"I Can..." statements for Math (BC New Curriculum)
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KindergartenNumber concepts to 10Change in quantity to 10Direct comparative measurement
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Big IdeasI can count items from one to ten.I can describe what happens to a quantity when a new item is added.
I can use the terms "more" and "less" to describe how two objects are different.
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I can count in sequence to ten, going up.I can explain how many items I need to make a specified quantity.I can compare how well an item will hold something (capacity)
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Quantities can be decomposed into smaller
I can associate a quantity with its number.I can compare the different weights of two items (mass)
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parts.I can recognize a quantity when arranged differently.Pictorial representation of concrete graphsI can compare the different heights or lengths of an item (linear height)
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I can put number symbols in order from smallest to largest.I read a pictorial graph to gain information about my class.
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One-to-one correspondence and aI can connect a quantity of items to its corresponding number symbol.I can use a graph to determine what is most or least common in my classroom.
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sense of 5 and 10 are essential for working
I can use ten frames to represent quantities and numbers.
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with numbers.I can recognize a number on a ten frame without counting the dots.Likelihood of events
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I can recognize quantities 0-5 without counting them up.I can determine how likely a familiar event is to happen.
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Repeating elements can be identified.I can recognize numbers on a six-sided die without counting the dots.I can use vocabulary to describe the likelihood of an event.
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Objects have attributes.Ways to make 5Financial literacy
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I can use manipulatives to make quantities to five.I can identify different colours of Canadian coins.
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Familiar events can be described as likely
I can put manipulatives into groups to make quantities to five (ex. 4 and 1)I can identify different sizes or shapes of Canadian coins
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or unlikely.I can put quantities together to make 5.
I can name the values of different Canadian coins (penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar)
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I can compare numbers and see which one is bigger.I can role-play interactions involving the exchange of money
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I can compare numbers and see which one is smaller.I can describe different needs and wants.
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Decomposition of numbers to 10Repeating and increasing patterns
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I can break apart numbers and put them together to make 10.I can make a pattern using sounds, objects, actions, and numbers to 100.
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I can use manipulatives, ten frames, or rods to make 10.I can identify different patterns in my daily life.
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I can use parts to create a whole (2 and 5 make 7)I can create a repeating pattern with two different things.
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I can create a repeating pattern with three different things.
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Attributes of 2D and 3D objectsI can find the core part of a repeating pattern.
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I can sort shapes into groups based on what they look like.
I can share a repeating pattern through pictures, sounds, objects, words, or numbers.
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I can describe common 2D and 3D shapes.
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I can draw different shapes.Equality as a balance (and inequality as an imbalance)
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I can make different shapes out of materials (crafts, lego, blocks, etc).I can use concrete materials to describe how things balance.
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I can use positional language to describe where something is.I can explain why an amount is unequal.
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Grade 1Number concepts to 20Addition and subtraction to 100Addition and subtraction facts to 20
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Big IdeasI can count forwards from zero to twenty, starting at any number.I can break down numbers up to 100I can add numbers to 20 without visual or concrete support.
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I can count backwards from twenty to zero, starting at any number.I can use the front-end estimating strategy to estimate sums to 100I can subtract numbers to 20 without visual or concrete support.
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Numbers to 20 can be decomposed into 10’s
I can skip count forwards by 2, starting at zero.I can use the front-end estimating strategy to estimate differences to 100
I can break down numbers up to twenty into parts without visual or concrete support
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and 1’s.I can skip count forwards by 5, starting at zero.I can use the compensation estimating strategy to estimate sums to 100
I can combine numbers up to a total of twenty without visual or concrete support
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I can put number symbols in order from least to greatest.I can use the compensation estimating strategy to estimate differences to 100
I can break down numbers up to twenty into parts without visual or concrete support
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I can recognize the number symbols for 0-20.I can use friendly numbers to calculate sums to 100I can double numbers up to twenty
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Addition and subtraction can be modelled
I can use ten frames to represent quantities and numbers.I can use friendly numbers to calculate differences to 100
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oncretely, pictorially, and mentally, using
I can recognize a number on two ten frames without counting.I can use multiples of ten to help calculate sums to 100Pictorial representation of concrete graphs
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strategies involving counting and making 10.
I can recognize quantities 0-20 without counting them up, when arranged in a familiar way.I can use multiples of ten to help calculate differences to 100I can collect data and represent it in a bar graph.
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I can explain the difference between tens and units.I can use number lines to calculate sums.I can represent an idea using objects to represent a single piece of data.
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Repeating elements can be identified.I can recognize quantities higher than 10 as "10 and some more".I can use number lines to calculate differencesI can sort data into groups based on a similar result
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I can use a hundreds chart to calculate sums.
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Objects and shapes have attributes.Ways to make 10I can use a hundreds chart to calculate differences.Likelihood of events
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I can break down numbers into parts.I can use ten frames to calculate sums.I can determine how likely an event is to happen.
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Concrete graphs show one-to-oneI can use ten-frames to calculate differences.I can use vocabulary to describe the likelihood of an event.
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correspondence.Repeating and increasing patternsI can use mathematical vocabulary to describe my thinking.
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I can make a pattern using sounds, objects, actions, and numbers to 100.I can apply subtraction and/or addition to real-life situationsFinancial literacy
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I can identify strategies appropriate for solving a particular problem.I can identify identify the value of coins in Canadian currency.
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Decomposition of numbers to 10I can use coins to represent their numerical quantities
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I can break apart numbers and put them together to make 10.Attributes of 2D and 3D objectsI can count by the values of coins.
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I can use manipulatives, ten frames, or rods to make 10.I can identify 2D shapes that are part of 3D shapes.I can explain what money is and how it is used.
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I can use parts to create a whole (2 and 5 make 7)I can describe and compare common 2D shapes.I can explain why it is important to save money for needs and wants
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I can identify the parts of a shape (faces, verteces and edges)I can set a simple savings goal
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Attributes of 2D and 3D objectsI can sort shapes into groups using at least two attributesI can name different sources of income (allowance, birthday money, etc)
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I can sort shapes into groups based on what they look like.I can find and describe the rule used to sort shapes.I can role-play interactions involving the exchange of money
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I can describe common 2D and 3D shapes.
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I can draw different shapes.Change in quantity using pictorial and symbolic representation.
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I can make different shapes out of materials (crafts, lego, blocks, etc).I can identify a what kind of change is happening in a problem
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I can use positional language to describe where something is.I can represent the change using a ten frame, number line or hundreds chart.
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Grade 2Number concepts to 100Addition and subtraction to 100Addition and subtraction facts to 20
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Big IdeasI can skip count by 2, starting at 0 and going up to 100.I can break down numbers up to 100I can add numbers to 20 without visual or concrete support.
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I can skip count by 2, starting at any number and going up to 100.I can use the front-end estimating strategy to estimate sums to 100I can subtract numbers to 20 without visual or concrete support.
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Numbers to 100 can be decomposedI can skip count by 2, starting at 100 and going down.I can use the front-end estimating strategy to estimate differences to 100
I can break down numbers up to twenty into parts without visual or concrete support
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into 10’s and 1’s.I can skip count by 2, starting at any number below 100 and going down.I can use the compensation estimating strategy to estimate sums to 100
I can combine numbers up to a total of twenty without visual or concrete support
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I can skip count by 5, starting at 0 and going up to 100.I can use the compensation estimating strategy to estimate differences to 100
I can break down numbers up to twenty into parts without visual or concrete support
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Fluency in addition and subtraction with
I can skip count by 5, starting at any number and going up to 100.I can use friendly numbers to calculate sums to 100I can double numbers up to twenty
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numbers to 100 requires understanding
I can skip count by 5, starting at 100 and going down.I can use friendly numbers to calculate differences to 100
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of place value and mental math strategies.
I can skip count by 5, starting at any number below 100 and going down.I can use multiples of ten to help calculate sums to 100Pictorial representation of concrete graphs
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I can skip count by 10, starting at 0 and going up to 100.I can use multiples of ten to help calculate differences to 100I can collect data and represent it in a bar graph.
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The regular change in increasingI can skip count by 10, starting at any number and going up to 100.I can use number lines to calculate sums.I can represent my findings using pictures (pictographs)
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patterns can be identified.I can skip count by 10, starting at 100 and going down.I can use number lines to calculate differencesI can sort data into groups based on a similar result
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I can skip count by 10, starting at any number below 100 and going down.I can use a hundreds chart to calculate sums.
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Objects and shapes have attributes.I can compare two numbers and decide which one is the largest.I can use a hundreds chart to calculate differences.Likelihood of events
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I can compare two numbers and decide which one is the smallest.I can use ten frames to calculate sums.I can determine how likely an event is to happen.
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Concrete items can be represented pictorially.
I can compare two numbers and put them in order from smallest to largest.I can use ten-frames to calculate differences.I can use vocabulary to describe the likelihood of an event.
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I can compare two numbers and put them in order from largest to smallest.I can use mathematical vocabulary to describe my thinking.
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I can compare multiple numbers and put them in order from smallest to largest.I can apply subtraction and/or addition to real-life situationsFinancial literacy
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I can compare multiple numbers and put them in order from largest to smallest.I can identify strategies appropriate for solving a particular problem.I can identify identify the value of coins in Canadian currency.
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I can identify units and tensI can use coins to represent their numerical quantities
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I can break down numbers into units and tensAttributes of 2D and 3D objectsI can add up the values of coins to 100 cents
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I can construct numbers when given the units and tens.I can identify 2D shapes that are part of 3D shapes.I can differentiate between human needs and wants
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I can relate digit places to their value (I know that the "4" in 49 means "40"I can describe and compare common 2D shapes.I can explain why it is important to save money for needs and wants
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I can identify the parts of a shape (faces, verteces and edges)I can set a simple savings goal
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Direct linear measurementI can sort shapes into groups using at least two attributesI can name different sources of income (allowance, birthday money, etc)
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I can identify centimetres on a ruler.I can find and describe the rule used to sort shapes.I can role-play interactions involving the exchange of money
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I can make connections between units (100cm = 1m)
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I can estimate the heights and widths of different objects using standard metric unitsChange in quantity using pictorial and symbolic representation.Repeating and increasing patterns
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I can record heights, widths and lengths using these unitsI can identify a what kind of change is happening in a problemI can make a pattern using sounds, objects, actions, and numbers to 100.
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I can choose an appropriate unit of measurement for what I am measuring.I can represent the change using a ten frame, number line or hundreds chart.
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Grade 3Number concepts to 1000Addition and subtraction to 1000Addition and subtraction facts to 20Multiplication and division concepts
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Big IdeasI can skip count by any number, starting at 0 up towards 1000I can break down numbers up to 1000I can add numbers to 20 without visual or concrete support.I can represent a multiplication problem through repeated addition.
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I can skip count by any number, starting at 1000 down towards 0.I can use the front-end estimating strategy to estimate sums to 1000I can subtract numbers to 20 without visual or concrete support.I can represent a multiplication problem through groups of ___.
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