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Click on the individual links for each tool below to access further details.  Based on feedback from members of the Europlanet community the tools are grouped according to when they might best be used (during, beginning/end, or after an event). Of course this doesn’t mean that some tools couldn’t be used at other times (e.g. the 3 words technique is very adaptable, and could really fit into all 3 categories).  However we hope that this arrangement will help you to more quickly locate tools likely to be of use to you.  The tools are also presented in order of increasing complexity, starting with those that are very simple to implement and moving on to more complex tools (e.g. requiring more preparation or resources such as Wi-Fi).
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Suitable audience(s) #Appropriate activity type(s) #`
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Tool namePrimary schoolSecondary schoolInterested adultGeneral publicDrop-in (festivals and demonstrations)Interactive workshopOngoing series (clubs, courses etc.)Lecture presentationOnlineBrief descriptionWorked example included?
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Tools best suited to use during an event
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Open palm on chestA simple, low-tech approach to gauge audience responses to multiple-choice questions during a lectureImage only
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Physical ranking scalesParticipants are asked to physically stand along a line representing different levels of experience / attitude etc. (any ranking type question can be asked).
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Graffiti wallColour and artistic freedom combine to allow participants to respond to an event or activity in a highly creative way.Image only
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MentimeterA free online interactive presentation tool that allows presenters to quickly (and accurately) gather audience responses.Yes
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Tools best suited to use at the beginning and/or end of an event or activity
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Snapshot interviewsVery brief, focused interviews, which are used in conjunction with an event to gather impressions quickly, like a photo of a moment in time.Yes
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Pre-post quizzesBrief surveys that are used before and after an event. They are ideal for helping you understand whether or not your audiences have learnt key aspects of the content you are trying to convey.Yes
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Geographic location mapWhere people come from can be really useful information, however isn’t always easy to obtain. This simple and inexpensive technique encourages participants to provide their location data in a fun and visual way instead of a standard survey.Yes
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Tools best suited to use at the end of (or after) an event
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Dropping pebbles in boxes or stickers on chartsThis process is quick, easy, and highly visual, and also provides an opportunity to participate for people who may find reading challenging.
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3 wordsA quick, focused way to get a feel for participants’ experiences by asking them to describe it in a few short words.Yes
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Target evaluationA visual ‘bullseye’ approach to rating different elements of an event, or other outcomes of interest.
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Post-event surveysSelf-completion questionnaires that are used immediately after an event, workshop or programme.Yes
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Photograph diaryInviting individuals to select and discuss images that are especially meaningful to them, in their own words, thus providing insights that are otherwise very difficult to attain.
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Peer interviewsPeer interviews are a great way to encourage honest opinions, especially from teenagers, through involving participants in interviewing each other, and thereby hopefully allowing a more natural and honest conversation.
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Tweet sentiment visualisation Automatic online analysis of tweets to help identify participants’ reactions to a particular key word or phrase.  Must be conducted within a week of the event (whilst the tweets are still “live” on Twitter).
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# ✅ = especially suitable to this category; ✔ = may be used
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These characteristics are estimates based on extensive previous experience, however they may not hold true for evaluating every outreach activity. See our dedicated advice to make sure the tool you choose is appropriate to your unique situation:
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Steps to choosing the right tools
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