Wisconsin SCAODA Legislative Tracking Document
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Wisconsin SCAODA Legislative Tracker - as of 12/10/19
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* SCAODA Four-Year Strategic Plan: 2018-2022 Primary Goals and Objectives
1. Change Wisconsin's cultural norms to transform the state's substance use disorder problems into healthy behavioral outcomes
2. Inform Wisconsin citizens on the negative fiscal, individual, and societal impacts of substance use disorders
3. Advocate for adequate funding, capacity, and infrastructure to implement effective outreach, prevention, treatment, and recovery services for all in need
4. Remedy historical, racial/ethnic, gender, and other bias in substance use disorder systems, policies, and practices
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Memo/Bill NameAuthorsSummaryAssembly ActionsSenate ActionsSCAODA Primary Goals *Council ActionEye on Lobbying
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SB-006Darling, Bernier, Carpenter, Craig, Kooyenga, Marklein, Nass, Taylor
Cosponsors: Ott, Horlacher, Quinn, Spiros, Whichgers
OWI Repeat Offenses
* This bill imposes a mandatory minimum period of 18 months in confinement in prison for fifth and sixth offenses of operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated (OWI)

Under current law:
> an OWI offense is defined as a person operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of an intoxicant, a controlled substance, a controlled substance analog, or any combination thereof, under the influence of any substance to a degree that renders him or her incapable of safely driving, with a detectable amount of a restricted controlled substance in his or her blood, or with a prohibited alcohol concentration
> a person who commits a fifth or sixth OWI offense is guilty of a Class G felony and may be fined up to $25,000, imprisoned for up to ten years, or both
> a person who commits a fifth or sixth OWI offense must be fined at least $600 and imprisoned for at least six months


Under this bill:
> a fifth or sixth OWI would require a sentencing court to impose a sentence that orders the person to spend at least 18 months confined in prison
> the court may impose a sentence term of confinement that is less than 18 months if the court finds that the best interests of the community will be served and the public will not be harmed and if the court places its reasons on record


* Because this bill creates a new crime or revises a penalty for an existing crime, the Joint Review Committee on Criminal Penalties may be requested to prepare a report
* 11/6/19: Received from Senate
* 11/12/19: Refused to suspend rules to withdraw from Senate message and take up (Ayes: 59, Noes 36)
* 1/29/19: Introduced by Senators Darling, Bernier, Carpenter, Craig, Kooyenga, Marklein, Nass, and L. Taylor; cosponsored by Representatives Ott, Horlacher, Quinn, Spiros, and Wichgers
* 1/29/19: Read first time and referred to Senate Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 2/15/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 2/25/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/4/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/20/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 4/10/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 5/10/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 6/6/19: Representative Rohrkaste added as a cosponsor
* 9/4/19: Public hearing held
* 9/24/19: Senate Amendment 1 offered by Senator Darling
* 9/25/19: Executive action taken - report adoption of Senate Amendment 1 recommended by Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety (5-0)
* 9/25/19: Report passage as amended recommended by Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety (5-0)
* 9/25/19: Available for scheduling
* 10/31/19: Senate Amendment 2 offered by Senator Darling
* 11/1/19: Placed on calendar 11-5-2019 pursuant to Senate Rule 18(1)
* 11/5/19: Read a second time
* 11/5/19: Senate Amendment 1 withdrawn and returned to author
* 11/5/19: Senate Amendment 2 adopted
* 11/5/19: Ordered to a third reading
* 11/5/19: Rules suspended
* 11/5/19: Read a third time and passed
* 11/5/19: Ordered immediately messaged
* 1/31/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association Inc >> FOR
* 2/1/19: Mothers Against Drunk Driving >> FOR
* 2/10/19: Wisconsin Profressional Police Association >> UNDISCLOSED
* 4/10/19: Tavern League of Wisconsin, Inc. >> OTHER
* 9/4/19: AAA Wisconsin >> FOR
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AB-016Ott, Horlacher, Novak, Plumer, Quinn, Sortwell, Spiros, Taylor, Wichgers, and Hutton
Cosponsors: Darling, Carpenter, Bernier, Craig, Kooyenga, Marklein, and Nass
OWI Repeat Offenses
* This bill imposes a mandatory minimum period of 18 months in confinement in prison for fifth and sixth offenses of operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated (OWI)

Under current law:
> an OWI offense is defined as a person operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of an intoxicant, a controlled substance, a controlled substance analog, or any combination thereof, under the influence of any substance to a degree that renders him or her incapable of safely driving, with a detectable amount of a restricted controlled substance in his or her blood, or with a prohibited alcohol concentration
> a person who commits a fifth or sixth OWI offense is guilty of a Class G felony and may be fined up to $25,000, imprisoned for up to ten years, or both
> a person who commits a fifth or sixth OWI offense must be fined at least $600 and imprisoned for at least six months

Under this bill:
> a fifth or sixth OWI would require a sentencing court to impose a sentence that orders the person to spend at least 18 months confined in prison
AMENDMENT 1: the court may impose a sentence that is less than 18 months if the it finds that the best interest of the community will be served and the public will not be harmed; and if the court places its reasons on the record
AMENDMENT 2: addition of an appropriation to provide alcohol or other drug abuse treatment to persons sentenced under s. 346.65 (2) (am) 5: $1,706,900 (2019-2020); $1,606,000 (2020-2021)



* Because this bill creates a new crime or revises a penalty for an existing crime, the Joint Review Committee on Criminal Penalties may be requested to prepare a report

* 2/8/19: Introduced by Representatives Ott, Horlacher, Novak, Plumer, Quinn, Sortwell, Spiros, Taylor, Wichgers, and Hutton; cosponsored by Senators Darling, Carpenter, Bernier, Craig, Kooyenga, Marklein, and Nass
* 2/8/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety
* 2/26/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 2/27/19: Representative Skowronski added as a coauthor
* 2/28/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/4/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/14/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 4/4/19: Public hearing held
* 4/10/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 5/1/19: Assembly Amendment 1 offered by Representatives Crowley, Spreitzer, and Emerson
* 5/1/19: Assembly Amendment 2 offered by Representatives Spreitzer, Emerson, and Crowley
* 5/10/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 6/5/19: Representative Rohrkaste added as a coauthor
* 9/18/19: Executive action taken; Amendment 1 adopted (10-0); Amendment 2 not adopted (5-6); Passage amended recommended (6-5)
* 2/10/19: Wisconsin Professional Police Association: >> UNDISCLOSED
* 3/4/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association Inc. >> FOR
* 3/7/19: Mothers Against Drunk Driving >> FOR
* 4/4/19: Association of State Prosecutors >> AGAINST
* 4/10/19: Tavern League of Wisconsin, Inc. >> OTHER
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SB-007Darling, Bernier, Carpenter, Jacque, Kooyenga, Larson, Marklein, and Nass
Cosponsors: Ott, Anderson, Horlacher, Quinn, Sortwell, Spiros, and Wichgers
OWI Mandatory Appearance
* This bill requires a person who receives a citation for a civil traffic violation related to operating while intoxicated (OWI) to appear in court to respond to the charge

Under current law:
> generally, a first violation of operating a vehicle while under the influence of an intoxicant, with a detectable amount of a restricted controlled substance in one's blood, or with a prohibited alcohol concentration (OWI-related violation), is a traffic violation punshiable by a civil forfeiture
> local units of government are allowed to enact ordinances in conformity with the state traffic law that punishes most first OWI-realted offenses as a civil violation
> a person who receives a citation for an OWI-related civil traffic violation or who receives a citation for an ordinance in conformity with the OWI-related traffic violation may opt to appear in court to plead not guilty to the violation or may opt to pay the forfeiture assocatied with the violation and avoid an appearance in court
> generally, a person who pays the forfeiture associated with the violation is considered to have pled guilty or no contest to the charge


Under this bill:
> a person who receives a citation for an OWI-related civil traffic violation or who receives a citation for an ordinance in conformity therewith is required to appear in court to plead guilty, no contest, or not guilty to the charge
> if the person fails to appear in court, the court is required to enter a default judgement against the person and impose the applicable penalties and a $300 surcharge for the person's failure to appear
* 1/29/19: Introduced by Senators Darling, Bernier, Carpenter, Jacque, Kooyenga, Larson, Marklein, and Nass; cosponsored by Representatives Ott, Anderson, Horlacher, Quinn, Sortwell, Spiros, and Wichgers
* 1/29/19: Read first time and referred to Senate Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 2/25/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 2/28/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/4/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/20/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/28/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 5/10/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 6/13/19: Senate Substitute Amendment 1 offered by Senator Darling
* 6/19/19: Representative Rohrkaste added as a cosponsor
* 9/4/19: Public hearing held
* 9/25/19: Executive action taken
* 9/25/19: Report adoption of Senate Substitute Amendment 1 recommended by Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety (5-0)
* 9/25/19: Report passage as amended recommended by Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety (5-0)
* 9/25/19: Available for scheduling
* 1/31/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association Inc >> FOR
* 2/1/19: Mothers Against Drunk Driving >> FOR
* 4/10/19: Tavern League of Wisconsin, Inc. >> OTHER
* 7/17/19: City of Milwaukee >> UNDISCLOSED
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AB-015Ott, Horlacher, Anderson, Plumer, Quinn, Sortwell, Spiros, Wichgers, Jagler, and Hutton
Cosponsors: Darling, Carpenter, Bernier, Jacque, Kooyenga, Larson, Marklein, and Nass
OWI Mandatory Appearance
* This bill requires a person who receives a citation for a civil traffic violation related to operating while intoxicated (OWI) to appear in court to respond to the charge

Under current law:
> generally, a first violation of operating a vehicle while under the influence of an intoxicant, with a detectable amount of a restricted controlled substance in one's blood, or with a prohibited alcohol concentration (OWI-related violation), is a traffic violation punshiable by a civil forfeiture
> local units of government are allowed to enact ordinances in conformity with the state traffic law that punishes most first OWI-realted offenses as a civil violation
> a person who receives a citation for an OWI-related civil traffic violation or who receives a citation for an ordinance in conformity with the OWI-related traffic violation may opt to appear in court to plead not guilty to the violation or may opt to pay the forfeiture assocatied with the violation and avoid an appearnce in court
> generally, a person who pays the forfeiture associated with the violation is considered to have pled guilty or no contest to the charge


Under this bill:
> a person who receives a citation for an OWI-related civil traffic violation or who receives a citation for an ordinance in conformity therewith is required to appear in court to plead guilty, no contest, or not guilty to the charge
> if the person fails to appear in court, the court is required to enter a default judgement against the person and impose the applicable penalties and a $300 surcharge for the person's failure to appear
* 2/8/19: Introduced by Representatives Ott, Horlacher, Anderson, Plumer, Quinn, Sortwell, Spiros, Wichgers, Jagler, and Hutton; cosponsored by Senators Darling, Carpenter, Bernier, Jacque, Kooyenga, Larson, Marklein, and Nass
* 2/8/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety
* 2/26/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 2/27/19: Representative Skowronski added as a coauthor
* 2/28/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/4/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/14/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/28/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 4/4/19: Public hearing held
* 4/30/19: Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 offered by Representative Ott
* 5/1/19: Assembly Amendment 1 to Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 offered by Representatives Crowley, Spreitzer, and Emerson

* 5/10/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 5/30/19: Executive action taken
* 6/12/19: Report: Assembly Amendment 1 to Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 adoption recommended by Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety (10-0)
* 6/12/19: Report: Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 adoption recommended by Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety (10-0)
* 6/12/19: Report: passage as amended recommended by Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety (11-0)
* 6/12/19: Referred to committee on Rules
* 6/18/19: Placed on calendar 6/20/19 by Committee on Rules
* 6/19/19: Representative Rohrkaste added as a coauthor
* 6/20/19: Read a second time
* 6/20/19: Assembly Amendment 1 to Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 laid on the table (62-34)
* 6/20/19: Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 adopted
* 6/20/19: Motion to reconsider vote by which Assembly Amendment 1 to Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 tabled offered by Representative Steineke
* 6/20/19: Vote by which Assembly Amendment 1 to Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 tabled reconsidered
* 6/20/19: Assembly Amendment 1 to Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 adopted
* 6/20/19: Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 adopted
* 6/20/19: Ordered to a third reading
* 6/20/19: Rules suspended
* 6/20/19: Read a third time and passed
* 6/20/19: Ordered immediately messaged
* 6/20/19: Recevied from Assembly
* 6/24/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 9/4/19: Public hearing held
* 9/25/19: Executive action taken
* 9/25/19: Report concurrence recommended by Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety (5-0)
* 9/25/19: Available for scheduling
*2/10/19: Wisconsin Professional Police Association >> UNDISCLOSED
* 2/25/19: Associated Builders and Contractors of Wisconsin Inc. >> OTHER
* 3/4/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association Inc. >> FOR
* 3/7/19: Mothers Against Drunk Driving >> FOR
* 4/10/19: Tavern League of Wisconsin, Inc. >> OTHER
* 5/30/19: Wisconsin Justice Initiative Inc. >> AGAINST: [memo attached]
* 7/17/19: City of Milwaukee >> UNDISCLOSED
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SB-008Darling, Bernier, Craig, and Marklein
Cosponsors: Ott, Anderson, Gundrum, Kerkman, Spiros, and Wichgers
OWI Homicide
* Under this bill, a person who is convicted of homicide by intoxicated use of a vehicle must be sentenced to a mandatory minimum period of confinement in prison of five years
* The bill creates an exception to the mandatory minimum setence created in this bill if the decedent was a passenger in the person's car and the court finds that the best interests of the community will be served and that the public will not be harmed
* If the court sentences a person to a period of confinement that is less than the mandatory minimum sentence, the bill requires the court to put its findings in writing
* A person who violates sub. (1) is guilty of a Class D felony; a person who violates sub. (1) is guilty of a Class C felony if the person has one or more prior convictions, suspensions, or revocations as counted under s. 343.307. Upon conviction, the court shall impose a bifurcated sentence under s. 973.01 and the term of confinement in prison portion of the bifurcated sentence shall be at least 5 years, except that a court may impose a term of confinement that is less than 5 years if the court finds a compelling reason and places its reason on the record


* Because this bill creates a new crime or revises a penalty for an existing crime, the Joint Review Committee on Criminal Penalties may be requested to prepare a report
* 1/29/19: Introduced by Senators Darling, Bernier, Craig, and Marklein; cosponsored by Representatives Ott, Anderson, Gundrum, Kerkman, Spiros, and Wichgers
* 1/29/19: Read first time and referred to Senate Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 2/25/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/4/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/6/19: Senator Wanggaard added as a coauthor
* 3/20/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/28/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 5/10/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 6/6/19: Representative Rohrkaste added as a cosponsor
* 6/12/19: Senate Amendment 1 offered by Senator Darling
* 9/4/19: Public hearing held
* 9/4/19: Senate Amendment 2 offered by Senator Darling
* 9/25/19: Executive action taken
* 9/25/19: Report adoption of Senate Amendment 2 recommended by Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety (5-0)
* 9/25/19: Report passage as amended recommended by Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety (5-0)
* 9/25/19: Available for scheduling
* 1/31/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association Inc >> FOR
* 2/1/19: Mothers Against Drunk Driving >> FOR
* 2/10/19: Wisconsin Profressional Police Association >> UNDISCLOSED
* 4/10/19: Tavern League of Wisconsin, Inc. >> OTHER
* 5/30/19: Association of State Prosecutors >> AGAINST
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AB-017Ott, Kerkman, Spiros, Wichgers, Anderson, Gundrum, Murphy, and Hutton
Cosponsors: Darling, Craig, Berner, and Marklein
OWI Homicide
* Under this bill, a person who is convicted of homicide by intoxicated use of a vehicle must be sentenced to a mandatory minimum period of confinement in prison of five years
* The bill creates an exception to the mandatory minimum sentence created in this bill if the decedent was a passenger in the person's car and the court finds that the best interests of the community will be served and that the public will not be harmed
* If the court sentences a person to a period of confinement that is less than the mandatory minimum sentence, the bill requires the court to put its findings in writing



* Because this bill creates a new crime or revises a penalty for an existing crime, the Joint Review Committee on Criminal Penalties may be requested to prepare a report

AMENDMENT 1: mandatory minimum period of confinement in prison of five years except that a court may impose a term of confinement that is less than five years if the court finds a compelling reason and places its reason on the record.
* 2/8/19: Introduced by Representatives Ott, Kerkman, Spiros, Wichgers, Anderson, Gundrum, Murphy, and Hutton;
cosponsored by Senators Darling, Craig, Bernier, and Marklein
* 2/8/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Criminal and Public Safety
* 2/26/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 2/27/19: Representative Skowronski added as coauthor
* 3/4/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/5/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/14/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/28/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 4/4/19: Public hearing held
* 5/1/19: Assembly Amendment 1 offered by Representatives Crowley, Spreitzer, and Emerson
* 5/10/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 5/29/19: Assembly Amendment 2 offered by Representative Ott (removing exception to sentence - Section 4 of the bill)
* 5/30/19: Executive action taken
* 6/5/19: Representative Rohrkaste added as a coauthor
* 6/12/19: Report Assembly Amendment 1 adoption recommended by Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety (10-0)
* 6/12/19: Report passage as amended recommended by Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety (10-0)
* 6/12/19: Referred to Committee on Rules
* 6/18/19: Placed on calendar 6/20/2019 by Committee on Rules
* 6/20/19: Read a second time
* 6/20/19: Assembly Amendment 1 adopted
* 6/20/19: Ordered to a third reading
* 6/20/19: Rules suspended
* 6/20/19: Read a third time and passed
* 6/20/19: Ordered immediately messaged

* 11/6/19: Received from Senate and concurred in
* 11/13/19: Report correctly enrolled on 11-13-2019
* 11/14/19: Presented to the Governor on 11/14/2019 by directive of the Speaker
* 11/20/19: Report approved by the Governor on 11-20-2019 - 2019 Wisconsin Act 31
* 11/20/2019: Published 11-21-2019
* 6/20/19: Recevied from Assembly
* 6/24/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 9/4/19: Public hearing held
* 9/25/19: Executive action taken
* 9/25/19: Report concurrence recommended by Committe on Judiciary and Public Safety (5-0)
* 9/25/19: Available for scheduling
* 11/1/19: Placed on calendar 11-5-2019 pursuant to Senate Rule 18(1)
* 11/5/19: Read a second time
* 11/5/19: Ordered to a third reading
* 11/5/19: Rules suspended
* 11/5/19: Read a third time and concurred in
* 11/5/19: Ordered immediately messaged
* 3/4/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association >> FOR
* 3/7/19: Mothers Against Drunk Driving >> FOR
* 4/4/19: Association of State Prosecutors >> AGAINST
* 4/10/19: Tavern League of Wisconsin >> OTHER
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SB-009Darling, Carpenter, Jacque, Kooyenga, Larson, Marklein, Nass, and L. Taylor
Cosponsors: Ott, Anderson, Kerkman, Sinicki, Sortwell, Spiros, Subeck, and Wichgers
OWI First Offense
* This bill criminalizes a first offense related to operating a vehicle while intoxicated (OWI-related offense)

Under current law:
> a first OWI-related offense is a civil violation, unless there was a minor passenger under the age of 16 in the vehicle at the time of the offense
> a person who commits a civil OWI-related offense is subject to a forfeiture of not less than $150 nor more than $300
> subsequent OWI-related offenses are crimes punishable by fines and periods of imprisonment that increase with every subsequent offense
> the penalty can be increased for a second OWI-related offense if the person committed the second offense within ten years of the first offense or if the person committed an OWI-related offense that caused death or great bodily harm to another

Under this bill:
> a person who commits a first OWI-related offense is guilty of a Class C misdemeanor and may be fined up to $500, imprisoned for up to 30 days, or both
> upon petition by the person who has been convicted of a first OWI-related offense, a court may vacate the person's criminal conviction and amend the record to a civil violation if, in the five years since the person was convicted of the offense, he or she has not committed any other OWI-related offense; the clerk of courts amends the court records that are availble in-person and online to show only the civil violation


* Because this bill creates a new crime or revises a penalty for an existing crome, the Joint Committee on Criminal Penalties may be requested to prepare a report
* 1/29/19: Introduced by Senators Darling, Carpenter, Jacque, Kooyenga, Larson, Marklein, Nass, and L. Taylor; cosponsored by Representatives Ott, Anderson, Kerkman, Sinicki, Sortwell, Spiros, Subeck, and Wichgers
* 1/29/19: Read first time and referred to Senate Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 1/25/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/4/10: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/14/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/20/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 4/17/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 5/10/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 9/4/19: Public hearing held
* 1/31/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association Inc >> FOR
* 2/1/19: Mothers Against Drunk Driving >> FOR
* 2/10/19: Wisconsin Profressional Police Association >> UNDISCLOSED
* 4/8/19: AAA Wisconsin >> FOR
* 7/25/19: City of Milwauke >> UNDISCLOSED
* 9/4/19: Wisconsin Counties Association >> AGAINST
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AB-018Ott, Spiros, Anderson, Kerkman, Murphy, Sinicki, Subeck, Taylor, Wichgers, and Hutton
Cosponsors: Darling, Carpenter, Jacque, Kooyenga, Larson, Marklein
OWI First Offense
* This bill criminalizes a first offense related to operating a vehicle while intoxicated (OWI-related offense)

Under current law:
> a first OWI-related offense is a civil violation, unless there was a minor passenger under the age of 16 in the vehicle at the time of the offense
> a person who commits a civil OWI-related offense is subject to a forfeiture of not less than $150 nor more than $300
> subsequent OWI-related offenses are crimes punishable by fines and periods of imprisonment that increase with every subsequent offense
> the penalty can be increased for a second OWI-related offense if the person committed the second offense within ten years of the first offense or if the person committed an OWI-related offense that caused death or great bodily harm to another

Under this bill:

> a person who commits a first OWI-related offense is guilty of a Class C misdemeanor and may be fined up to $500, imprisoned for up to 30 days, or both
> a person who commits a second OWI-related offense is subject o increased penalties regardless of whether the person commits the offense within ten years of his or her first OWI-related offense
> upon petition by the person who has been convicted of a first OWI-related offense, a court may vacate the person's criminal conviction and amend the record to a civil violation if, in the five years since the person was convicted of the offense, he or she has not committed any other OWI-related offense; the clerk of courts amends the court records that are availble in-person and online to show only the civil violation


* Because this bill creates a new crime or revises a penalty for an existing crome, the Joint Committee on Criminal Penalties may be requested to prepare a report
* 2/8/19: Introduced by Representatives Ott, Spiros, Anderson, Kerkman, Murphy, Sinicki, Subeck, Taylor, Wichgers, and Hutton; cosponsored by Senators Darling, Carpenter, Jacque, Kooyenga, Larson, and Marklein
* 2/8/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety
* 2/26/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 2/27/19: Representative Skowronski added as coauthor
* 3/4/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/13/19: Ammendment 1 (Representative Ott) > petitioning the court to vacate the person's criminal conviction and amend the record to a civil violation if, in the five years since the person was convicted of the offense, he or she has not commited any other OWI-related offense does not apply to a conviction for a violation committed while a person is engaged in commercial vehicle-related activities, as defined in s. 343.315 (1g).
>> [ammendment to insert: page 4, line 25: after "s. 343.307 (1)"]
* 3/14/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/15/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 4/4/19: Public hearing held
* 4/4/419: LRB Correction - Assembly Amendment 1
* 4/17/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 5/1/19: ASSEMBLY AMENDMENT 2 offered by Representatives Spreitzer, Emerson, and Crowley > inclusion of making appropriations to department of administration, department of corrections, department of transportation, and public defender board for costs related to this act.
* 5/10/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 2/10/19: Wisconsin Professional Police Association: >> UNDISCLOSED
* 2/21/19: Wisconsin Medical Society >> FOR
* 3/4/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association Inc. >> FOR
* 3/7/19: Mothers Against Drunk Driving >> FOR
* 4/8/19: AAA Wisconsin >> FOR
* 5/15/19: Wisconsin Justice Initiatve Inc. >> AGAINST
* 7/25/19: City of Milwaukee >> UNDISCLOSED
* 9/4/19: Wisconsin Counties Association >> AGAINST
12
SB-010Jacque, Wanggaard, Larson, Nass, Schachtner, Smith, and Stroebel
Cosponsors: Horlacher, Duchow, Fields, Gundrum, Kulp, Murphy, Plumer, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Skowronski, Subeck, C. Taylor, Thiesfeldt, Tittl, Zimmerman, and Tusler
OWI Snowmobile
* This bill establishes an absolute sobriety requirement for the purpose of operating a snowmobile for any person under the age of 21

Under current law:
> no one may operate an all-terrain vehicle, utility-terrain vehicle, off-highway motorcycle, boat, or snowmobile (recreational vehicle) with a prohibited alcohol concentration; under most circumstances, a prohibited alcohol concentration is [0.08]
> for a person who has not attained the age of 21, absolute sobriety is required for the purpose of operating any recreational vehicle except for snowmobiles;
> for the purpose of operating a snowmobile, absolute sobriety is required for a person who has not attained the age of 19

Under this bill:
> the absolute sobriety requirement age is increased to a person under the age of 21 operating any recreational vehicle, including snowmobiles
* 1/29/19: Introduced by Senators Jacque, Wanggaard, Larson, Nass, Schachtner, Smith, and Stroebel; cosponsored by Representatives Horlacher, Duchow, Fields, Gundrum, Kulp, Murphy, Plumer, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Skowronski, Subeck, C. Taylor, Thiesfeldt, Tittl, Zimmerman, and Tusler
* 1/29/19: Read first time and referred to Senate Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 4/11/19: Representative James added as a cosponsor
* 9/4/19: Public hearing held
* 9/24/19: Representative Born added as a cosponsor
* 9/25/19: Executive action taken
* 9/25/19: Report passage recommended by Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety (5-0)
* 9/25/19: Available for scheduling
* 1/31/19: Wisconsin Chiefs Police Association Inc >> FOR
* 2/1/19: Mothers Against Drunk Driving >> FOR
* 2/1/19: Association of Wisconsin Snowmobile Clubs, Inc. >> FOR
* 4/10/19: Tavern League of Wisconsin, Inc. >> OTHER
* 8/30/19: Badger State Sheriffs' Association >> FOR
* 8/30/19: Wisconsin Sheriffs and Deputy Sheriffs Association >> FOR
* 9/15/19: WIsconsin Professional Police Association Inc >> FOR
13
AB-007Horlacher, Duchow, Fields, Gundrum, Kulp, Murphy, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Skowronski, Subeck, Taylor, Thiesfeldt, Tittl, Plumer, Zimmerman, and Tusler
Cosponsors: Jacque, Wanggaard, Larson, Nass, Schachtner, Smith, and Stroebel
OWI Snowmobile
* This bill establishes an absolute sobriety requirement for the purpose of operating a snowmobile for any person under the age of 21

Under current law:
> no one may operate an all-terrain vehicle, utility-terrain vehicle, off-highway motorcycle, boat, or snowmobile (recreational vehicle) with a prohibited alcohol concentration; under most circumstances, a prohibited alcohol concentration is [0.08]
> for a person who has not attained the age of 21, absolute sobriety is required for the purpose of operating any recreational vehicle except for snowmobiles;
> for the purpose of operating a snowmobile, absolute sobriety is required for a person who has not attained the age of 19

Under this bill:
> > the absolute sobriety requirement age is increased to a person under the age of 21 operating any recreational vehicle, including snowmobiles
* 2/5/19: Introduced by Representatives Horlacher, Duchow, Fields, Gundrum, Kulp, Murphy, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Skowronski, Subeck, Taylor, Thiesfeldt, Tittl, Plumer, Zimmerman, and Tusler; cosponsored by Senators Jacque, Wanggaard, Larson, Nass, Schachtner, Smith, and Stroebel
* 2/5/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety
* 3/7/19: Public hearing held
* 5/8/19: Executive action taken: PASSAGE RECOMMENDED (6-2)
* 9/24/19: Representative Born added as a coauthor
* 2/6/19: Association of Wisconsin Snowmobile Clubs Inc. >> FOR
* 2/10/19: Wisconsin Professional Police Association >> FOR
* 3/4/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association Inc >> FOR
* 3/6/19: Badger State Sheriffs' Association >> FOR
* 3/6/19: Wisconsin Sheriffs and Deputy Sheriffs Association >> FOR
* 4/10/19: Tavern League of Wisconsin, Inc. >> FOR
* 4/30/19: Wisconsin Association for Justice >> FOR
14
SB-026Darling, Jacque, Roth, Johnson, Feyen, Marklein, Nass, Olsen, Ringhand, Wanggaard, Testin, Cowles, LeMahieu, Carpenter, and Wirch
Cosponsors: Nygren, Oldenburg, Schraa, Kolste, Subeck, Rodriguez, Ballweg, Dittrich, Petersen, Horlacher, Vorpagel, Mursau, Kuglitsch, Spiros, Edming, Gundrum, Felzkowski, Kulp, Skowronski, Thiesfeldt, Brooks, Ramthun, Tittl, Swearingen, Novak, Jagler, VanderMeer, Zimmerman, Krug, Quinn, Rohrkaste, Duchow, Magnafici, Born, Kurtz, Brandtjen, Plumer, Summerfield, Loudenbeck, Ott, and Knodl
Step Therapy Protocol - Exception Protocol
* This bill sets specifications on the development and use of and exceptions to step therapy protocols (STP) for prescription drug coverage

Background information:
> step therapy protocol: (as defined in the bill) is a protocol that establishes the specific sequence in which prescription drugs for a specified medical condition that are medically appropriate for a particular patient are covered by a policy or plan
> i.e. insurance companies often have a "fail-first" policy -- someone has to try the cheapest option first before they will agree to cover more
> clinical practice guideline: a systematically developed statement to assist decision-making by health care providers and patients about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances and conditions
> clinical review criteria: written screening procedures, decision abstracts, clinical protocols, and clinical practice guidelines used by an insurer, pharmacy benefit manager, or utilization review organization to determine whether health care services are medically necessary and appropriate
> exigent circumstances: when a patient is suffering from a health condition that may seriously jeopardize the patient's life, health, or ability to regain maximum function
> when establishing a step therapy protocol, an insurer, pharmacy benefit manager, or utilization review organization must use clinical review criteria based on clinical practice guidelines that satisifes the following:
>> the guidelines recommend that the prescription drugs be taken in the specific sequence required by the STP
>> the guidelines are developed and endorsed either by a multidisciplinary panel of experts that manages conflicts of interest among its members or, (in the absense of a multidisciplinary panel) based on peer reviewed publications
>> the guidelines are based on evidence-based, high quality studies, research, and medical practice
>> the guidelines are created in an explicit and transparent process that does all of the following: (a) minimizes biases and conflicts of interest; (b) explains the relationship between treatment options and outcomes; (c) rates the quality of evidence supporting recommendations; (d) considers relevant patient subgroups and preferences
>> the guidelines are continually updated through a review of new evidence and research and newly developed treatments

Under this Bill:
> the insurer, pharmacy benefit manager, or utilization review organization is required to consider the needs of atypical patient populations and diagnoses when establishing the use clinical review criteria based on clinical practice guidelines that meet certain criteria specified in the bill when establishing an STP
> if an STP restricts the coverage of a prescription drug, the insurer, pharmacy benefit manager, or utilization review organization must provide access to a clear, readily accessible, convenient process to request an exception to the STP; an existing medical exceptions process may be used to satisfy this requirement
> the insurer, pharmacy benefit manager, or utilization review organization must grant an exception to the STP if the prescribing provider submits complete, clinically relevant written documentation supporting the request and any of the following are satisfied:
> the insurer, pharmacy benefit manager, or utilization review organization must expeditiously grand an exception to the STP under certain circumstances specified in the bill, including:
>> when the drug is contraindicated for the patient or will likely cause an adverse reaction for the patient
>> the drug is expected to be ineffective
>> the patient tried the drug previously and discontinued its use due to adverse event or ineffectiveness
>> use of the drug is not in the patient's best interest
>> or the patient is stable on a different drug under this or a previous policy or plan
> upon granting an exception to the STP, the insurer, pharmacy benefit manager, or utilization review organization must authorize coverage for the drug prescribed by the patient's treating health care provider to the extent the drug is covered under the patient's policy or plan
> an insured individual may appeal a denied request for an exception to the STP
> an insurer, pharmacy benefit manager, or utilization review organization must grant or deny a request for an exception (or an appeal) within 72 hours of receipt, or within 24 hours in exigent circumstances 3 business days (or by the end of the next business day in exigent circumstances) of receipt of supporting documentation
> if this deadline is not met, the exception is considered granted
* 6/5/19: Received from Senate
* 6/10/19: Read first time and referred to committe on Rules
* 6/13/19: Placed on calendar 6/18/2019 by Committee on Rules
* 6/18/19: Rules suspended to withdraw from calendar and take up
* 6/18/19: Read a second time
* 6/18/19: Ordered to a third reading
* 6/18/19: Read a third time and concurred in
* 6/18/19: Ordered immediately messaged
* 2/8/19: Introduced by Senators Darling, Jacque, Roth, Johnson, Feyen, Marklein, Nass, Olsen, Ringhand, Wanggaard, Testin, Cowles, LeMahieu, Carpenter, and Wirch; cosponsored by Representatives Nygren, Oldenburg, Schraa, Kolste, Subeck, Rodriguez, Ballweg, Dittrich, Petersen, Horlacher, Vorpagel, Mursau, Kuglitsch, Spiros, Edming, Gundrum, Felzkowski, Kulp, Skowronski, Thiesfeldt, Brooks, Ramthun, Tittl, Swearingen, Novak, Jagler, VanderMeer, Zimmerman, Krug, Quinn, Rohrkaste, Duchow, Magnafici, Born, Kurtz, Brandtjen, Plumer, Summerfield, Loudenbeck, Ott, and Knodl
* 2/8/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Health and Human Services
* 3/7/19: Representative Sinicki added as a cosponsor
* 3/26/19: Senate Subsitute Amendment 1 offered by Senator Darling
* 3/27/19: Representative Ohnstad added as a cosponsor
* 4/17/19: Public hearing held
* 4/17/19: Senator Bewley added as a coauthor
* 5/7/19: Executive action taken: Report adoption of Senate Substitute Amendment 1 recommended by Committee on Health and Human Services (5-0)
*5/7/19: Executive action taken: PASSAGE AS AMENDED RECOMMENDED (5-0)
* 5/7/19: Available for scheduling
* 6/3/19: Placed on calendar 6-5-2019 pursuant to Senate Rule 18(1)
* 6/5/19: Read a second time
* 6/5/19: Senate Substitute Amendment 1 adopted
* 6/5/19: Ordered to a third reading
* 6/5/19: Rules suspended
* 6/5/19: Read a third time and passed
* 6/5/19: Ordered immediately messaged
* 6/18/19: Received from Assembly and concurred in
* 6/25/19: Report correctly enrolled
* 7/9/19: Presented to the Governor on 7-9-2019
* 7/10/19: Report approved by the Governor on 7-9-2019 - 2019 WISCONSIN ACT 12
* 7/10/19: Published 7-10-2019
* 2/11/19: WPS Health Insurance >> AGAINST
--- "The bill is not acceptable as written."
* 2/11/19: Celgene Corporation >> FOR
* 2/11/19: American Diabetes Association >> FOR
* 2/11/19: American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) >> FOR
* 2/11/19: Alliance of Health Insurers, U.A. >> AGAINST
* 2/12/19: Wisconsin Primary Health Care Association (WPHCA) >> FOR
* 2/13/19: Wisconsin Association of Health Plans >> AGAINST
* 2/13/19: Wisconsin Academy of Family Physicians >> FOR
* 2/13/19: Sunovian Pharmaceuticals Inc. >> FOR
* 2/13/19: Pfizer >> FOR
* 2/13/19: Common Ground Healthcare Cooperative >> AGAINST
* 2/13/19: Anthem Inc. and its Affiliates >> AGAINST
* 2/14/19: Coalition of Wisconsin Aging Groups >> FOR
* 2/14/19: America's Health Insurance Plan (AHIP) >> AGAINST >> OTHER
* 2/14/19: American Lung Association, dba American Lung Association in Wisconsin >> FOR
* 2/15/19: Sanofi US (FKA Sanofi-Aventis) >> FOR
* 2/15/19: CVS Health >> UNDISCLOSED
* 2/15/19: Bio Forward Inc. (formerly Wisconsin Biotechnology and Medical Device Association) >> FOR
* 2/19/19: Wisconsin Psychiatric Association >> FOR
* 2/19/19: Humana Inc >> AGAINST
---
"The legislation in its current form impedes critical care management tools like step therapy developed by clinicians to protect patients and encourage the first use of lower cost, potentially less harmful alternative therapies."
* 2/20/19: SSM Health >> OTHER
* 2/21/19: National Alliance on Mental Illness Wisconsin >> FOR
* 3/1/19: Wisconsin Medical Society >> FOR
* 3/7/19: Network Health Plan >> UNDISCLOSED >> OTHER
* 3/8/19: National Psoriasis Foundation >> FOR
* 3/11/19: WEA Insurance Corporation >> UNDISCLOSED
* 3/11/19: Health Tradition Health Plan, Inc. >> UNDISCLOSED
* 3/12/19: Hometown Pharmacy Partnerships LLC >> FOR
* 3/22/19: AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin >> FOR
* 3/25/19: Molina Healthcare, Inc. >> UNDISCLOSED
* 3/25/19: Walgreen Co >> UNDISCLOSED
* 3/28/19: Medical College of Wisconsin >> FOR
* 4/5/19: Amgen, Inc. >> FOR
16
SB-058Larson, Carpenter, and Smith
Cosponsors: Sinicki, Brostoff, Anderson, Spreitzer, Considine, Vruwink, Emerson, Fields, Bowen, Ott, Pope, Subeck, and Myers
Ignition Interlock
* This bill expands the ignition interlock requirement to all OWI offenses that involve the use of alcohol

Under current law:
> a court must order a person's operating privilege restricted to operating vehicles that are equipped with an ignition interlock device if a person is convicted of:
>> a second or subsequent offense related to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of an intoxicant or other drug,
>> with a prohibited alcohol concentration
>> or with a measurable amount of a controlled substance in his or her blood (OWI offense)
>> or a first OWI offense for which his or her alcohol concentration is 0.15 or greater

Under this bill:
> the ignition interlock requirement expands to all OWI offenses that involve the use of alcohol
* 2/25/19: Introduced by Senators Larson, Carpenter, and Smith; cosponsored by Representatives Sinicki, Brostoff, Anderson, Spreitzer, Considine, Vruwink, Emerson, Fields, Bowen, Ott, Pope, Subeck, and Myers
* 2/25/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 2/27/19: Representative Taylor added as a cosponsor
* 3/7/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/21/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 5/13/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 2/27/19: Mothers Against Drunk Driving >> FOR
* 4/8/19: AAA Wisconsin >> FOR
* 4/30/19: Tavern League of Wisconsin, Inc. >> AGAINST
17
AB-061Sinicki, Brostoff, Anderson, Spreitzer, Considine, Vruwink, Emerson, Fields, Bowen, Ott, Pope, Subeck, Myers, and Taylor
Cosponsors: Larson, Carpenter, and Smith
Ignition Interlock
* This bill expands the ignition interlock requirement to all OWI offenses that involve the use of alcohol

Under current law:
> a court must order a person's operating privilege restricted to operating vehicles that are equipped with an ignition interlock device if a person is convicted of:
>> a second or subsequent offense related to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of an intoxicant or other drug,
>> with a prohibited alcohol concentration
>> or with a measurable amount of a controlled substance in his or her blood (OWI offense)
>> or a first OWI offense for which his or her alcohol concentration is 0.15 or greater

Under this bill:
> the ignition interlock requirement expands to all OWI offenses that involve the use of alcohol
* 3/7/19: Introduced by Representatives Sinicki, Brostoff, Anderson, Spreitzer, Considine, Vruwink, Emerson, Fields, Bowen, Ott, Pope, Subeck, Myers, and Taylor; cosponsored by Senators Larson, Carpenter, and Smith
* 3/7/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety
* 3/13/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/20/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 5/3/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/8/19: Mothers Against Drunk Driving >> FOR
* 4/8/19: AAA Wisconsin >> FOR
* 4/30/19: Tavern League of Wisconsin, Inc. >> AGAINST
19
SB-073Jacque, Taylor, Carpenter, Johnson, Kooyenga, and Marklein
Cosponsors: Brandtjen, Dittrich, Brooks, Crowley, Duchow, Horlacher, Kerkman, Kitchens, Kuglitsch, Kulp, Mursau, Myers, Oldenburg, Plumer, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Sinicki, Skowronski, Spreitzer, Subeck, Taylor, Thiesfeldt, Tittl, Tusler, and Wichgers
Vapor Product Sales
* This bill prohibits the sale of vapor products to minors and the purchase of those products by or for minors

Under current law:
> certain actors, such as retailer and manufacturers, are prohibited from selling cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products to a person who is under the age of 18 (a minor), and from providing cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products for free to any person unless the cigarettes or products are provided in a place where minors are generally not permitted to enter
> minors are prohibited from purchasing, attempting to purchase, posessing, or falsely representing his or her age for the purpose of receiving any cigarette, nicotine product, or tobacco product, with certain limited exceptions
>> a person under 18 years of age may purchase or possess cigarettes, nicotine products, or tobacco products for the sole purpose of resale in the course of employment during his or her working hours if employed by a retailer
>> a person under 18 years of age - but not under 15 years of age - may purchase, attempt to purchase, or possess cigarettes, nicotine products, or tobacco products in the course of his or her participation in an investigation under s. 254.916 that is conducted in accordance with s. 254.916 (3)
> any person is prohibited from puchasing cigarettes, nicotine products, or tobacco products on behalf of a minor

Under this bill:
> similarly prohibits the sale or provision of vapor products, such as e-cigarettes and vape pens, to minors
> similarly prohibits the purchase or vapor products by or on behalf of minors
* 3/1/19: Introduced by Senators Jacque, Taylor, Carpenter, Johnson, Kooyenga, and Marklein; cosponsored by Representatives Brandtjen, Dittrich, Brooks, Crowley, Duchow, Horlacher, Kerkman, Kitchens, Kuglitsch, Kulp, Mursau, Myers, Oldenburg, Plumer, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Sinicki, Skowronski, Spreitzer, Subeck, Taylor, Thiesfeldt, Tittl, Tusler, and Wichgers
* 3/1/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 3/12/19: Senator Wanggaard added as a coauthor
* 4/15/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 4/18/19: Senator Risser added as a coauthor
* 7/3/19: Senator Bewley added as a coauthor
* 3/4/19: Gundersen Health System >> FOR
* 3/4/19: Wisconsin Medical Society >> FOR
* 3/5/19: Wisconsin Sheriff and Deputy Sheriff's Association >> FOR
* 3/5/19: Marshfield Clinic Health System >> FOR
* 3/5/19: Badger State Sheriff's Association >> FOR
* 3/7/19: American Lung Association, dba American Lung Association in Wisconsin >> UNDISCLOSED
* 3/14/19: Wisconsin Primary Health Care Association (WPHCA) >> FOR
* 3/14/19: Wisconsin Cheifs of Police Association Inc >> FOR
* 3/15/19: Washington County >> OTHER
* 3/20/19: American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) >> FOR
* 3/27/19: Altria Client Services LLC >> OTHER (neutral)
* 3/30/19: Vapor Technology Association >> UNDISCLOSED
* 4/1/19: DCI Group AZ L.L.C. >> OTHER
* 4/10/19: Wisconsin Association of School Nurses >> FOR
* 4/23/19: American Heart Association >> FOR
* 5/21/19: City of Milwaukee >> FOR
20
AB-065Brandtjen, Dittrich, Brooks, Crowley, Duchow, Horlacher, Kerkman, Kitchens, Kuglitsch, Kulp, Mursau, Myers, Oldenburg, Plumer, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Sinicki, Skowronski, Spreitzer, Subeck, Taylor, Thiesfeldt, Tittl, Tusler, and Whichgers
Cosponsors: Jacque, Taylor, Carpenter, Kooyenga, Marklein, and Johnson
Vapor Product Sales
* This bill prohibits the sale of vapor products to minors and the purchase of those products by or for minors

Under current law:
> certain actors, such as retailer and manufacturers, are prohibited from selling cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products to a person who is under the age of 18 (a minor), and from providing cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products for free to any person unless the cigarettes or products are provided in a place where minors are generally not permitted to enter
> minors are prohibited from purchasing, attempting to purchase, posessing, or falsely representing his or her age for the purpose of receiving any cigarette, nicotine product, or tobacco product, with certain limited exceptions
>> a person under 18 years of age may purchase or possess cigarettes, nicotine products, or tobacco products for the sole purpose of resale in the course of employment during his or her working hours if employed by a retailer
>> a person under 18 years of age - but not under 15 years of age - may purchase, attempt to purchase, or possess cigarettes, nicotine products, or tobacco products in the course of his or her participation in an investigation under s. 254.916 that is conducted in accordance with s. 254.916 (3)
> any person is prohibited from puchasing cigarettes, nicotine products, or tobacco products on behalf of a minor

Under this bill:
> similarly prohibits the sale or provision of vapor products, such as e-cigarettes and vape pens, to minors
> similarly prohibits the purchase or vapor products by or on behalf of minors
* 3/7/19: Intoduced by Representatives: Brandtjen, Dittrich, Brooks, Crowley, Duchow, Horlacher, Kerkman, Kitchens, Kuglitsch, Kulp, Mursau, Myers, Oldenburg, Plumer, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Sinicki, Skowronski, Spreitzer, Subeck, Taylor, Thiesfeldt, Tittl, Tusler, and Whichgers; cosponsored by Senators Jacque, Taylor, Carpenter, Kooyenga, Marklein, and Johnson
* 3/7/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on State Affairs
* 4/18/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 7/3/19: Senator Bewley added as a cosponsor
* 3/8/19: Gundersen Health System >> FOR
* 3/8/19: Wisconsin Medical Society >> FOR
* 3/14/19: Wisconsin Primary Health Care Association (WPHCA) >> FOR
* 3/14/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association Inc >> FOR
* 3/14/19: Marshfield Clinic Health System >> FOR
* 3/20/19: American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) >> FOR
* 3/27/19: Altria Client Services LLC >> OTHER (neutral)
* 3/29/19: American Lung Association, dba American Lung Association in Wisconsin >> FOR
* 3/30/19: Vapor Technology Association >> UNDISCLOSED
* 4/1/19: DCI Group AZ L.L.C. >> OTHER
* 4/10/19: Wisconsin Association of School Nurses >> FOR
* 4/23/19: American Heart Association >> FOR
* 5/21/19: City of Milwaukee >> FOR
21
SB-083Kooyenga, Craig, Erpenbach, Stroebel, Taylor, and Nass
Cosponsors: Vorpagel, Subeck, Duchow, Gundrum, Hutton, Jagler, Kitchens, Macco, Ramthun, Tusler, Vruwink, Wichgers, and Brandtjen
Liquor Sales
* This bill allows certain liquor retailers to sell distilled spirits, in any quantity, for off-premises consumption in municipalities that allow such off-premises sales

Under current law:
> no persons may sell alcohol beverages at retail unless the person possesses a license or permit authorizing the sale (with specific exceptions)
> a "class B" license, issued by a municipality, authorizes: (a) retail sale of fermented malt beverages (beer) on or off the premises (ex: restaurants, "beer bars"); or (b) retail sale of intoxicating liquor (including wine) for consumption on the premises, and wine in original sealed containers for consumption off the premises; if the municipality elects to, it may also permit sale of not more than four liters of intoxicating liquor at any time (there are no limits on the quantity of wine that may be sold), in the original sealed container, for consumption off the premises; state law also allows carryout of a single, opened (resealed) bottle of wine, if sold with a meal at either a "class B' or "class C" licensed premises (ex: taverns and restaurants with alcohol beverage service)
> a municipality may also, by ordinance, authorize "class B" licenses to sell, in quantities not exceeding four liters at any time, distilled spirits in the original package or container for consumption off the licensed premises

Under this bill:
> elimination of the four-liter limit on "class B" licensees for distilled spirits sales for off-premeses consumption in municipalities that, by ordinance, allow such off-premises sales
> a "class B" license allows for the sale of intoxicating liquor in the original package or container, in any quantity, to be consumed off the premises of where it was sold

* 5/15/19: Received from Senate
* 5/15/19: Read
* 5/15/19: Rules suspended and taken up
* 5/15/19: Read a second time
* 5/15/19: Ordered to a third reading
* 5/15/19: Rules suspended
* 5/15/19: Read a third time and concurred in
* 5/15/19: Ordered immediately messaged
* 3/7/19: Introduced by Senators Kooyenga, Craig, Erpenbach, Stroebel, Taylor, and Nass; cosponsored by Representatives Vorpagel, Subeck, Duchow, Gundrum, Hutton, Jagler, Kitchens, Macco, Ramthun, Tusler, Vruwink, Wichgers, and Brandtjen
* 3/7/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Economic Development, Commerce, and Trade
* 3/15/19: Representative Bowen added as a cosponsor
* 4/23/19: Public hearing held
* 5/3/19: Representative Felzkowski added as a cosponsor
* 5/8/19: Executive action taken: PASSAGE RECOMMENDED (5-0)
* 5/8/19: Available for scheduling
* 5/10/19: Placed on calendar 5-15-2019 pursuant to Senate Rule 18(1)
* 5/15/19: Read a second time
* 5/15/19: Ordered to a third reading
* 5/15/19: Rules suspended
* 5/15/19: Read a third time and passed
* 5/15/19: Received from Assembly concurred in
* 5/20/19: Report correctly enrolled
* 6/18/19: Presented to the Governor on 6-18-2019
* 6/24/19: Report approved by the Governor on 6-24-2019 - 2019 WISCONSIN ACT 6
* 6/24/19: Published 6-25-2019
* 3/8/19: Retail Services & Systems, Inc. d/b/a Total Wine & More >> FOR
* 3/11/19: Tavern League of Wisconsin, Inc. >> FOR
* 3/12/19: Wisconsin Grocers Association >> FOR
* 4/8/19: Wisconsin Restaurant Assocation >> FOR
23
SB-118Jacque, Schachtner, Taylor, Bewley, Carpenter, Darling, Hansen, Johnson, Larson, Miller, Olsen, Petrowski, and Wanggaard
Cosponsors: Mursau, Billings, Allen, Anderson, Ballweg, Bowen, Brandtjen, Considine, Crowley, Dittrich, Doyle, Duchow, Edming, Emerson, Felzkowski, Goyke, Gruszyinski, Gundrum, Hesselbein, Kitchens, Kolste, Kulp, Loudenbeck, Meyers, Milroy, Myers, Ohnstad, Oldenburg, Pope, Quinn, Ramthun, Riemer, Rodriguez, Sargent, Sinicki, Skowronski, Spiros, Spreitzer, Steffen, Stuck, Subeck, Taylor, Thiesfeldt, Tittl, Tusler, VanderMeer, and Vruwink
Retail Placement of Cigarettes, Nicotine Products, and Tobacco Products
* This bill creates guidelines for the placement of cigarettes, nicotine products, or tobacco products in retail locations and provides a penalty

Under current law:
> there are imposed restrictions on sales from a vending machine that this bill does not affect

Under this bill:
> retailers are allowed to place cigarettes, nicotine products, or tobacco products only in locations that are inaccessible to customers without assistance, such as behind the counter or in a locked case
> this restriction does not apply to: (1) cigarettes, nicotine, or tobacco products sold in a vending machine; (2) retail locations that generate 75% or more of its revenue from the sales of cigarettes, nicotine or tobacco products - as long as anyone under the age of 18 is prohibited from entering without a parent or guardian; or (3) cigars that are placed in a separate, humidity-controlled room in a retail location if the entrance to the room is visible, either directly or by video surveillance, from the check-out area and anyone under the age of 18 is prohibited from entering the room without a parent or guardian
> a retailer who violates the bill's restriction is subject to the same penalties that apply to violations of other cigarette/nicotine/tobacco-product retail restrictions, including: (1) a forfeiture of not more than $500, if the retailer has not committed a previous violation within 12 months; (2) a forfeiture of not less than $200 nor more than $500, if the retailer has committed a previous violation within 12 months; and (3) suspension of the retailer's license for a period of time that depends on the number of previous violations
> a "first-class city" (city of 150,000 population and over, which currently only includes Milwaukee) is allowed to suspend, revoke, or refuse to renew a cigarette and tobacco products retailer license if the retailer violates the bill's restriction
* 3/20/19: Introduced by Senators Jacque, Schachtner, Taylor, Bewley, Carpenter, Darling, Hansen, Johnson, Larson, Miller, Olsen, Petrowski, and Wanggaard; cosponsored by Representatives Mursau, Billings, Allen, Anderson, Ballweg, Bowen, Brandtjen, Considine, Crowley, Dittrich, Doyle, Duchow, Edming, Emerson, Felzkowski, Goyke, Gruszyinski, Gundrum, Hesselbein, Kitchens, Kolste, Kulp, Loudenbeck, Meyers, Milroy, Myers, Ohnstad, Oldenburg, Pope, Quinn, Ramthun, Riemer, Rodriguez, Sargent, Sinicki, Skowronski, Spiros, Spreitzer, Steffen, Stuck, Subeck, Taylor, Thiesfeldt, Tittl, Tusler, VanderMeer, and Vruwink
* 3/20/19: Read first time and referred to the Committee on Local Government, Small Business, Tourism, and Workforce Development
* 3/25/19: Representative Shankland added as a cosponsor
* 4/4/19: Public hearing held
* 5/6/19: Representative James added as a cosponsor
* 3/21/19: City of Milwaukee >> FOR
* 3/21/19: Gundersen Health System >> FOR
* 3/23/19: Children's Hospital of Wisconsin >> FOR
* 3/25/19: American Lung Association, dba American Lunch Association in Wisconsin >> FOR
* 3/25/19: League of Wisconsin Municipalities >> FOR
* 4/2/19: Wisconsin Public Health Association >> FOR
* 4/2/19: Wisconsin Medical Society >> FOR
* 4/2/19: Wisconsin Associaiton of Local Health Departments and Boards >> FOR
* 4/2/19: Marshfield Clinic Health System >> FOR
* 4/2/19: American Heart Association >> FOR
* 4/2/19: American Caner Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) >> FOR
* 4/3/19: Altria Client Services LLC >> OTHER
* 4/3/19: DCI Group AZ L.L.C. >> OTHER
* 4/4/19: Cigar Association of America Inc >> UNDISCLOSED
* 4/4/19: SI Group Client Services >> AGAINST
* 4/5/19: Wisconsin Primary Health Care Association (WPHCA) >> FOR
* 4/10/19: Sixteenth Street Community Health Centers >> FOR
* 5/6/19: Wisconsin Association of School Boards Inc >> FOR
* 5/22/19: Vapor Technology Association >> UNDISCLOSED
24
SB-134 Jacque and Wanggaard
Cosponsors: Wichgers, Plumer, Horlacher, Murphy, Skowronski, Brandtjen, Ramthun, Thiesfeldt, and Zimmerman
Naloxone Administration Reporting
* This bill requires the Department of Health Services (DHS) to include reports of naloxone or other opioid antagonist administration by ambulance service providers to the Wisconsin Ambulance Run Data System (WARDS, the data system that tracks ambulance run data)

Under current law:
> ambulance service providers require emergency responders and service practitioners under their supervision to keep a record of each instance of administration of naloxone or another opioid antagonist to an individual who is believed to be undergoing an opioid-related drug overdose to DHS, in the manner prescribed by DHS
> the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) monitors dispensed controlled substances and other drugs identified by the Controlled Substances Board as having a substantial potential for abuse

Under this bill:
> there will be better tracking and sharing of information amongst Wisconsin health entities on the administration of naloxone or other opioid antagonists by ambulance service providers
> the DHS will be required to include reports of naloxone or other opioid antagonist administration by ambulance service providers to WARDS
> DHS will also be required to submit the records received from the ambulance service providers of a naloxone or other opioid antagonist administration to the PDMP
> DHS will also be required to consult with the Controlled Substances Board, which administers the PDMP, if necessary to determine a method to facilitate inclusion of the reports from DHS into the PDMP
* 3/20/19: Introduced by Senators Jacque and Wanggaard; cosponsored by Representatives Wichgers, Plumer, Horlacher, Murphy, Skowronski, Brandtjen, Ramthun, Thiesfeldt, and Zimmerman
* 3/20/19: Read first and referred to Committee on Health and Human Services
* 7/3/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/28/19: Wisconsin EMS Association >> FOR
* 6/28/19: Wisconsin Nurses Association >> FOR
25
AB-139Wichgers, Brandtjen, Horlacher, Murphy, Plumer, Ramthun, Skowronski, Thiesfeldt, and Zimmerman
Cosponsors: Jacque and Wanggaard
Naloxone Administration Reporting
* This bill requires the Department of Health Services (DHS) to include reports of naloxone or other opioid antagonist administration by ambulance service providers to the Wisconsin Ambulance Run Data System (WARDS, the data system that tracks ambulance run data)

Under current law:
> ambulance service providers require emergency responders and service practitioners under their supervision to keep a record of each instance of administration of naloxone or another opioid antagonist to an individual who is believed to be undergoing an opioid-related drug overdose to DHS, in the manner prescribed by DHS
> the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) monitors dispensed controlled substances and other drugs identified by the Controlled Substances Board as having a substantial potential for abuse

Under this bill:
> there will be better tracking and sharing of information amongst Wisconsin health entities on the administration of naloxone or other opioid antagonists by ambulance service providers
> the DHS will be required to include reports of naloxone or other opioid antagonist administration by ambulance service providers to WARDS
> DHS will also be required to submit the records received from the ambulance service providers of a naloxone or other opioid antagonist administration to the PDMP
> DHS will also be required to consult with the Controlled Substances Board, which administers the PDMP, if necessary to determine a method to facilitate inclusion of the reports from DHS into the PDMP
* 3/25/19: Introduced by Representatives Wichgers, Brandtjen, Horlacher, Murphy, Plumer, Ramthun, Skowronski, Thiesfeldt, and Zimmerman; cosponsored by Senators Jacque and Wanggaard
* 3/25/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Health
* 7/3/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 3/28/19: Wisconsin EMS Association >> FOR
* 6/28/19: Wisconsin Nurses Association >> FOR
26
SB-141Jacque
Cosponsors: Kurtz, Felzkowski, Murphy, Skowronski, Sortwell, Spiros, Thiesfeldt, Tusler, Wichgers, Zimmerman, and VanderMeer
Veterans Outreach and Recovery Program
* Creation of the Veterans Outreach and Recovery Program

Under this bill:
> the DVA is required to administer a program to provide outreach, mental health services, and support to certain individuals who are serving or who have served in the armed forces, who reside in Wisconsin, and who may have a mental health condition or substance use disorder
> $1,296,4000 is provided in funding for each year of the 2019-2021 fiscal biennium for this purpose
> the DVA will add 10FTE positions on July 1, 2019 to be funded from the appropriation for the purpose of hiring employees to administer the veterans outreach and recovery program
* 3/28/19: Introduced by Senator Jacque; cosponsored by Representatives Kurtz, Felzkowski, Murphy, Skowronski, Sortwell, Spiros, Thiesfeldt, Tusler, Wichgers, Zimmerman, and VanderMeer
* 3/28/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Transportation, Veterans, and Military Afffairs
* 4/8/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 5/21/19: National Association of Social Workers - Wisconsin Chapter >> FOR
27
AB-131Kurtz, Felzkowski, Murphy, Sortwell, Skowronski, Spiros, Thiesfeldt, Tusler, Wichgers, Zimmerman, and VanderMeer
Cosponsors: Jacque
Veterans Outreach and Recovery Program
* Creation of the Veterans Outreach and Recovery Program

Under this bill:
> the DVA is required to administer a program to provide outreach, mental health services, and support to certain individuals who are serving or who have served in the armed forces, who reside in Wisconsin, and who may have a mental health condition or substance use disorder
> $1,296,4000 is provided in funding for each year of the 2019-2021 fiscal biennium for this purpose
> the DVA will add 10FTE positions on July 1, 2019 to be funded from the appropriation for the purpose of hiring employees to administer the veterans outreach and recovery program
* 3/25/19: Introduced by Representatives Kurtz, Felzkowski, Murphy, Sortwell, Skowronski, Spiros, Thiesfeldt, Tusler, Wichgers, Zimmerman, and VanderMeer; cosponsored by Senator Jacque
* 3/25/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Veterans and Military Affairs
* 4/8/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 5/21/19: National Association of Social Workers - Wisconsin Chapter >> FOR
28
SB-161Wanggaard, Darling, Carpenter, Jacque, Kooyenga, and Smith
Cosponsors: Kerkman, Ott, Anderson, Kulp, Kurtz, Mursau, Ohnstad, Skowronski, Spreitzer, C. Taylor, Thiesfeldt, and Tusler
Release after OWI Arrest
* Removes option to release a person to a responsible adult

Under current law
> if a person is arrested for operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of an intoxicant or with a prohibited alcohol concentration, the person is taken into custody by a law enforcement officer
> the arrested person may not be released until 12 hours have elapsed from the time of arrest, or until a chemical test shows that the person has an alcohol concentration of 0.04 or less
> EXCEPT, that the preson may be released to a responsible adult at any time

Under this bill:
> the option of releasing the person to a responsible adult is eliminated
* 4/11/19: Introduced by Senators Wanggaard, Darling, Carpenter, Jacque, Kooyenga, and Smith; cosponsored by Representatives Kerkman, Ott, Anderson, Kulp, Kurtz, Mursau, Ohnstad, Skowronski, Spreitzer, C. Taylor, Thiesfeldt, and Tusler
* 4/11/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 5/6/19: Fiscal estimate recieved
* 5/9/19: Fiscal estimate recieved
* 6/6/19: Representative Fields added as a cosponsor
* 9/4/19: Public hearing held
*4/26/19: Badger State Sheriffs' Association >> UNDISCLOSED
* 4/26/19: Wisconsin Sheriffs and Deputy Sheriffs Association >> UNDISCLOSED
29
AB-172Kerkman, Ott, Anderson, Kulp, Kurtz, Mursau, Ohnstad, Skowronski, Spreitzer, C. Taylor, Thiesfeldt, and Tusler
Cosponsors: Wanggaard, Darling, Carpenter, Jacque, Kooyenga, and Smith
Release after OWI Arrest
* Removes option to release a person to a responsible adult

Under current law
> if a person is arrested for operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of an intoxicant or with a prohibited alcohol concentration, the person is taken into custody by a law enforcement officer
> the arrested person may not be released until 12 hours have elapsed from the time of arrest, or until a chemical test shows that the person has an alcohol concentration of 0.04 or less
> EXCEPT, that the preson may be released to a responsible adult at any time

Under this bill:
> the option of releasing the person to a responsible adult is eliminated
> an attorney, spouse, relative, or other responsible adult to whom a person is arrested where the offense involved the use of a vehicle, is released as set forth in sub. (1) is jointly and severally liable for any damages caused by the person released if the damages are caused after release and within 12 hours after the time of the person's release (a person tow hom the person who directly committed the crim was released under s. 345.24, if the crime was committed within 12 hours after the time of the release
* 4/18/19: Introduced by Representatives Kerkman, Ott, Anderson, Kulp, Kurtz, Mursau, Ohnstad, Skowronski, Spreitzer, C. Taylor, Thiesfeldt, and Tusler; cosponsored by Senators Wanggaard, Darling, Carpenter, Jacque, Kooyenga, and Smith
* 4/18/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety
* 5/3/19: Fiscal estimate recieved
* 6/6/19: Representative Fields added as a coauthor
* 6/13/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 10/29/19: Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 offered by Representative Kerkman
* 10/31/19: Public hearing held
* 5/6/19: Wisconsin Professional Police Association >> OTHER
*5/17/19: Badger State Sheriffs' Association >> UNDISCLOSED
* 5/17/19: Wisconsin Sheriffs and Deputy Sheriffs Association >> UNDISCLOSED
30
SB-189Wanggaard
Cosponsor: Spiros
Lifetime Revocation of License - OWI
* Bill makes technical changes to the statues providing for lifetime revocation of a person's operating privilege for certain offenses related to OWI

Please see bil text for detail on the proposed technical changes
* 4/30/19: Introduced by Senator Wanggaard; cosponsored by Representative Spiros
* 4/30/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 9/4/19: Public hearing held
* 9/25/19: Executive action taken
* 9/25/19: Report passage recommended by Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety (4-1)
* 9/25/19: Available for scheduling
* 5/6/19: City of Milwaukee >> FOR
* 5/13/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association Inc >> FOR
31
AB-222Spiros
Cosponsor: Wanggaard
Lifetime Revocation of License - OWI
* Bill makes technical changes to the statues providing for lifetime revocation of a person's operating privilege for certain offenses related to OWI

Please see bil text for detail on the proposed technical changes
* 5/21/19: Introduced by Representative Spiros; cosponsored by Senator Wanggaard
* 5/21/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary
* 10/24/19: Public hearing held
* 12/5/19: Executive action taken. Passage recommended (7-0)
* 5/22/19: City of Milwaukee >> FOR
* 5/28/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association Inc >> FOR
32
SB-198Jacque, Larson, Marklein, Taylor, Ringhand, and Johnson
Cosponsors: Thiesfeldt, Taylor, Spreitzer, Brostoff, Anderson, Vining, Sinicki, Quinn, Kulp, Rohrkaste, Ramthun, and Considine
OWI Record Expungement
* Creates conditions under which a person may petition to court to have a first offense OWI expunged from their record


Under this bill:

> a court may, upon petition by a person who has been convicted of a first offense OWI, expunge the record of the person's conviction
> a person may file a petition under this procedure only if:
>> the OWI offense did not involve an injury
>> and the alcohol concentration of the person at the time of offense was less than 0.15
> In addition, expungement under this process may be granted only if the person does one of the following for a minimum of of 6 months:
>> equips their motor vehicle with an ignition interlock device, operates only motor vehicles that are equipped with an ignition interlock device, and provides access to the data generated by the ignition interlock device
>> OR wears a device that continuously monitors the person's alcohol consumption and provides access to the data generated by the device
* 5/8/19: Introduced by Senators Jacque, Larson, Marklein, Taylor, Ringhand, and Johnson; cosponsored by Representatives Thiesfeldt, Taylor, Spreitzer, Brostoff, Anderson, Vining, Sinicki, Quinn, Kulp, Rohrkaste, Ramthun, and Considine
* 5/8/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 6/6/19: Representative Fields added as a cosponsor
* 6/10/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 8/22/19: Representative Sortwell added as a cosponsor
* 9/4/19: Public hearing held
* 5/14/19: Mothers Against Drunk Driving >> FOR
* 5/16/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association Inc >> FOR
33
AB-211Thiesfeldt, Taylor, Spreitzer, Brostoff, Anderson, Vining, Sinicki, Quinn, Kulp, Rohrkaste, Ramthun, and Considine
Cosponsors: Jacque, Larson, Marklein, Taylor, Ringhand, and Johnson
OWI Record Expungement
* Creates conditions under which a person may petition to court to have a first offense OWI expunged from their record


Under this bill:

> a court may, upon petition by a person who has been convicted of a first offense OWI, expunge the record of the person's conviction
> a person may file a petition under this procedure only if:
>> the OWI offense did not involve an injury
>> and the alcohol concentration of the person at the time of offense was less than 0.15
> In addition, expungement under this process may be granted only if the person does one of the following for a minimum of of 6 months:
>> equips their motor vehicle with an ignition interlock device, operates only motor vehicles that are equipped with an ignition interlock device, and provides access to the data generated by the ignition interlock device
>> OR wears a device that continuously monitors the person's alcohol consumption and provides access to the data generated by the device
* 5/15/19: Introduced by Representatives Thiesfeldt, Taylor, Spreitzer, Brostoff, Anderson, Vining, Sinicki, Quinn, Kulp, Rohrkaste, Ramthun, and Considine; cosponsored by Senators Jacque, Larson, Marklein, Taylor, Ringhand, and Johnson
* 5/15/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety
* 5/28/19: Representative Zimmerman added as a coauthor
* 5/30/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 6/6/19: Representative Fields added as a coauthor
* 8/22/19: Representative Sortwell added as a coauthor
* 8/22/19: Public hearing held
* 5/23/19: Mothers Against Drunk Driving >> FOR
* 5/28/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association Inc >> FOR
34
SB-203Kapenga, Kooyenga, Nass, Stroebel, and Wanggaard
Cosponsors: Knodle, Ballweg, Duchow, Kitchens, Kurtz, Mursau, Plumer, Rohrkaste, Sanfelippo, Schraa, Skowronski, Spiros, Steffen, Subeck, Tittl, and Zimmerman
Municipalities' Alcohol Beverage Operator's Licenses
* This bill allows a municipal governing body to delegate authority to issue operator's licenses (commonly referred to as "bartender's licenses") to a designated municipal official


Under current law:
> a municipal governing must issue an operator's license to a qualified applicant
> although a person is not required to hold an operator's license to provide alcohol beverages on retail licensed premises, a retail licensee may not be open for business unless the licensee, the designated agent of a corporate licensee, or a person who possesses an operator's license or manager's license is present and responsible for the acts of all persons providing alcohol beverages on the premises

Under this bill:
> a governing body of a municipality, by ordinance, is allowed to authorize or designate a municipal official to issue operator's licenses
*10/8/19: Received from senate* 5/8/19: Introduced by Senators Kapenga, Kooyenga, Nass, Stroebel, and Wanggaard; cosponsored by Representatives Knodle, Ballweg, Duchow, Kitchens, Kurtz, Mursau, Plumer, Rohrkaste, Sanfelippo, Schraa, Skowronski, Spiros, Steffen, Subeck, Tittl, and Zimmerman
* 5/8/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Public Benefits, Licensing, and State-Federal Relations
* 5/10/19: Representative Wichgers added as a cosponsor
* 6/24/19: Senator Bewley added as a coauthor
* 9/10/19: Public hearing held
* 9/26/19: Executive action taken
* 9/26/19: Report passage recommended by Committee on Public Benefits, Licensing and State-Federal Relations (5-0)
* 9/26/19: Available for scheduling
* 10/4/19: Placed on calendar 10-8-19 pursuant to Senate Rule 18(1)
* 10/8/19: Read a second time
* 10/8/19: Ordered to a third reading
* 10/8/19: Rules suspended
* 10/8/19: Read a third time and passed
* 10/8/19: Ordered immediately messaged
* 5/14/19: League of Wisconsin Municipalities >> FOR
* 5/16/19: Wisconsin Grocer's Association >> FOR
* 5/28/19: Wisconsin Restaurant Association >> FOR
* 5/28/19: Wisconsin Wine and Spirit Institute >> OTHER
* 5/29/19: Wisconsin Petroleum Marketers & Convenience Store Association >> FOR
* 6/7/19: Wisconsin Realtors Assocation >> FOR
* 7/10/19: Tavern League of Wisconsin, Inc. >> FOR
* 7/25/19: Wisconsin Municipal Clerks Association >> FOR
* 9/16/19: Wisconsin Hotel and Lodging Association >> FOR
35
AB-216Knodl, Ballweg, Duchow, Kitchens, Kurtz, Mursau, Plumer, Rohrkaste, Sanfelippo, Schraa, Skowronski, Spiros, Steffen, Subeck, Tittl, Zimmerman, and Wichgers
Cosponsors: Kapenga, Kooyenga, Nass, Stroebel, Wanggaard, and Smith
Municipalities' Alcohol Beverage Operator's Licenses
* This bill allows a municipal governing body to delegate authority to issue operator's licenses (commonly referred to as "bartender's licenses") to a designated municipal official


Under current law:
> a municipal governing must issue an operator's license to a qualified applicant
> although a person is not required to hold an operator's license to provide alcohol beverages on retail licensed premises, a retail licensee may not be open for business unless the licensee, the designated agent of a corporate licensee, or a person who possesses an operator's license or manager's license is present and responsible for the acts of all persons providing alcohol beverages on the premises

Under this bill:
> a governing body of a municipality, by ordinance, is allowed to authorize or designate a municipal official to issue operator's licenses
* 5/15/19: Introduced by Representatives Knodl, Ballweg, Duchow, Kitchens, Kurtz, Mursau, Plumer, Rohrkaste, Sanfelippo, Schraa, Skowronski, Spiros, Steffen, Subeck, Tittl, Zimmerman, and Wichgers; cosponsored by Senators Kapenga, Kooyenga, Nass, Stroebel, Wanggaard, and Smith
* 5/15/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on State Affairs
* 6/24/19: Senator Bewley added as a cosponsor
* 7/10/19: Public hearing held
* 9/25/19: Executive action taken
* 5/20/19 : Wisconsin Grocers Association >> FOR
* 5/23/19: League of Wisconsin Municipalities >> FOR
* 5/28/19: Wisconsin Restaurant Association >> FOR
* 5/28/19: Wisconsin Wine and Spirit Institute >> OTHER
* 5/29/19: Wisconsin Petroleum Marketers & Convenience Store Association >> FOR
* 6/7/19: Wisconsin Realtors Association >> FOR
* 7/9/19: Tavern League of Wisconsin, Inc. >> FOR
* 7/25/19: Wisconsin Municipal Clerks Association >> FOR
* 9/16/19: Wisconsin Hotel and Lodging Association >> FOR
36
AB-220Sargent, Ohnstad, Fields, Anderson, Bowen, Brostoff, Crowley, Emerson, Gruszynski, Hebl, Kolste, Pope. Sinicki, Spreitzer, Stubbs, Stuck, Taylor, and Zamarripa
Cosponsors: Johnson, Taylor, Larson, Smith, and Miller
Legalization of Marijuana
* This bill changes state law to permit both recreational and medical use of marijuana

Under current law:
> prohibits a person from:
>> manufacturing, distributing, or delivering marijuana;
>> possessing marijuana with the intent to manufacture, distribute, or deliver it;
>> posessing or attempting to possess marijuana;
>> using drug paraphernalia;
>> or possessing drug paraphernalia with the intent to produce, distribute, or use a controlled substance
> a person may not operate a vehicle with a detectable amount of a restricted controlled substance, which includes THC, in his/her blood, regardless of impairment.
> (fair employment law) no employer or other person may engage in any act of employment discrimination against any individual on the basis of the individual's use or nonuse of lawful products off the employer's premises during nonworking hours, subject to certain exceptions, one of which is if the use impairs the individual's ability to adequately undertake job-related responsibilities
> an individual may be disqualified from receiving unemployment insurance benefits if they are terminated because of misconduct or substantial fault
> Department of Workforce Development (DWD) must establish a program to test claimants who apply for unemployment benefits for the presence of controlled substances (as defined under federal law); if a claimant tests positive, the claimant may be denied unemployment benefits, subject to certain exceptions and limitations

Under this bill:
RECREATIONAL USE OF MARIJUANA
> state law is changed to permit a Wisconsin resident who is at least 21 years of age to possess no more than two ounces of marijuana and to permit a nonresident of Wisconsin who is at least 21 years of age to possess no more than 1/4 ounce of marijuana
> a person who possesses more than the maximum amount they are allowed to possess, but not more than 28 grams of marijuana, is subject to a civil forfeiture not to exceed $1,000 or imprisonment not to exceed 90 days or both
> a person who possesses more than 28 grams of marijuana is guilty of a Class B misdimeanor; if the person takes action to hide the amount of marijuana they have and the person has a security system in place to alert them to the presence of law enforcement, a method of intimidation, or a trap that could injure or kill a person approaching the area containing marijuana, the preson is guilty of a Class I felony
> prohibition on possessing or using drug paraphernalia that relates to marijuana consumption is eliminated
> a process is created by which a person may obtain a permit to produce, process, or sell marijuana for recreational use and pay an excise tax for the privilege of doing business in Wisconsin
> a person must obtain separate permits from the Department of Revenue (DOR) to produce, process, distribute, or sel marijuana
> marijuana producers and processors must also obtain additional permits from the Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection (DATCP)
> a permit applicant with 20+ employees may not receive a permit from DATCP or DOR unless the applicant certifies that they have entered into a labor peace agreement with a labor organization
> DATCP and DOR are required to use a competitive scoring system to determine which applicants are eligible to receive permits
> a person who does not have a permit from DOR to sell marijuana who sells, distributes, transfers, or possesses marijuana with the intent to sell or distribute it anyways is guilty of a Class I felony; if the person sells distributes, or transfers the marijuana to a person who is under the age of 21 (minor), and the person is at least three years older than the minor, the felony classification increases to a Class H felony
> a DOR permittee is prohibited from selling, distributing, or transferring marijuana to a minor and from allowing a minior to be on premises for which a permit is issued; if a permittee violates one of those prohibitions, the permittee may be subject to a civil forfeiture of not more than $500 and the permit may be suspended for up to 30 days
> a minor who: procures or attempts to procure marijuana from a permittee; falsely represents their age to receive marijuana from a permittee; knowingly possesses marijuana for recreational use; or knowingly enters any premises for which a permit has been issues without being accompanied by their parent, guardian, or spouse who is 21+ years of age, is subject to a forfeiture between $250-$500
> a person cultivating marijuana plants without a permit who possesses more than 6 marijuana plants that have reached the flowering stage but nore more than 12 at one time, is subject to a civil forfeiture not to exceed $1,000 or imprisonment not to exceed 90 days, or both; if the person possess more than 12 plants that have reached the flowering stage at one time, the person is guilty of a Class B misdimeanor; if the person takes action to hide the number of plants they have and the person has a security system in place to alert them to the presence of law enforcement, a method of intimidation, or a trap that could injure or kill a person approaching the area containing the plants, the person is guilty of a Class I felony

MEDICAL USE OF MARIJUANA
> state law is changed to permit a person to use marijuana for medical use to alleviate the symptoms or effects of a debilitating medical condition or treatment
> a person's primary caregiver also may acquire, possess, cultivate, or transport marijuana for a person suffering from a debilitating medical condition or treatment if it is not practicable for the person to acquire, possess, cultivate, or transport marijuana independently, or if the person is under the age of 18
> the Department of Health Services (DHS) is required to establish a registry for persons who use marijuana for medical use
> a person may apply for a registry identification card by submitting a signed application, a written certification by their physician that the person has or is undergoing a debilitating medical condition or treatment and that the potential benefits of use would likely outweigh the health risks, and a registration fee of not more than $150 to DHS
> DHS must verify the information and issue a registry identification card to the person
> registry identification cards are valid for four years and may be renewed
> DHS may not disclose that it has issued a registry identification card to a person, or information from an application for one, except to a law enforcement agency for the purpose of verifying that a person possesses a valid registry identification card
> DHS is also required to promulgate a rule listing other jurisdictions that allow the medical use of marijuana by a visiting person or allow a person to assist with a person's medical use of marijuana; the bill treats documents issued by these entities the same as registry identification cards issued by DHS
> DHS is required to license and regulate compassion centers to distribute or deliver marijuana or drug paraphernalia or possess or manufacture marijuana or drug paraphernalia with the intent to deliver or distribute to facilitate the medical use of marijuana
> compassion centers are prohibited from being located within 500 feet of a school, distributing more than 6 live marijuana plants and 3 ounces of usable marijuana (maximum medicinal amount) to a person, and possessing a quantity that exceeds the total maximum medicinal amount of marijuana of all of the persons it serves -- an amount determined by DHS
> an applicant for a license must pay an initial application fee of $250, and a compassion center must pay an annual fee of $5,000
> DHS is also required to register entities as THC-testing laboratories; these labs must test marijuana for contaminants; researching findings on the use of medical marijuana; and provide training on safe and efficient cultivation, harvesting, packaging, labeling, and distribution of marijuana, security and inventory accountability, and research on medical marijuana
> health insurance policies, known in the bill as disability insurance policies, and self-insured health plans of the state or of a county, city, town, village, or school district that provides coverage of prescription drugs and devices to provide coverage for the medical use of THC in accordance with requirements specified in the bill and any equipment or supplies necessary for the medical use of THC
> the coverage of the medical use of THC may be subject under the policy or plan only to the exclusions, limitations, and cost-sharing provisions that apply generally to the coverage of prescription drugs or devices under the policy or plan

GENERAL REGULATION OF MARIJUANA
> a person may not operate a vehicle with a THC concentration of 5.0ng/mL or more, instead of a detectable amount, in their blood; this bill does not change the penalty structure (penalities for violating this provision increase with the number of violations)
> marijuana is specifically defined as a lawful product for the purposes of the fair employment law, such that no person may engage in any act of employment discrimination against an individual because of the individual's use of marijuana off the employer's premises during nonworking hours, subject to those exceptions
> specific provisions are made to clarfy that marijuana use off the employer's premises during nonworking hours does not constitute misconduct or substantial fault unless termination for that use is permitted under one of the exceptions under the fair employment law
> THC is excluded from the required testing for unemployment benefits; an individual who tests positive for THC may not be denied unemployment benefits
> THC, including marijuana, is exempted from drug testing for certain public assistance programs
> unless federal law requires otherwise, a hospital, physician, organ procurement organization, or other person is prohibited from determining the ultimate recipient of an anotomical gift on the sole basis of a positive test for the use of marijuana by a potential recipient
> only state law regarding marijuana is changed; this bill does not affect federal law, which generally prohibits persons from manufacturing, delivering, or possessing marijuana and applies to both intrastate and interstate violations
> proposal may contain a health insurance mandate requiring social and financial impact report under s. 601.423 stats.
* 5/17/19: Introduced by Representatives Sargent, Ohnstad, Fields, Anderson, Bowen, Brostoff, Crowley, Emerson, Gruszynski, Hebl, Kolste, Pope. Sinicki, Spreitzer, Stubbs, Stuck, Taylor, and Zamarripa; cosponsored by Senators Johnson, Taylor, Larson, Smith, and Miller
* 5/17/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety
* 6/4/19: Commissioner of Insurance report received pursuant to s.601.423(2), Wisconsin Statutes
* 6/10/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 6/13/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 6/17/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 6/19/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 8/16/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 9/13/19: LRB correction
37
SB-377Johnson, Taylor, Larson, Smith, and Miller
Cosponsors: Sargent, Ohnstad, Fields, Anderson, Bowen, Brostoff, Crowley, Emerson, Gruszynski, Hebl, Kolste, Pope, Sinicki, Spreitzer, Stubbs, Stuck, Taylor, Zamarripa
Legalization of Marijuana
* This bill changes state law to permit both recreational and medical use of marijuana

Under current law:
> prohibits a person from:
>> manufacturing, distributing, or delivering marijuana;
>> possessing marijuana with the intent to manufacture, distribute, or deliver it;
>> posessing or attempting to possess marijuana;
>> using drug paraphernalia;
>> or possessing drug paraphernalia with the intent to produce, distribute, or use a controlled substance
> a person may not operate a vehicle with a detectable amount of a restricted controlled substance, which includes THC, in his/her blood, regardless of impairment.
> (fair employment law) no employer or other person may engage in any act of employment discrimination against any individual on the basis of the individual's use or nonuse of lawful products off the employer's premises during nonworking hours, subject to certain exceptions, one of which is if the use impairs the individual's ability to adequately undertake job-related responsibilities
> an individual may be disqualified from receiving unemployment insurance benefits if they are terminated because of misconduct or substantial fault
> Department of Workforce Development (DWD) must establish a program to test claimants who apply for unemployment benefits for the presence of controlled substances (as defined under federal law); if a claimant tests positive, the claimant may be denied unemployment benefits, subject to certain exceptions and limitations

Under this bill:
RECREATIONAL USE OF MARIJUANA
> state law is changed to permit a Wisconsin resident who is at least 21 years of age to possess no more than two ounces of marijuana and to permit a nonresident of Wisconsin who is at least 21 years of age to possess no more than 1/4 ounce of marijuana
> a person who possesses more than the maximum amount they are allowed to possess, but not more than 28 grams of marijuana, is subject to a civil forfeiture not to exceed $1,000 or imprisonment not to exceed 90 days or both
> a person who possesses more than 28 grams of marijuana is guilty of a Class B misdimeanor; if the person takes action to hide the amount of marijuana they have and the person has a security system in place to alert them to the presence of law enforcement, a method of intimidation, or a trap that could injure or kill a person approaching the area containing marijuana, the preson is guilty of a Class I felony
> prohibition on possessing or using drug paraphernalia that relates to marijuana consumption is eliminated
> a process is created by which a person may obtain a permit to produce, process, or sell marijuana for recreational use and pay an excise tax for the privilege of doing business in Wisconsin
> a person must obtain separate permits from the Department of Revenue (DOR) to produce, process, distribute, or sel marijuana
> marijuana producers and processors must also obtain additional permits from the Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection (DATCP)
> a permit applicant with 20+ employees may not receive a permit from DATCP or DOR unless the applicant certifies that they have entered into a labor peace agreement with a labor organization
> DATCP and DOR are required to use a competitive scoring system to determine which applicants are eligible to receive permits
> a person who does not have a permit from DOR to sell marijuana who sells, distributes, transfers, or possesses marijuana with the intent to sell or distribute it anyways is guilty of a Class I felony; if the person sells distributes, or transfers the marijuana to a person who is under the age of 21 (minor), and the person is at least three years older than the minor, the felony classification increases to a Class H felony
> a DOR permittee is prohibited from selling, distributing, or transferring marijuana to a minor and from allowing a minior to be on premises for which a permit is issued; if a permittee violates one of those prohibitions, the permittee may be subject to a civil forfeiture of not more than $500 and the permit may be suspended for up to 30 days
> a minor who: procures or attempts to procure marijuana from a permittee; falsely represents their age to receive marijuana from a permittee; knowingly possesses marijuana for recreational use; or knowingly enters any premises for which a permit has been issues without being accompanied by their parent, guardian, or spouse who is 21+ years of age, is subject to a forfeiture between $250-$500
> a person cultivating marijuana plants without a permit who possesses more than 6 marijuana plants that have reached the flowering stage but nore more than 12 at one time, is subject to a civil forfeiture not to exceed $1,000 or imprisonment not to exceed 90 days, or both; if the person possess more than 12 plants that have reached the flowering stage at one time, the person is guilty of a Class B misdimeanor; if the person takes action to hide the number of plants they have and the person has a security system in place to alert them to the presence of law enforcement, a method of intimidation, or a trap that could injure or kill a person approaching the area containing the plants, the person is guilty of a Class I felony

MEDICAL USE OF MARIJUANA
> state law is changed to permit a person to use marijuana for medical use to alleviate the symptoms or effects of a debilitating medical condition or treatment
> a person's primary caregiver also may acquire, possess, cultivate, or transport marijuana for a person suffering from a debilitating medical condition or treatment if it is not practicable for the person to acquire, possess, cultivate, or transport marijuana independently, or if the person is under the age of 18
> the Department of Health Services (DHS) is required to establish a registry for persons who use marijuana for medical use
> a person may apply for a registry identification card by submitting a signed application, a written certification by their physician that the person has or is undergoing a debilitating medical condition or treatment and that the potential benefits of use would likely outweigh the health risks, and a registration fee of not more than $150 to DHS
> DHS must verify the information and issue a registry identification card to the person
> registry identification cards are valid for four years and may be renewed
> DHS may not disclose that it has issued a registry identification card to a person, or information from an application for one, except to a law enforcement agency for the purpose of verifying that a person possesses a valid registry identification card
> DHS is also required to promulgate a rule listing other jurisdictions that allow the medical use of marijuana by a visiting person or allow a person to assist with a person's medical use of marijuana; the bill treats documents issued by these entities the same as registry identification cards issued by DHS
> DHS is required to license and regulate compassion centers to distribute or deliver marijuana or drug paraphernalia or possess or manufacture marijuana or drug paraphernalia with the intent to deliver or distribute to facilitate the medical use of marijuana
> compassion centers are prohibited from being located within 500 feet of a school, distributing more than 6 live marijuana plants and 3 ounces of usable marijuana (maximum medicinal amount) to a person, and possessing a quantity that exceeds the total maximum medicinal amount of marijuana of all of the persons it serves -- an amount determined by DHS
> an applicant for a license must pay an initial application fee of $250, and a compassion center must pay an annual fee of $5,000
> DHS is also required to register entities as THC-testing laboratories; these labs must test marijuana for contaminants; researching findings on the use of medical marijuana; and provide training on safe and efficient cultivation, harvesting, packaging, labeling, and distribution of marijuana, security and inventory accountability, and research on medical marijuana
> health insurance policies, known in the bill as disability insurance policies, and self-insured health plans of the state or of a county, city, town, village, or school district that provides coverage of prescription drugs and devices to provide coverage for the medical use of THC in accordance with requirements specified in the bill and any equipment or supplies necessary for the medical use of THC
> the coverage of the medical use of THC may be subject under the policy or plan only to the exclusions, limitations, and cost-sharing provisions that apply generally to the coverage of prescription drugs or devices under the policy or plan

GENERAL REGULATION OF MARIJUANA
> a person may not operate a vehicle with a THC concentration of 5.0ng/mL or more, instead of a detectable amount, in their blood; this bill does not change the penalty structure (penalities for violating this provision increase with the number of violations)
> marijuana is specifically defined as a lawful product for the purposes of the fair employment law, such that no person may engage in any act of employment discrimination against an individual because of the individual's use of marijuana off the employer's premises during nonworking hours, subject to those exceptions
> specific provisions are made to clarfy that marijuana use off the employer's premises during nonworking hours does not constitute misconduct or substantial fault unless termination for that use is permitted under one of the exceptions under the fair employment law
> THC is excluded from the required testing for unemployment benefits; an individual who tests positive for THC may not be denied unemployment benefits
> THC, including marijuana, is exempted from drug testing for certain public assistance programs
> unless federal law requires otherwise, a hospital, physician, organ procurement organization, or other person is prohibited from determining the ultimate recipient of an anotomical gift on the sole basis of a positive test for the use of marijuana by a potential recipient
> only state law regarding marijuana is changed; this bill does not affect federal law, which generally prohibits persons from manufacturing, delivering, or possessing marijuana and applies to both intrastate and interstate violations
> proposal may contain a health insurance mandate requiring social and financial impact report under s. 601.423 stats.
* 8/29/19: Introduced by Senators Johnson, Taylor, Larson, Smith, and Miller; cosponsored by Representatives Sargent, Ohnstad, Fields, Anderson, Bowen, Brostoff, Crowley, Emerson, Gruszynski, Hebl, Kolste, Pope, Sinicki, Spreitzer, Stubbs, Stuck, Taylor, Zamarripa
* 8/29/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 9/6/19: Commissioner of Insurance report received pursuant to s.601.423(3), Wisconsin Statutes
* 9/9/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 9/10/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 9/11/10: Fiscal estimate received
* 9/13/19: LRB correction
* 9/16/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 9/20/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 9/25/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 9/27/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 10/29/19: Fiscal estimate received
38
SB-237Bernier
Cosponsors: Sortwell, Felzkowski, Duchow, Edming, Magnafici, and Quinn
Medical Marijuana Registry Confidentiality
* This bill creates confidentiality requirements for persons who participate in a medical marijuana program that is legal under state or federal law


Under current law:
> when a person purchases a handgun, the firearms dealer may not transfer the handgun to the purchaser until the dealer requests the Department of Justice (DOJ) to conduct a firearms restrictions record search to determine if the purchaser is prohibited from possessing a firearm under state or federal law
> the DOJ is required to conduct the same search on a person who applies for a license to carry a concealed weapon

Under this bill:
> would prohibit DOJ, when conducting searches to determine if a person is prohibited from possessing a firearm, from considering if the person participates in a medical marijuana program that is legal under state or federal law
> the Department of Health Services would also be prohibitied from disclosing the registry status of a person who participates in a medical marijuana registry program that is legal under state or federal law to any federal agency
* 5/23/19: Introduced by Senator Bernier; cosponsored by Representatives Sortwell, Felzkowski, Duchow, Edming, Magnafici, and Quinn
* 5/23/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Public Benefits, Licensing, and State-Federal Relations
39
AB-236Sortwell, Felzkowski, Magnafici, Quinn, Duchow, and Edming
Cosponsor: Bernier
Medical Marijuana Registry Confidentiality
* This bill creates confidentiality requirements for persons who participate in a medical marijuana program that is legal under state or federal law


Under current law:
> when a person purchases a handgun, the firearms dealer may not transfer the handgun to the purchaser until the dealer requests the Department of Justice (DOJ) to conduct a firearms restrictions record search to determine if the purchaser is prohibited from possessing a firearm under state or federal law
> the DOJ is required to conduct the same search on a person who applies for a license to carry a concealed weapon

Under this bill:
> would prohibit DOJ, when conducting searches to determine if a person is prohibited from possessing a firearm, from considering if the person participates in a medical marijuana program that is legal under state or federal law
> the Department of Health Services would also be prohibitied from disclosing the registry status of a person who participates in a medical marijuana registry program that is legal under state or federal law to any federal agency
* 5/24/19: Introduced by Representatives Sortwell, Felzkowski, Magnafici, Quinn, Duchow, and Edming; cosponsored by Senator Bernier
* 5/24/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on State Affairs
40
SB-245Jacque, Risser, Carpenter, Smith, Bewley, Larson, and Ringhand
Cosponsors: Kolste, Mursau, Quinn, Oldenburg, Sinicki, Milroy, Goyke, Billings, Ohnstad, Considine, Crowley, Subeck, Hesselbein, Anderson, Zamarripa, Rodriguez, Skowronski, Pope, Stubbs, and Neubauer
Indoor Smoking Ban
* This bill revises the definition of "smoking" for purposes of the general prohibition under current law against smoking in indoor locations.

Under current law:
> "smoking" is defined as burning, holding, inhaling, or exhaling smoke from any of the following tobacco-containing items: a lighted cigar, cigarette, or pipe or any other lighted smoking equipment

Under this bill:
> "smoking" is redefined as inhaling, exhaling, burning, or carrying any lighted or heated cigar, cigarette, pipe, hookah, or any other lighted or heated tobacco or plant product that is intended for inhalation, including natural or synthetic marijuana, in any manner or form
> "smoking" is further specified to include inhaling or exhaling vapr from a "vapor product"
>> "vapor product" defined as: any noncombustible product that employs a heating element, power source, electronic circuit, or other electronic, chemical, or mechanical means that can be used to produce vapor from a solution or other substance
>> "vapor product" includes an electronic cigarette, electronic cigar, electronic cigarillo, electronic pipe, or similar product or device
>> a product satisfies the definition of "vapor product" regardless of wether the product contains nicotine
* 5/30/19: Introduced by Senators Jacque, Risser, Carpenter, Smith, Bewley, Larson, and Ringhand; cosponsored by Representatives Kolste, Mursau, Quinn, Oldenburg, Sinicki, Milroy, Goyke, Billings, Ohnstad, Considine, Crowley, Subeck, Hesselbein, Anderson, Zamarripa, Rodriguez, Skowronski, Pope, Stubbs, and Neubauer
* 5/30/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Government Operations, Technology and Consumer Protection
* 7/9/19: Representative Doyle added as a cosponsor
* 8/26/19: Senator L. Taylor added as a coauthor
* 10/10/19: Senator Schachtner added as a coauthor
* 6/4/19: Wisconsin Medical Society >> FOR
* 6/27/19: American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) >> FOR
* 6/27/19: American Heart Association >> FOR
* 6/27/19: American Lung Association, dba American Lung Association in Wisconsin >> FOR
41
SB-331Jacque and Bewley
Cosponsors: Spiros, Horlacher, James, Kulp, Myers, Ramthun, Stubbs, and Tusler
Intoxicated Operation of Recreational Vehicles
* This bill makes laws regulating the intoxicated operation of various recreational vehicles more consistent

Under current law:
> a person may not operate a snowmobile, an all-terrain vehicle (ATV), a utility terrain vehicle (UTV), an off-highway motorcycle (OHM), or a motorboat (collectively referred to as, "recreational vehicles") while under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance to a degree that he or she cannot operate the vehicle or boat safely
> a personal watercraft is included in the definition of "motorboat"
> the operation of an ATV, UTV, OHM, a recreational motorboat, or a snowmobile is prohibited by a person who has an alcohol concentration of 0.08 or more
> motorboats being operated on a commercial bases, the maximum alcohol concentration is 0.04
> these laws are respectively referred to as the intoxicated operation of an ATV or UTV law, the intoxicated operation of an OHM law, the intoxicated boating law, and the intoxicated snowmobiling law
> a person who refuses to submit to a legal request for a breath, blood, or urine sample pursuant to an arrest for operating a snowmobile, ATV, UTV, OHM, or recreational motorboat while under the influence is in violation of what is known as the refusal law
>> for example, if a person is before the court for violating the intoxicated snowmobiling law or the snowmobile refusal law, the court may count only previous conviction of the intoxicated snowmobiling law and the snowmobile refusal law as prior convictions; previous convictions of the intoxicated operation of an ATV or UTV law, or of the intoxicated boating law or of the applicable refusal laws may not be counted

Under this bill:
> a court must count previous convictions of any of these intoxicated operation or refusal laws that occurred within the previous five years when imposing a pentalty for a violation
> the provisions of the intoxicated operation of an ATV or UTV, the intoxicated operation of an OHM, the intoxicated boating, and the intoxicated snowmobiling laws are made more consistent
> higher pentalties are adopted for various violations where the penalties for variations of the previously separate laws conflict
> increased penalties are imposed for operation of recreational vehicles with a passenger under 16 years of age
> the provisions that imposed increased penalties for operating an ATV or UTV with an alcohol concentration that is 0.17 or more is repealed (as these increased penalties are not imposed for violations of the intoxicated boating or snowmobiling laws)
> the impositions of fines and mandatory terms of confinement in the county jail are eliminated for a person who is found guilty of a violation of a refusal law who has, within the previous five years, violated an intoxicated operation of a recreational vehicle law one or more times; the penalty for violating a refusal law is a forfeiture of at least $400 but not more than $550, regardless of the number of prior violations
> when counting the number of conviction within the previous five years, the previous convictions for intoxicated operation of that same type of recreational vehicle or the related refusal law that occurred before the effective date of this bill are counted, but previous convictions for the other three types of recreational vehicles that occurred before the effective date of this bill are not counted
> a court is required to enter an order to suspend the person's privilege to operate a snowmobile, ATV, UTV, OHM, and a motorboat for a period of not less than 12 months and not more than 16 months if the court imposes a penalty for a violation of the intoxicated operation of a recreational vehicle or the related refusal law
> the court is allowed, as part of the order, to authorize the person to operate an ATV, UTV, OHM, or snowmobile exclusively on land under the management and control of the person's immediate family, or to operate a recreational motorboat, if the court finds that such operation is essential for the purpose of engaging in an occupation or trade; a forfeiture and additional six-month period of operating privilege suspension is provided for violating the order of suspension
> if a person is found guilty of a violation of the intoxicated operation of a recreational vehicle law or the related refusal law ahd has, within the previous five years, violated one of these laws, the court is required revoke to person's privilege to operate a motor vehicle for 6-12 months; the person may be eligible for an occupational driver's license; person will be required to pay a $140 reinstatement fee
> the option to reduce the sentences of a person who is convicted of a violation of an intoxicated operation of a recreational vehicle law or the related refusal law if the violator successfully completes a period of probation that includes alcohol and other drug treatment is allowed
* 7/31/2019: Introduced by Senators Jacque and Bewley; Cosponsored by Representatives Spiros, Horlacher, James, Kulp, Myers, Ramthun, Stubbs, and Tusler
* 7/31/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 8/19/19: Department of Transportation Revocation report received pursuant to s.13.0965, Wisconsin Statutes
* 8/27/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 8/29/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 9/4/19: Public hearing held
* 9/24/19: Representative Born added as a cosponsor
* 9/25/19: Executive action taken
* 9/25/19: Report passage recommended by Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety (5-0)
* 9/25/19: Available for scheduling
* 8/30/19: Badger State Sheriffs' Assocation >> FOR
* 8/30/19: Wisconsin Sheriffs and Deputy Sheriffs Association >> FOR
42
AB-356Spiros, Horlacher, James, Kulp, Myers, Ramthun, Stubbs, Tusler
Cosponsors: Jacque and Bewley
Intoxicated Operation of Recreational Vehicles
* This bill makes laws regulating the intoxicated operation of various recreational vehicles more consistent

Under current law:
> a person may not operate a snowmobile, an all-terrain vehicle (ATV), a utility terrain vehicle (UTV), an off-highway motorcycle (OHM), or a motorboat (collectively referred to as, "recreational vehicles") while under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance to a degree that he or she cannot operate the vehicle or boat safely
> a personal watercraft is included in the definition of "motorboat"
> the operation of an ATV, UTV, OHM, a recreational motorboat, or a snowmobile is prohibited by a person who has an alcohol concentration of 0.08 or more
> motorboats being operated on a commercial bases, the maximum alcohol concentration is 0.04
> these laws are respectively referred to as the intoxicated operation of an ATV or UTV law, the intoxicated operation of an OHM law, the intoxicated boating law, and the intoxicated snowmobiling law
> a person who refuses to submit to a legal request for a breath, blood, or urine sample pursuant to an arrest for operating a snowmobile, ATV, UTV, OHM, or recreational motorboat while under the influence is in violation of what is known as the refusal law
>> for example, if a person is before the court for violating the intoxicated snowmobiling law or the snowmobile refusal law, the court may count only previous conviction of the intoxicated snowmobiling law and the snowmobile refusal law as prior convictions; previous convictions of the intoxicated operation of an ATV or UTV law, or of the intoxicated boating law or of the applicable refusal laws may not be counted

Under this bill:
> a court must count previous convictions of any of these intoxicated operation or refusal laws that occurred within the previous five years when imposing a pentalty for a violation
> the provisions of the intoxicated operation of an ATV or UTV, the intoxicated operation of an OHM, the intoxicated boating, and the intoxicated snowmobiling laws are made more consistent
> higher pentalties are adopted for various violations where the penalties for variations of the previously separate laws conflict
> increased penalties are imposed for operation of recreational vehicles with a passenger under 16 years of age
> the provisions that imposed increased penalties for operating an ATV or UTV with an alcohol concentration that is 0.17 or more is repealed (as these increased penalties are not imposed for violations of the intoxicated boating or snowmobiling laws)
> the impositions of fines and mandatory terms of confinement in the county jail are eliminated for a person who is found guilty of a violation of a refusal law who has, within the previous five years, violated an intoxicated operation of a recreational vehicle law one or more times; the penalty for violating a refusal law is a forfeiture of at least $400 but not more than $550, regardless of the number of prior violations
> when counting the number of conviction within the previous five years, the previous convictions for intoxicated operation of that same type of recreational vehicle or the related refusal law that occurred before the effective date of this bill are counted, but previous convictions for the other three types of recreational vehicles that occurred before the effective date of this bill are not counted
> a court is required to enter an order to suspend the person's privilege to operate a snowmobile, ATV, UTV, OHM, and a motorboat for a period of not less than 12 months and not more than 16 months if the court imposes a penalty for a violation of the intoxicated operation of a recreational vehicle or the related refusal law
> the court is allowed, as part of the order, to authorize the person to operate an ATV, UTV, OHM, or snowmobile exclusively on land under the management and control of the person's immediate family, or to operate a recreational motorboat, if the court finds that such operation is essential for the purpose of engaging in an occupation or trade; a forfeiture and additional six-month period of operating privilege suspension is provided for violating the order of suspension
> if a person is found guilty of a violation of the intoxicated operation of a recreational vehicle law or the related refusal law ahd has, within the previous five years, violated one of these laws, the court is required revoke to person's privilege to operate a motor vehicle for 6-12 months; the person may be eligible for an occupational driver's license; person will be required to pay a $140 reinstatement fee
> the option to reduce the sentences of a person who is convicted of a violation of an intoxicated operation of a recreational vehicle law or the related refusal law if the violator successfully completes a period of probation that includes alcohol and other drug treatment is allowed
* 8/12/19: Introduced by Representatives Spiros, Horlacher, James, Kulp, Myers, Ramthun, Stubbs, Tusler; cosponsored by Senators Jacque and Bewley
* 8/12/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary
* 8/19/19: Department of Transportation Revocation report received pursuant to s.13.0965, Wisconsin Statutes
* 8/21/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 8/29/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 9/24/19: Representative Born added as a coauthor
* 10/24/19: Public hearing held
* 8/30/19: Badger State Sheriffs' Assocation >> FOR
* 8/30/19: Wisconsin Sheriffs and Deputy Sheriffs Association >> FOR
43
AB-362Tauchen, Duchow, Doyle, Jagler, Sanfelippo, SkowronskiRemote Alcohol Orders
* This bill allows certain alcohol beverage retailers to make online or telephone sales of alcohol beverages to be picked up by the customer at parking spaces that are part of the retail licensed premises and prohibits municipalities from imposing by ordinance additional restrictions on these sales

Under current law:
> with limited exceptions, no person may sell alcohol beverages to a consumer unless the seller possesses a license or permit authorizing the sale
> Class "A" and "Class A" licenses authorize the retail sale of, respectively, fermented malt beverages (beer) and intoxicating liquor (including wine and distilled spirits) in original packages for consumption off the licensed premises
> Class "B" licenses authorize the retail sale of beer for consumption on or off the premises; except when issued to a winery, a "Class B" license authorizes the retail sale of intoxicating liquor for consumption on the licensed premises and, subject to certain restrictions, the retail sale of intoxicating liquor in original pachages for consumption off the license premises
> each of these retail licenses is issued by a municipality
> a retail license authorizes only face-to-face sales of alcohol beverages to consumers on the licensed premises; this sale is governed by certain requirements, including that the purchaser be of legal drinking age and that the sale be made only during certain hours; the licensed premises on which the sale occurs must be particularly described in the retail license issued by the municipality, and each applicant for a retail license must identify in the application the premises where alcohol beverages will be sold

Under this bill:
> if a Class "A" or "Class A" licensee or a restaurant holding a Class "B" or "Class B" license receives a remote order for alochol beverages that the consumer will pick up at a parking space that is part of the retailer's licensed premises, the sale of alcohol beverages occurs at the time the consumer takes possession of the alcohol beverages at the parking space, regardless of when the consumer makes payment
> "remote order" is defined as an order for the sale of alcohol beverages that is placed by telephone or internet by a consumer who asserts at the time of placing the order that he or she is at least 21 years of age
> a restaurant holding a Class "B" or "Class B" license may sell alcohol beverages by remote order only for consumption off the licensed premises
> it is specified that licensed premises identified in the retail license may include parking spaces associated with a structed described as licensed premises, even if the parking spaces are not contiguous with the remainder of the licensed premises
> municipalities are prohibited from adopting ordinances that impose additional restrictions on alcohol beverage sales made by these retailers pursuant to remote orders
* 8/12/19: Introduced by Representatives Tauchen, Duchow, Doyle, Jagler, Sanfelippo, Skowronski
* 8/12/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on State Affairs
* 8/14/19: MillerCoors LLC >> OTHER
* 8/15/19: Tavern League of Wisconsin >> AGAINST
* 8/21/19: Wisconsin Association of Local Health Departments and Boards >> AGAINST
* 8/21/19: Wisconsin Public Health Association >> AGAINST
* 8/22/19: Wisconsin Restaurant Associaiton >> FOR
44
AB-363Tauchen, Duchow, Jagler, and KurtzAlcohol Delivery
* This bill allows certain alcohol beverage retailers to make online or telephone sales of alcohol beverages and deliver the alcohol beverages to the customer or to have the alcohol beverages delivered to the customer by an independent third-party delivery service

Under current law:
> with limited exceptions, no person may sell alcohol beverages to a consumer unless the seller possesses a license or permit authorizing the sale
> Class "A" and "Class A" licenses authorize the retail sale of, respectively, beer and intoxicating liquor (which includes wine and distilled spirits) in original packages for consumption off the licensed premises
> Class "B" license authorizes the retail sale of fermented malt beverages (beer) for consumption on or off the premises; except when issued by a winery, a "Class B" license authorizes the retail sale of intoxicating liquor for consumption on the licensed premises and, subject to certain restrictions, the retail sale of intoxicating liquor in original packages for consumption off the licensed premises
> each of these retail licenses is issued by a municipality
> a retail license authorizes only face-to-face sales of alcohol beverages to consumers at the licensed premises; after the sale is made on the licensed premises, if the alcohol beverages are sold for off-premise consumption, the retailer may deliver the alcohol beverages to a location designated by the consumer; the sale to the consumer on the licensed premises is governed by certain requirements, including that the purchaser be of legal drinking age, that the sale be made only during certain hours, and that the licensed premises be supervised by a person holding an operator's (bartender's) license

Under this bill:
> an alcohol beverages retailer can process and fill an online or telephone order for the sale and delivery of both food and alcohol beverages or alcohol beverages alone (remote order) if all of the following apply:
1. the retailer holds a Class "A" or "Class A" license, or holds a Class "B" or "Class B" license issued for a grocery store or restaurant;
2. the products ordered are delivered to a customer by the retailer or by an independent delivery service that derives less than half its revenues from delivering alcohol beverages;
3. full payment for the order is made at the time the order is placed, although a delivery tip is permitted;
4. at the time the order is placed, the customer asserts that they are at least 21 years of age and not intoxicated;
5. at the time of delivery and prior to transferring possession of the alochol beverages to the customer, the delivery service examines the customer's identification, verifies visually and by using electronic scanning technology that the customer is at least 21 years of age, and creates a record of this age verification
> age verification records must be retained by the retailer for one year
> an individual may not deliver alcohol beverages to a customer unless the individual is at least 21 years of age and has successfully completed a responsible beverage server training course or comparable course
> alcohol beverages may not be delivered to a person who is less than 21 years of age or visibly intoxicated
> if alcohol beverages are delivered by a delivery service to an underage person, the delivery service is liable for the violation, and the retailer is not liable is the customer asserted when placing the order that he or she is at least age 21
* 8/12/19: Introduced by Representatives Tauchen, Duchow, Jagler, and Kurtz
* 8/12/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on State Affairs
* 8/14/19: Representative Jagler withdrawn as a coauthor
* 8/14/19: MillerCoors LLC >> OTHER
* 8/15/19: Tavern League of Wisconsin >> AGAINST
* 8/21/19: Wisconsin Association of Local Health Departments and Boards >> AGAINST
* 8/21/19: Wisconsin Public Health Association >> AGAINST
* 8/22/19: Wisconsin Restaurant Associaiton >> FOR
* 9/16/19: City of Milwaukee >> FOR
45
SB-345Darling, Jacque, and Nass
Cosponsors: Ott, Skowronski, Wichgers, and Rohrkaste
OWI Time Limits
* This bill extends time limit for commencing a prosecution of a first, second, or third offense operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of an intoxicant or with a prohibited alcohol concentration (OWI) or an action for a violation of an ordinance prohibiting OWI

Under current law:
> with exceptions, a prosecution for a misdemeanor must be commenced within three years of the commission of the misdemeanor
> actions for ordinance violations must be brought within two years after the cause of action accrues or be barred

Under this bill:
> a prosecution for a misdemeanor OWI (a second or third OWI) must be commenced within six years of the commission of the misdemeanor
> the time limit for actions relating to the violation of an ordinance prohibiting OWI is extended to three years
* 8/14/19: Introduced by Senators Darling, Jacque, and Nass; cosponsored by Representatives Ott, Skowronski, Wichgers, and Rohrkaste
* 8/14/19: Read first time a referred to Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 9/3/19: Senator Tusler added as a cosponsor
* 9/4/19: Public hearing held
* 9/25/19: Executive action taken
* 9/25/19: Report passage as recommended by Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety (5-0)
* 9/25/19: Available for scheduling
* 8/19/19: City of Milwaukee >> FOR
* 9/8/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association >> FOR
46
AB-379Ott, Skowronski, Wichgers, and Rohrkaste
Cosponsors: Darling, Jacque, and Nass
OWI Time Limits
* This bill extends time limit for commencing a prosecution of a first, second, or third offense operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of an intoxicant or with a prohibited alcohol concentration (OWI) or an action for a violation of an ordinance prohibiting OWI

Under current law:
> with exceptions, a prosecution for a misdemeanor must be commenced within three years of the commission of the misdemeanor
> actions for ordinance violations must be brought within two years after the cause of action accrues or be barred

Under this bill:
> a prosecution for a misdemeanor OWI (a second or third OWI) must be commenced within six years of the commission of the misdemeanor
> the time limit for actions relating to the violation of an ordinance prohibiting OWI is extended to three years
* 8/28/19: Introduced by Ott, Skowronski, Wichgers, and Rohrkaste; cosponsored by Senators Darling, Jacque, and Nass
* 8/28/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety
* 9/3/19: Representative Tusler added as a coauthor
* 10/17/19: Public hearing held
* 10/31/19: Executive action taken
* 8/30/19: City of Milwaukee >> FOR
* 9/8/19: Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association >> FOR
47
SB-353Bewley and Kooyenga
Cosponsors: Meyers, Anderson, Milroy, Ohnstad, Spreitzer, and Taylor
Liquor Quotas
* This bill allows a municipality that has reached its liquor license quota to issue one additional license if certain conditions exist


Under current law:
> a person is prohibited from selling alcohol beverages at retail unless the seller possesses a license ot permit authorizing the sale
> a "Class B" license authorizes the retail sale of intoxicating liquor (including wine and distilled spirits) for consumption on the retail premises and, subject to restrictions, the retail sale of intoxicating liquor in original packages for consumption off the retail premises
> a quota is imposed on the number of "Class B" licenses that a municipality may issue; this quota is generally determined by a formula based on the number of licenses previously issued by the municipality and the municipality's population

Under this bill:
> the quota formula is modified to provide a municipality with one additional "Class B" license if the municipality has already reached its quota and if no "Class B" licensed establishment in the municipality satisfies current accessibility standards for public accommodations under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
> the additional "Class B" license may be issued only for an establishment that satisfies ADA public accommodation accessibility standards for new construction
* 8/14/19: Introduced by Senators Bewley and Kooyenga; cosponsored by Representatives Meyers, Anderson, Milroy, Ohnstad, Spreitzer, and Taylor
* 8/14/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Public Benefits, Licensing and State-Federal Relations
* 9/13/19: Wisconsin Realtors Association >> FOR
48
AB-385Meyers, Milroy, Ohnstad, Spreitzer, Anderson, and Taylor
Cosponsors: Bewley and Kooyenga
Liquor Quotas
* This bill allows a municipality that has reached its liquor license quota to issue one additional license if certain conditions exist


Under current law:
> a person is prohibited from selling alcohol beverages at retail unless the seller possesses a license ot permit authorizing the sale
> a "Class B" license authorizes the retail sale of intoxicating liquor (including wine and distilled spirits) for consumption on the retail premises and, subject to restrictions, the retail sale of intoxicating liquor in original packages for consumption off the retail premises
> a quota is imposed on the number of "Class B" licenses that a municipality may issue; this quota is generally determined by a formula based on the number of licenses previously issued by the municipality and the municipality's population

Under this bill:
> the quota formula is modified to provide a municipality with one additional "Class B" license if the municipality has already reached its quota and if no "Class B" licensed establishment in the municipality satisfies current accessibility standards for public accommodations under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
> the additional "Class B" license may be issued only for an establishment that satisfies ADA public accommodation accessibility standards for new construction
* 8/28/19: Introduced by Representatives Meyers, Milroy, Ohnstad, Spreitzer, Anderson, and Taylor; cosponsored by Senators Bewley and Kooyenga
* 8/28/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on State Affairs
* 8/29/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 9/13/19: Wisconsin Realtors Association >> FOR
49
SB-364Marklein, Bewley, Darling, Olsen, Shilling, Johnson, Larson, Risser, Schachtner, Taylor, Wanggaard, Wirch, and Cowles
Cosponsors: Spiros, Crowley, Dittrich, Myers, Oldenburg, Rodriguez, Rohrkaste, Sargent, Vruwink, Bowen, Considine, Doyle, Emerson, Goyke, Haywood, James, Kolste, Meyers, Milroy, Mursau, Ohnstad, Pope, Sinicki, Spreitzer, Steffen, Stubbs, Subeck, Taylor, Wittke, Zamarripa, and Fields
Raising Tobacco Age
* This bill changes the age for purchasing cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products from 18 to 21, and imposes a minimum age for purchasing vapor products


Under current law:
> nicotine products are products that contain nicotine and that are not tobacco products, cigarettes, or products that have been approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration for sale as a smoking cessation product
> tobacco products include products such as cigars, chewing tobacco, and smoking tobacco
> vapor products are noncumbustible products that produce a vapor or aerosol for inhalation from the application of a heating element, regardless of whether the liquid or other substance contains nicotine
> no person under the age of 18 may purchase, attempt to purchase, possess, or falsely represent their age for the purpose of receiving any cigarette, nicotine product, or tabacco product with certain limited exceptions
> any person is prohibited from purchasing cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products on behalf of a person who is under the age of 18 and subjects that purchaser to a penalty
> a person is prohibited from delivering a package of cigarettes unless the person making the delivery verifies that the person receiving the package is at least 18 years of age
> retailers, manufacturers, distributors, jobbers, subjobbers, or independent contractors or an employee or agent of any of these persons are probhibited from selling or providing cigarettes or tobacco or nicotine products to an individual who is udner the age of 18 and from providing cigarettes or tobacco or nicotine products to any person for free unless the cigarettes or products are provided in a place where persons under 18 years of age are generally not permitted to enter
> retailers and vending machine operators are prohibited from selling cigarettes or tobacco or nicotine products from a vending machine unless the retailer or vending machine operator ensures that no person under 18 years of age is present on or permitted to enter the premises where the machine is located

Under this bill:

> the age is changed from 18 to 21 for all of the provisions under current law
> similarly, the purchase of vapor products by or on behalf of a person under age 21 is prohibited
> similarly, the sale or provision of vapor products to a person under the age of 21 is prohibited
*8/22/19: Introduced by Senators Marklein, Bewley, Darling, Olsen, Shilling, Johnson, Larson, Risser, Schachtner, Taylor, Wanggaard, Wirch, and Cowles; cosponsored by Representatives Spiros, Crowley, Dittrich, Myers, Oldenburg, Rodriguez, Rohrkaste, Sargent, Vruwink, Bowen, Considine, Doyle, Emerson, Goyke, Haywood, James, Kolste, Meyers, Milroy, Mursau, Ohnstad, Pope, Sinicki, Spreitzer, Steffen, Stubbs, Subeck, Taylor, Wittke, Zamarripa, and Fields
* 8/22/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Health and Human Services
* 8/30/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 9/9/19: Representative Skowronski added as a cosponsor
* 10/10/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 8/23/19: American Heart Association >> FOR
* 8/23/19: Children's Hospital of Wisconsin >> FOR
* 8/23/19: DCI Group AZ L.L.C. >> FOR
* 8/23/19: Marshfield Clinic Health System >> FOR
* 8/23/19: Wisconsin Association of Local Health Departments and Boards >> FOR
* 8/23/19: Wisconsin Primary Health Care Association (WPHCA) >> FOR
* 8/23/19: Wisconsin Public Health Association >> FOR
* 8/26/19: Wisconsin Retired Educators Association >> FOR
* 8/26/19: Wisconsin Counsil for Administrators of Special Services >> FOR
* 8/26/19: Wisconsin Association of School Business Officials >> FOR
* 8/26/19: Wisconsin Association of School District Administrators >> FOR
* 8/26/19: Wisconsin Association of School Personnel Administrators >> FOR
* 8/26/19: Association of Wisconsin School Administrators >> FOR
* 8/27/19: Wisconsin Chifs of Police Association Inc >> FOR
* 8/27/19: American Lung Association, dba American Lung Association of Wisconsin >> UNDISCLOSED
* 8/29/19: Altria Client Services LLC >> FOR
* 9/2/19: Wisconsin Grocers Association >> FOR
* 9/5/19: JUUL Labs, Inc. >> FOR
* 9/5/19: SSM Health >> FOR
* 9/9/19: Walgreen Co >> FOR
* 9/10/19: Wisconsin Association of School Boards Inc >> FOR
* 9/10/19: Wisconsin Petroleum Marketers & Convenience Store Association >> OTHER
* 9/12/19: SI Group Client Services >> AGAINST
* 9/16/19: American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) >> AGAINST: We support raising the sales age to 21 & applaud the efforts of the authors but do not support his bill in current form. Critical elements & updates are missing - the devil is in the details on this - we owe it to our kids to get the details right. [memo attached]

50
AB-422Spiros, Crowley, Dittrich, Lyers, Oldenburg, Rodriguez, Rohrkaste, Sargent, Vruwink, Bowen, Considine, Doyle, Emerson, Goyke, Haywood, James, Kolste, Meyers, Milrow, Mursau, Ohnstad, Pope, Sinicki, Spreitzer, Steffen, Stubbs, Subeck, Taylor, Wittke, Zamarripa, and Fields
Cosponsors: Marklein, Bewley, Darling, Olsen, Shilling, Johnson, Larson, Risser, Schachtner, Taylor, Wanggaard, Wirch, and Cowles
Raising Tobacco Age
* This bill changes the age for purchasing cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products from 18 to 21, and imposes a minimum age for purchasing vapor products


Under current law:
> nicotine products are products that contain nicotine and that are not tobacco products, cigarettes, or products that have been approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration for sale as a smoking cessation product
> tobacco products include products such as cigars, chewing tobacco, and smoking tobacco
> vapor products are noncumbustible products that produce a vapor or aerosol for inhalation from the application of a heating element, regardless of whether the liquid or other substance contains nicotine
> no person under the age of 18 may purchase, attempt to purchase, possess, or falsely represent their age for the purpose of receiving any cigarette, nicotine product, or tabacco product with certain limited exceptions
> any person is prohibited from purchasing cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products on behalf of a person who is under the age of 18 and subjects that purchaser to a penalty
> a person is prohibited from delivering a package of cigarettes unless the person making the delivery verifies that the person receiving the package is at least 18 years of age
> retailers, manufacturers, distributors, jobbers, subjobbers, or independent contractors or an employee or agent of any of these persons are probhibited from selling or providing cigarettes or tobacco or nicotine products to an individual who is udner the age of 18 and from providing cigarettes or tobacco or nicotine products to any person for free unless the cigarettes or products are provided in a place where persons under 18 years of age are generally not permitted to enter
> retailers and vending machine operators are prohibited from selling cigarettes or tobacco or nicotine products from a vending machine unless the retailer or vending machine operator ensures that no person under 18 years of age is present on or permitted to enter the premises where the machine is located

Under this bill:

> the age is changed from 18 to 21 for all of the provisions under current law
> similarly, the purchase of vapor products by or on behalf of a person under age 21 is prohibited
> similarly, the sale or provision of vapor products to a person under the age of 21 is prohibited
* 9/12/19: Introduced by Representatives Spiros, Crowley, Dittrich, Lyers, Oldenburg, Rodriguez, Rohrkaste, Sargent, Vruwink, Bowen, Considine, Doyle, Emerson, Goyke, Haywood, James, Kolste, Meyers, Milrow, Mursau, Ohnstad, Pope, Sinicki, Spreitzer, Steffen, Stubbs, Subeck, Taylor, Wittke, Zamarripa, and Fields; cosponsored by Senators Marklein, Bewley, Darling, Olsen, Shilling, Johnson, Larson, Risser, Schachtner, Taylor, Wanggaard, Wirch, and Cowles
* 9/12/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Substance Abuse and Prevention
* 9/25/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 10/9/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 10/11/19: Fiscal estimate recieved
* 10/22/19: Representative Emerson withdrawn as coauthor
* 10/23/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 11/8/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 11/12/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 9/13/19: Walgreen Co >> FOR
* 9/16/19: DCI Group AZ L.L.C. >> FOR
* 9/16/19: American Lung Association, dba American Lung Association in Wisconsin >> UNDISCLOSED
* 9/16/19: American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) >> AGAINST: We support raising the sales age to 21 & applaud the efforts of the authors but do not support his bill in current form. Critical elements & updates are missing - the devil is in the details on this - we owe it to our kids to get the details right. [memo attached]
51
AB-434Vorpagel and Katsma
Cosponsor: LeMahieu
Retail Alcohol Beverage Permits for Motor Vehicle Racetrack Grounds
* This bill authorizes the Department of Revenue to issue retail alcohol beverage permits for motor vehicle racetrack grounds; this bill also authorizes caterers to make retail sales of alcohol beverages on racetrack grounds; this bill further establishes hours during which brewers may not make retail sales of alcohol beverages


Under current law:
> with limited exceptions, no person may sell alcohol beverages to a consumer unless the seller possesses a license or permit authorizing the sale
> municipalities may issue retail Class "B" licenses authorizing the sale of fermented malt beverages (beer), and retail "Class B" licenses authorizing the sale of intoxicating liquor (which includes wine and distilled spirits) to consumers; under certain circumstances, DOR may issue retail Class "B" and "Class B" permits authorizing the retail sale of beer and intoxicating liquor to consumers

Under this bill:
> DOR is authorized to issue retail Class "B" and "Class B" permits for racetrack grounds
>> "racetrack grounds" are defined as: property consisting of at least 300 acres containing a motor vehicle racetrack at least four miles in length capable of hosting professional racing events, and includes any building or other structure on this property associated with the racetrack or with services provided in connection with events held at the racetrack
> DOR may issue Class "B" and "Class B" permits, for locations within racetrack grounds, to the owner or operator of the racetrack grounds or to any person designated by the owner or operator of the racetrack gorunds to operate premises located within the racetrack grounds
> Class "B" and "Class B" permits issued by DOR for racetrack grounds authorize the retail sale of beer and intoxicating liquor at the location within the racetrack grounds specified in the permit, for possession and consumption anywhere within the racetrack grounds; but they do not authorize the sale of beer and intoxicating liquor for consumption away from the racetrack grounds and do not authorize the sale of beer and intoxicating liquor at any designated camping area on racetrack grounds while the area is in use for camping
> there is an exception allowing underage persons to be present on those locations at racetrack grounds for which Class "B" or "Class B" permits are issued
> a caterer is allowed to make retail sales of alcohol beverages off its licensed presmises on racetrack grounds, except at a designated camping area while the area is in use for camping and except on presmises for which DOR has issued a retail permit for the racetrack grounds
> a brewer is prohibited from making retail sales of beer and intoxicating liquor during the hours in which a Class "B" or "Class B" licensed premises must be closed (2am - 6am on weekdays; 2:30am-6:00am on weekends)
* 9/12/19: Introduced by Representatives Vorpagel and Katsma; cosponsored by Senator LeMahieu
* 9/12/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on State Affairs
* 9/25/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 9/25/19: Public hearing held
* 11/6/19: Executive action taken
* 11/7/19: Report passage recommended by Committee on State Affairs (13-0)
* 11/7/19: Referred to committee on Rules
* 11/7/19: Placed on calendar 11-12-2019 by Committee on Rules
* 11/12/19: Read a second time
* 11/12/19: Ordered to a third reading
* 11/12/19: Rules suspended
* 11/12/19: Read a third time and passed
* 11/12/19: Ordered immediately messaged
* 11/12/19: Received from Assembly
52
SB-395LeMahieu
Cosponsors: Vorpagel and Katsma
Retail Alcohol Beverage Permits for Motor Vehicle Racetrack Grounds
* This bill authorizes the Department of Revenue to issue retail alcohol beverage permits for motor vehicle racetrack grounds; this bill also authorizes caterers to make retail sales of alcohol beverages on racetrack grounds; this bill further establishes hours during which brewers may not make retail sales of alcohol beverages


Under current law:
> with limited exceptions, no person may sell alcohol beverages to a consumer unless the seller possesses a license or permit authorizing the sale
> municipalities may issue retail Class "B" licenses authorizing the sale of fermented malt beverages (beer), and retail "Class B" licenses authorizing the sale of intoxicating liquor (which includes wine and distilled spirits) to consumers; under certain circumstances, DOR may issue retail Class "B" and "Class B" permits authorizing the retail sale of beer and intoxicating liquor to consumers

Under this bill:
> DOR is authorized to issue retail Class "B" and "Class B" permits for racetrack grounds
>> "racetrack grounds" are defined as: property consisting of at least 300 acres containing a motor vehicle racetrack at least four miles in length capable of hosting professional racing events, and includes any building or other structure on this property associated with the racetrack or with services provided in connection with events held at the racetrack
> DOR may issue Class "B" and "Class B" permits, for locations within racetrack grounds, to the owner or operator of the racetrack grounds or to any person designated by the owner or operator of the racetrack gorunds to operate premises located within the racetrack grounds
> Class "B" and "Class B" permits issued by DOR for racetrack grounds authorize the retail sale of beer and intoxicating liquor at the location within the racetrack grounds specified in the permit, for possession and consumption anywhere within the racetrack grounds; but they do not authorize the sale of beer and intoxicating liquor for consumption away from the racetrack grounds and do not authorize the sale of beer and intoxicating liquor at any designated camping area on racetrack grounds while the area is in use for camping
> there is an exception allowing underage persons to be present on those locations at racetrack grounds for which Class "B" or "Class B" permits are issued
> a caterer is allowed to make retail sales of alcohol beverages off its licensed presmises on racetrack grounds, except at a designated camping area while the area is in use for camping and except on presmises for which DOR has issued a retail permit for the racetrack grounds
> a brewer is prohibited from making retail sales of beer and intoxicating liquor during the hours in which a Class "B" or "Class B" licensed premises must be closed (2am - 6am on weekdays; 2:30am-6:00am on weekends)
* 9/16/19: Introduced by Senator LeMahieu; cosponsored by Representatives Vorpagel and Katsma
* 9/16/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Government Operations, Technology and Consumer Protection
* 10/3/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 11/14/19: Public hearing held
53
SB-384Wanggaard, Darling, Jacque, Taylor, and Smith
Cosponsors: Ott, Bowen, Murphy, and Subeck
Operating Privileges for Certain OWI Offenses
* This bill provides for a restricted occupational operating license limiting the holder to operating only vehicles that are equipped with an ignition interlock device (IID) and makes various related changes to statutes governing operating privilege revocations for certain offenses related to operating a vehicle while intoxicated (OWI offense).

Under current law:
> if a person commits a first OWI offense in which his or her blood alcohol concentration was 0.15 or greater, or a second or subsequent OWI offense or improperly refuses to take a test for intoxication, a court must order one of the following: 1) that the person's operating privilege be restricted to operating vehicles equipped with an IID and that each of the person's motor vehicles be equipped with an IID; or 2) that the person participate in a 24/7 sobriety program
> a court must revoke the driving privileges of persons convicted of certain OWI offenses for period ranging from not less than 6 months for a first OWI offense to not less than 2 years for a third or subsequent OWI offense; personse whose operating privilege is suspended under these provisions are eligible for occupational licenses with a waiting period of 15-45 days; with certain exceptions and limitations, a person may apply for an occupational license if the person's operating privilege is revoked or suspended and the person is engaged in an occupation making it essential that he or she operate a motor vehicle
> a person is prohibited from circumventing the operation of an IID installed under a court orderl failing to have an IID installed as ordered by a court, and violating certain court orders restricting a person's operating privilege; violation of any of these prohibitions is punishable by a forfeiture of $10-$200 and extension of the period of IID restriction

Under this bill:
> if a person commits a first OWI offense in which their blood alcohol concentration was 0.15 or greater, or a second subsequent OWI offense or improperly refuses to take a test for intoxication, with limited exceptions, a court must order that the person's operating privilege be restricted to operating motor vehigles that are equipped with an IID, but need not order that a person's motor vehicles be equipped with an IID
> a person is eligible for a restricted occupational license after 15 days have elapsed from the day of suspension or revocation
> the penalty for circumventing the operation of an IID installed under a court order, failing to have an IID installed, and violating certain court orders restricting a person's operating privilege is increased to, for a first offense, a fine of $150-$600 and imprisonment for not more than six months or both and, for a second or subsequent offense, a fine of $300-$1000 or imprisonment for not more than six months or both
> provisions are made such that a person who violates the IID restriction of an IID restricted license is subject to the penalties, as modified in this bill
> if an IID service provider removes or disconnects an IID from a motor vehicle, the service provider must inform DOT of the removal or disconnection no later than three days after the removal or disconnection
* 8/29/19: Introduced by Senators Wanggaard, Darling, Jacque, Taylor, and Smith; cosponsored by Representatives Ott, Bowen, Murphy, and Subeck
* 8/29/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 9/4/19: Public hearing held
* 9/20/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 9/24/19: Senate Amendment 1 offerred by Senator Wanggaard
* 9/25/19: Executive action taken
* 9/25/19: Report adoption of senate Amendment 1 recommended by Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety (5-0)
* 9/25/19: Report passage as amended recommended by Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety (5-0)
* 9/25/19: Available for scheduling
* 10/15/19: Representative Tusler added as a cosponsor
* 8/30/19: Mothers Against Drunk Driving >> FOR
* 9/4/19: AAA Wisconsin >> FOR
54
SB-442Jacque, Risser, Bewley, Carpenter, Darling, Johnson, Larson, Olsen, Ringhand, Schachtner, and Wanggaard
Cosponsors: Mursau, Kolste, Allen, Anderson, Billings, Bowen, Cabrera, Considine, Doyle, Fields, Goyke, Hebl, Hesselbein, Horlacher, Milroy, Myers, Neubauer, Ohnstad, Oldenburg, Pope, Ramthun, Rodriguez, Rohrkaste, Sinicki, Spiros, Stubbs, Subeck, Taylor, Tittl, Tusler, Vining, Vruwink, and Zamarripa
Vaping Restrictions
* This bill specifies restrictions on the use of products used for inhaling or exhaling vapor

Under this law:
> the term "smoking" is specified, for the purposes of the general prohibition under current law against smoking in indoor locations, to include inhaling or exhaling vapor from a "vapor product," which this bill defines as any noncombustible product that employs a heating element, power source, electronic circuit, or other electronic, chemical, or mechanical means that can be used to produce vapor from a solution or other substnace
> this bill specifies that "vapor product" includes an electronic cigarette, electronic cigar, electronic cigarillo, electronic pipe, or similar product or device
> also, a product satisfies the definition of "vapor product" regardless of whether the product contains nicotine
* 9/23/19: Introduced by Senators Jacque, Risser, Bewley, Carpenter, Darling, Johnson, Larson, Olsen, Ringhand, Schachtner, and Wanggaard; cosponsored by Representatives Mursau, Kolste, Allen, Anderson, Billings, Bowen, Cabrera, Considine, Doyle, Fields, Goyke, Hebl, Hesselbein, Horlacher, Milroy, Myers, Neubauer, Ohnstad, Oldenburg, Pope, Ramthun, Rodriguez, Rohrkaste, Sinicki, Spiros, Stubbs, Subeck, Taylor, Tittl, Tusler, Vining, Vruwink, and Zamarripa
* 9/23/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Government Operations, Technology and Consumer Protection
* 10/4/19: Representative Spreitzer added as a cosponsor
55
AB-491Mursau, Kolste, Allen, Anderson, Billings, Bowen, Cabrera, Considine, Doyle, Fields, Goyke, Hebl, Hesselbein, Horlacher, Milroy, Myers, Neubauer, Ohnstad, Oldenburg, Pope, Ramthun, Rodriguez, Rohrkaste, Sinicki, Spiros, Stubbs, Subeck, Taylor, Tittl, Tusler, Vining, Vruwink, and Zamarripa
Cosponsors: Jacque, Risser, Bewley, Carpenter, Darling, Johnson, Larson, Olsen, Ringhand, Schachtner, and Wanggaard
Vaping Restrictions
* This bill specifies restrictions on the use of products used for inhaling or exhaling vapor

Under this law:
> the term "smoking" is specified, for the purposes of the general prohibition under current law against smoking in indoor locations, to include inhaling or exhaling vapor from a "vapor product," which this bill defines as any noncombustible product that employs a heating element, power source, electronic circuit, or other electronic, chemical, or mechanical means that can be used to produce vapor from a solution or other substnace
> this bill specifies that "vapor product" includes an electronic cigarette, electronic cigar, electronic cigarillo, electronic pipe, or similar product or device
> also, a product satisfies the definition of "vapor product" regardless of whether the product contains nicotine
* 10/1/19: Introduced by Representatives Mursau, Kolste, Allen, Anderson, Billings, Bowen, Cabrera, Considine, Doyle, Fields, Goyke, Hebl, Hesselbein, Horlacher, Milroy, Myers, Neubauer, Ohnstad, Oldenburg, Pope, Ramthun, Rodriguez, Rohrkaste, Sinicki, Spiros, Stubbs, Subeck, Taylor, Tittl, Tusler, Vining, Vruwink, and Zamarripa; cosponsored by Senators Jacque, Risser, Bewley, Carpenter, Darling, Johnson, Larson, Olsen, Ringhand, Schachtner, and Wanggaard
* 10/1/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on State Affairs
* 10/4/19: Representative Spreitzer added as a coauthor
56
SB-507Erpenbach, Testin, Carpenter, Hansen, Risser, Shilling, Taylor, Schachtner, Ringhand, Larson, Miller, Johnson, and Smith
Cosponsors: Taylor, Shankland, Zamarripa, Fields, Bowen, Sinicki, Kitchens, Considine, Brostoff, Stuck, Milroy, Pope, Hesselbein, Gruszynski, Spreitzer, Novak, Hebl, Ohnstad, Vruwink, Anderson, Crowley, Stubbs, Goyke, and Hintz
Medical Cannabis
* This bill creates a medical use defense to such THC-related prosecutions and forfeiture actions for a person who is registered with the Department of Health Services as having a specified debilitating medical conditions or undergoing a specified debilitating treatment
* 10/18/19: Introduced by Senators Erpenbach, Testin, Carpenter, Hansen, Risser, Shilling, Taylor, Schachtner, Ringhand, Larson, Miller, Johnson, and Smith; cosponsored by Representatives Taylor, Shankland, Zamarripa, Fields, Bowen, Sinicki, Kitchens, Considine, Brostoff, Stuck, Milroy, Pope, Hesselbein, Gruszynski, Spreitzer, Novak, Hebl, Ohnstad, Vruwink, Anderson, Crowley, Stubbs, Goyke, and Hintz
* 10/18/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Government Operations, Technology and Consumer Protection
* 10/23/19: Representatives Subeck and Edming added as cosponsors
* 11/8/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 11/12/19: Fiscal estimate received
57
AB-570Taylor, Shankland, Zamarripa, Fields, Bowen, Sinicki, Kitchens, Considine, Brostoff, Stuck, Milroy, Pope, Hesselbein, Gruszynski, Spreitzer, Novak, Hebl, Ohnstad, Vruwink, Anderson, Crowley, Stubbs, Goyke, Hintz, Edming, and Subeck
Cosponsors: Erpenbach, Testin, Carpenter, Hansen, Risser, Shilling, Taylor, Schachtner, Ringhand, Larson, Miller, Johnson, and Smith
Medical Cannabis
* This bill creates a medical use defense to such THC-related prosecutions and forfeiture actions for a person who is registered with the Department of Health Services as having a specified debilitating medical conditions or undergoing a specified debilitating treatment
* 10/25/19: Introduced by Representatives Taylor, Shankland, Zamarripa, Fields, Bowen, Sinicki, Kitchens, Considine, Brostoff, Stuck, Milroy, Pope, Hesselbein, Gruszynski, Spreitzer, Novak, Hebl, Ohnstad, Vruwink, Anderson, Crowley, Stubbs, Goyke, Hintz, Edming, and Subeck; cosponsored by Senators Erpenbach, Testin, Carpenter, Hansen, Risser, Shilling, Taylor, Schachtner, Ringhand, Larson, Miller, Johnson, and Smith
* 10/25/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on State Affairs
* 11/8/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 11/12/19: Fiscal estimate received
58
SB-520Bernier, Carpenter, Nass, Olsen, and Taylor
Cosponsors: Kurtz, Ballweg, Doyle, Cabrera, Duchow, Edming, James, Milroy, Mursau, Oldenburg, Petersen, Petryk, Ramthun, Rodriguez, Rohrkaste, Schraa, Spiros, Taylor, and Subeck
Suicide Prevention Training
* This bill requires two hours of continuing education on suicide prevention to be completed every two years for each of the following types of practitioners to renew their credentials: physicians, psychologists, private practice school psychologists, social workers, advanced practice social workers, independent professional counselors, substance abuse counselors, clinical substance abuse counselors, and prevention specialists

Under current law:
> each of those types of professionals must complete at least 30 hours of continuing education every two years to renew their credentials, except that psychologsts and private practice school psychologists are required to complete 40 hours of continuing education ever two years to renew their licenses
* 10/25/19: Introduced by Senators Bernier, Carpenter, Nass, Olsen, and Taylor; cosponsored by Representatives Kurtz, Ballweg, Doyle, Cabrera, Duchow, Edming, James, Milroy, Mursau, Oldenburg, Petersen, Petryk, Ramthun, Rodriguez, Rohrkaste, Schraa, Spiros, Taylor, and Subeck
* 10/25/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Public Benefits, Licensing and State-Federal Relations
* 11/6/19: Representative Milroy withdrawn as a cosponsor
* 11/7/19: Representative Ramthun withdrawn as a cosponsor
* 11/13/19: Representative C. Taylor withdrawn as a cosponsor
* 11/18/19: Fiscal estimate received
59
AB-526Kurtz, Ballweg, Doyle, Cabrera, Duchow, Edming, James, Milroy, Mursau, Oldenburg, Petersen, Petryk, Ramthun, Rodriguez, Rohrkaste, Schraa, Spiros, Taylor, and Subeck
Cosponsors: Bernier, Carpenter, Nass, Olsen, and Taylor
Suicide Prevention Training
* This bill requires two hours of continuing education on suicide prevention to be completed every two years for each of the following types of practitioners to renew their credentials: physicians, psychologists, private practice school psychologists, social workers, advanced practice social workers, independent professional counselors, substance abuse counselors, clinical substance abuse counselors, and prevention specialists

Under current law:
> each of those types of professionals must complete at least 30 hours of continuing education every two years to renew their credentials, except that psychologsts and private practice school psychologists are required to complete 40 hours of continuing education ever two years to renew their licenses

Assembly Substitute Amendment 1
> the Department of Safety and Professional Services (DSPS); the Medical Examining Board; the Psychology Examining Board; the Marriage and Family Therapy, Professional Counseling, and Social Work Examining Board; are required to promulgate rules that require a person holding a credential as a physician, psychologist, private practice school psychologist, social worker, advanced practice social worker, independent social worker, clinical social worker, marriage and family therapist, professional counselor, substance abuse counselor, clinical substance abuse counselor, or prevention specialist to complete at least 2 hours of continuing education on suicide prevention the first time that the person renews that credential
> DSPS and examining boards are also required to promulgate emergency rules that require a person who holds a credential for the above mentioned professions to complete at least 2 hours of continuing education on suicide prevention for the next time that the person renews that credential

Assembly Amendment 1
> updated to include required education on suicide prevention for persons conducting sales of firearms for firearms dealers
* 10/14/19: Introduced by Representatives Kurtz, Ballweg, Doyle, Cabrera, Duchow, Edming, James, Milroy, Mursau, Oldenburg, Petersen, Petryk, Ramthun, Rodriguez, Rohrkaste, Schraa, Spiros, Taylor, and Subeck; cosponsored by Senators Bernier, Carpenter, Nass, Olsen, and Taylor
* 10/14/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Health
* 10/18/19: Representative Subeck added as a coauthor
* 10/24/19: Representative Taylor withdrawn as a coauthor
* 10/28/19: Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 offered by Representative Kurtz
* 10/29/19: Representative Subeck withdrawn as a coauthor
* 10/29/19: Public hearing held
* 10/30/19: Assembly Amendment 1 offered by Representative Kolste
* 10/30/19: Assembly Amendment 1 to Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 offered by Representative Kolste

* 10/30/19: Executive action taken
* 10/30/19: Representative Vining withdrawn as a coauthor
* 10/31/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 11/1/19: Report Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 adoption recommended by Committee on Health (13-0)
* 11/1/19: Report passage as recommended by Committee on Health (8-5)
* 11/1/19: Referred to Committee on Rules
* 11/5/19: Placed on calendar 11-7-2019 by Committee on Rules
* 11/6/19: Representative Milroy withdrawn as a coauthor
* 11/7/19: Read a second time
* 11/7/19: Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 adopted
* 11/7/19 Ordered to a third reading
* 11/7/19: Rules suspended
* 11/7/19: Read a third time and passed (56-39)
* 11/7/19: Representative Ramthun withdrawn as a coauthor
* 11/7/19: Ordered immediately messaged
* 11/8/19: Received from Assembly
60
SB-506Olsen, Bernier, and Ringhand
Cosponsors: Schraa, Doyle, Ballweg, Anderson, Bowen, Cabrera, Duchow, Edming, James, Kurtz, Meyers, Milroy, Mursau, Neubauer, Oldenburg, Ott, Petersen, Petryk, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Spiros, Spretizer, Subeck, Taylor, Tittl, Tranel, Tusler, VanderMeer, Vining, Vruwink, and Wittke
WISH Grants
* This bill requires the Department of Public Instruction (DPI) to annually award a grant to a cooperative educational service agency (CESA) to support a collaborative project between DPI and CESAs that provides training and technical assistance to school districts related to prevention and intervention programs for alcohol, tobacco and other drug abuse, mental health programs, and programs to promote school safety; this collaborative project is known as the Wisconsin Safe and Healthy Schools Center, or the WISH Center

Under this bill:
> the CESA that receives the grant must use the money to support the ongoing operations of the WISH Center and, if money is available, to expand the WISH Center's offerings to include training and technical assistance related to general wellness
* 10/18/19: Introduced by Senators Olsen, Bernier, and Ringhand; cosponsored by Representatives Schraa, Doyle, Ballweg, Anderson, Bowen, Cabrera, Duchow, Edming, James, Kurtz, Meyers, Milroy, Mursau, Neubauer, Oldenburg, Ott, Petersen, Petryk, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Spiros, Spretizer, Subeck, Taylor, Tittl, Tranel, Tusler, VanderMeer, Vining, Vruwink, and Wittke
* 10/18/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Education
* 10/21/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 10/24/19: Representative Born added as a cosponsor
* 10/24/19: Representative Kitchens added as a cosponsor
61
AB-529Schraa, Doyle, Ballweg, Anderson, Bowen, Cabrera, Duchow, Edming, James, Kurtz, Meyers, Milroy, Mursau, Neubauer, Oldenburg, Ott, Petersen, Petryk, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Spiros, Spretizer, Subeck, Taylor, Tittl, Tranel, Tusler, VanderMeer, Vining, Vruwink, and Wittke
Cosponsors: Olsen, Bernier, and Ringhand
WISH Grants
* This bill requires the Department of Public Instruction (DPI) to annually award a grant to a cooperative educational service agency (CESA) to support a collaborative project between DPI and CESAs that provides training and technical assistance to school districts related to prevention and intervention programs for alcohol, tobacco and other drug abuse, mental health programs, and programs to promote school safety; this collaborative project is known as the Wisconsin Safe and Healthy Schools Center, or the WISH Center

Under this bill:
> the CESA that receives the grant must use the money to support the ongoing operations of the WISH Center and, if money is available, to expand the WISH Center's offerings to include training and technical assistance related to general wellness mental health wellness as it pertains to suicide prevention
* 10/14/19: Introduced by Representatives Schraa, Doyle, Ballweg, Anderson, Bowen, Cabrera, Duchow, Edming, James, Kurtz, Meyers, Milroy, Mursau, Neubauer, Oldenburg, Ott, Petersen, Petryk, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Spiros, Spretizer, Subeck, Taylor, Tittl, Tranel, Tusler, VanderMeer, Vining, Vruwink, and Wittke; cosponsored by Senators Olsen, Bernier, and Ringhand
* 10/14/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Education
* 10/22/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 10/23/19: Representative Born added as a coauthor
* 10/24/19: Public hearing held
* 10/28/19: Assembly Amendment 1 offered by Representative Schraa
* 10/29/19: Executive action taken
* 11/1/19: Report Assembly Amendment 1 adoption recommended by Committee on Education (12-0)
* 11/1/19: Report passage as amended recommended by Committee on Education (14-0)
* 11/1/19: Referred to Committee on Rules
* 11/5/19: Placed on calendar 11-7-2019 by Committee on Rules
* 11/7/19: Read a second time
* 11/7/19: Assembly Amendment 1 adopted
* 11/7/19: Ordered to a third reading
* 11/7/19: Rules suspended
* 11/7/19: Read a third time and passed (92-3)
* 11/7/19: Ordered immediately messaged
* 11/8/19: Received from Assembly
62
AB-508Subeck, Billings, Anderson, Bowen, Brostoff, Haywood, Hebl, Hesselbein, Kolste, Ohnstad, Pope, Sargent, Sinicki, Spreitzer, Taylor, Vruwink, Zamarripa, and Stubbs
Cosponsors: Johnson, Bewley, Carpenter, Larson, Miller, and Taylor
Housing and Homelessness
This bill relates to: housing and homelessness; workforce development; community action agencies; poverty reports; mental health; public assistance advisory committee; economic security; adverse childhood experiences reports; creating a nonrefundable individual income tax credit for household and dependent care services; reimbursement for nonemergency medical transportation services; urban mass transit aid; and making an appropriation.


Under current law: Housing Stability
> Department of Administration (DOA) provides housing grants to counties, municipalities, community action agencies, and private organizations for the purpose of providing housing and associated supportive services to homeless individuals and families in order to facilitate the movement of homeless persons to independent living

Under this bill: Housing Stability
> an additional $1,800,000 is provided in the 2019-21 fiscal biennium to fund the DOA housing grant program
> DOA funding is increased to award grants for the purpose of supplementing the operating budgets of agencies and shelter facilities related to providing shelter to the homeless; the bill provides an additional $700,000 in each fiscal year of the 2019-21 fiscal biennium for that purpose
> also increases DOA funding with an additional $220,000 in each fiscal year of the 2019-21 fiscal biennium to award grants to persons or families of low or moderate income to defray housing costs
> the Interagency Council on Homelessness is required to do the following every two years: (1) review all of the state's housing and homelessness-related programs; (2) identify ways in which DOA and other state agencies specified in the bill and the Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority (WHEDA) can increase access to services for homeless individuals and families, including homeless children and youth (as defined under federal law); (3) advise each of the state agencies specific in this bill and WHEDA to revise and policy or practice that the council determines impedes homeless individuals and families from obtaining services
> WHEDA is required to issue up to $1,000,000 in bonds to make grants directly to individuals and families or to one or more local housing authorities for the purpose of providing rent assistance to individuals and families who are in danger of being evicted
> the Department of Public Instruction (DPI) is required annually to issue a report to the legislature on the number of homeless children and youths in the public schools of this state
> WHEDA is required annually to issue a report to the legislature on the number of households with worst case housing needs in this state; the report must include data and demographnic information on these households, analysis of the impediments to obtaining affordable housing, and recommendations on how to improve state and local programs to assist these households with their housing needs
> a 2-year pilot program is created that gives priority to homeless children and their families on the waiting list that WHEDA, or a public housing agency that contracts with WHEDA, maintains under the federal Housing Choice Voucher Program; WHEDA is required to develop policies and procedures for this pilot program

Under current law: Workforce Development and Job and Income Supports
> the Department of Children and Families (DCF) must distribute grants to community action agencies to provide skills enhancement services, including access to transportation, child care, career counseling, job placement assistance, and financial support for education and training; a community action agency may provide these services to individuals who work at least 20 hours/week and whose earned income is at or below 150% of the poverty line
> the Department of Transportation (DOT) may award grants to public and private organizations for the development and implementation of demand management, ride-sharing, and job access and employment transportation assistance programs
> in compliance with the federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA), the governor must establish a state workforce development board

Under this bill: Workforce Development and Job and Income Supports
> funding is increased by $799,400 in each fiscal year of the 2019-21 fiscal biennium to supplement, on a one-to-one matching basis, federal employment opportunity demonstration project funds from other federal and private foundation sources for job creation and development for individuals with low incomes; the program funded by these funds is commonly referred to as the Job and Business Development Program
> an additional $500,000 in each fiscal year of the 2019-21 fiscal biennium is provided to DCF for the purposes of providing skills enhancement services and increases the earned income threshold for eligibility to 200% of the poverty line
> the Department of Workforce Development (DWD) is required to establish a pilot program that offers job and employment services for individuals receiving housing vouchers or services from state-funded homeless shelters; this pilot program is to offer services similar to those offered under the existing Transform Milwaukee Jobs and Transitional Jobs programs in current law; this bill funds the pilot program with $500,000 in each fiscal year of the 2019-21 fiscal biennium
> this bill increases the amount of state monies appropriated to DOT for development and implementation of job access and employment transportation assistance programs by $249,450 in each year of the 2019-21 fiscal biennium
> the state workforce development board must identify certain populations for services under their WIOA strategic plans; the populations to be included are: (1) homeless individuals ages 18-24; (2) certain children placed in out-of-home care; and (3) homeless adults; this bill repeals a provision concerning review and approval of certain matters regarding assistance to dislocated workers that was part of the federal 1988 Workforce Investment Act (WIA) but that no longer exists

Under current law: Community Action Agencies
> a Community Action Agency (CAA) is an entity that provides services such as employment or housing assistance, financial planning, or educational services to individuals whose income is at or below 125% of the federal poverty line and that works to combat poverty in the community that it serves
> the federal community services block grant funds the work of community action agencies

Under this bill: Community Action Agencies
> a 25% match from state funding to the federal community services block grant is provided
> the Department of Health Services (DHS) is required to establish a grant program to provide grants to community action agencies to enable them to repond to the needs of communities and low-income families and individuals in crisis resulting from opioid addiction-related issues; through this program, DHS is required to endeavor to expand and support effective community efforts to identify and respond to causes and consequences of opioid misuse and addiction experienced by low-income individuals, families, and communities
> DHS shall award grants of at least $25,000 and up to $250,000 per year; this bill sets out criteria DHS must use in awarding grants, as well as characteristics of applications to which DHS must give preference; grants under this bill may not be more than three years in duration unless approved by the DHS secretary

Under this bill: Public Assistance Advisory Committee
> DHS is required, in consultation with DCF and DOA, to create an advisory committee to review proposed legislation and proposed requests for approval from the federal government of changes to public assistance programs and to review performance data outcomes and costs of changes to public assistance programs after federal approval of changes to those programs
> it is specified that which participants DHS must appoint to the advisory committee
> a state agency that administers a public assistance program is required to hold a public comment period before developing language for a proposal to waive federal law and to conduct no fewer than three public hearings on the proposed waiver before submitting to the federal government; the agency may not submit the request on the proposed waiver without prioir approval of the proposed waiter request by the Joint Committee on Finance

Under this bill: Sober Living and Mental Health
> DHS is required to encourage the development, expansion, and quality control of networks of sober living residences and to allocate monies to create a revolving loan fund for establishing sober living residences or a network of sober living residences or to award grants for purposes specified in this bill
> DHS is required to award grants to entities or groups that meet its qualifications to perform research projects on mental health issues and access to mental health services in rural areas of the state

Under this bill: Nonemergency Medical Transportation Services
> DHS is required to determine and implement a reimbursement rate for nonemergency medical transportation services for Medical Assistance recipients who are nursing home residents that is the same as the prevalent brokerage reimbursement rate applied to other nonemergency medical transportation services for Medical Assistance recipients

Under current law: Household Dependent Care Services Expenses Tax Credit
> under current federal law, there exists a tax credit for expenses for household and dependent care services necessary for gainful employment; generally the federal credit is a nonrefundable individual income tax credit that may be claimed by an individual for employment-related expenses for household services and dependent care services for a qualifying individual; because the credit is nonrefundable, it may be claimed only up to the amount of the taxpayer's liability
> a qualifying individual is someone who has the same principal place of abode as the claimant for more than one-half of the year, is the claimant's dependent, and is: (1) a child age 12 or under; (2) a child age 13 or older who is incapable of self-care; or (3) the claimant's spouse who is incapable of self-care
> the credit may be claimed for expenses to enable the claimant to be gainfully employed or actively search for gainful employment; generally allowable expenses include: costs for in-home care or daycare, nursery school or preschool programs, and before- or after-school care for school-age children
> dependent on the claimant's adjusted gross income, the credit may be worth 20 and 35% of the claimant's allowable expenses, up to a maximum annual amount of $3,000 if there is one qualifying individual, and up to $6,000 if there are two or more

Under current law: Transportation
> DOT provides state aid payments to local public bodies in urban areas served by mass transit systems to assist the local public bodies with the expenses of operating those systems

Under this bill: Transportation
> the total amount of state aid payments for mass transit systems serving urban areas having a population of less than 50,000 is increased to $5,707,800 in calendar year 2020 and thereafter

Under current law: Children
> a child may be placed in out-of-home care, such as a foster home, the home of a guardian or relative other than a parent, or a group home, if a court assigned to exercise jurisdiction under the Children's Code finds the child to be in need of protection or services

Under this bill: Children
> DCF is required to prepare and transmit to the governor and the legislature an annual report on the number of children in out-of-home care in the previous year who have experienced adverse childhood experiences

Under this bill: Higher Education
> the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System is required to allocate $50,000 each fiscal year for the Institute for Research on Poverty at the UW-Madison to study and provide and annual report to the public on poverty in this state

Under this bill: Household Dependent Care Services Expenses Tax Credit
> a nonrefundable individual income tax credit for certain expenses for household and dependent care services is created, based on a similar federal credit
> an individual who is eligible for and claims the federal tax credit for expenses for household and dependent care services may claim the same amount as a nonrefundable credit on his or her Wisconsin income tax return; the Wisconsin credit may not be claimed by a part-year resident or nonresident of this state
* 10/7/19: Introduced by Representatives Subeck, Billings, Anderson, Bowen, Brostoff, Haywood, Hebl, Hesselbein, Kolste, Ohnstad, Pope, Sargent, Sinicki, Spreitzer, Taylor, Vruwink, Zamarripa, and Stubbs; cosponsored by Senators Johnson, Bewley, Carpenter, Larson, Miller, and Taylor
* 10/7/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Housing and Real Estate
* 10/18/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 10/22/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 10/25/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 10/30/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 11/13/19: Fiscal estimate received
63
SB-467Johnson, Bewley, Carpenter, Larson, Miller, Schachtner, and Taylor
Cosponsors: Subeck, Billings, Anderson, Bowen, Brostoff, Haywood, Hebl, Hesselbein, Kolste, Ohnstad, Pope, Sargent, Sinicki, Spreitzer, Taylor, Vruwink, and Zamarripa
Housing and Homelessness
This bill relates to: housing and homelessness; workforce development; community action agencies; poverty reports; mental health; public assistance advisory committee; economic security; adverse childhood experiences reports; creating a nonrefundable individual income tax credit for household and dependent care services; reimbursement for nonemergency medical transportation services; urban mass transit aid; and making an appropriation.


Under current law: Housing Stability
> Department of Administration (DOA) provides housing grants to counties, municipalities, community action agencies, and private organizations for the purpose of providing housing and associated supportive services to homeless individuals and families in order to facilitate the movement of homeless persons to independent living

Under this bill: Housing Stability
> an additional $1,800,000 is provided in the 2019-21 fiscal biennium to fund the DOA housing grant program
> DOA funding is increased to award grants for the purpose of supplementing the operating budgets of agencies and shelter facilities related to providing shelter to the homeless; the bill provides an additional $700,000 in each fiscal year of the 2019-21 fiscal biennium for that purpose
> also increases DOA funding with an additional $220,000 in each fiscal year of the 2019-21 fiscal biennium to award grants to persons or families of low or moderate income to defray housing costs
> the Interagency Council on Homelessness is required to do the following every two years: (1) review all of the state's housing and homelessness-related programs; (2) identify ways in which DOA and other state agencies specified in the bill and the Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority (WHEDA) can increase access to services for homeless individuals and families, including homeless children and youth (as defined under federal law); (3) advise each of the state agencies specific in this bill and WHEDA to revise and policy or practice that the council determines impedes homeless individuals and families from obtaining services
> WHEDA is required to issue up to $1,000,000 in bonds to make grants directly to individuals and families or to one or more local housing authorities for the purpose of providing rent assistance to individuals and families who are in danger of being evicted
> the Department of Public Instruction (DPI) is required annually to issue a report to the legislature on the number of homeless children and youths in the public schools of this state
> WHEDA is required annually to issue a report to the legislature on the number of households with worst case housing needs in this state; the report must include data and demographnic information on these households, analysis of the impediments to obtaining affordable housing, and recommendations on how to improve state and local programs to assist these households with their housing needs
> a 2-year pilot program is created that gives priority to homeless children and their families on the waiting list that WHEDA, or a public housing agency that contracts with WHEDA, maintains under the federal Housing Choice Voucher Program; WHEDA is required to develop policies and procedures for this pilot program

Under current law: Workforce Development and Job and Income Supports
> the Department of Children and Families (DCF) must distribute grants to community action agencies to provide skills enhancement services, including access to transportation, child care, career counseling, job placement assistance, and financial support for education and training; a community action agency may provide these services to individuals who work at least 20 hours/week and whose earned income is at or below 150% of the poverty line
> the Department of Transportation (DOT) may award grants to public and private organizations for the development and implementation of demand management, ride-sharing, and job access and employment transportation assistance programs
> in compliance with the federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA), the governor must establish a state workforce development board

Under this bill: Workforce Development and Job and Income Supports
> funding is increased by $799,400 in each fiscal year of the 2019-21 fiscal biennium to supplement, on a one-to-one matching basis, federal employment opportunity demonstration project funds from other federal and private foundation sources for job creation and development for individuals with low incomes; the program funded by these funds is commonly referred to as the Job and Business Development Program
> an additional $500,000 in each fiscal year of the 2019-21 fiscal biennium is provided to DCF for the purposes of providing skills enhancement services and increases the earned income threshold for eligibility to 200% of the poverty line
> the Department of Workforce Development (DWD) is required to establish a pilot program that offers job and employment services for individuals receiving housing vouchers or services from state-funded homeless shelters; this pilot program is to offer services similar to those offered under the existing Transform Milwaukee Jobs and Transitional Jobs programs in current law; this bill funds the pilot program with $500,000 in each fiscal year of the 2019-21 fiscal biennium
> this bill increases the amount of state monies appropriated to DOT for development and implementation of job access and employment transportation assistance programs by $249,450 in each year of the 2019-21 fiscal biennium
> the state workforce development board must identify certain populations for services under their WIOA strategic plans; the populations to be included are: (1) homeless individuals ages 18-24; (2) certain children placed in out-of-home care; and (3) homeless adults; this bill repeals a provision concerning review and approval of certain matters regarding assistance to dislocated workers that was part of the federal 1988 Workforce Investment Act (WIA) but that no longer exists

Under current law: Community Action Agencies
> a Community Action Agency (CAA) is an entity that provides services such as employment or housing assistance, financial planning, or educational services to individuals whose income is at or below 125% of the federal poverty line and that works to combat poverty in the community that it serves
> the federal community services block grant funds the work of community action agencies

Under this bill: Community Action Agencies
> a 25% match from state funding to the federal community services block grant is provided
> the Department of Health Services (DHS) is required to establish a grant program to provide grants to community action agencies to enable them to repond to the needs of communities and low-income families and individuals in crisis resulting from opioid addiction-related issues; through this program, DHS is required to endeavor to expand and support effective community efforts to identify and respond to causes and consequences of opioid misuse and addiction experienced by low-income individuals, families, and communities
> DHS shall award grants of at least $25,000 and up to $250,000 per year; this bill sets out criteria DHS must use in awarding grants, as well as characteristics of applications to which DHS must give preference; grants under this bill may not be more than three years in duration unless approved by the DHS secretary

Under this bill: Public Assistance Advisory Committee
> DHS is required, in consultation with DCF and DOA, to create an advisory committee to review proposed legislation and proposed requests for approval from the federal government of changes to public assistance programs and to review performance data outcomes and costs of changes to public assistance programs after federal approval of changes to those programs
> it is specified that which participants DHS must appoint to the advisory committee
> a state agency that administers a public assistance program is required to hold a public comment period before developing language for a proposal to waive federal law and to conduct no fewer than three public hearings on the proposed waiver before submitting to the federal government; the agency may not submit the request on the proposed waiver without prioir approval of the proposed waiter request by the Joint Committee on Finance

Under this bill: Sober Living and Mental Health
> DHS is required to encourage the development, expansion, and quality control of networks of sober living residences and to allocate monies to create a revolving loan fund for establishing sober living residences or a network of sober living residences or to award grants for purposes specified in this bill
> DHS is required to award grants to entities or groups that meet its qualifications to perform research projects on mental health issues and access to mental health services in rural areas of the state

Under this bill: Nonemergency Medical Transportation Services
> DHS is required to determine and implement a reimbursement rate for nonemergency medical transportation services for Medical Assistance recipients who are nursing home residents that is the same as the prevalent brokerage reimbursement rate applied to other nonemergency medical transportation services for Medical Assistance recipients

Under current law: Household Dependent Care Services Expenses Tax Credit
> under current federal law, there exists a tax credit for expenses for household and dependent care services necessary for gainful employment; generally the federal credit is a nonrefundable individual income tax credit that may be claimed by an individual for employment-related expenses for household services and dependent care services for a qualifying individual; because the credit is nonrefundable, it may be claimed only up to the amount of the taxpayer's liability
> a qualifying individual is someone who has the same principal place of abode as the claimant for more than one-half of the year, is the claimant's dependent, and is: (1) a child age 12 or under; (2) a child age 13 or older who is incapable of self-care; or (3) the claimant's spouse who is incapable of self-care
> the credit may be claimed for expenses to enable the claimant to be gainfully employed or actively search for gainful employment; generally allowable expenses include: costs for in-home care or daycare, nursery school or preschool programs, and before- or after-school care for school-age children
> dependent on the claimant's adjusted gross income, the credit may be worth 20 and 35% of the claimant's allowable expenses, up to a maximum annual amount of $3,000 if there is one qualifying individual, and up to $6,000 if there are two or more

Under current law: Transportation
> DOT provides state aid payments to local public bodies in urban areas served by mass transit systems to assist the local public bodies with the expenses of operating those systems

Under this bill: Transportation
> the total amount of state aid payments for mass transit systems serving urban areas having a population of less than 50,000 is increased to $5,707,800 in calendar year 2020 and thereafter

Under current law: Children
> a child may be placed in out-of-home care, such as a foster home, the home of a guardian or relative other than a parent, or a group home, if a court assigned to exercise jurisdiction under the Children's Code finds the child to be in need of protection or services

Under this bill: Children
> DCF is required to prepare and transmit to the governor and the legislature an annual report on the number of children in out-of-home care in the previous year who have experienced adverse childhood experiences

Under this bill: Higher Education
> the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System is required to allocate $50,000 each fiscal year for the Institute for Research on Poverty at the UW-Madison to study and provide and annual report to the public on poverty in this state

Under this bill: Household Dependent Care Services Expenses Tax Credit
> a nonrefundable individual income tax credit for certain expenses for household and dependent care services is created, based on a similar federal credit
> an individual who is eligible for and claims the federal tax credit for expenses for household and dependent care services may claim the same amount as a nonrefundable credit on his or her Wisconsin income tax return; the Wisconsin credit may not be claimed by a part-year resident or nonresident of this state
* 9/27/19: Introduced by Senators Johnson, Bewley, Carpenter, Larson, Miller, Schachtner, and Taylor; cosponsored by Representatives Subeck, Billings, Anderson, Bowen, Brostoff, Haywood, Hebl, Hesselbein, Kolste, Ohnstad, Pope, Sargent, Sinicki, Spreitzer, Taylor, Vruwink, and Zamarripa
* 9/27/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Local Government, Small Business, Tourism, and Workforce Development
* 10/15/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 10/18/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 10/23/10: Fiscal estimate received
* 10/25/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 10/30/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 11/22/19: Fiscal estimate received
64
SB-577Risser, Larson, Taylor, and Miller
Cosponsors: Stubbs, Crowley, Considine, Vruwink, Brostoff, Gruszynski, Ohnstad, Shankland, Billings, Sinicki, Spreitzer, Zamarripa, Kolste, Hesselbein, Subeck, Anderson, Pope, and Emerson
Marijuana Decriminalization
Decriminalizing 28 grams or less of marijuana

Under current law:
> a person is prohibited from possessing or attempting to possess; possessing with the intent to manufacture, distribute, or deliver; and manufacturing, distributing, or delivering marijuana; the penalties vary based on the amount of marijuana or plants involved or the number of previous controlled-substance convictions the person has
> local governments are allowed to enact ordinances prohibiting the possession of marijuana
> it is required that, when determining the weight of controlled substances, the weight includes the weight of the controlled substance together with any compound, mixture, or other substance mixed or combined with the controlled substance

Under this bill:
> the following are eliminated: (1) the penalty for possession of marijuana if the amount of marijuana involved is no more than 28 grams; (2) the penalty for manufacturing or for possessing with the intent to manufacture, distribute, or deliver if the amount of marijuana involved is no more than 28 grams; (3) the penalty for distributing or delivering marijuana if the amount of marijuana involved is no more than 28 grams or the number of plants involved is no more than two
> the current law penalty for distributing or delivering any amount of marijuana to a minor who is no more than 17 years of age by a person who is at least three years older than the minor is retained
> local governments are limited to enacting ordinances prohibiting only the possession of more than 28 grams of marijuana
> it is also prohibited to establish probable cause that a person is violating the prohibition against possessing more than 28 grams of marijuana by an odor of marijuana or by the possession of not more than 28 grams of marijuana
> when determining the amount of tetrahydrocannabinols, only the weight of the marijuana may be considered
> creation of a process for expunging or dismissing convictions involving less than 28 grams of marijuana that occurred before this bill takes effect
* 11/22/19: Introduced by Senators Risser, Larson, Taylor, and Miller; cosponsored by Representatives Stubbs, Crowley, Considine, Vruwink, Brostoff, Gruszynski, Ohnstad, Shankland, Billings, Sinicki, Spreitzer, Zamarripa, Kolste, Hesselbein, Subeck, Anderson, Pope, and Emerson
* 11/22/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
65
SB-580Kooyenga, Cowles, and Wanggaard
Cosponsors: Nygren, Novak, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Quinn, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Magnafici, Plumer, Horlacher, Rohrkaste, Knodl, Tusler, Petryk, Tranel, Thiesfeldt, Jagler, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Born, Billings, and Bowen
Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome
Guidelines regarding the treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS)

This bill requires the Medical Examining Board to issue guidelines regarding best practices for the treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), a condition that may occur in a newborn following the discontinuation of fetal exposure to substances that were used by the mother during pregnancy.
* 11/22/19: Introduced by Senators Kooyenga, Cowles, and Wanggaard; cosponsored by Representatives Nygren, Novak, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Quinn, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Magnafici, Plumer, Horlacher, Rohrkaste, Knodl, Tusler, Petryk, Tranel, Thiesfeldt, Jagler, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Born, Billings, and Bowen
* 11/22/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Health and Human Services
* 12/3/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 12/6/19: Representative Wichgers added as a cosponsor
66
AB-649Nygren, Born, Novak, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Quinn, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Magnafici, Plumer, Horlacher, Rohrkaste, Knodl, Tusler, Petryk, Dittrich, Tranel, Thiesfeldt, Jagler, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Billings and Bowen
Cosponsors: Kooyenga, Cowles, and Wanggaard
Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome
Guidelines regarding the treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS)

This bill requires the Medical Examining Board to issue guidelines regarding best practices for the treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), a condition that may occur in a newborn following the discontinuation of fetal exposure to substances that were used by the mother during pregnancy.
* 12/5/19: Introduced by Representatives Nygren, Born, Novak, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Quinn, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Magnafici, Plumer, Horlacher, Rohrkaste, Knodl, Tusler, Petryk, Dittrich, Tranel, Thiesfeldt, Jagler, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Billings and Bowen; cosponsored by Senators Kooyenga, Cowles and Wanggaard
* 12/5/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Health
* 12/6/19: Representative Wichgers added as a coauthor
67
SB-581Testin, Cowles, Olsen, Schachtner, Wanggaard, Marlkein
Cosponsors: Nygren, Plumer, Magnafici, Hutton, James, Petryk, Kolste,Sargent, Billings, Born, Bowen, Dittrich, Doyle, Duchow, Edming, Felzkowski, Jagler, Kitchens, Knodl, Kulp, Mursau, Petersen, Pope, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Snyder, Spiros, Spreitzer, Thiesfeldt, Tranel and Tusler
PDMP
The prescription drug monitoring program

Under current law:
> the Controlled Substances Board is required to establish a Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) that requires pharmacies and health care practitioners to generate records documenting the dispensing of monitored prescription drugs
> records from the PDMP may be disclosed to persons specified under current law or by the board by rule

Under this bill:
> changes are made to certain requirements under the PDMP:
>> (1) Subject to exceptions, current law requires that a patient's records under the program be reviewed before a practitioner issues a prescription order for the patient. However, current law provides that this requirement does not apply after April 1, 2020. This bill extends the application of this requirement by five years, to April 1, 2025.
>> (2) Current law requires the board to conduct a quarterly review of the PDMP to evaluate the actual outcomes of the PDMP compared with projected outcomes. However, current law provides that this requirement does not apply after October 30, 2020. This bill extends the application of this requirement by five years, to October 30, 2025.
*11/22/19: Introduced by Senators Testin, Cowles, Olsen, Schachtner, Wanggaard, Marklein; Cosponsored by Representatives Nygren, Plumer, Magnafici, Hutton, James, Petryk, Kolste, Sargent, Billings, Born, Bowen, Dittrich, Doyle, Duchow, Edming, Felzkowski, Jagler, Kitchens, Knodl, Kulp, Mursau, Petersen, Pope, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Snyder, Spiros, Spreitzer, Thiesfeldt, Tranel and Tusler
* 11/22/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Health and Human Services
* 12/3/19: Fiscal estimate received
* 12/6/19: Representative Wichgers added as a cosponsor
68
AB-647Nygren, Plumer, Magnafici, Hutton, James, Petryk, Kolste, Sargent, Billings, Born, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Quinn, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Rohrkaste, Knodl, Tusler, Duchow, Dittrich, Tranel, Thiesfeldt, Jagler, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Pope, Doyle, Bowen and Spreitzer
Cosponsors: Testin, Cowles, Olsen, Wanggaard, Schachtner, and Marklein
PDMP
The prescription drug monitoring program

Under current law:
> the Controlled Substances Board is required to establish a Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) that requires pharmacies and health care practitioners to generate records documenting the dispensing of monitored prescription drugs
> records from the PDMP may be disclosed to persons specified under current law or by the board by rule

Under this bill:
> changes are made to certain requirements under the PDMP:
>> (1) Subject to exceptions, current law requires that a patient's records under the program be reviewed before a practitioner issues a prescription order for the patient. However, current law provides that this requirement does not apply after April 1, 2020. This bill extends the application of this requirement by five years, to April 1, 2025.
>> (2) Current law requires the board to conduct a quarterly review of the PDMP to evaluate the actual outcomes of the PDMP compared with projected outcomes. However, current law provides that this requirement does not apply after October 30, 2020. This bill extends the application of this requirement by five years, to October 30, 2025.
* 12/5/19: Introduced by Representatives Nygren, Plumer, Magnafici, Hutton, James, Petryk, Kolste, Sargent, Billings, Born, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Quinn, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Rohrkaste, Knodl, Tusler, Duchow, Dittrich, Tranel, Thiesfeldt, Jagler, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Pope, Doyle, Bowen and Spreitzer; cosponsored by Senators Testin, Cowles, Olsen, Wanggaard, Schachtner and Marklein
* 12/5/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Substance Abuse and Prevention
* 12/6/19: Representative Wichgers added as a coauthor
69
SB-582Testin, Cowles, and Wanggaard
Cosponsors: Nygren, Novak, Billings, Born, Bowen, Dittrich, Edming, Felzkowski, Horlacher, Jagler, Kitchens, Knodl, Kulp, Magnafici, Mursau, Petersen, Plumer, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Snyder, Spiros, Tranel and Tusler
Peer Recovery Reimbursement
Reimbursement for peer recovery coach services under the Medical Assistance program and coordination of continuation of care following an overdose

Under this bill:
> the Department of Health Services (DHS) is required to provide as a benefit and reimburse peer recovery coach services under the Medical Assistance program and to establish and maintain a program to coordinate and continue care following a substance use overdose
> a "Peer Recovery Coach," as defined in this bill, is an individual who practices in the recovery field and who provides support and assistance to individuals who are in treatment or recovery from mental illness or a substance use disorder
> DHS is required to reimburse under the Medical Assistance program a peer recovery coach service that meets all of the following criteria:
>> the recipient of the peer recovery coach service is in treatment for or recovery from mental illness or a substance use disorder;
>> the peer recovery coach provides the service under the supervision of a peer supervisor and in coordination and accordance with the recipient's individual treatment plan and treatment goals;
>> and the peer recovery coach completes the training specified in the bill
> DHS is required to request any federal approval necessary to implement the reimbursement
> DHS is required to establish and maintain a program to facilitate overdose treatment providers to do all of the following: use peer recovery coaches to encourage individuals to seek treatment for a substance use disorder following an overdose; provide access to medications to reverse an overdose; provide education to patients and families on preventing and reversing an overdose; provide follow-up services for patients after an overdose to ensure continued recovery and connection to support services; and collect and evaluate outcomes data on patients receiving peer recovery coach services and coordination and continuation of care services
> allows DHS to establish policies and procedures to provide guidance on the provision of medications that reverse an overdose or treat a substance use disorder or on continuation of, or referral to, evidence-based treatment services for patients with a substance use disorder who have experienced an overdose
> DHS is required to seek any funding available from the federal government, including grant funding under the federal SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act, to establish and maintain the program or establish the policies and procedures
* 11/22/19: Introduced by Senators Testin, Olsen and Wanggaard; cosponsored by Representatives Nygren, Novak, Billings, Born, Bowen, Dittrich, Edming, Felzkowski, Horlacher, Jagler, Kitchens, Knodl, Kulp, Magnafici, Mursau, Petersen, Plumer, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Snyder, Spiros, Tranel and Tusler
* 11/22/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Health and Human Services
70
AB-650Nygren, Novak, Born, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Quinn, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Magnafici, Plumer, Horlacher, Rohrkaste, Knodl, Tusler, Dittrich, Tranel, Jagler, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Billings and Bowen
Cosponsors: Testin, Olsen, and Wanggaard
Peer Recovery Reimbursement
Reimbursement for peer recovery coach services under the Medical Assistance program and coordination of continuation of care following an overdose

Under this bill:
> the Department of Health Services (DHS) is required to provide as a benefit and reimburse peer recovery coach services under the Medical Assistance program and to establish and maintain a program to coordinate and continue care following a substance use overdose
> a "Peer Recovery Coach," as defined in this bill, is an individual who practices in the recovery field and who provides support and assistance to individuals who are in treatment or recovery from mental illness or a substance use disorder
> DHS is required to reimburse under the Medical Assistance program a peer recovery coach service that meets all of the following criteria:
>> the recipient of the peer recovery coach service is in treatment for or recovery from mental illness or a substance use disorder;
>> the peer recovery coach provides the service under the supervision of a peer supervisor and in coordination and accordance with the recipient's individual treatment plan and treatment goals;
>> and the peer recovery coach completes the training specified in the bill
> DHS is required to request any federal approval necessary to implement the reimbursement
> DHS is required to establish and maintain a program to facilitate overdose treatment providers to do all of the following: use peer recovery coaches to encourage individuals to seek treatment for a substance use disorder following an overdose; provide access to medications to reverse an overdose; provide education to patients and families on preventing and reversing an overdose; provide follow-up services for patients after an overdose to ensure continued recovery and connection to support services; and collect and evaluate outcomes data on patients receiving peer recovery coach services and coordination and continuation of care services
> allows DHS to establish policies and procedures to provide guidance on the provision of medications that reverse an overdose or treat a substance use disorder or on continuation of, or referral to, evidence-based treatment services for patients with a substance use disorder who have experienced an overdose
> DHS is required to seek any funding available from the federal government, including grant funding under the federal SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act, to establish and maintain the program or establish the policies and procedures
* 12/5/19: Introduced by Representatives Nygren, Novak, Born, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Quinn, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Magnafici, Plumer, Horlacher, Rohrkaste, Knodl, Tusler, Dittrich, Tranel, Jagler, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Billings and Bowen; cosponsored by Senators Testin, Olsen and Wanggaard
* 12/5/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Substance Abuse and Prevention
71
SB-590Olsen, Wanggaard, and Schachtner
Cosponsors: Nygren, Bowen, Novak, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Quinn, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Magnafici, Plumer, Rohrkaste, Knodl, Tusler, Petryk, Dittrich, Tranel, Thiesfeldt, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Spreitzer and Doyle
Drug Immunity
Immunity from revocation of probation, parole, or extended supervision for certain controlled substance offenses

Under current law:
> an "aider" (a person who summons or provides emergency medical assistance to another person because the aider believes the other person is suffering from an overdose or other adverse reaction to a controlled substance or controlled substance analog) is granted immunity from prosecution for certain controlled substance crimes and immunity from having probation, parole, or extended supervision revoked for possessing a controlled substance or controlled substance analog
> immunityis also granted to the aided person in this circumstance from prosecution or from having probation, parole, or extended supervision revoked for possessing a controlled substance or analog, provided that the aided person completes a drug treatment program
> the provisions relating to revocation of probation, parole, or extended supervision and to aided persons are set to sunset on August 1, 2020, at which time the law will only provide immunity from prosecution for certain controlled substance crimes to aiders.

Under this bill:
> the sunsetting or the provisions relating to probation, parole, or extended supervision and aided persons are repealed, so that current law will remain in place after August 1, 2020
* 11/27/19: Introduced by Senators Olsen, Wanggaard and Schachtner; cosponsored by Representatives Nygren, Bowen, Novak, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Quinn, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Magnafici, Plumer, Rohrkaste, Knodl, Tusler, Petryk, Dittrich, Tranel, Thiesfeldt, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Spreitzer and Doyle
* 11/27/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
72
AB-651 Nygren, Bowen, Novak, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Quinn, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Magnafici, Plumer, Rohrkaste, Knodl, Tusler, Petryk, Dittrich, Tranel, Thiesfeldt, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Spreitzer, Doyle, Billings and Stuck
Cosponsors: Olsen, Wanggaard and Schachtner
Drug Immunity
Immunity from revocation of probation, parole, or extended supervision for certain controlled substance offenses

Under current law:
> an "aider" (a person who summons or provides emergency medical assistance to another person because the aider believes the other person is suffering from an overdose or other adverse reaction to a controlled substance or controlled substance analog) is granted immunity from prosecution for certain controlled substance crimes and immunity from having probation, parole, or extended supervision revoked for possessing a controlled substance or controlled substance analog
> immunityis also granted to the aided person in this circumstance from prosecution or from having probation, parole, or extended supervision revoked for possessing a controlled substance or analog, provided that the aided person completes a drug treatment program
> the provisions relating to revocation of probation, parole, or extended supervision and to aided persons are set to sunset on August 1, 2020, at which time the law will only provide immunity from prosecution for certain controlled substance crimes to aiders.

Under this bill:
> the sunsetting or the provisions relating to probation, parole, or extended supervision and aided persons are repealed, so that current law will remain in place after August 1, 2020
* 12/5/19: Introduced by Representatives Nygren, Bowen, Novak, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Quinn, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Magnafici, Plumer, Rohrkaste, Knodl, Tusler, Petryk, Dittrich, Tranel, Thiesfeldt, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Spreitzer, Doyle, Billings and Stuck;
cosponsored by Senators Olsen, Wanggaard and Schachtner
* 12/5/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Substance Abuse and Prevention
73
SB-591Darling, Kooyenga, Olsen, Wanggaard, and Marklein
Cosponsors: Nygren, Plumer, Allen, Novak, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Magnafici, Rohrkaste, Tusler, Petryk, Dittrich, Tranel, Thiesfeldt, Jagler, Zimmerman, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Born and Billings
Recovery Residences
This bill creates a registry for recovery residences and specifies circumstances under which a state employee may not be disciplined for using controlled substances as part of medication-assisted treatment

Under this bill:
> the Department of Health Services (DHS) is required to establish and maintain a registry of approved recovery residences
> DHS must approve a recovery residence for registration if the recovery residence is either certified by a nationally recognized recovery residence certification organization that is approved by DHS or a chapter of a national recovery residence organization that is approved by DHS, and the certification organization or national organization has requirements for recovery residences as described in this bill
> DHS may not include a recovery residence in the registry if the recovery residence excludes any resident solely on the basis that the resident participates in medication-assisted treatment
> DHS must revoke the registration of a recovery residence if it ceases to be certified by or have chapter status from whichever organization had approved it
> a recovery resdence is not required to register unless the recovery residence seeks referrals or funds from the state or federal funds passing through the state treasury
> upon request for referrals to recovery residences, DHS must provide a list of registered recovery residences but may limit the list of registered recovery residences it provides based on the geographical and other preferences specified by the person requesting referrals
> a recovery residence is prohibited from using the designation of or holding itself out as "registered" or "state approved" unless the recovery residence is included in the registry under this bill

Under current law - State Employees:
> a state employee may be removed, suspended without pay, discharged, demoted, or receive a reduction in pay without receiving prior progressive discipline for being under the influence of or in possession of a controlled substance or controlled substance analog while on duty
Under this bill - State Employees:
> a state employee is not subject to discipline without prior progressive discipline if the person is under the influence of a controlled substance or a controlled substance analog while on duty if the employee is using the controlled substance or analog as dispensed, prescribed, or recommended as part of medication-assisted treatment
> it is provided that a state employee is not subject to discipline without prior progressive discipline for possession of a controlled substance or analog without a prescription while on duty if the employee is using the controlled substance or analog as dispensed, prescribed, or recommended as part of medication-assisted treatment
* 11/27/19: Introduced by Senators Darling, Kooyenga, Olsen, Wanggaard and Marklein; Cosponsored by Representatives Nygren, Plumer, Allen, Novak, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Magnafici, Rohrkaste, Tusler, Petryk, Dittrich, Tranel, Thiesfeldt, Jagler, Zimmerman, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Born and Billings
* 11/27/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Health and Human Services
* 12/6/19: Representative Wichgers added as a cosponsor
74
AB-646Nygren, Plumer, Allen, Novak, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Magnafici, Rohrkaste, Tusler, Petryk, Dittrich, Tranel, Thiesfeldt, Jagler, Zimmerman, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Born and Billings
Cosponsors: Darling, Olsen, Wanggaard, and Marklein
Recovery Residences
This bill creates a registry for recovery residences and specifies circumstances under which a state employee may not be disciplined for using controlled substances as part of medication-assisted treatment

Under this bill:
> the Department of Health Services (DHS) is required to establish and maintain a registry of approved recovery residences
> DHS must approve a recovery residence for registration if the recovery residence is either certified by a nationally recognized recovery residence certification organization that is approved by DHS or a chapter of a national recovery residence organization that is approved by DHS, and the certification organization or national organization has requirements for recovery residences as described in this bill
> DHS may not include a recovery residence in the registry if the recovery residence excludes any resident solely on the basis that the resident participates in medication-assisted treatment
> DHS must revoke the registration of a recovery residence if it ceases to be certified by or have chapter status from whichever organization had approved it
> a recovery resdence is not required to register unless the recovery residence seeks referrals or funds from the state or federal funds passing through the state treasury
> upon request for referrals to recovery residences, DHS must provide a list of registered recovery residences but may limit the list of registered recovery residences it provides based on the geographical and other preferences specified by the person requesting referrals
> a recovery residence is prohibited from using the designation of or holding itself out as "registered" or "state approved" unless the recovery residence is included in the registry under this bill

Under current law - State Employees:
> a state employee may be removed, suspended without pay, discharged, demoted, or receive a reduction in pay without receiving prior progressive discipline for being under the influence of or in possession of a controlled substance or controlled substance analog while on duty
Under this bill - State Employees:
> a state employee is not subject to discipline without prior progressive discipline if the person is under the influence of a controlled substance or a controlled substance analog while on duty if the employee is using the controlled substance or analog as dispensed, prescribed, or recommended as part of medication-assisted treatment
> it is provided that a state employee is not subject to discipline without prior progressive discipline for possession of a controlled substance or analog without a prescription while on duty if the employee is using the controlled substance or analog as dispensed, prescribed, or recommended as part of medication-assisted treatment
* 12/5/19: Introduced by Representatives Nygren, Plumer, Allen, Novak, Snyder, Petersen, Kitchens, Felzkowski, Edming, Kulp, Magnafici, Rohrkaste, Tusler, Petryk, Dittrich, Tranel, Thiesfeldt, Jagler, Zimmerman, Spiros, Mursau, Ramthun, Born and Billings; Cosponsored by Senators Darling, Olsen, Wanggaard and Marklein
* 12/5/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Substance Abuse and Prevention
* 12/6/19: Representative Wichgers added as a coauthor
75
SB-592Darling, Feyen, Olsen, and Wanggaard
Cosponsors: Brooks, Schraa, Ballweg, Born, Bowen, Emerson, Krug, Kulp, Magnafici, L. Myers, Nygren, Plumer, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Spiros, Tusler and Zimmerman
Prisoner Medication
Providing medication and a valid prescription to a prisoner upon release

Under this bill:
> the Department of Corrections (DOC) must identify whether any person who is about to be released from prison is currently taking a prescription medication
> if an individual is taking a prescription medication for a condition that is expected to last at least 12 weeks after the individual's release, DOC must provide to the individual at the time of release a six-week supply of the medication and a valid prescription to obtain six weeks worth of medication to be filled at a later date
> if an individual is taking prescription medication for a condition that is expected to last less than 12 weeks after the inidividual's release, DOC must provide to the individual at the time of their release an appropriate supply of the medication
* 11/27/19: Introduced by Senators Darling, Feyen, Olsen and Wanggaard; cosponsored by Representatives Brooks, Schraa, Ballweg, Born, Bowen, Emerson, Krug, Kulp, Magnafici, L. Myers, Nygren, Plumer, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Spiros, Tusler and Zimmerman
* 11/27/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety
* 12/3/19: Representatives Subeck and Skowronski added as cosponsors
76
AB-653Brooks, Schraa, Ballweg, Born, Bowen, Emerson, Krug, Kulp, Magnafici, L. Myers, Nygren, Plumer, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Spiros, Tusler, Zimmerman, Subeck and Skowronski
Cosponsors: Darling, Feyen, Olsen, and Wanggaard
Prisoner Medication
Providing medication and a valid prescription to a prisoner upon release

Under this bill:
> the Department of Corrections (DOC) must identify whether any person who is about to be released from prison is currently taking a prescription medication
> if an individual is taking a prescription medication for a condition that is expected to last at least 12 weeks after the individual's release, DOC must provide to the individual at the time of release a six-week supply of the medication and a valid prescription to obtain six weeks worth of medication to be filled at a later date
> if an individual is taking prescription medication for a condition that is expected to last less than 12 weeks after the inidividual's release, DOC must provide to the individual at the time of their release an appropriate supply of the medication
* 12/5/19: Introduced by Representatives Brooks, Schraa, Ballweg, Born, Bowen, Emerson, Krug, Kulp, Magnafici, L. Myers, Nygren, Plumer, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Spiros, Tusler, Zimmerman, Subeck and Skowronski; cosponsored by Senators Darling, Feyen, Olsen and Wanggaard
* 12/5/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Corrections
77
SB-593Darling, Feyen, Olsen, and Wanggaard
Cosponsors: Brooks, Schraa, Bowen, Ballweg, Born, Dittrich, Emerson, Horlacher, Knodl, Kulp, Nygren, Plumer, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Spiros and Tusler
DOC Telehealth
Expanding telehealth mental health treatment to offenders under community supervision

This bill requires the Department of Corrections to expand telehealth mental health treatment to offenders under community supervision in division of community corrections regions 4, 6, and 8.
* 11/27/19: Introduced by Senators Darling, Feyen, Olsen and Wanggaard; cosponsored by Representatives Brooks, Schraa, Bowen, Ballweg, Born, Dittrich, Emerson, Horlacher, Knodl, Kulp, Nygren, Plumer, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Spiros and Tusler
* 11/27/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Health and Human Services
78
AB-654Brooks, Schraa, Ballweg, Born, Bowen, Emerson, Krug, Kulp, Magnafici, L. Myers, Nygren, Plumer, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Spiros, Tusler, Zimmerman, Subeck and Skowronski
Cosponsors: Darling, Feyen, Olsen, and Wanggaard
DOC Telehealth
Expanding telehealth mental health treatment to offenders under community supervision

This bill requires the Department of Corrections to expand telehealth mental health treatment to offenders under community supervision in division of community corrections regions 4, 6, and 8.
* 12/5/19: Introduced by Representatives Brooks, Schraa, Bowen, Ballweg, Born, Dittrich, Emerson, Horlacher, Knodl, Kulp, Nygren, Plumer, Quinn, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Spiros and Tusler; cosponsored by Senators Darling, Feyen, Olsen and Wanggaard
* 12/5/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Mental Health
79
SB-594Darling, Cowles, Olsen, and Wanggaard
Cosponsors: Born, Nygren, Billings, Bowen, Dittrich, Edming, Felzkowski, Jagler, Kitchens, Knodl, Kulp, Magnafici, Mursau, Novak, Petersen, Petryk, Plumer, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Snyder, Spiros, Thiesfeldt, Tranel and Tusler
Medication-Assisted Treatment
Opioid antagonist administration in jails and medication-asssisted treatment availability in prisons and jails

Under current law:
> law enforcement agencies and fire departments may enter into agreements to affiliate with ambulance service providers or physicians to obtain a supplyof naloxone or other opioid antagonist and allow certain individuals to receive the training necessary to safely and properly administer those medications to individuals who are undergoing an opioid-related drug overdose
> law enforcement officers and fire fighters are also granted immunity from civil and criminal liability for any outcomes resulting from the administration of an opioid antagonist to a person the officer or fire fighter reasonably believes is undergoing an opioid-related drug overdose, if the officer or firefighter is acting pursuant to an agreement with an ambulance service provider or physician and their training

Under this bill:
> the authority to enter into agreements related to obtaining, training, and administration of naloxone is granted to county jails
> the same immunity from civil and criminal liability granted to law enforcement officers and firefighters in the administration of an opioid antagonist is extended to a jailer or keeper of a jail or person designated with custodial authority by the jailer or keeper
> the Department of Health Services (DHS), after consulting with the Department of Corrections (DOC), to study the availability of medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder in each prison and county jail, including by identifying certain pieces of data specificed in this bill
> DHS, again after consulting DOC, must then use the results of this study to propose to implement, or identify county officials to implement, a pilot project to make available all approved medications for medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder in at least one prison or county jail
> DHS must report its study findings, its proposal, and any requests for proposed statutory changes or funding necessary to implement the pilot project to the Joint Committee on Finance
* 11/27/19: Introduced by Senators Darling, Cowles, Olsen and Wanggaard; cosponsored by Representatives Born, Nygren, Billings, Bowen, Dittrich, Edming, Felzkowski, Jagler, Kitchens, Knodl, Kulp, Magnafici, Mursau, Novak, Petersen, Petryk, Plumer, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Snyder, Spiros, Thiesfeldt, Tranel and Tusler
* 11/27/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Health and Human Services
80
AB-645Born, Nygren, Billings, Bowen, Dittrich, Edming, Felzkowski, Jagler, Kitchens, Knodl, Kulp, Magnafici, Mursau, Novak, Petersen, Petryk, Plumer, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Snyder, Spiros, Thiesfeldt, Tranel and Tusler;
Cosponsors: Darling, Cowles, Olsen and Wanggaard
Medication-Assisted Treatment
Opioid antagonist administration in jails and medication-asssisted treatment availability in prisons and jails

Under current law:
> law enforcement agencies and fire departments may enter into agreements to affiliate with ambulance service providers or physicians to obtain a supplyof naloxone or other opioid antagonist and allow certain individuals to receive the training necessary to safely and properly administer those medications to individuals who are undergoing an opioid-related drug overdose
> law enforcement officers and fire fighters are also granted immunity from civil and criminal liability for any outcomes resulting from the administration of an opioid antagonist to a person the officer or fire fighter reasonably believes is undergoing an opioid-related drug overdose, if the officer or firefighter is acting pursuant to an agreement with an ambulance service provider or physician and their training

Under this bill:
> the authority to enter into agreements related to obtaining, training, and administration of naloxone is granted to county jails
> the same immunity from civil and criminal liability granted to law enforcement officers and firefighters in the administration of an opioid antagonist is extended to a jailer or keeper of a jail or person designated with custodial authority by the jailer or keeper
> the Department of Health Services (DHS), after consulting with the Department of Corrections (DOC), to study the availability of medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder in each prison and county jail, including by identifying certain pieces of data specificed in this bill
> DHS, again after consulting DOC, must then use the results of this study to propose to implement, or identify county officials to implement, a pilot project to make available all approved medications for medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder in at least one prison or county jail
> DHS must report its study findings, its proposal, and any requests for proposed statutory changes or funding necessary to implement the pilot project to the Joint Committee on Finance
* 12/5/19: Introduced by Representatives Born, Nygren, Billings, Bowen, Dittrich, Edming, Felzkowski, Jagler, Kitchens, Knodl, Kulp, Magnafici, Mursau, Novak, Petersen, Petryk, Plumer, Ramthun, Rohrkaste, Snyder, Spiros, Thiesfeldt, Tranel and Tusler; cosponsored by Senators Darling, Cowles, Olsen and Wanggaard
* 12/5/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Substance Abuse and Prevention
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SB-609Darling, Johnson, Bewley, Olsen, Wanggaard, and Ringhand
Cosponsors: Ballweg, Billings, Bowen, Considine, Emerson, Horlacher, Krug, Ohnstad, Ramthun, Snyder, Spreitzer, Stubbs, Tittl, Tusler and Dittrich
Residential Treatment Program
Qualified residential treatment programs, providing an exemption from rule-making procedures, and granting rule-making authority

Under this bill:
> the Department of Children and Families (DCF) is authorized to certify a residential care center, group home, or shelter care facility to operate a qualified residential treatment program for children and youth (QRTP) if it determines that the program meets the federal requirements for such a program to receive Title IV-E child welfare funding and DCF's requirements for such a program
> DCF is required to promulgate the rules for establishment, certification, and operation of a QRTP
*12/6/19: Introduced by Senators Darling, Johnson, Bewley, Olsen, Wanggaard and Ringhand; cosponsored by Representatives Ballweg, Billings, Bowen, Considine, Emerson, Horlacher, Krug, Ohnstad, Ramthun, Snyder, Spreitzer, Stubbs, Tittl, Tusler and Dittrich
* 12/6/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Universities, Technical Colleges, Children and Families
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AB-643Ballweg, Billings, Bowen, Considine, Emerson, Horlacher, Krug, Ohnstad, Ramthun, Snyder, Spreitzer, Stubbs, Tittl, Tusler, Vining and Skowronski
Cosponsors: Darling, Johnson, Bewley, Olsen, Wanggaard, and Ringhand
Residential Treatment Program
Qualified residential treatment programs, providing an exemption from rule-making procedures, and granting rule-making authority

Under this bill:
> the Department of Children and Families (DCF) is authorized to certify a residential care center, group home, or shelter care facility to operate a qualified residential treatment program for children and youth (QRTP) if it determines that the program meets the federal requirements for such a program to receive Title IV-E child welfare funding and DCF's requirements for such a program
> DCF is required to promulgate the rules for establishment, certification, and operation of a QRTP
* 12/2/19: Introduced by Representatives Ballweg, Billings, Bowen, Considine, Emerson, Horlacher, Krug, Ohnstad, Ramthun, Snyder, Spreitzer, Stubbs, Tittl, Tusler, Vining and Skowronski; cosponsored by Senators Darling, Johnson, Bewley, Olsen, Wanggaard and Ringhand
* 12/2/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Children and Families
* 12/3/19: Representative Kolste added as a coauthor
* 12/5/19: Representative Dittrich added as a coauthor
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SB-618Schachtner, Bewley, Carpenter, Miller, and Ringhand
Cosponsors: Emerson, Brostoff, Ohnstad, Stubbs, Subeck, and Bowen
Behavioral Health Grant
Hospital-based behavioral health crisis management grant and making an appropriation

Under this bill:
> the Department of Health Services (DHS) is required to award a onetime grant to a critical access hospital to support the cost of a behavioral health crisis management system
> DHS must award the grant to a critical access hospital that meets certain criteria, including providing alcohol and drug abuse assessment and treatment services and inpatient psychiatric services and presenting a proposal that does all of the following:
>> (1) provides in-person triage, assessment, and brief intervention services to persons presenting in the hospital emergency department for reasons related to a behavioral health crisis;
>> (2) provides these services through video telemedicine consultation to persons presenting in hospital emergency departments, other than the hospitals emergency department, in the hospital's region; and
>> (3) coordinates the transfer of persons who require care for a behavioral health condition to another facility, as appropriate
* 12/6/19: Introduced by Senators Schachtner, Bewley, Carpenter, Miller and Ringhand; cosponsored by Representatives Emerson, Brostoff, Ohnstad, Stubbs, Subeck and Bowen
* 12/6/19: Read first time and referred to Committee on Health and Human Services
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