context of growing interdependence among nations and related issues of integration and conflict.
63
POLS384International LawContemporary problems relating to law and legal institutions in the global community. The nature, sources, and application of international law; international instruments; membership in the international community; state and non-state actors; duties and responsibilities at the global level; war and peace.
64
REL290Topics in ReligionTopics such as religious phenomena, e.g., Millenialism, religious ethics and historical religious figures and movements. <I>May be repeated for credit with different topics.</I>
65
REL354Women and Gender in IslamThis course examines women and gender in the Islamic tradition and Muslim societies. Through a variety of written and visual sources, it treats 1.) the history of women in Islam, 2.) the impact of the tradition on women's lives and gender categories, and 3.) the efforts of modern Muslims to challenge traditional gender definitions and create a useable past.
66
SOC210Gender and SocietyThis course examines the role of gender systems in human societies. How do societies vary in the positions assigned to men and women? In the power and privileges accorded each sex? How do we acquire a gender identity? What are the consequences of sex-typing and sex-stratified societies? The role of religion, intellectual traditions, language, families and schools, economic organization, labor markets and the state is explored. The focus is on contemporary U.S. society and recent changes in gender relations. <I>Prerequisite: SOC 100 or sophomore standing.</I>
67
SOC215CriminologyThe course explores theoretical explanations for criminal behavior, empirical research on crime in diverse contexts and policy debates on crime control and punishment in the U.S. We place particular emphasis on the intersection of race, social class and gender as a conceptual lens through which to analyze street crime, white collar crime and intimate familial crime. <I>Prerequisite: SOC 100 or sophomore standing.</I>
68
SOC217Queer Theory/Queer LivesAn interdisciplinary exploration of the social and historical development of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) categories, identities and communities; the emergence and development of Queer Theory and its ability to deconstruct, de-politicize and extend beyond "LGBT"; the effect of interlocking systems of domination and control on queer lives, including sexism, racism, ethnicity and social class; and LGBT/Queer experiences within social institutions including families, marriage, law and the media. <i>Prerequisite: SOC 100 or sophomore standing. May be crosslisted with W S 250, Queer Theory/Queer Lives.</i>
69
SOC225Sexuality, Culture and PowerAn exploration of the diverse ways in which human sexualities have been conceptualized, molded, policed and transformed in particular cultures, social contexts, moral climates and political terrains. Investigated are how the seemingly personal and natural world of sexual desire and behavior is shaped by larger societal institutions (e.g., law, medicine, religion) and by cultural ideas. Also examined is how social categories that have primacy in a culture,(e.g., gender, race, class and age) are expressed in sexual ideas, behavior and politics. <i> Prerequisites: SOC 100 or sophomore standing.</i>
70
SOC322Black Issues and IdentityThis course considers how oppressive social realities inform the lives and the study of socially marginal and politically disempowered groups. While emphasis is placed on the experiences of people of African descent, the class covers issues of power, definition, bias, resistance, and resilience that are also prominent in the histories of other marginalized groups in the U.S. <i>Prerequisite: One course in Sociology or permission of instructor.</i>
71
SOC329Social InequalitiesThis course examines multiple systems of privilege and oppression, such as gender, race, ethnicity, social class, and sexuality. The course considers how these systems of inequality intersect to influence people's experiences of social processes (e.g., discrimination, stereotyping, and violence) and various social institutions (e.g., family, paid labor, education, and media).
72
SOC332Women, Culture and IdentityDrawing on work in sociology, psychology, and cultural and feminist studies, the course investigates how women from various ethnicities, socio-economic strata, and age groups make sense of gendered expectations, opportunities, and constraints. Particular emphasis is placed on the ways women encounter and resist circumstances they find limiting of their human potential. <i>Prerequisites: W S 140 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with W S 332.</i>
73
SOC333Intimate ViolenceThis course examines intimate violence from a historically grounded, cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspective. We explore the meaning of intimate violence, its relationship to violence in general, its root causes, and its universal and parochial forms. In addition to exposure to various theories of violence, we consider the usefulness of these theories in explaining specific empirical cases of intimate violence (e.g., rape, child abuse, hate crimes, femicide and trafficking in women) with an eye toward understanding these micro-level phenomena in broader social, cultural, economic and political context. <i>Prerequisite: one course in sociology or permission of instructor.</I>
74
SOC342Women, Health and Social ControlThis course focuses on the intersection of health, illness and gender. It combines classic and contemporary feminist ideologies to explore how health and illness have been defined and experienced by different women across historical time and space. Considerable attention is paid to how conceptualization of women (and their bodies) as inferior has led to the medicalization and control of women's bodies. The course especially highlights the role of women's health movements in shaping how women's health is understood, embodied and contested. We start the course addressing theoretical frames for understanding gender and health, then assess contemporary women's health status. The course then loosely follows a life course approach in that we explore women's experiences with menstruation, sexuality, reproductive technologies, childbirth and menopause. <i>Prerequisite: One course in sociology or permission of instructor.</i>
75
UNIV291Prindle Selected Topics in EthicsPrindle reading courses are designed to give students an opportunity to take a focused mini-course on a subject or issue that speaks to issues of ethical concern. The offerings are multi-disciplinary and topics will vary significantly depending on the professor and their disciplinary home.
76
WGSS190Topics in Women's StudiesAn interdisciplinary exploration of a particular theme, area, or period, with respect to issues of women and gender.
77
WGSS225Sexuality, Culture and PowerAn exploration of the diverse ways in which human sexualities have been conceptualized, molded, policed and transformed in particular cultures, social contexts, moral climates and political terrains. Investigated are how the seemingly personal and natural world of sexual desire and behavior is shaped by larger societal institutions (e.g., law, medicine, religion) and by cultural ideas. Also examined is how social categories that have primacy in a culture,(e.g., gender, race, class and age) are expressed in sexual ideas, behavior and politics. <i> Prerequisites: SOC 100 or sophomore standing.</i>
78
WGSS250Queer Theory, Queer LivesAn interdisciplinary exploration of the lives of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered and intersexed people through historical, sexological, scientific and literary texts, media respresentations and autobiographies. We will examine scholarly and activist definitions of sexual identity, especially as these have intersected with race, class, gender, ethnicity and age, and discuss ways sexual desire often escapes, complicates or is mismatched with fixed gender roles and dominant cultural categories. We will also discuss the insight queer perspectives can bring to our understanding of masculinity and femininity, cultural constructions of the body, the social construction of heterosexuality, and the future of difference.
79
WGSS262Transnational FeminismsAn interdisciplinary exploration gender and sexuality in a transnational context. We examine a variety of global processes, including colonialism and present-day capitalism and development studies; topics may also include military conflict, transnational ecofeminisms, and the use of art in developing solidarity across transnational feminist movements.
80
WGSS290Topics in Women's StudiesAn interdisciplinary exploration of a particular theme, area or period, with respect to issues of women and gender.
81
WGSS332Women, Culture and IdentityDrawing on work in sociology, psychology, and cultural and feminist studies, the course investigates how women from various ethnicities, socio-economic strata, and age groups make sense of gendered expectations, opportunities, and constraints. Particular emphasis is placed on the ways women encounter and resist circumstances they find limiting of their human potential. <i>Prerequisites: W S 140 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with SOC 332, Women, Culture and Identity.</i>
82
WGSS342Women, Health and Social ControlIn this course, we will focus on the intersection of health, illness, and gender. This course combines classic and contemporary feminist and sociological ideologies to explore how health and illness have been defined and experienced for different women across historical time and space. There is considerable attention to how conceptualization of women (and their bodies) as inferior has led to the medicalization and control of women's bodies. We will especially highlight the role of women¿s health movements in shaping how women's health is understood, embodied and contested. We start the course addressing theoretical frames for understanding gender and health. We then assess contemporary women's health status. The course then loosely follows a life course approach in that we explore women's experiences with menstruation, sexuality, reproductive technologies, childbirth, and menopause. <i>Prerequisites: one course in sociology or permission of instructor.</i>
83
WGSS350Feminist Inquiry (formerly WS 240)This course offers hands-on experience in the interdisciplinary field of Women's Studies. Students will survey research methods by reading excellent examples that show how various research methods have been applied; by reading about, and discussing, the practical details and the ethical issues involved in doing research; and by applying research methods themselves in class exercises and the undertaking of an individual project. <i>Prerequisite: W S 140.</i>
84
WGSS355Educating WomenWomen in Education is an interdisciplinary discussion of how girls and women have affected and been influenced by K-12 schooling and post-secondary education over the last 125 years. Drawing on the fields of education studies, sociology, women's studies, and history, we will examine areas such as the rise of co-education, the feminization of teaching, 'feminine' learning styles, and the impact of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and social class on women's aspirations, interactions, and experiences within learning institutions. <i>Prerequisite: WS 140 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with EDUC 350.</i>
85
WGSS362Feminist Approaches to EnvironmentalismAre women really closer to nature? Are women more deeply impacted by environmental degradation than men? Why do women make up the majority of the world's environmental activists? We will debate these questions and more as we consider how ecological narratives and practices are constructed at the intersections of gendered, raced, classed, and sexual identities. This course explores the work of artists, activists, and scholars to show how women and men have been at the forefront of struggles to reclaim their homes, communities and lands from patriarchal and (neo)colonial oppression. Topics include: ecofeminism, environmental racism and the environmental justice movement, queer ecologies, food politics, ecological economies, and eco-spiritual traditions. By the end of the term, you will be able to map some of the key debates in these fields and determine your own beliefs about philosophies and best practices for social-environmental justice.
86
WGSS370Topics in Women's StudiesAn interdisciplinary exploration of a particular theme, area or period, with respect to issues of women and gender.
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
Loading...
 
 
 
Sheet1
 
 
Main menu