4th Grade AF FINAL ELA/Math/Science/Computer Science Crosswalk
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Computer Science StandardsELA StandardResourcesLesson Activity and/or NotesMath StandardResourcesLesson Activity and/or Notes
Science Standard
ResourcesLesson Activity and/or NotesSocial StudiesResourcesLesson Activity and/or Notes
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CT.1.4.1 Examine the process of problem solving and how it applies to algorithmic problem solvingW.4.2.a Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g.,headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
W.4.3 Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
W.4.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
Write On Fourth GradeWriting process and steps to follow when you are writing, specifically in the revising and editing stages.
AR.Math.Content.4.OA.A.2- • Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison
• Use drawings and equations with a letter for the unknown number to represent the
problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison

AR.Math.Content.4.OA.A.3- Solve multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and having whole-number answers
using the four operations, including problems in which remainders must be interpreted.
Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity
• Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies
including rounding


http://www.education.com/activity/article/slap-happy/
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Khan academy
Create an anchor chart detailing the steps for problem solving word problems.4-PS3-1 Use evidence to construct an explanation relating the speed of an object to the energy of that object.
4-PS3-2 Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.
PS3-3 Ask questions and predict outcomes about the changes in energy that occur when objects collide.
4-PS3-4 Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.
4-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and their uses affect the environment.
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CT.2.4.1 Examine the relative position of objects using angles within a program (e.g., 30 degree turn) W.4.2.a Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g.,headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
W.4.6 With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to produce writing in a single sitting.
SL.4.5 Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
Write On Fourth GradeDuring the creation of multi-media presentation use tools to change the angle of a text box

AR.Math.Content.4.MD.C.5-
Recognize angles as geometric shapes that are formed wherever two rays share a common endpoint, and understand concepts of angle measurement:
• An angle is measured with reference to a circle with its center at the common endpoint of the rays, by considering the fraction of the circular arc between the points where the two rays intersect the circle
• An angle that turns through 1/360 of a circle is called a "one-degree angle," and can be used to measure angles
• An angle that turns through n one-degree angles is said to have an angle measure
of n degree
Note: Use the degree symbol (e.g., 360°).
4-PS3-3 Ask questions and predict outcomes about the changes in energy that occur when objects collide.
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CT.3.4.1 Construct innovative solutions to problems of increasing complexity collaborativelyW.4.1
Write opinion pieces on topics
or texts, supporting the opinion
with reasons and information. W.4.1.B
Provide reasons that are
supported by facts and details.
Fabulous in FifthAR.Math.Content.4.OA.A.2
Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison
• Use drawings and equations with a letter for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison

AR.Math.Content.4.OA.A.3
• Solve multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and having whole-number answers using the four operations, including problems in which remainders must be interpreted. Represent theseproblems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity
• Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding
https://www.illustrativemathematics.org/4.OA Partner and small group work
4-PS4-3 Generate and compare multiple solutions that use patterns to transfer information.*
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D.4.4.1 Compare the representation of existing data in multiple formatsRI.4.7 Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.This could occur in scientific texts as well has historical or biographical texts.AR.Math.Content.4.OA.A.1
• Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison (e.g., interpret 35 = 5 × 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5)
• Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations

AR.Math.Content.4.NBT.A.2
• Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form
• Compare two multi-digit numbers based on meanings of the digits in each place, using symbols (>, =, <) to record the results of comparisons


Compare students' work who used different strategies to solve the same problem.

"interpret 35 = 5 × 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5"
4-PS3-1 Use evidence to construct an explanation relating the speed of an object to the energy of that object.
4-PS3-2 Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light,
heat, and electric currents.
4-PS3-3 Ask questions and predict outcomes about the changes in energy that occur when objects collide.
4-PS3-4 Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.
4-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and
their uses affect the environment.
http://www.internet4classrooms.com/grade_level_help/data_analysis_statistics_probability_fourth_4th_grade.htm
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D.4.4.2 Use 0’s and 1’s to represent data (e.g., encode and decode a word with 0’s and 1’s)AR.Math.Content.4.OA.C.5• Generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule
• Identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself
For example: Given the rule "Add 3" and the starting number 1, generate terms in the resulting sequence and observe that the terms appear to alternate between odd and even numbers. Explain why the numbers willcontinue to alternate in this way.
illuminations.nctm.org/Lesson.aspx?id=1122Students can answer a serious of questions using 0's and 1's. For example, '0' represents no, and '1' represents yes. After students answer the questions, they can look to see if any coding answers create a pattern.4-PS4-3 Generate and compare multiple solutions that use patterns to transfer information.*Examples of solutions could include drums sending coded information through sound waves, using a grid of 1s and
0s representing black and white to send information about a picture, or using Morse code to send text.
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D.5.4.1 Compare and use appropriate tools to collect dataRI.4.7 Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.
SL.4.2 Paraphrase portions of information that is gained by means other than reading (e.g., texts read aloud; oral presentations of charts, graphs, or diagrams; speeches).
Discussions about the appropriate graphic organizer for different types of data with informational text.AR.Math.Content.4.MD.A.3
Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems
For example: Find the width of a rectangular room given the area of the flooring and the length, by viewing the area formula as a multiplication equation with an unknown factor.
https://www.illustrativemathematics.org/content-standards/4/MD/A/3Students take the area and perimeter in their classroom using conventional and unconventional tools. (Ex: rulers, feet, books, etc.) Then the student can analyze which tools were more effective and efficient than others.
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D.5.4.2 Collect and arrange data logically based on multiple characteristics in teams and individuallyW.4.2.a A Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
W.4.7 Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
illuminations.nctm.org/Lesson.aspx?id=1305Informational writing and research papers should be written in a logical way based on the information.AR.Math.Content.4.MD.B.4
• Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (e.g., 1/2, 1/4, 1/8)
• Solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions by using information presented in line plots
For example: From a line plot, find and interpret the difference in length between the longest and shortest specimens in an insect collection.
After you create the line plot based on length, you can then discuss other characteristics for arranging the data.

You can also discuss why arranging the data in sequence is essential to data organization and understanding.
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D.6.4.1 Explore graphs as models for data analysisRI.4.7 Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.Informational textsAR.Math.Content.4.MD.B.4
• Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (e.g., 1/2, 1/4, 1/8)
• Solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions by using information presented in line plots
For example: From a line plot, find and interpret the difference in length between the longest and shortest specimens in an insect collection.
http://theteacherscafe.com/teaching-4-md-b-4-make-a-line-plot-to-display-a-data-set-of-measurements-in-fractions-of-a-unit-12-14-18/After you create the line plot based on length, you can then discuss other characteristics for arranging the data.

You can also discuss why arranging the data in sequence is essential to data organization and understanding.
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A.7.4.1 Create and follow algorithms to accomplish a task or solve a problemW.4.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience
SL.4.1.b Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles
YouTube/TedEd video: What's an Algorithm? - David J. MalanThe writing process and literature discussion process both have steps (algorithms) to follow.AR.Math.Content.4.NBT.B.4
Add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers with computational fluency using a standard algorithm
Notes:
• Computational fluency is defined as a student’s ability to efficiently and accurately solve a problem with some degree of flexibility with their strategies.
• A standard algorithm can be viewed as, but should not be limited to, the traditional recording system.
• A standard algorithm denotes any valid base-ten strategy.
Analyze students' different methods to solve the same problem.
4-ETS1-1 Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and
constraints on materials, time, or cost.
4-ETS1-2 Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet
the criteria and constraints of the problem.
4-ETS1-3 Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify
aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.
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A.7.4.2 Compare and contrast algorithms of appropriate complexityFabulous in FifthAR.Math.Content.4.NBT.B.4
Add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers with computational fluency using a standard algorithm
Notes:
• Computational fluency is defined as a student’s ability to efficiently and accurately solve a problem with some degree of flexibility with their strategies.
• A standard algorithm can be viewed as, but should not be limited to, the traditional recording system.
• A standard algorithm denotes any valid base-ten strategy.
http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/vlibrary.html
Calculationnation.nctm.org
As students demonstrate their own method to solve the problems, you can compare and contrast their mathematical thinking.
4-ETS1-1 Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and
constraints on materials, time, or cost.
4-ETS1-2 Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet
the criteria and constraints of the problem.
4-ETS1-3 Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify
aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.
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A.7.4.3 Identify and correct multiple errors within an algorithm that accomplishes a task or solves a problemSL.4.4
Report on a topic or text, tell a
story, or recoun t an experience
to support main ideas or
themes .
● Organize ideas logically.
● Use appropriate facts.
● Use relevant, descriptive
details.
● Speak clearly at an
understandable pace.
studio.code.org/s/course1/stage/2/puzzel/1AR.Math.Content.4.NBT.B.4
Add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers with computational fluency using a standard algorithm
Notes:
• Computational fluency is defined as a student’s ability to efficiently and accurately solve a problem with some degree of flexibility with their strategies.
• A standard algorithm can be viewed as, but should not be limited to, the traditional recording system.
• A standard algorithm denotes any valid base-ten strategy.
http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/vlibrary.html
Calculationnation.nctm.org
http://www.classroomfreebiestoo.com/2012/08/place-value-of-large-numbers.html
studio.code.org/s/course1/stage/2/puzzel/1
Teachers can create a sample work completed with possible errors. Students have to identify and correct any errors.
4-ETS1-1 Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and
constraints on materials, time, or cost.
4-ETS1-2 Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet
the criteria and constraints of the problem.
4-ETS1-3 Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify
aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.
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A.7.4.4 Design and test algorithms of appropriate complexity collaboratively using technology
SL.4.4
Report on a topic or text, tell a
story, or recoun t an experience
to support main ideas or
themes .
● Organize ideas logically.
● Use appropriate facts.
● Use relevant, descriptive
details.
● Speak clearly at an
understandable pace.
studio.code.org/s/course1/stage/2/puzzel/1https://studio.code.org/s/course1/stage/2/puzzle/14-PS3-4 Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.*
4-ETS1-1 Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and
constraints on materials, time, or cost.
4-ETS1-2 Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet
the criteria and constraints of the problem.
4-ETS1-3 Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify
aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.
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A.8.4.1 Use a visual block-based programming language individually and collaboratively to solve problems of increasing complexityeducators.Brainpop.com code.org Foos.comCreating algorithms, commands and directions to complete a set of sequenceseducators.Brainpop.com code.org Foos.comCreating algorithms, commands and directions to complete a set of sequences
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CC.9.4.1 Identify a variety of careers that require computing and technologyRI.4.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
W.4.7 Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/rankings/best-technology-jobsInformational text on careers could be read or researched.AR.Math.Content.4.NF.C.5
Express a fraction with denominator 10 as an equivalent fraction with denominator 100, and use this technique to add two fractions with respective denominators 10 and 100
For example: Express 3/10 as 30/100, and add 3/10 + 4/100 = 34/100.
Note: Students who can generate equivalent fractions can develop strategies for adding fractions with unlike denominators in general. However, addition and subtraction with unlike denominators in general is not a requirement at this grade.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mlCFVWHUv54&t=186s Connect fractions to cooking and discuss various jobs that require this. (This is one of many examples you can use for this standard.)
4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for
changes in a landscape over time.
4-ESS2-1 Make observations and/or measurements to provide evidence of the effects of weathering or the rate of
erosion by water, ice, wind, or vegetation.
4-ESS2-2 Analyze and interpret data from maps to describe patterns of Earth’s features.
4-ESS3-2 Generate and compare multiple solutions to reduce the impacts of natural Earth processes on humans.*
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CC.9.4.2 Recognize that computers perform actions or outputs based on input by humans (e.g., using a video game controller, typing and using a mouse)W.4.6 With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to produce writing in a single sitting.
SL.4.5 Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
Any use of technology to publish work requires input and output devices.Google ClassroomStudents can transfer work completed on notebook paper to a digital program (ex. Google Classroom).

Coding

Students can use calculators to see that it will only compute what it is programmed for.
4-ESS2-2 Analyze and interpret data from maps to describe patterns of Earth’s features.
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CC.10.4.1 Demonstrate an appropriate level of proficiency with keyboards and other input/output devicesW.4.6 With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to produce writing in a single sitting.
SL.4.5 Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
Google Docs
Microsoft Office
Prezi
Typing papers and creating presentations.Google ClassroomStudents can transfer work completed on notebook paper to a digital program (ex. Google Classroom).

Coding

Students can use calculators to see that it will only compute what it is programmed for.
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CC.10.4.2 Recognize the expense of the equipment and how care and protection of the computers can prolong use and save the cost of purchasing new equipment, therefore benefiting all studentsResearch and ProceduresResearch and ProceduresResearch and Procedures
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CC.10.4.3 Demonstrate touch typing techniques, not looking at fingers, while increasing speed and maintaining accuracyW.4.6 With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to produce writing in a single sitting.Google Docs
Microsoft Office
Prezi
Typing papers and creating presentations.
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CC.10.4.4 Practice proper keyboarding technique: ● posture ● elbows down ● body centered in front of keyboardW.4.6 With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to produce writing in a single sitting.Google Docs
Microsoft Office
Prezi
Typing papers and creating presentations.
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CC.11.4.1 Use productivity technology tools for writing, communicating, and publishing activitiesW.4.6 With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to produce writing in a single sitting.
SL.4.5 Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
Google Docs
Microsoft Office
Prezi
Typing papers and creating presentations.Google ClassroomStudents can type their open-ended math resonses into a digital program.4-LS1-1 Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support
survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
4-LS1-2 Use a model to describe that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the
information in their brain, and respond to the information in different ways.
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CC.11.4.2 Identify that information can be transmitted using computing devices via a networkW.4.6
With some guidance and
support from adults, use
technology, including the
Internet, to produce and publish
writing as well as to interact and
collaborate with others;
demonstrate sufficient
command of keyboarding skills
to produce writing in a single
sitting.
Discuss what a network is and how it is used to connect us to each other .Google ClassroomGoogle Classroom4-LS1-1 Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support
survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
4-LS1-2 Use a model to describe that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the
information in their brain, and respond to the information in different ways.
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CC.11.4.3 Identify a variety of computing devices that execute programs using processors (e.g., digital watch, home appliances, vehicles)W.4.7
Conduct short research
projects that build knowledge
through investigation of different
aspects of a topic.
SL.4.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a
story, or recoun t an experience
to support main ideas or
themes .
● Organize ideas logically.
● Use appropriate facts.
● Use relevant, descriptive
details.
● Speak clearly at an
understandable pace.
W.4.8 Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources.
Demonstrate that math resources can be used on multiple devices: computers, tablets, phones, etc.4-PS3-4 Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.
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CC.11.4.4 Apply strategies for solving simple hardware and software problems that may occur during useProblem solving policies and procedures. 4-PS3-4 Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.
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CGE.12.4.1 Identify and discuss positive and negative impacts of technology on the daily life of individuals and societyW.4.9
Draw evidence from literary or
informational texts to support
analysis, reflection, and
research.
Use standard English when
speaking, differentiating
between contexts that call for
formal English and situations
where informal discourse is
appropriate.
SL.4.3.B
Discuss the negetives of using "text" Language in emails, and formal documents and the etiquette of speech in text documents.
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CGE.12.4.2 Discuss basic issues related to the appropriate use of technology and information, and the consequences of inappropriate useW.4.6 With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to produce writing in a single sitting.Plagiarism discussion
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CGE.12.4.3 Identify and discuss attributes of credible, unbiased, electronic information sourcesW.4.6
With some guidance and
support from adults, use
technology, including the
Internet, to produce and publish
writing as well as to interact and
collaborate with others;
demonstrate sufficient
command of keyboarding skills
to produce writing in a single
sitting.
Discuss credibility and plagiarism
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CGE.12.4.4 Demonstrate an understanding of ethical issues in copyright, fair use, and intellectual property in various mediaW.4.6 With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to produce writing in a single sitting.Plagiarism discussion
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