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Shared list of all of the footnotes that discuss "(d)eaf" decisions, based off Twitter discussion: https://twitter.com/kympmeyer/status/1197048113682362370?s=21
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Full citation of referenceCopy/paste footnote herepage number of footnotecontributor nameany notes
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Hochgesang, J.A. (2015). Ethics of researching signed languages: The case of Kenyan Sign Language (KSL). In A.C. Cooper & K.K. Rashid (Eds.), Signed Languages in Sub-Saharan Africa: Politics, citizenship and shared experiences of difference, 11-30. Washington, DC : Gallaudet University Press."In the American Deaf community, it is standard practice to capitalize “Deaf” to refer to the cultural sense of the word, that is, to refer to a community that considers itself a cultural entity complete with a language and a set of norms. The lowercase “deaf” is a more neutral designation and refers instead to a person with some degree of hearing loss. I follow this practice but ask the reader to remember that such cultural identification may be different in the Kenyan community."29Julie A. Hochgesanghttps://slla.lab.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1793/2017/06/Hochgesang_2015.pdf
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Gesser, Audrei. 2007. “Learning about Hearing People in the Land of the Deaf: An Ethnographic Account.” Sign Language Studies 7 (3): 269–83."It is common practice in the specialized Deaf literature to use the capitalized term Deaf to refer to a particular group of deaf people who share a language, values and beliefs, and the term deaf, with a lower case, to refer to the audiological condition of not hearing. Some might argue that this distinction, even though relevant, is difficult to make because it is not possi- ble to know ‘‘at what precise point do deaf become Deaf ’’ (Baynton 1996, 12). Still, I believe that the distinction has to be made, because it mirrors ‘‘a movement in the identity of Deaf people that derives from their ‘ethnic revival’ ’’ (Baker 1999, 122)."281Julie A. Hochgesang
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Hill, Joseph. 2017 “The importance of the sociohistorical context in sociolinguistics: the case of Black ASL". Sign Language Studies 18(1): 41-57“The use of uppercase “Deaf” indicates cultural deafness, as opposed to the strictly audiological condition indicated by lowercase “deaf.” Both uses are conventional in the literature on deafness.” 354Julie A. Hochgesang
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Baker, Colin. Foundations of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism (Bilingual Education & Bilingualism Book 106). Channel View Publications. Kindle Edition.In writings about deaf people, the word ‘deaf’ is sometimes spelt with a lower case ‘d’; other times with a capital ‘D’. As James and Woll (2004) state: ‘To be deaf is to have a hearing loss; to be Deaf is to belong to a community with its own language and culture’ (p. 125). This is a contentious area (see Monaghan et al., 2003) but the spelling distinction is retained in this chapter. There may be times and places where having the identity of a deaf person and belonging to the Deaf community is valued and enjoyed. However, a deaf person may not always want to identify (see later) as ‘Deaf’. On some occasions, that same person may want her identity to be about gender, ethnicity, teenage culture and friendships, but not about her deafness (see Chapter 18). Also, the term ‘deaf’ has increasingly been used to cover mild, moderate, severe and profound deafness, leaving some ambiguity, for example, when talking about classroom teaching and learning styles.352-353Julie A. Hochgesang(not a footnote but a part of the body)
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Thumann, H. R., & Simms, L. E. (2009). Who Decides for Us, Deaf People? In Handbook of Social Justice in Education (pp. 209–226). Routledge.Many authors use capital "D" Deaf to refer to those who are members of the American Deaf culture and lower case "d"deaf to refer to the audiological condition. 209Julie A. HochgesangSecond footnote - 2 In using the term Deaf culture or Deaf community we do not mean to imply that all Deaf people believe, act or support the same ideas and beliefs. As with any culture or community the Deaf community is varied and diverse. With this in mind, however, interviews and research on identity in the Deaf community often finds members of the Deaf community as identifying themselves first as Deaf. For example in a survey of Deaf lesbians, it was found that these women consistently identified themselves as Deaf first then as women or lesbians.
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Ferndale, D. (2018). “Nothing about us without us”: navigating engagement as hearing researcher in the Deaf community. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 15(4), 437–455.“deaf” is a term used to encompass full range of diversity that exists within the deaf population, while “Deaf” is used as a marker of cultural and linguistic identity, namely, people who use sign language and who are part of the Deaf community and “d/Deaf” is used when referring to culturally Deaf people but not exclusively acknowledging that identity is fluid (see Young & Temple 2014 for a lengthy discussion).451Julie A. Hochgesang
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Spooner, R. A. (2020). Permissive vs. prohibitive: Deaf and hard-of-hearing students’ perceptions of ASL and English. In A. Kusters, M. Green, E. Moriarty, & K. Snoddon (Eds.), Sign Language Ideologies in Practice (pp. 167–183). De Gruyter Mouton.To avoid cluttersome acronyms such as D/d/HOH or D/HOH in this article, I will simply use the
term deaf to refer to all individuals who identify as Deaf, deaf, and hard-of-hearing when discussing the deaf population as a whole or the group of student-participants in this study. If relevant when discussing a specific participant, I will label them with the descriptor that they use to describe themselves: Deaf, deaf, or hard-of-hearing.
167Julie A. Hochgesang
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