PHCF Plants Database
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Common NameArea/BedGenusSpeciesCultivar# of PlantsMore infoPlant PhotoBed Photo (summer)Bed Photo (spring)TypeBloom timeBloom colourAspectZoneSoil typeCareMax size (h x w)Notes (diseases, pests, control needed etc)Unsuitable locationPropagationUses
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LavenderSustainable BedLavandulaPhotoPhotoShrubdrought tolerant plantLeaves, petals and flowering tips - raw. Used as a condiment in salads, soups, stews. The fresh or dried flowers are used as a tea. Fresh flowers used as flavoring in jams, honey, ice-cream and vinegar. Various medicinal uses: an important relaxing herb, having a soothing and relaxing affect upon the nervous system; flowering spikes can be dried and used internally in a tincture; essential oils and can be safely applied direct to the skin as an antiseptic to help heal wounds, burns etc; when oil is rubbed into the temples it can cure a nervous headache; has powerful antiseptic properties that can kill many of the common bacteria such as typhoid, diphtheria, streptococcus and Pneumococcus; very useful in the treatment of burns, sunburn, scalds, bites. essential oil can be used in perfumes and soaps. It can be used as a cleaning product and insect repellent.
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Coral bells / Alum rootSustainable BedHeucheraPhotoPhotoPerennialJuneFull sun - partial shade4--9
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SedumSustainable BedSedum"Autumn Joy"PhotoPhotoPerennialSeptemberDark pinkNative plant
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New England Aster, Michaelmas DaisySustainable BedSymphyotrichumnovae-angliaePhotoPhotoPerennialAutumnNative plant
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Northeastern ColumbineSustainable BedAquilegiaPhotoPhotoPerennialNative plant
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Bee BalmSustainable BedMonardadidyma"Marhsall's Delight"several / clumpdavesgarden.comPhotoPhotoPerennialmid-Summer- FallBubblegum pinkNative plantaromatic leaves used in Oswego Tea. Contains Thymol, the active ingredient in Listerine and other antiseptic mouthwashes
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Sustainable BedPhotoPhoto
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Granny's BonnetMarcia BedAquilegiavulgarisSeveralfinegardening.comPhotoPhotoPhotoPerennialMayFull sun - partial shade3-8Well drained, dry to medium1-3ft x 6-12inPowdery mildew, rust, fungal leaf spots. Aphids, leaf miners, and caterpillars. None seem to be much of a problem at PHCF though.Plants will cross pollinate so remove or move crosses if you want to keep a true variety.The plant is potentially poisonous though the toxins are destroyed by heat or by drying. Flowers can be eaten raw and are rich in nectar, making them sweet and delightful. Use in salads or as a
thirst-quenching munch in the garden. The flowers are also used as a tea substitute. The dried and crushed seed is used to kill external body parasites, and kills lice in hair.
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PeonyMarcia BedPaeonia1PhotoPhotoPerennialThe entire plant is poisonous if taken in large doses. The cooked flowers can be used as a vegetable or to scent tea. The root harvested in the autumn from plants that are at least two years old can be dried and employed in the treatment of convulsions and spasmodic nervous affections such as epilepsy. A tea made from the dried crushed petals of various peony species has been used as a cough remedy, and as a treatment for haemorrhoids and varicose veins.
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RoseMarcia BedRosa1PhotoPhotoShrub
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False IndigoMarcia BedBaptisiaaustralisfinegardening.comPhotoPhotoPhotoPerennialMayBlueFull sun - partial shade3-9Well drained, dry to mediumCan be cut back after flowering. Otherwise produces big back seed pods.3-6ft x 1-3ftA blue dye is obtained from the plant's leaves & flowers. A poultice of the root is anti-inflammatory and is held in the mouth to treat toothaches.
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Bell flowerMarcia BedCampanularapunculoidesmissouribotanicalgarden.comPhotoPhotoPerennialJune-JulyBlue-purpleFull sun - partial shade4-8Well drained, medium moistureSpreads quite readily so may need controlling. Can be cut back after flowering to promote further blooms and prevent self seeding.3-4ft x 1.5-2ftWith its serrated, nettle-like leaves, it looks quite weedy before it flowers so make sure you don't pull it out!Can be split in autumn every 3-4 years. Self seeds.Flowers can be eaten raw or cooked. Young shoot can bee eaten raw or cooked and are very high in vitamin C.
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Coventry BellsCampanulatracheliumPhotoPhoto
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Cornish bellflowerMarcia BedCampanulaalliariifoliaPhotoPhoto
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TulipMarcia BedTulipaPhotoPhotoBulb
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LarkspurMarcia BedDelphiniumPhotoPhoto
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ColumbineMarcia BedAquilegiaPhotoPhoto
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Wild VioletsMarcia BedPhotoPhoto
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Grape HyacinthMarcia BedMuscariarmeniacumClusterfinegardening.comPhotoPhotoPhotoBulbSpringBlueFull sun - part shade4-8Must be well drained
6-12" x 3-6"Divide when dormant
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Black-eyed SusanTextile & Dye BedRudbeckiahirta1finegardening.comPhotoPhotoPhotoPerennialJulyYellowFull sun - partial shadeSeparate leaves, stems from flower heads for green and golden colors, depending on which part is used
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California PoppyTextile & Dye BedEschscholziacalifornicaManyAnnualOrangeFull sunSeedroots yellow dye
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Daffodils (perhaps 'sea gull')Textile & Dye BedNarcissusManyPhotoPhotoPhotoBulbAprilWhite petals, yellow cupFull sun - partial shadeflowers for yellow
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Dyer's CoreopsisTextile & Dye BedCoreopsistinctoriaManydavesgarden.comPhotoPhotoAnnualJuly-August-SeptemberYellow/orangeFull sun - partial shaden/aNeutrual phSelf seeds freely although perhaps not quite as well against the poppies and queen anne's lace2-3ft x 1ftPlant seeds 1/2" deepGather flower heads during growing season for an orange
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Lily of the ValleyTextile & Dye BedConvallariamajalisManyfinegardening.comPhotoPhotoBulbMayWhiteParial shade - full shade3-8Medium moistureDivide if flowers become sparse6-12" x 1-3ftQuite prolific, will spreadDivisionLeaves for pale green
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MadderTextile & Dye BedRubiatinctorum1PerennialWhiteFull sun - partial shadeshould have something to grow upMature root (~3 years) produces red
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Marigold (medley)Textile & Dye BedTageteslucida and patulaFewPhotoPhotoAnnualRed, gold, yellowFull sun - partial shadeworks best if grown indoors firstGather leaves and flower heads during the growing season. Use them fresh or dry them to create shades of yellow, gold, beige and brown.
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Common milkweedTextile & Dye BedAsclepiassyriacaFewPinkyVigourous, grows from suckers.DivisionSeed pod as insulation or buoyancy aid, bast fiber from stem
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Queen Anne's LaceTextile & Dye BedDaucuscarotaManySeedUse tops fresh in a dye bath to get green-yellow shades on alum mordanted wool
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SoapwortTextile & Dye BedSaponariaofficinalisBetty Arnold2PerennialJuly to SeptemberWhiteFull sunleaves and stem for washing/soap
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WoadTextile & Dye BedIsatistinctoria1PhotoPhotoBiennialYellowFull sun - partial shade3-8SeedLeaves can be used to make blue dye
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YuccaTextile & Dye BedYuccafilamentosaAdam's Needle2http://www.hortmag.com/plants/plants-we-love/adams-needle-yucca-is-a-low-maintenance-hardy-succulentPerennialWhiteFull sun4-10most well-drained soil types. native: dry, sandy soils.Water regularly and thoroughly until established; then they will tolerate drought. Remove the flower stalks once the flowers have dropped. 2' to 3' with a similar spread. flower stalks: 5' to 8', up to 12'DivisionLeaves for fiber
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Blood rootTextile & Dye BedSanguinariaCanedensis1http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=m290PerennialMarch to AprilWhitePart shade - full shade too sunny? Root produces red
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Dahlia Crossfield EbonyTextile & Dye BedDahlia"Crossfield Ebony"1davesgarden.comPhotoPhotoTuberJuly-August-SeptemberDark redFull sunNot hardy in NYC. Tubers must be lifted and stored during winter. Deadhead for more bloomsdid fine, but needs winter storageGather flower heads during growing season for a violet dye
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Dahlia GlenplaceTextile & Dye BedDahlia"Glenplace"1allthingsplants.comPhotoPhotoTuberJuly-August-SeptemberDark redFull sunNot hardy in NYC. Tubers must be lifted and stored during winter. Deadhead for more bloomsdid fine, but needs winter storageGather flower heads during growing season for a violet dye
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ElecampaneTextile & Dye BedInulaheleniumOfficial3Perennial
YellowFull sun - partial shadeMoistRoots can be used to make blues and purple dye
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FlaxTextile & Dye BedLinumusitatissimum>10
PhotoPhotoAnnualFull sun - partial shadeFiber
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HollyhockTextile & Dye BedAlcearosea var. nigra"The Watchman"PhotoPhotoBiennialJuly-August-SeptemberDeep burgundyFull sunhardy to US zone 2Well composted, not too sandy, fertile5-6ft x 1ftGrown from seed, the plant succumbed to rust two years in a rowdarker flowers give interesting pinkish hues, while lighter blooms give light pink to yellow orange hues. Pick flowers every few days and keep them in a plastic bag in refrigerator for a week or two until you have enough to use for dying.
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Japanese Indigo
Textile & Dye BedPolygonumtinctoriaa fewAnnualwhite, Pink
Full sunLeaves can be used to make blue dye
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SafflowerTextile & Dye BedCarthamustinctoriusZanzibar3AnnualYellowFull sun - partial shadePoor, dry to mesicflowers for pink
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SunflowersTextile & Dye BedHelianthusannus
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DaffodilsFrancis's BedNarcissusPhotoPhotoPhotoBulbAprilThe chopped root is applied externally as a poultice to abscesses, boils and other skin complaints.
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HydrangeaFrancis's BedHydrangea1PhotoPhotoShrubThe young leaves, even without fermentation, are very sweet and are used to make a sweet tea called 'tea of heaven', it is used in Buddhist ceremonies. The young leaves and shoots are also eaten cooked
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Rose (species?)Francis's BedRosa?1PhotoPhotoShrubYellow
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Rose (species?)Francis's BedRosa?1PhotoPhotoShrub
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Black-eyed SusanFrancis's BedRudbeckiahirtaManyfinegardening.comPhotoPhotoPhotoPerennialAugustA yellow dye is obtained from the flowers. An infusion of the roots has been used in the treatment of colds, dropsy and worms in children. A warm infusion of the root has been used as a wash on sores and snake bites. The ooze from the roots has been used as drops to treat earaches.
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Lily of the ValleyFrancis's BedConvallariamajalisManyfinegardening.comPhotoPhotoBulbMayWhiteParial shade - full shade3-8Medium moistureDivide if flowers become sparse6-12" x 1-3ftQuite prolific, will spreadDivision
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TulipFrancis's BedTulipa10http://www.phcfarm.com/welcome/wp-content/uploads/front-box-2_tulip-red_201404.jpg
http://www.phcfarm.com/welcome/wp-content/uploads/front-box-2_tulip-white_201404.jpg
PhotoPhotoBulbSpringWhite, orange
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HyacinthFrancis's BedHyacinthus2PhotoPhotoPhotoBulbSpringWhite
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GeraniumFrancis's BedPhotoPhoto
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Oldfield CinquefoilFrancis's BedPotentillasimplex Michx.ManyPhotoPhotoUncertain on this one. Looks like false strawberry but has 5 leaflets.
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Bleeding HeartFront box 5Lamprocapnos (prev. Dicentra)spectabilis2finegardening.comPhotoPhotoPhotoRhizomatous herbaceous perennialMayMagenta/pink, whiteFull sun - (preferably) part shade3-9Humusy, medium moisture, neutral to slightly alkaline3-6ft x 1-3ftDivide in early spring of after foliage has died down. Root cuttings in winter. From seeedling (self seeds freely, seedlings can be transplanted in early May)The plant is potentially poisonous and can also cause skin rashes
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Bleeding HeartFront box 5Lamprocapnos (prev. Dicentra)spectabilis"Alba"2finegardening.comPhotoPhotoPhotoRhizomatous herbaceous perennialMayMagenta/pink, whiteFull sun - (preferably) part shade3-9Humusy, medium moisture, neutral to slightly alkaline3-6ft x 1-3ftDivide in early spring of after foliage has died down. Root cuttings in winter.The plant is potentially poisonous and can also cause skin rashes
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American BeautyberryFront box 5Callicarpaamericana1finegardening.comPhotoPhotoShrublate summer/ fruit OcotberFull sun - partial shade6-106'-10' h. x 3'-6ft w.
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HydrangeaFront box 5Hydrangea1PhotoPhotoShrubThe young leaves, even without fermentation, are very sweet and are used to make a sweet tea called 'tea of heaven', it is used in Buddhist ceremonies. The young leaves and shoots are also eaten cooked
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Daffodils (species?)Front box 5Narcissus2 clumpsfinegardening.comPhotoPhotoPhotoBulbAprilThe chopped root is applied externally as a poultice to abscesses, boils and other skin complaints.
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Echinops ritro (Globe Thistle)Front box 5Echinops ritro1finegardening.comPhotoPhotoPhotoPerennialSummerFull sun - partial shade3-9Poor, well drainedDead head to prevent self seeding1-3ft x 1-3ftSow seed in mid spring. Divide in fall or spring
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Rose Rockin' Robin ('WEKboroco')Front box 5Rosa"Rockin' Robin"1http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/138114/
http://www.emerisa.com/product.aspx?p=11607
PhotoPhotoPhotoLate Spring/Early SummerBlooms on new growth. Prune early to encourage repeat flowering.
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Lily of the ValleyFront box 5ConvallariamajalisManyfinegardening.comPhotoPhotoBulbMayWhiteParial shade - full shade3-8Medium moistureDivide if flowers become sparse6-12" x 1-3ftQuite prolific, will spreadDivision
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Coral bells / Alum rootFront box 5Heuchera1PhotoPhotoPerennialJuneFull sun - partial shade4--9
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Yellow BaptisiaFront box 5Baptisiasphaerocarpa
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ChrysanthemumFront box 5
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AliumFront box 5Alium
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Rose Purple HeartFront box 5Rosa (floribunda)"Purple Heart"1pnwplants.wsu.eduPhotoPhotoShrubSummerRed/light pink
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TulipAlpine/Rock gardenhttp://www.phcfarm.com/welcome/wp-content/uploads/front-left-corner_tulip-red_201404-1024x680.jpgPhotoPhoto
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DaffodilAlpine/Rock gardenNarcissushttp://www.phcfarm.com/welcome/wp-content/uploads/front-left-corner_narcissus_201404-1024x680.jpgPhoto
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HyacinthAlpine/Rock gardenhttp://www.phcfarm.com/welcome/wp-content/uploads/front-left-corner_hyacinth-blue_201404-1024x680.jpgPhotoPhoto
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Scarlet FirethornAlpine/Rock gardenPyracanthacoccinea2finegardening.comPhotoPhotoShrubLate summer and fallOrange fruitFull sun - partial shade6-9Well drainedPrune at any time to maintaine shape and size6-18ft x 6-18ftFireblight and scab can be problems as well as aphids, lacebug and scale.Fruit can be cooked and used for making jellies, marmalade and sauces
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Yellow CorydalisAlpine/Rock gardenCorydalisluteamanydavesgarden.comPhotoPhotoPerennialLate spring-mid summerBright yellowLight shade4-8NeutralNone.12" x 12"Prolific.Transplant
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Saxifrage Southside SeedlingAlpine/Rock gardenSaxifragacotyledon"Southside Seedling"davesgarden.comPhotoPhotoPerennialMaySun to partial shade5-9Neutral-alkaline48"By dividing the rootball.
From herbaceous stem cuttings.
Not from seed.
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Meadow-rueAlpine/Rock gardenThalictrumdelavayi"Hewitt's Double"3-4PhotoPhotoPerennialSelf seeds.
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Sea lavenderAlpine/Rock gardenLimoniumlatifoliumPhotoPhotoResents being moved. Very tough and long lived once established.
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Monk's hoodAlpine/Rock gardenAconitumnapellusPhotoPhotoBack of border. Would be happier in full sun.
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Campanula poscharskyanaAlpine/Rock gardenCampanulaposcharskyanaPhotoPhotoNever spreads. Difficult to propagate. Ours is from white flower farms PRE takeover from burpee.
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Coventry BellsAlpine/Rock gardenCampanulatracheliumPhotoPhotoSome white, some purpleSelf sows
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Cornish bellflowerAlpine/Rock gardenCampanulaalliariifoliaPhotoPhotoWhiteTough tough alba variety. Self sows.
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Alpine/Rock gardenVeronicaaustriaca (subsp. teucrium?)"Crater Lake Blue"PhotoPhotoVery special! Under the cage.
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Veronica alpina Crater Lake BlueAlpine/Rock gardenVeronicaalpina"Crater Lake Blue"PhotoPhoto
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Foxglove Penstemon / beardtongueAlpine/Rock gardenPenstemondigitalisPhotoPhotoWhiteGrown from seed.
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Desert beardtongue / Desert penstemonAlpine/Rock gardenPenstemonpseudospectabilisPhotoPhotoCrossing the path
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Clematis-flowered Columbine Alpine/Rock gardenAquilegiavulgaris var. stellatamauvePhotoPhoto
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Three-leaved Ladybells / Nan sha shenAlpine/Rock gardenAdenophoratriphylla var. japonicaPhotoPhoto
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Perennial Toadflax Alpine/Rock gardenLinariapurpureaAlbaPhotoPhoto
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Shasta Daisy 'Everest' Alpine/Rock gardenLeucanthemumx superbum"Everest"PhotoPhoto
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Montauk daisyAlpine/Rock gardenNipponanthemumnipponicumPhotoPhoto
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Evergreen candytuft / Perennial candytuftAlpine/Rock gardenIberissempervirensPhotoPhotoFrom siskiyou rare plant alpine nursery
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Rosea Plena SoapwortAlpine/Rock gardenSaponariaofficinalis"Rosea Plena"PhotoPhoto
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SoapwortAlpine/Rock gardenSaponariaoriginal?PhotoPhoto
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Rock soapwortAlpine/Rock gardenSaponariaocymoidesPhotoPhoto
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Baikal skullcapAlpine/Rock gardenScutellariabaicalensisPhotoPhoto
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Oakleaf HydrangeaBurning Bush BedHydrangeaquercifoliaseveralhttp://www.hydrangeashydrangeas.com/oakleaf.html
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/131/
https://www.finegardening.com/plantguide/hydrangea-quercifolia-oakleaf-hydrangea.aspx
PhotoPhotoShrubMay to fallFull sun - partial shade5-9Moist, well drainedPrune immediately after flowering4-6ft x 5-7ft
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Burning BushBurning Bush BedEuonymousalatus1finegardening.comPhotoPhotoShrubNo bloom but fall colourBright redFull sun - full shade4-9All except wet 12-15ft x 14-18ftThe fruits, seed and bark are considered to be mildly poisonous. Root bark used as an eye lotion, as a poultice for facial sores and for gynaecological conditions. In small doses it stimulates the appetite. Root bark especially useful in the treatment of biliousness and liver disorders which follow or accompany fevers[4, 254] and for treating various skin disorders such as eczema. Can be used as a tea in the treatment of malaria, liver congestion, constipation. Root bark is gathered in the autumn and can be dried for later use.
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Coral bells / Alumroot [species?]Burning Bush BedHeuchera?ClusterPhotoPhotoPerennialJunePinkFull sun - partial shade4--9
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Grape HyacinthBurning Bush BedMuscariClusterfinegardening.comPhotoPhotoPhotoBulbSpringBlueFull sun - part shade4-8Must be well drained
6-12" x 6-12"Divide when dormant
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GeraniumBurning Bush BedPhotoPhotoPerennialMay
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SedumBurning Bush BedPhotoPhoto
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ColumbineBurning Bush BedAquilegiaPhotoPhotoPerennialMay
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Wild VioletsBurning Bush BedPhotoPhotoApril-MayWhite with violet specks
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Variegated HydrangeaStewartia garden2PhotoPhotoShrub
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